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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, December 06, 1922, LATE NEWS EDITION, Image 2

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Womens College Notes
( University of Delaware)
BY RUTH ANNE RU88ELL.
The Thanksgiving reces s ended a t
Work started
!
1 o'clock on Monday,
ns usual Monday afternoon. A num
ber of the girls in the class of musi
cal appreciation attended the con
by Paderewski In the
Music, .Philadelphia.
cert given
Academy ,4fH|
Miss Dora W Irox. Instructor In mu
sic at the Women's College, also at
tended this concert.
The executive board of the Stu
Self-Government Association
dent
ond the cabinet of the Y. W. C. A.
met as usual on Mond«y. Th© ba
for which the girls have been
useful and pretty
xaar
making many
things suitable for Christmas gifts,
will b© held December 14. This ba
zaar is given by the Y. W. C. A. and
th© public is Is Invited to come and
to buy.
The Freshmen h*ve elected their
effloers for this year. Miss Lillian
lAtose was elected president; Miss
Kvelyn Cooke, vice-president: Miss
Beulah Thompson, secretary, and
Miss Irene Wilkinson, treasurer.
The hiking season has started,
'fho seaaon opened as soon as the
Thankagivlng recess ended. No lese
titan two miles will count toward
point* for an athl»tio letter. Miss
Esther Gentieu '23 -was elected head
of hiking. The walking for points can
be done from now until Easter vaca
tion.
The French Club will meet to
night at 7 o'clock In the Hllarium.
fi|he topic of the evening will be
Clemenceau.
The Student Forum will
the Wednesday afternoon meetings
today. The topic will be the Lau
Mtas
Hal latter '23 nnd Mis* Kathryn Mof
fltt '24 will
resume
sinne Conference.
Marian
The Rifle Club will soon begin Its
weekly practice. Miss Natalie Ay erst
'23 was olected .the Head ,of ' the
Rifle Club. The girl* who are mem
bers of the club this year are: Miss
Sara Roe '23, Miss Gertrude Rouse
'23, Miss Letttla Root *23, Mias Rose
■Roberts '23, Miss Mary Deer '23
Miss Mabel Smith '23. Miss Natalie
Ayerst '23. Miss Emma Dayett '23,
Miss ÉMIzatoeth Walker
Helen Short '23,
'23. Miss
Miss 'Florence
! PhiDlps'23, Miss Elizabeth Maclntlre
' 24 - Miss Florence Phillips. '33, Miss
Mildred W'olfender '24,
Garrett '24, Miss Jean Rothrock '24
Mies Frances Worthington '34. Miss
Josephine Burnett '24, Miss Mlrlan
Carll '24, Miss Helen
Miss Kathryn Moffitt '24, Miss Helen
Black '24, Miss Emily Roe '24. Miss
Anne Carroll '24. Miss Louise .Taek
son '24, Miss Mae Tempone '26. Miss
Mary Kreuger '25.
I tanks '26, Miss Margaret Tonhey
'25, Mise Dorothy ^LeFevTe '26,
Miss Helen Lucas '25, Miss Blanche
Workman '25, Miss Frances Buttles
'25, Miss Mary Bradley '25, Miss
Charlotte Dayett '25, Mils
Goodwin *25, Miss Virginia Burnett
'25, Miss Estelle Kite '25, Miss
Frances Richards '25. Mls9 Ollle
Kramer '25, Miss Helen Baker '25,
Miss Kathryn Ladd *25, Miss Zelda
Clendanlel '26, Miss Dor.othy Bowen
'2«. Miss Alice Devis '26. Misa Saille
, Calloway '26. Miss Dorothy Heyd
k 2S. Miss Edith Chandler 126. Miss
Elizabeth Warner '26, Miss Ruth
StSng'e '26, Mias Katharine Jacobs
'S«, Miss Mildred Webh '26, Miss
Metre! Pyle *26, Mise Virginia Chip
man '26. Mias Marx- Ellas '26, Miss
Harriet Gum '28, Mies Sara Mas
singer '26, Miss Anna Mazer '26,
Miss Barbara Parry '26, Mias Lillian
Loose '26, Miss Louise Thompson
*2*, Miss Madeline Forward '26,
Miss Elizabeth Crooks '26, Miss
Bara Slaughter '26, Miss Beulah
Thompson '26, Miss Mary Louise
Marvll '26, Miss Ruth Tearsley '26.
Mias Betty Snyder '26. Miss Leslie
Blackwell '26, Mies Anna
'1^5; Miss Anne Ralston
Miss Lois
Beach '24.
