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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, November 13, 1922, LATE NEWS EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1922-11-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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Saturday
The Weather
Cloudy tonight; Tuesday, showers
and somewhat warmer, moderate
easterly winds.
Non-Returnable
I
LATE NEWS EDITION
TWO CENTS.
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1922
14 PAGES.
I'HIRTY-FIFTH YEAR. NO. 133
-y
1400 DIE IN SOUTH AMERICAN EARTHQUAKE;
NEGRESS DENIES MRS. GIBSON SA W MURDER
BOTH TERMS
IN SENATE
i
I
Majority of 60 for Short
Tenure, and 325 for
Six-Year Term
BOYCE'S LEAD IS 6549;
HARRINGTON'S IS 5815
OFFICIAI, VOTE IX STATE.
SENATOR, LONG TERM
Raynrd. I>. duPont, R.
13099
1642
7544,

5800
-'
30070
Bayard. I>. dupont, H.
15619
1703
7332
80
0
CONGRESS
Hover D lÆvtnn. R.
7 13217
7062
5112
»Rev. Charles H. Bohner
Appealing earnestly to the hun- j
hlm to !
I
pWtlmlngton .14057
>Iajorfty .
Rural New Castle. 7618
JJMaJorlt j
IlCent . J
\ majority . . 18611
«70«
702^
.
K önnt y majority ..
«80
37804
Total vote
323
KRayanl's majority.
SEN ATOR, SHORT TERM
jAVUmlngton .18808
"Majorlt y .
»Rural Now Castle. 7432
iMajority . .
Kent ......
iConnly majority .. 1272
j Bussex . . .
County majority . .
5080
... «»r >2
. . 8081
651
Wilmington . 14801
(Majority . 1584
I Rnral New Castle. 7064
; Majority
Kent ... .
. 602
. 7330
(Continued on Pago Ten)
CHERISH IDEALS,
SPEAKER URGES
Addresses Students of
High School
FOOTBALL TEAM
GIVEN OVATION
-dr*ds of student* befo-re
Kherlsh the highest Ideals In life, the j
Rev. Charles H. Bohner, pastor of;
• Hanover F-eebyterlan Churoh, ad- I
dressed the senior assembly In the
Wilmington High School auditorium j
Rhls morning.
Dr Bohner's
enthusiasm due to
Saturday's' game and the activity of
«taff of The Wblsp In soliciting
student support for that high school
rnarazlne made the assembly one'of
the most'interesting held this year,
"I come to you "said Dr. Bohner,
address, overhanging
the fact that the
had tied Chester in|
the
"with an appeal
A man
without'a"uion.' 0 "wUhofit a sky",;
" ld t a * rn^tCt h a 'coiTntry
There have been cynical men In all
es" said Dr. Bohner, "but they
bnvo hed no visions and have had
rage Thirteen^
„ , , + ml, Rvenlng Journal.
P novFR N'ov n -Tffe new Negro
„b„r,i n'n« onened today for ocou-iall
*o„cv hv the Negro children of
r>„v» nnd vicinity Two hundred
children marched from the
children march
NEW NEGRO SCHOOL
AT DOVER OPENED
nnd ten
two old school buildings to the new
building beyond the railroad. Pro
fessor W. B. Thornburg, superinten
dent of the Dover school district who
also has charge of the Negro * aho f' s '
was In charge of the transfer of the
pupils. Appropriate exercises were
held In the building ln honor of the
opening.
TODAY'S TEMPERATURE
At The Evening Journal Office.
8 00 A. M...4* 12.01 P. M...64
loioo A. M.!.50 1.00 P. M...67
.6.42 A. M.
.4.46 P. M.
6.50 P. M.
2.00 P. M.
-j
SUN AND TIDE.
Sun rises ,.,
gun sets ...
need of Christiana.
Hlgfii water..7.15 A. Rl.
Low water ..1.20 A. M.
LOST.