Miss Delma
Vesta
McRorley
'26, Miss ;
Money '28, Miss Ola Dukes '26, Miss
Georgia Wlggtn '26, Miss Clam
Rfady '26. Miss Ida Tatman '26,
Miss Blanche Holton '26. Misa Cath
erine Whl2e '26. iMss Ruh Stoll '26
'Dr. H. V. Holloway, State Com
ttfcssloner of Education, addressed
rite students of the University dur
Injg the chapel period on Tuesday
)>t. Holloway pave the statistics
slfowlng the decrease In school at
t*dance as the higher grades are
rijhched In the school. The young
mfen and women attending the Unl
vacuity are In this way a selected
BRAIN TESTS.
By Sam Ix>yd.
Five Minutes to Answer Tills.
.0
;
1
i
m w
lilt
W
A
§
JgSlL .
iJÄi
I
VA
II
■s.
lii_
I
C "Gee wbizl
' cury Jumps!"
I truck driver as he got down
I from his perch to look at the
j -'thermometer, which registered
J .80 degrees in the shade. Then
] as he studied the fluctuation ta
, tie alongside, he was heard to
j ejaculate, "According to these
figures the quicksilver has trav
! eled 20 degrees during the day,
I But gained only 2% degrees."
I Now, If the driver told the
j truth, what is the highest mark
I that the thermometer could
j have registered during those 20
î degrees of travel? •
j Answer to Yesterday's.
HAIR plus SHIP minus AIR
' SHIP plus BELL plus EMU
j plus GAWK minus
; minus MUG equals HAWK.
How the mer
remarked the
BELLE II
I
They are enjoying the priv
group.
ilogos of higher education, but they
Jtnve the responsibility which this
privilege carries with It. Delaware
Is looking to the students of the Uni
versity for her future leaders. This
country will not realize the ideal of
democracy until everyone has at
least the rudiments of an education.
Education will keep the country safe
from the perils of anarchy, socialism
and Bolshevism. The students of to
day must work to better the condi
tions of education for the coming
generations.
The Newark New Century Club
has Invited the students of the Uni
versity to a lecture In Wolf Hall, on
Monday evening, December
George B. Hyneon will be the leo
turer. Mr. Hynson is a native Dela
warean. He was at one time, a mem
ber of the faculty of Delaware Col
lege.
The series of lecturers to be given
by Glenn Frank, editor of the Cen
tury Magazine, will begin next week
at the regular college hour Tuesday
at 11 o'clock. The pubic Is cordially
Invited to attend tre lecture at 11
o'clock, and also the lecture which
will be given on Tuesday evening by
Mr. Frank.
11 .
Headaches from Slight Cold»
Laxative BROMO QUININE Tablets
relieve the Headache by curing the
Cold. A tonlo laxative and germ d»
strover. The box hears the elgnature
É. w. Grove. (Be sure you get
BKOMO.) 39c.—Ad v.
AS HEAD OF
NEK SENATE
(Continued from First Page.)
also attended by several mem
was
bers of the State committee, Sena
or Thomas F. Bayard and Congress
man-elect 'William H. Boyoe. Chair
man Hoey being authorized to ap
point an advisory committee to ad
vise with Démocratie members of
the Legislature from now on and
during the legislative session named
the chairmen of Wilmington and
eâch county on that committee, as
follows: Timothy J. Mooney, of Wil
mington; W. Truxton Boyce, rural
New Castle county; General R. R.
Kenney, Kent, and Andrew J. Lynch,
Sussex. There were also added to
this committee Joseph Banoroft, of
Wilmington; Francis deH. Janvier
of Rural New Castle; James H.
Hughes, of Kent, and William E
Vaillant of Suseex county. After tho
naming of this committee the Sen
ators and Representatives went Into
separate meetings wlfto the result
stated.

Senator Melnttre presided
over
the Senate conference and Repre
sentative Collins, of Newark,
that of the House members.
That tho Democratic
over
legislators
have In mind a plan of restricting
Ihe work of the Wale Highway De
portment and also to investigate
that department was brough out by
the talk of some of the leaders
the Joint meeting of Senators and
Representatives.
at
This project, how
ever, is said to not bo especially pop
ular among some of tho members
who know the sentiment of th©
payers relative to the continuation
of tho good roads (program and also
know how grateful- thousands
taxpayers In the rural sections feel
for the enduring good roads that
hlch have been
tax
of
have been provide'd w
of greot benefit to tile
m.
Boyce In a talk
suggested calling a halt on the road
building program,
while
Sehator
Bayard suggested an Investigation of
the highway department.
It Is said
tile Democrats have In mind the get
ting of "Jobs" for party workers In
the Highway Department.