VOST—Saturday night, between Delà
waer avenue and 1814 Church St., okl
pocketbook. containing money, trunk
ley and ring Finder may have money
If they will return key and ring to 1814
( huren St. novl3-lt
# (Continued on Page Thirteen)
I
>1
MURDER TALE
W
Negress Says "Pig 'Vornan
Didn't See Hall-Mills
Killing
STATE INVESTIGATES
NEW AFFIDAVIT
NEW BRUNSWICK. N. J., Nov.
13 (United Press).—Special froeecu
tor Wilbur A. Mott will confer today|
with Prosecutor Beekman and De
tective Totten In regard tothe mgrt
ling affidavit made by Mrs. Nellie L.
Russell, Negress, who swears that]
she was with Mrs Jane Gibson allj
'during the time In which the latter|
she witnessed the murder ofi
the Rev. Edward W. Hall and Mrs.
Eleanor R. Mills.
Mott would not comment on
story of Mrs. Russell, who lives In aj
shanty back of Mrs. Gibson's farm.
A copy of the woman's affidavit was
given him yesterday by Timothy
Pfeiffer, attorney for Mrs. Hall.
"I will investigate Mrs. Russell's
story." he said.
The affidavit by the Negro woman I
.states that on the night of Septem
her 14, she and Mrs. Gibson were
together between 10 and 11 p. m.
Mrs. Gibson stated that she witness
,.Tr,**£sss.
Russell's statements were true the ;
Stats*» case against the "woman lr
grey" and the "man with the !
bushy hair" would be completely j
broken up. •
The Negress «ent her story to Mrs 1
[Hal! and explained her delay In
(Continued on Page Two.)
State Chapter Hopes to Re-i
««C* D«c,.1eo
port Kesults Before
Wednesday
7 j
j
j
MAKE APPEALS
Red Cross workers are" now cheek- I
Ing up after the one-day member
. j
conducted throughout j
the]
CHECK HP AFTER
RED CROSS CAI.L
CHURCH PULPITS
ship drive
the State yeaterdsy and hope to
mR ke their report Wednesday,
fort, was desirous that, if possible.
many thousands of members might
be enrolled this year The organ
zatlon that began Its work at 2
o'clock yesterday afternoon was one
of the smoothest and well directed
machines that
Mrs. Henry P. Scott, «halt-men for [
' IDr
Wilmington, and who for a month
hast has with Mrs J. Ball Pierce;
and others been engaged In enroll-j
iffff the workers for yesterday's ef-|
three-hour campaign covering a city
The work
of HO.OOO Inhabitants.
receipt books, button^ and window
flags, days ahead of time and had
distributed literature at the home
of the sections of the city they were
to canvas. So that when they called
'yesterday afternoon If the folks'were
at home there would be a ready re
sponse or declination.
Originally there had been 452
'women lined up for the drive and
every one of these reported with the
exception of five, these being pre
vented through Illness, or death at
home. The headquarters were open
day. in charge of Mrs. Tierce.
It was surprising to the workers
how many Joined the sixth roll call
who apparently were not any too
(Continued On Page Thirteen.)
Oil. LAKE BURNS,
1X)SS IS $1,00», 000
HOUSTON, Texas. Nov. 13.—(Uni
ted Press).—A burning'lake of oil,
which ha-t already caused property
loss of 11.000,000 was still raging
In the Humble oil fields near here
today.
The fire, started by lightning, will
cause property damage estimated at
12,000,000 authorities believed to
day. The lightning struck an earth
en reservoir containing more than
500,000 barrels of oil. Great boilers
have been moved as close as possible
to the oil tank« on the Humble
property and streams of live steam
are being played on the spectacular
_
Are.
A small artlflcal lake caused by
recent heavy rains over which a film
of oil has settled also Is blazing and
menacing reveal other large tanks
Fasciti Chiefs in Rome
r m
r
*'
{
1
Ml
7 U *r
.V
4'
' f '
il *
s ■
* S
m
This picture Just received In A raertoa shows a group of Fascist! chiefs, gathered In Rome where the ;
groat demonstration took place which placed the government In their hands. The faces illustrate the va- I
rlous types from which the organisation was reorulted.