Former Senator Willard Sauls
bury. while not present, sent a let
ter which Chairman Hoey read, Jnli
which he suggested some changes*
in the Wilmington Election Depart
ment. The Democrats desire to ob
tain control of the department.
That the Democrats have In mind
the "ripping" out of
some of the
present State commissions could also
be seen from the talk of
leaders.
some of the
The speakers
urged econ
omy on the part of the Legislature
for the coming term, whjch, how
ever. is the popular cry every two
years before each session of the
Legislature.,
While the subject
was not dis
cussed in the conferences, there was
talk among certain Democrats out
side the session of trying to put over
a "ripper" charter for -Wilmington
that would oust some of the Repub
, lican city Officials and give the Dem
oenu,control ofCItyCourt and some
other departments. There also was
talk of trying to devise some legis
lation for educational qualifications
! for voters with the Idea in
\ barring a great
groes from voting^
mind of
proportion of Ne
Another drive Is
■ to bo aimed toy tho Democrats at the
State Tax Department, Itoo, It is said.
It would require a two-thirds vote in
each branch to pass some of this
legislation, and the Democrats could
not put It over without Republican
aid.
General Kenne/, of Dover,
the first epeaker before the Joint]
conference of senators and
serttatives. He urged the carrying out
of the part platform pledges and
confining the legislative session to
the actual sixty days as prescribed
in the State Constitution,
the Legislature should be
legislative body, one of business and
économy. He suggested the forming
of a steering committee,
should be composed of strong
who would be able to formulate a
legislative program.
The next speaker was Senator
Thomas F. Bayard. He reminded the
members of the Legislature that
their first consideration was to pass
only such laws as might be for the
good of all the people. He also
purged economy and the reduction of
was
repre
H© «aid
a real'
which
D
our OUR WAY
BY WILLIAMS
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The Test
safd the bill* should be reported out
of commttee promptly so that the
business of tooth houses would not
h© delayed. He ©uggested that con
ferences of the two houses be
held in order »that they might
decide upon a speaker pro-tem of the
Senate and "Peaker of the House.
and by so doing It P 01 ** 11 enable
fhese officers to go ahead and a P-j
point their committees and avoid
Ihe usual delay In the selection or,
these committees Th.s, he said.
would enable the legislature to pt
down to business promptly. ,
He urged that in the selection of
officers in the House and Senate
they he selected from the stand
point of efficiency. He »ugge»ted a
thorough investigation into the af
fairs of the State Highway Depart
ment. He said wise Judgment should
be used In connection with the rtln-,
n.ng Of county office .and intimated
some and the eltminatlon of unneees ;|
thousands o
taxes wherever possible and prac
ticable.
Mr.jBayard olalmed that the State
could not keep on spending vast
urns of money, that some expenses
and appropriations must be cut down.
He also urged the preparation ofj
bills to be presented early In the
legislature session and seeing to It
that they are carefully drawn.
He
sary ones would, save
dollars to the taxpayers.
Chairman Hoey read a letter from
former United States Senator Wil
lard Saulsbury, expressing regret
that he could not be present, and
recommending the cutting down of
expenses, the abolishing of tnany of
tho State commissions, retaining only
a suffleent number to properly carry
on the work needed, and the re
organization of the Department of
Elections to provide for a fair
minority representation of registra
tion and election officers,
the Republicans and
should have an equal number of elec-1
It ion officers.
Also that
Democrats
He suggested that
bills be prepared to carry out the
pledges made In the party platform,
The next speaker was Congress
man-elect. William H. Boyce, who
also advocated early preparation of
bills to be presented to the Legls
These, he said, should be
and open mind.
In summing up he said, Justice
and economy should govern legls
lature. that the legælators should |
find out tho nee'ds of the people and
be Just with them.
Speaking of road building. Judge
Boyce advanced the thought that
perhaps It would be a good thing to
•have a let-up for awhile so tho peo
ple "can get their breath." He said
he had nothing to say against good I
highways, but thought some atten-l
tlon ought to be paid to dirt roads. I
Ho pledged his advice and assist-1
called upon, and
the keeping of campaign!
lature.
carefully drawn *0 that there could
be no question as to their meaning.
The members, he said, should vote
all measures with a clear, honest
ance whenever
urged
pledges. He laid stress on the fact|
thot tho Legislature Is supremo In
making investigations into the ]
fairs of the State, and suggested
that a demand toe made on officers
of any commission where therejmay (
b© r«i»on to believe that euch officers 1
commission ere not needed, to
Fhow why the commission should be
I
]
.
Chairman Hoey also urged out
ting down of unnecessary clerks In
the two houses. He said he thought
one attorney was sufficient, and thatj
he could see no necessity for a speak-1
or
er's clerk.
!
1
j
I
I
FATHER AND SON I
SEEK NEW TRIAL
Hook.
j
the 75-ton Davis
David J. Re.nhardt is counsel for
j
(Continued from First Page.)
Henry G. Hook, co
of the court,
defendant of tho Frantzes, pleaded
nolo contendro at ithe outstart of
Hook was th© agent of
He i« said to
the trial.
the Davis Company,
have entered Into an agreement to
pay to Howard Frantz $7500 If the
city purchased
plant, and Dr. Frantz Is alleged to
have had an interest In the "deal."
California coast below ths border,
, vpr8 nn the lookout and had prom
| W d to ma k, an arrest If they fourni
the fuglUv *.
roa(1 f r0 m Fanta Ana to Tla
! , Tulina la Mng closeIy watchM . Tia
Juana „ JlIÄ B jver th8 llne . Anwthar
m8ana of cx , t from th „ Unlt8< j stal#!(
Mexlc0 v , a In , p8r ; al Valley,,
trough Calexico and so Into Mex
acalls. This route 1s also toeing close- :
, watched and trave!er « question^.
Th „ e ta hard]y , chanc8 of the
hun(eJ wom(kn a< , rog8 tho
[f abe tra from th8 „ 8 Peads
for vast areas of trackless land. !
wa(erless m0untaln0U8 and lm
ab|e for an amomoblIe lnt8rv8ne !
Ca , ex , c0 , lc# ar8 uslnf an alr .
. , thmir nntrol of th© border
"«'. P ^ n i^L_ b *^ d alp „V bv an i
Jl 8m Sb8
underground railway eyserti. She
^
Angel« and the border to divert j
^ j a „ matron , aya tbat during
the few days Immediately before
the escape she saw men walking j
on the roof of a building adjoining i
AIRPLANES IN
[
\
WOMAN HUNT
(Continued From Page Two.)
lief, authorities believe, that Mrs.
the prison and In full view of Mrs.
Phillips' window.
These probably were her accom
plices signalling to her.
Mrs. Madalynne Obenchain, re
leased from the prison Just before
Mrs. Phillips' escape, gave the "ham
mer murderess" the dainty curtain
which she hung over the bars, thus
concealing her sawing operations
thereon. This strengthens the be
!
!
Obenchain at least had knowledge
that Mrs. Phillips was going to
make a break for liberty. Sheriff
Traeger questioned Mrs. Obenchain
f or hours, and then stated he he
Ueved she had nothing to do with
it. However, she was kept under
surveillance.
There was much speculation as to
the probable fate of Mrs. Caffee,
If she had been carried away by
Mrs. Phillips and her gang. Ina«
much as Mrs. Mrs. Caffoo's evidence
conv i C { ed Mrs. Phillips, police had
mt , e expectaUon of finding her alive
jf ghe haa fancn , into th8 woman's
_
gp fc |„i t0 q- b8 Evening Journal,
Advices from Mexico this
officers there were
California officers
hands,
morning said
working with
to the fullest extent.
FIVE POINTS CIVICS
ACCOMPLISHES MUCH
_ JHB
g — Members of tho Five Points Cl
v | pg Association at their meeting on
priday night, will nominate officers
b# e]ect8d at tha j anuar y meet
Th# awoclatIon W as organized
Feb 7 mi> and durln g the
RICHARDSON PARK, Del.. Dec.
twenty-two months It lias been In
existence. It has purchased a $4,000
fire apparatus. $1000 for flro hose,
e , 3tpe " de , d rensiderable money for
Improvements and welfare
work and own » a community build
' n K at > d Playground. Tho money
ra'sed through streot carnivals.
suppers nnd other soctal affairs and
it Is hoped to use tho proceeds of
the next carnival in lighting the
Five Points section as well as pro
vlding for street crossings.
The (present officers of tho asso
ciation are: John Guyer, president;
William L.
Nixon, vice-president;
Fred Gassert, secretary; W. K. Ra
ker. financial secretary and treasurer.
Raker, treasurer.
CAPTAIN CAREY'S FUNERAL
Special to Tho Evening Journal.
DOVER, Dec. 6.—James J. Beh
en, local merchant, who has been
ill for a week with pneumonia,
reported better today.