There were more deaths from
cancer ]„ tvilmlngtnn during the
-* « .
other cause. Dr. C. M. Hanby
president of the Board of Health.
said today "and as this Is National
Cancer Week." I think It an oppor-i
tune occasion to make an effort to
revive, stimulate and renew publia
interest In the war on cancer In
Wilmington.
"The incidence of the disease,"
Dr. Hanby added. "Has reached such
proportions as to arouse the medical
profession and groups of publlc
spirited citizens to unite with the
purpose of sp'reitdlng" broadcast In
formation which will give the public
a better understanding of this dis
ease and encourage persons having
auspicious symptoms to seek medi
cal attention In the early stages
wOien cancer la curable."
After quoting statistics relating to
the death rate among cancer victims
(and the danger of delay in treatment.
Dr. Hanby mad ® the following sug
gestion:
"The right way to attack cancer:
go Immediately to a reputable physl
[clan and Insist upon a thorough ex
amlnatlon when you n 0 V C9: , .
1. Any lump, especially In the
breast.
"2 Any Irregular bleeding or dls
cha f®*' .. . . . .
"3. Any sore that does not heal,
particularly about the tongue mouth
RATE IS HIGH
Disease Claimed Largest
Number'of Victims Here
in October
DR. HANBY TELLS
HOW TO PREVENT
or lips.
MOTHER DIES AFTER
«IUIHHII I/iiaj ru lull
"4. Persistent Indigestion, with
we! * ht '
'The wrong way. wasting precious
time and money:
"1.. Waiting to see If the oondl
y on won't go way of Itself,
"2. Using 'patent medicines.'
"8. Allowing advertising 'cancer
(Continued on Page Ten)
DAUGHTER VISITS
Mr * Clam Wtlklm,on - «*• «
George Wilkinson 231 North
Franklin street, died In the Delaware
Hospital last night, three hours
after her admission.
Mrs. Wilkinson was accompanying ;
her daughter, Mrs. George Rosen
berger and family of Baltimore, to
the Baltimore and Ohio station, and
when nearing Eleventh and Broome I
streets complained of being dizzy. |
She was placed on a door step, a I
passing automobil 1st haled and taken
to the hospital. ,
Mrs. Wilkinson had b^en suffering
with kidney trouble for several
months which caused her death.
The two daughters. Mrs. Rosenber
ger, of Baltimore, and Mrs. Eugene ;
Deakyne, of Taylor's Bridge, and
families had spent the day at home
with their parents, and It was said
Mrs. Wilkinson did not complain
until stricken in the street.
Mrs. Wilkinson Is survived by her
husband, who Is employed by the
Coxe and Lloyd Leather Company,
211 West Third street, two daugh- j
ters and two sons, LeRoy *nd Rob
ert.
SEE TÜR MOVIES TOMORROW
Invitations to the Movies are ex
tended to six persons today through
our Classified Adx'ertlslng Depart
ment. Look through he classified
advs. and If your name Is there come
to the Journal office and receive free
tickets for two (war tax paid) to
see the special production, Jack
Holt, ln "On the High Sea," at the
Queen, and
"Grandma's Boy," at the Arcadia.
Tuesday night. See page 13 today.
Harold Lloyd, In
For Clover D»lry Safe Milk phone
1640-1641.—Adv.
~ . _ _ . _
said motive w.as to
PC A DP CIIIlDU f YU L'L'DC
OtAllEi otlUl II \JIll\JjI\0
Of BRIDGE fiET
Sentences Range From 6
Years to 7 Years, 10
Months
Five men. four of them railroad
strlkers, who were indicted on a
charge of conspiracy In connection
with the blowing up of Fourteenth
street bridge of the Pennsylvania
railroad In August, were sentenced
by Chief Justice Pennewlll In the
Court of General Session* this morn
were
years, ten
:ng.
The sent-nee*-- Imposed
Daniel Befany. seven
months: Rohsrt Pratt and Dominick
each; Hemy
Gregory, seven years
Seidel and Lionel M. Philips, six
years each.
Robert O. Harman, counsel for tho
five defendants, addressing the court
said all of them had confessed, hav
ing «Igned and sworn to confessions
before they retained counsel. This,
he said Indicates that the men show
ed repentance and should be consid
ered In the matter of leniency.