The funeral of Capbaln George
Carey, of Little Creek, who died
early Tuesday morning, will take
place Friday afternoon at 1:30
o'clock from his residence In Little
Creek, with interment at Lakeside
Cemetery, this town.
was
James H. Hughes. Jr., and Chester
A. Gwlnn. counsel for the Treasury
Department^ Mr. duPont we# r»p-|
teeented byVilli.w A. Glssgow, Jr.,
* n J f He li , 7 r P ' ® rown -
Mr Glasgow, argument hinged
»n 'the et.tute of Um.tation He
contended that after the assessment
V'*
' n P®-£ taxe., coun. el for Mr, du
P 01 « had repeatedly sought a hear
,n * f, 1 - 0 "* the Comm leal oner of In
tornal Revenue, but had not even
received the "courtesy of a reply.
The demand for the payment of theL
t;l / es was made more than five years
after the assessment In 1915.
Mr. Glasgow quotedla soctlon of
the revenue act to the effect that
no eult or Proceedings for the cot
of any such taxe. • • ehall
hegun after the expiration of five
years after the date when such re
nled ••
^Th. "attorney contended that
"d taxes
**><» »hen attempted to bring suit for
t ho "- recovery his action would have
been automatically barred and his
client without redress.
Declares Suit Barred
HIGHEST COURT
TO PASS ON LAW
(Continued from First Pegs.)
had
Dlstrict Attorney Hughes based
the government's case on a statute
reading:
"No suit for the purpose of re
straining the assessment or collec
tion of any tax shall be maintained
tn any court."
He held the statute to be a bar
against any Injunction. This Is one
of the major questions Involved, lie
said, as to whether a taxpayer can
bring a suit to prevent the collec
At Judge Buffington's suggestion,
counsel for the defense was heard
first. Mr. Glasgow, counsel for
Mr. du Pont, said the defense would
show the department had no
power to collect or attempt to
collect the tax. If they failed to
show this, he said, they would show
that the statute of 1921 relieved Mr.
du Pont of all liability, as the five
year period had ©lapsed. He said
section 8224 of tho Revised Statutes
was effective only where there was a
remedy at law. Ho claimed, also,
that the government had greatly
over-valued the stock It was sought
to tax.
Counsel for the Government
contended that in his income
tax returns for 1915 Mr/ du
Pont failed to mention the receipt of
75,534 shares of the common stock
of the E. I. duPont de Nemours &
(company after stock of the E. I. du
Pont de Nemours Powder Company
had been transferred to the former
company. The stock at that time. It
Is stated, had a market value of
$347.50 a share.
An investigation conducted by the
Internal Revenue Department show
ed that additional tax due from Mr.
duPont for 1913 amounted to $2.
584.19, and an overpayment of
$978.01 for 1914.
Attorneys for the Government al
leged four error« In the appeal of the
case. They maintain that the court
erred in overruling the motion to
dismiss the bill; in granting Mr. du
Pont's motion for a preliminary in
junction; in holding that the plaintiff
had no adequate remedy at law If
tho collector of Internal revenue
carried out his threat to collect the
taxes by distraint in selling Mr. du
Pont's property. The government
also contended that the court erred
also In holding that If tho plaintiff
had paid the tax In response to the
assessment and demanded his right
to recover the same. If Illegally or
erroneously assessed and collected,
would b© barred by certain sections
J " J, _ f
of the Re\cnue Act.
"There can be no doubt to the
argued." The only relief prayed for j
In the bill was Injunction to restrain
the collection of the tax, thereby |
clearly branding th© suit as the kind'snd
° tt , . . . ., .
that cannot be •maintained under
ßefitfon 3224, R. S. The averment
«hoiild havr
of such a purpose should ha\e
sounded the desth-kneil of the com
purposo of the suit In the case at
bar. "Counsel for the Government
plainant.
"Th©r© was neither allegation nor
SEEK SOURCE OF i
LIQUOR SUPPLY
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a
protest I
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Minister and Magistrate at;
Milford Clash Over
Hooch Cases
ATTORNEY-GENERAL
TO BE CONSULTED
Special to The Evening Journal.
MIDFORD, Deo.
6.—In
against the light flnes Imposed on
person© oonvioted of being intoxicat
ed and disorderly, the Rev. Dlsaton
W. Jacobs, pastor of the Ave. M. E.
Church, of Milford, appeared in !
Municipal Court yesterday morning j
when #?ix defendants were arraign- ;
ed before Alderman Hendrixeon on .
charges «of belnx intoxicated and ;
disorderly on Sunday. |
Mr. Jacob* wss particularly
tous, as an agent of the Prohibition ;
Enforcement League, to have the
State law, which directs that any ■
one arrested fer drunkenness must I
disclose the source from which the \
intoxicating liquor was obtained or
be committed to jail, be inforced In .
these cases. Alderman Hendrlxson, !
who le a!so s Justice of the Peace,
explained to &Ir. Jacobs that those
before h!m were arrested by a town !
officer and It was a municipal ca.se
before an Alderman, while the lew i
he quoted was a State law and could i
he only used in State offense»».
Jacobs said that this
1
Mr.
wae
questionable 1n hi» mind, and stated
that he would go to Wilmington to
day to consult th© Attorney General
for hi» Interprtation of the law.
VRquir© Hendrlxson, after consul- *
point
tation with Mayor Frank Reedy, de
.elded In these eases to Impose «
!h«svy Penalty In order to break up
Sunday dilnk-ng in Milford. The
I defendants were fined 110 end sen
I Thoao who were sentenced were
I Robert Marts, Walter Rvan, Walter
| Maeklin. Daniel White, I.orence
j Palely snd Janie Emory.
on an anpeal It was found that
th , , entenc . , mpo „ d not ac
cording to law. That If fined they
eo „ M not he lnrarc8rated . and
ta;k of a CM# w , Blrt tho town
wh8n hut Jan8 Knl0or had 8Brv _
cd part of a day In Jail, she having
br8n re i easpd on p aynien t of tine.
Mr j acobs etat o(i that the efTort
t0 break up the practIce of diïor .
I dprIy conduct and drunU8nn „„ m
| Mn f ord on Sund ay would b e pushed
^ , |mlt and , f n8ces9arv W0u w
be car rie d to the next town elec
t)on
-
FASHION AND FADS.
No longer is it necessary to push
the drapery to the sides or back of
one s skirt. Fashion allows It a fa
vored place In the center front.
î fenced to 10 days In Jail each, and
1 If they do not pay their fine and
costs at the extplratlon of ten days
they are to remain In Jail ten days
additional.
Implication tn the complaint that no
taxes were due, or that
complainant
had paid the assessment, or that the
collector was not acting under color
of his office, or that collection by,
distraint was not authorized by law.
"On the contrary It was admitted
that the complainant was Indebted
to the United States for Income
taxes for 1915; that the assessment
had not been paid; that the assess
ment was made by the officer
charged by law with the duty of;
making assessments in such cases.
The suit was solely for the purpose
of restraining the collection of the
A suit for such a purpose can
not be maintained under th© section'
tax.
In 'the answer to the Government's
argument, Mr. duPont's counsel
contended that the Government
valued the 75,534 shares at 8347.60
a share, or a total of $26,248,065,
while the real valus was not In ex
cess of $50 a share.
Continuing tho lawyer» cltetL the
latest utterance of tho Supreme
Court on this subject where It was
stated by President Taft that: "Sec
tion 3224 of the revised Statutes
dtfes not prevent an Injunction In a
case apparently within its terms In
which some extraordinary and en
tlrely exceptional circumstances
make Its provisions Inapplicable.''
Mr. duPont through his attorneys
took exception to a great number of
the statement» mado Jn the appel
lant's brief.
He cited the Act of 1921 whtdh ex- j
pressly forbids the collector from j
proceeding either by distraint or
suit to collect any tax after five years j
from the date -when the return was
filed. The return for 1915 was filed
March 1, 1916.
"Regardless of these facts" coun
sel for
have the spectacle of a
ted States Government
Insisting that although hts threaten-]
ed actions are In express violation of ]
statutory inhibition, they cannot be,
enjoined because of a technical con
struction of Section 3224 R. S." i
:
Mr. duPont argued, we j
Uni-I
official]
People go on suffering from little
stomach troubles for years and Imagine
th They"over-Mt'and forcVon the atom
eh a lot of extra work,
But they never think that the storn
ach need© extra help to do extra work,
th eP ,» peopl*» would take a Ml-O-Na
Tablet with or after meals it would be
great big help to th© stomach in its
strain of overwork.
Ml-O-Na helps your tired out stom
ach to do its work and banishes the
ca £"' mnl , er what you eat or drink Ml
o-Na will sweeten your sour stomach
stop gn© belching In five minutes.
The heaviness disappears and the stom
Hch is groat iy aided in its work of di
gestion.
And Ml-O-Na not only promptly re
îlfVM1 R]1 distress but if taken regularly
will banish Indigestion.
Druggists everywhere and N. R Pan
ihe money back
For Indigestion
Mi-0-Na Is Guaranteed to
Promptly Relieve Stomach
Distress
forth s#!l Ml-O-Na
Alan. —Ad*.
I
i
LOCAL SECURITIES
Dec. 6. 1922.
j Laird and Çompany. duPont Build
ing, furnish the following quotation*
! of local securities.
Bid. Asked
Corporation Stotts
Diamond Ice & Coal Co.