Mr. Harman said It was his sincere
(Continued on Page Seven)
BREAKS HIM III PALL
Edmund E. Scott, aged 78, tax col
lector of Toughkenamon. Pa., was
admitted to the Physicians' and Sur
admltted to the unys.c.ans and ur
geons' Hospital yesterday suffering
with a broken left arm
brought to fhe hospital by Dr. D.
Dues Reynolds, of Kennett Square.
Mr. Scott was walking along the
road near the home of his son, S. G.
Scott Saturday evening, when he trip
ped over a wire In the road, break
ing his arm.
the home of his son until Sunday
morning when he was brought to the
hospital.
He was
He was cared for at
WAS BORN, DIES
IN SAME HOUSE
Miss Margaret C. Perkins. *S. died
at her home at Holly Oak last night
from Infirmities of age.
been ill for several years.
born iç the house In which she died
and had lived there all her life She
was the daughter of the late Chrls
tlan and Julia Pierce Perkins, who
jot one time owned nearer all the land
on which Holly Oak Is built.
She was a life-long member of
Mt. Pleasant M. E. Church. Miss
Perkins Is survived hy one sister,
Mrs. Emma Talley, of Marcus Hook.
Th f funeral will take place from
bar la,e residence at 11 o clock
Thursday, with the Hpy. W.
8bar P' P«*?«-, of ■ p, '" a " a "
Church, officiating. Interment will
be In Mt. Pleasant cemetery.
Rh« had
She was
_ __
«AFTLE . .
, C * f9 Ir r B 8t ' .^ n,r * nC °
Wll. Savings Fund Bldg.—Adv.
Where to Join
the Red Cross
Women Red Cross workers
completed the canvass of the
I city on Sunday afternoon.
There wore many homes
where the occupants were out
and away for the day.
There citizens whom the Red j
Cross worker failed to meet are ,
asked to Join and to either go
send their dollar membership
fee to Red Cross headquarters.
The
I
911 Delawa
redit for the enrollment will
go to the worker ln whose dis
trict It Is listed.
avenue.
)
WIFE ESCAPES
Albert Nickle Run Down
While Returning Home
From Church
EDWARD CRAIG
ALSO IS INJURED
Special to The Evening Journal.
ELKTON. Md, Nov. IS—Albert
Nickle, aged 46 years, employed by
jthe Government was run down by
an automobile and killed while
walking home from church, accom
panled by his wife, et Prlnciplo Fur
ness, about 0 o'clock last night. Ed
ward Craig, aleo of Prlnciplo Fur
ness, who was with Mr. and Mrs
Nickle at the time, while knocked
a ■
ray the
Clark claims he was blinded by the
lights of an approaching car and did
not see the pedestrians on the side of
the road until nearly on top of them,
He then applied his brakes but It
was too late. The machine struck
Nickle knocking him down with auch
force as to fracture his skull. He
lied almost Instantly and the body
waa removed to his home.* Mr. Craig
was also knocked down but was
seriously
down, was not
Mra. Nickle was not struck
machine.
Tho machine that struck Mr.
Nickle was owned and driven by
Wilson H. COaric. who conducts a
garage at Perryvllle.
taking a can of gasoline to a car
that had run out of gas near Prln
ciplo Furness when the accident
happened.
Clark was
only slightly hurt.
Howard Nickle. a brother of eh*j
man killed last night, was killed
about five years ago while working
^ brakem . n on the Pennsylvania|
Railroad.
Bestdes his wife the deceased Is
survived bv one son. who graduated
from the Northeast High School last
June, and a daughter who Is teach
Ing school at Perry Point. Four
brothers, Wilbert. John, Clyde and
Perry also survive.
Coroner Magraw Is making an In
vestlgatlon of the case and will prob
ably hold an inquest this sftemoon.
e— — »
E. F. MEREDITH
_ . _
1/HUMTilAtm ti^siits
80, 210
drowned In
Earl Francis Meredith,
M ary land avenue, was
I the Rappahannock river. last Wed
1 nesday. His body was recovered
1 last Friday and shipped to the prl
of James T. Chandler,
Meredith was the son of |
va:e morgue
Saturday.
Mrs. Thomas R. Magulgan, by her
The funeral services will be held
from the residence of his mother.
with whom he resided, at 2.30 o'olock
Wednesday afternoon, with the Rev.
Edmund H. Stevens, rector of Cal
vary Episcopal Churoh, officiating,
Interment will be In Sllverbrook i
first marriage.
cemetery.
Meredith obtained employment on
the barge Chowan, belonging to the
Southern Transportation Company .
about two months ago. and was
aboard the barge when he fell over- |
board.
That the defendant might havelll
an opportunity to apply for a dupll-j
cate llcense to replace the origi
nal. which he claimed to have lost.
the csss of William Frey, charged
with operating an automobile with-1
out a license, was continued until;
Thursday by Deputy Judge Lynn, In I
Municipal Court this morning.
Benjamin Field was fined 110 and
rotes on a charge of exceeding the'"
speed limit.
must g Err duplicate license.
!
AUTOS COLLIDE.
An automobile owned and oper-jl'
ated by Joseph F. Bradley. 103 Del- >
amore Place, struck an automobile
owned by Mrs. J. Hoey. 1909 Boule- ,
tard, which had been parked on
West street between Sixth and|||
Seventh streets, yeeterday afternoon.
Both cars were damaged.
HUNGER, PESTILENCE ADD
TO DEATH LIST AFTER
CHILEAN CATASTROPHE
i
FUEL FOR ALL,
PRODUCTION
NOW NORMAL
Must Regulate Distribution
While l T suaI Reserves Are
Beinfr Piled Up
jMOBE RAII.ROAD
EQUIPMENT SOON
WASHINGTON. Nov. II (United
Press)—All danger of a fuel short
age this winter has been averted. It
was definitely declared today at the
office of C. E. Spens, Federal fuel
distributor and tlte Geological Sur
vey. Coal Is being mined and moved
In sufficient quantities to meet cur
rent demands and build up a small
reserve.
Approximately 16 000.000 tens of
soft and hard coal la floating from
the mine« to the cities at the present
Peak production of approx
tons
reached within a few weeks, It was
time.
imately 12.000.000
will be
believed.
Production depends on the ability
of the railroads to mot» the coel.
Mor# railroad equipment will he
available shortly and by the middle
of wittier a record coal movement
trill be tinder way. It was confidently!
prophesied.
While a fuel famine with atten-T
dant Buffering has been averted, con
slderable inconvenience will be ex
perienced by householders dependent
on hard coal for fuel. While bard
coal production now Is at normal
j the exhaustion of supplies during the
j coal strike created a shortage that
j will require time to rectify. Even
I (Continued on Page Seven)
— --
4|ITD IJITV TWO
.'ll) II* llIlO I "I I ty
TIJL'ID DHYL'C UUAL'L'Y
lllrdll DUilEjo Dlt'/IYIail
!
Arthur Grohmann. 35. and Emil
Kloppsteln. 42. an employe of the

American Dredging Company, are in
the Del.w.re Hospital safferlng with
fractured legs, due to being struck
by an automobile late Saturday night j
«hile walking along the causeway,
Crohmann's right shoulder blade also i
A panning automobil 1st
»« broken.
*ent them to the hospital,
The men said they were walking
from Farnhurst and were struck by
«" automobile coming from the rear,
The detective bureau Is Investigating
the accident and an arrest Is sx-j
peeted.
Cail has besn Issued by Col
TO DISCUSS SALEM RIVER.
for th# W u mlnffton District for a
publia hearing In the courthouse,
Salem. N. J., at 2 p. m. Tuesday,
November 21, to dlscu
the prd
■ _ . ■
posed Improvement* to Salem River.
These Improvements are authorized
1922.
Hiver and Harbor acts of 1920 and
FINE TWO CRAP SHOOTERS
On charges of playing crap, Roy
Coston was fined $10 and costs and
George Rlghter was fined $5 and
costs by Deputy Judge Lynn in Mu*
iolp&l Court this morning. It was
Coston'a second offense and Rlghter'*
ftpgt. Both defendants were Negroes.