Pfd.
duPont Debenture Frac
1 tions .
duPont Com. Warrants ..
Hercules Pwder Co. Pfd. 102
j Hercules Common .
I Atlas Fractions ..
i Industrial Salvage .
1 Chas. Warner Co. Com. 17
Chas. Warner Co. 1st.
Pfd.
J Electric Hose & Rub
ber Common .
Wilmington Ois Co. Com.
.Wilmington Gas Co. Pfd. 70
I Delaware R. It. 8% Guar.
I Com. par. 25 .
! Rank Stocks
I Central National, par. 100 127
Delà. Trust Co., par. 100 150
I Equitable Trust Co. par.
J 100 . 298
i Farmers Bank. par. 80 .. 120Vi
I Industrial Trust Co., par.
85
75
84
■114
3 Vi
mi
100
...
7
214
1.'
97
100

80
42
40
120
160
^Y(jo Bank C '
! Security''Trust Co*'
j 100 % .7.
; wn.^Trust * par. 60..
. Continental idfe Ins. Co.',
;
| Rights
duPont Debenture .
Atlas Common ....
AtIa8 1>referred - ••
300
122
61
60
65
Del., par.
200
.... 195
par.
2*5
9.
95
*
24
. ?2
par. 10.
Continental Lite Ins. Co.
.2.00
160
. 158
85
155
. 90%
STOCK PRICES
-
Some Industrials Open at,
Fractionally Higher Fig- I
ures on Better News I
NEW YORK. Dec. 6 fTTnited
: Press.)—Price movements were lr-!
regular In early dealings on th© New
| Tork stock Echange today con
; tinuJngr un der the earn© Influences
, vhich dominated the previous clos
!ng.
Uneasiness was still In evidence
among standard rails owing to th*
uncertainty regarding the great
Northern Preferred stock dividend.
Union Pacific showed a loss of more
,han a P olnt at 1*7H, while frac-|_
j 1 inal losses were sustained
Northern Pacific and Great North
i r ?'^im,listed bv
j f u î thPr c^nstrû't?ve rfew^wUh
j arf , to „ t)ec i a i dividend» and leader»
there"a,* opened fractional:"
"J £'* | cl " ! °P ened fractionally
*
Copper «3'-, t.p'-i: Studebaker 125,
,i p Atchison 100Ü, up H: Erlej
io, off >* ; Northern Pacific 75. off'
U. Annc0 nda 48V«. up U: Pan
American 931». off K; Kennecott 3.
up ■(. : American Telephone 123H
off >/»: General Motors 13%; New
York Central 93%. off %; New
Haven Sl>4. up %: U. S. Rubber
50 H ; Consolidated Gas 125%, oft % :
Baldwin 117. off % ; Corn Products
327*i. up % ; Union Pacific 137**,
^ p
hr
•'
. , * ,,, ,
Included: Utah
NEW YORK COTTON.
NEW YORK, Dec. 6 (United
Press.)—Cotton opened steady today.
December was up 5 at 24 40; .Tanu-j
ary 24.40, up 6; March 24.59. up 3;
24.40, up 2; July 24.20, up 9.
ji ay
FOREIGN EXCHANGE.
NEW TORK, Dec. 6
Press.) — Foreign exchange opened]
firm toay. Sterling opened 4.66%;
francs, .06981,5;
.0001%.
Baby's
rats!
at tbo bo ttle.
(United
lire, .04958; marks.
Nursing Bottles
Attract Them !
bottles attract
nursing
They will do anything to get
If they do. they will
lnfeot thc mllk with d;se ""- ,
heälth's sake wipe out rats! L se
Royal Guaranteed Rat Paste. Posl
tively DESTROYS all rats. 26e &!
50o tubes,
x
For j
Sold and guaranteed by
Cut-Rate Medicine Co.,
Eckerd's
Inc.
Laird & Company
InvestmentSecurities
duPont Bldg. Phone 4242
CHEAPER COAL
BUY OUR HIGH-GRADE
Bituminous Coal
Low volatile, excollent for domestic purposes. Got more
heat, less ash. Now being used in apartment houses, cliurehes,
schools nnd private residences. Don't pay high prices when you
can get service cheaper. Save the difference. Lot us tell you
about It.
f
Call Phone 8549, 6760, 8470
Builders' Supplies Corporation
Newport Pike and B. & O. R. R.
31' 1
f
VISIT
The Wistaria Garden
Tonight
DINNER ANI) DANCING
Good Food
'
4
Good Music
Dancing 9 Till Closing
Lambros Cafe
t
837 Market St.
/
INCOME TAX PAYMENT.