I
j; Earthquake Death
Toll in Largest
Catastrophes
_ _ __ ._ „ Killed j
B " # ^p' ' ' «J2
v* Ipara „ 0 , Äug'. ï«'.' ioo« ! 1.500
KIn ^ ton Jam atca. Jan.
^ lï#7 1100
y an< j ^ abrta ; '
19p8 78 483
' rYc. Mav
s mo
Turkey Aug. »1811
r ' '
.1,600
. 8.000
, enn
j 000
200
Sicily. May 8-9. 1914.
Central Italy, Jan. 18,
1016 .29,978
Guatemala City, Dec. 24
81, 1917 .
Valley.
June 29, 1919.
Porto Rico. Oct. 11, 1919.
Orizaba. Mexico, Jan. 8,
1920 .
China, Dec. 16, 1921
Mugello
. 3.600
Italy,
loo
116
t
HIGH COURT
BARS JAP AS
O.S. CITIZEN
Not White Within Meaning
of Law, Supreme Tri
bunal Decides
TRADE PARTNERSHIP
ALSO IS DENIED
I
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 (United
Press)—Japanese are not white,
within the meaning of the American
law and are not entitled to cttlsen
ehlp In the United States, the Su
preme Court held today.
The high court affirmed a decision
of the California Circuit Court of
Appeala In a test case brought by
Takao Ozawa, of Honolulu, who
claimed he was "white" and was
eligible for naturalization • as an
American citizen.
At the same time the court upheld
the Washington Supreme Court
g citizenship to Takujl Tam-1
a-hlla and Charles Hlokono of
Seattle.
The decision held that the two!
tapanese were not entitled to nat
uraltzation under fh* United State»
laws and could not enter a business
partnership.
The Supreme Court'» decision In
these rasp» has long been awaited
particularly on the Pacific Coast
where anti Japanese feeling exista,
Ozawa contended he was entltld to
Amriean citizenship as a descendent
of the white tribe of Alsu. He start -
ed his fight for citizenship several
years ago In Hawaii but was defeat
ed In the courts there and also In the
higher courts In California.
Ozawa has lived In Hawaii since
hin childhood and was educated In
the America schools there,
II!fl
children now attending- American
«choolfl. are being brought up Amert
can citizen».
Yamashita presented sn argument
[similar to (hat of Ozawa. He ap
pealed from ths Supreme Court of
the State of Washington which de
him the privilege of lnoorpora
Mon of a real «Kate company ba
rau «, c f his Ineligibility to alMeen
shlp
13 HORSES AND
26 PIGS HORNED
Barn and Granary With All
THOMAS LATTOMUS
Contents, Near Townsend,
Destroyed by Fire
PROPERTY OWNED BY
Special to The Evening Journal.
TOWNSEND. Nov. 13.—Thirteen
horses, two calves
pigs were
and twenty-six
burned when th* barn
and granary wi'th all contents on the
farm of Thom&* Isattomus, -tenanted
by Harvey Holton, a short distance
from Townsend, were destroyed by
fire early yesterday morning. The
fire, tie origin of which is undeter
mlned, Is .thought to have started In
the hay loft on the second floor of
the large barn. No estimate oould
. __ - .. , _ . . ...
1 . .' " . 099 ° c .
s an« t^ fr ° m V ' °
115.000. There was soma Insurance
on everything destroyed with the
exception of the wheat snd corn.
The fire was discovered by me m .
bsrs of the Boltor» family about 2.30
o'clock yesterday morning. Efforts
wer* made to get the live stock out
of the building but the Are had
gained too much of a headway. A
number of cows that were ln the
barnvard were driven out. Middle
town was appealed to and
chemical engine made a quick run t
to the scene of the fire. The fire
the I
I
BURNED BY HOT COPPER.
Falllng into a pot of boiling copper
at the plant of the Pyrites Company 1
In South Wilmington. yeeterday.