John W. Hering, oolleetor of In
ternal Revenue, announced ted«/
that Anal payments of Income and
profit taxes for 1921 are due on or
before December 15. The payment
of thee«
be made at the Internal
the Federal
the last installment
on
taxes may
Revenue Office, in
Building, Ninth and Shipley etreets.
BLOW OX HEAD KILLS BEAK.
BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Dec. #■
Samuel Krum returned
Boyd and
from a bear hunting trip to North
Mountain with two bears, one weigh
ing 100 pounds and the other 300
Samuel Krum shot the latter and
Boyd Krum killed ' the 100-pound
beat with a blow on the head wttb
his rifle. He had wounded the bear
at clos» range and when it attacked
him before he could reload his rifle
The
swung it on the bear's head,
barrel of the rifle was broken by the
blow.
TEACHERS' STRIKE ENDS.
POTTS VILLE, Pa., Dec. «.—The
strike of theten public school teach
ers of New Philadelphia ended yes
terday and the schools, whicn have
been closed for a week reopened.
The teachers struck because they had
not received salaries this term and
some had money due from iaat term.
The Lehigh Coal and Navigation
Company, the heaviest taxpayer in
the district, has come to the rescue
by paying $ 12,000 in taxes and the
State has forwarded 110,000 in ap
propriation.
IN MEMORIAM.
Tn remembrance of Airs. Annie Lyon*,
who departed this
1916.
life December
Daughter and Son*
Bip i
p M 8 j! y c ,ia vXw D T m ïr
S 0 n w ^*iX;, f0 a r ^ r ;r v ! e 0 n r ds W ^ ,, ;L
^ÂmÏkiÏÂm.':
.. , nn Saturday morning,
at 9 .,0 « clock. Requiem mass
bt. Francis He Sales Church. at
«clock. Interment a- v'»rh»drrl
DAYETT—Near '«Rasf ow.' net, ^ n M j>c
oem'ber 6. 1922* William Thoms*
1 »nd^/rlends 'Sre inrittd ,?*Ä"
funeral service*, at h!» re»
'.irday, DwembS?*^ a °"1 o"c!oîk'
1 Intcrmlnt at iSalem cemetery.
1/0 >A lv--!n this city, on December :
Relatives"Ltd' friSSdi ara^nvU#"' Ï.
attend the funeral services, at the
( «sidence of her aon-ln-law, John
<l«y aftemooif'nt'^'VclocIc ^InTer
mem at Rivervie
DAWSON—In Norristown, P.i ,'on D» -
l cember 3. 1922. Joseph E. Dawson,
husband of llattie .Moore Dawsoi
age« 6o yes re.
. Members of OooJ
Mill Council. No. 38. Grand Unite!
Order of St. Luke's and friends er«
Invited to attend the funeral #er
vices, from his late residence, «77
Orange 6treet, on Thursdav after
noon. December 7. at 2 o'clock. Jn
at Mt. Olive cemetery.
WILSON—In this city, on December 6.
1922, George H. Wilson, husband of
Irene Wilson, aged 62 years. P.ela
tlves, friends and members of Dla
mond State Lodge. No. 2, Knights
or Pythias are invited to attend
the funeral from his late residence,
801 Wilson street, on Friday a/ter
noon. December 8. at 1 o'clock. Ser
vices at A. U. Church, at 2 o'clock.
,, J»î«>;™ent at Mt. Olive cemetery,
McELWEE—In this city, on Decem
ber 4, 1922, Margaret G. McElwe«
aged 80 years. 4.,
friends are Invited to
Relatives and
. , _ attend the
funeral services, from the residence
of her son. Frank McElwee, 1884
W Eleventh street, on Thursday
afternoon, at 1.30 o'clock.
Inter
»"fnt at R ed Clay Creek cematerv.
ORA1—Suddenly. In this city, on D*
c*»mber 3. 1922. Margaret J. B., wif*
of the Hon. George Gray. Funeral
«erviee* will be held at her ]*:«
residence. 13Î7 Market »treat,
Thursday. Decemher 7. at 12 o'clock
Interment private.
noon.
W illiam E. Haines
UNDERTAKER
(Graduate Emlmlmer)
S. W. Cor. 24th and Market Sta.
Phone 573.
GEO. M. FISHER
Estât»
Undertaker and Embalmer
Telephones: 1160-1840
Office and Residence
722 KING STREET
Executrix
_
Marshall H. YeatlTJail
Undertaker and Embalmer
Successor to John B. Marti
OFFICE: 81# WASHINGTON »I.
Telephone 13.
CARTLEDGE
Call222 for Flowers
New Location, Tenth and Oranga
Sta. Open Evenings.

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