Samuel Johnson, colored, 22. 300
East Eighth etreet. an employe of
the company, was badly burned
«bout the right foot and leg. He *«> ;
removed to the Delaware HotpltaL I
(Continued on Page Ten)
x
Attribute
Night Horror to Sun
spots — Battleships
and Caravans Carry
Food and Other Sup
plies to Survivors.
Scientists
Many by
Tidal IT are — Hun
dreds Are Homeless
WOMEN, TOTS
ARE SUFFERERS
By LAWRENCE 8. HAAS.
United Proas Staff rorreapondant.
(Copyright, 1022. by United Press)
SANTIAGO. (Title, Nov. IS.—
Fourteen hundred persons lost their
live« In a dent «taxing eartiiqnakxt
snd tldsl wnre which rent the coast
of Northern Chile early Saturday,
_
according to the most accnrate cstl
mates available today,
Starvation, pestllonno and expo
sure are claiming additional victims
In the wake of the disaster, and re
caravans are pushing In to aid
hameten* Inhabitant« of the stricken
territories.
Communication with the shatter
ed town» along the (toast from Val
pnrnlao to Antofagasta, the district
0**11 disrupted, but inuriers brought
word to flat capital of whole vll
which bore the brant of the shock
and the upheaval of the Pacific, tvan
Ingvtt levelled by fbe qnake, with
rvtvoia, wounded, lying by hun
dreds Ih tho streets.
Vallsnanx Uoplapo snd Ooqutmho,
three Uttlo coastal towns, an derart
most frean the great shock at 12:20
a m*. Saturday. They were Inun
dated by a rush of the Paclflo which
followed the first earth tremors. But
little village« farther hank fn the
hills oppenr also to have Buffered
terrlblo Io» of life and dtwo-notion
of property, which It may never bo
IHmslble to estimate,
reports that whole communities were
wiped oat.
Thene were
The largest quake, felt »wr th»
entire South American continent and
registered on seismographs aJl over
the world lasted for over three
hours, olthugh It was perceptible to
human senses only two minutes.
That was sufficient to drive those
whose houses withstood ths shook In
terror to the streets, where many. In
costal villages, were drowned by the
térrltla tidal wave which lifted Its
millions of tons of water a thousand
feet the houses
along the shore.
Thousand slept In the open last
night afraid Mi return to tottering
houses or even to those that had
withstood he shock, for fear of a
repetition of the quake Slight tre
mon W9r * felt Sun<lay «ftemoon
spreading panic among the natives
for three hundred miles along the
coast.
Couriers c&m* to Santiago today
froTn Vallenar and Copapo to ar
^ or caravans to take food* and
medicine» to the strteken towns. The
t orm * r place, they declared, was
obliterated. All the build
in * a ®* ea Pt school house, lay In ,
ru * nad heaps of mortar, brick and
n ? obe ' Half t of * h * buildings In Co
bla !'° l \. ur,e< ? tr ° m ' he,r foun '
da "°" a b y the shock, fhe courlars
T 110 ,,, 9 '
standing webe uninhabitable.
In jured and e+ck are being treated
' ha and public squares.
starvatIon „ aIr , ady ln at V al
, enar wh „ e „„ be(fUB to
a „ am<Jng tha quake v | ctlœ ,
who Rra hu(Mled togrther
, hal1ars ln lh# plalaa .
Ramond Alravgo. a prominent
rhlIaan mInePi WM g mon g the first
a reliable eve witness story
of the da , 0lat j 0 n and disaster,
sajd con t a gious diseases are spread
and from hunger,
Those that remained
He
Ing like wild fire and that many are
threatened with death by exposure
Aioayo
Serena.
Arriving at La
told » dramatic story ot the destruc
rion of the Jail at Yallensr, which
as usual was crowded w"h prlson
era sentenced for minor offense»
TTh* shock hurled down the adobe
walls of the little prlaon Injuring
many of the tightened Inmate*.
Thoee able to do so, rushed nm
the Jail, but made no attempt to flee
farther, remaining •h' k '"*J a tarr ~ •
(Continued «■ Page Two)

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