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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, December 22, 1922, LATE NEWS EDITION, Image 16

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I
THE
SKYLINE
;
OF
Spruce
.
h/ SdisonJtanhallr
6&IQ -Litti«,Biown t Company
&
STlvoPSta
Freed from prison because he «uf
TfEV DARBY^avSi for the Tuga Riv-l
er with
IfeRA MfLVU.DE. an old friand, to
"r^XKrof a^U^iafml
«I&mLmeY^lITSSo'' hid written
' -on his death bed for his brother Ezra
T-to come. ... . , ,
^ow?,£ T R^B^4 JÏÏ 8 ° "
y jwA v hevikwaT, plan to steal the
Melville claim before Ezra can « r
mm fro. .
DCTL beautiful daughter of
« ~ SeUBon. la loved by Ray Brent, but
£^ahe detests him. yjjen -J*?!
" Ezra arrive In the north woods. 3>ar-!
1 *jij-'i memory suddenly is restored.*
J; On the way to Snowy Gulch, Ben and
it Ezra meet a frontiersman who tells
« « Ezra that the Xeilson pang Is al
- ready at the Melville claim. Keep
"*'ing this knowledge from Ben. Ezra
suggests that Darby go to Snowy
#'.Gulch to call for Fenrle. pet of Hiram
' 'Melville. Ezra goes alone toward
'„.his brother's claim. At Snowy Gulch.
Ben calls for Fenria and finds him to
be a wolf who has Just broken loose
and is about to aprtng upon a
to standing in his patchwnv.
seems to poeaess some secret power.
over the wolf and succeeded in quiet
u ing him instantly. Beatrice Xeilson.
the rescued girl, travels with Ben to
J, Join her father. On his arrival at
the Yuga River, Ben can find no trace
of Ezra, ao he calls upon Fenrls to
it aid him tn the search.
"He'a nay buddy, old boy, and 1
want you to find him for me," Ben
w»nt on, more patiently. He
searched his pockets, drawing out at
loot the oopy of the letter Ezrnm
had given him that morning, and,
.beoause the old man had oarrled It
for many days, It could still con
vey a message to the keen nose of
the wolf. He put It to the animal's
nostrils, then polrrt/0 away Into the
darkness.
Fenrls followed ths motion with
his eya«; and prssent his long j
body stiffened. Ben watched him,!
Jasotnnted Then the wolf «niffed at j
the paper again and trotted away j
into the night.
In on* leap Ben was on his feet j
following him. The wolf turned J
onto, saw that his master was at hie !
heels, and sped on. They turned up
a slight draw, toward the hillside.
: Fenrie halted at the edge of a
distant thicket. The oold sweat
Ben's forehead, and
•prang ont on
he broke Into a headlong run.
he oalled, a ouriout
throbbing qnaltty In his votoe. "Are
you there, Els? It'« m
Together, the man and the wolf
they crept on Into the thlokeL They
hâlted at last before a curious!
shadow In tha slivered oovert. Ben
knew at once he had found hta an
cient oomrade.
t He and Eiram had their last!
laugh together. He lay very still,
the moonlight ensllvertng his droll !
kindly face—«leaping so deeply that
"Bznem!'
Ben."
,no human voloe could ever yawned
'darkly at his ample
■» For a long time Ben eat beside the
'Sead body of hts old oounaelor and
«Mend es a child might sit among
"(lowers
His mind began to work olear
«»gain; ha began to understand.
* Ezram had been shot, murdered
*bg the men who had Jumped his
JClalm.
HI» mind naturally fell to Hiram's
ppartlng advlto to him. 'Tvs only
tent one decent place to keep things
jmfe, and that ain't so allsflred da
on
The mateii craoked, Inordinately
goud in the «llanoe. and his eyes
föllowsd the script. Ezram had been
Aattbful to the hist:
,To Whom It May Concern:
* In oaae of my death I leave all 1
.die possessed of Including my
Arother Hbrsun'e olalm near Yuga
..River to my pard and buddy, Ben
■fearby. , *
„ejnt" the old man had told hlm. "I
.always put 'em down my bootleg,
between the sock and the leather. If
As ever get ehuffled off, all of a aud
'flipn, I want you to look there care
ir 1 "
J . Still with th# same deathly pallor
be crept over the dead leavea to Ez
afcm's feet. His hands were perfect
djr «Wady ns he unlooped «be laces.
;*ce after another, end quietly pulled
'off the right boot. In the boot leg,
Juat as Ezram had promised, Ben
und a «orap of white paper.
«U He spread H on hie knee, and
-raided It with ears. He felt In his
(Pocket tor a match.
Ezra Melville.
»"The dooument was as formal ae
J3zram oould make It,
etflly drawn aeal. and for all Its
ftaalnt wording. It was a will to
irtbnd m any courL But Ezram had
nor been able to hold hl« dignity for
long. He had added a postscript:
Son, old Hiram made a will, and 1
guess I oan make one too. I Just
found out about them devils that
Jumped our claim. I left you back
,'ABere a* the river because I dldnft
' want you taking any dam fool risks
tjjl I found out how things lay.
• I Juat got one thing to ask. It
get them. My

with a car«»
l
them devils get m
life ain't worth much but I want you
to make them pay for the little It J«
Never stop .till you've done
worth.
It.
"Fenria,
FenrisI'V he breathed
"we've got t omake them
we must not stop till we're done."
> It was more than
bad the quality of
pay. And
was asleep
moonlit
a command. It
a vow.
. . And now.
they knelt, eyee looklag into eves,
* -was like a pagan rite in the
o!#nt world.
an
PART TWO
Tile Wolf Man
CHAPTER VIII
•' - The Olalm Jumpers
. -As a wolf might plan a hunt in
'■he forest, Ben planned his
lySbl 1 * 5 !. Nellson and
nartes.
war
hl« subordl
He knew perfectly that he
T)B't not attempt open warfare.
•ft was not his aim to give his foee
be least chanoe to fight back.
^ best way of all, of course, was
» strike indirectly at them, perhaps
ihjough some one they loved. Soon,
)»chnp«. he would see the wa y.
JVnd when Beatrice
Nailer:, stole down
.'ftfiofe rail and Joined his men.
:
the
t I've brought news," ho «aid.
, "What's your news?" Hay's voice
harshenod, possessing
quality of grim levity. '1 guess old
HJram> ^mher hasn't come to life
again, has he?"
'That'» what I came to see J™
about tonight. INeilson paused, for
the sake of suspense. "Beatrice
"P tonight, as agreed, end «he
had a prospector with her—and he
knew old Hiram's brother."
He doejm't seem to be a close
*
a certain
frletvd of thie old man; he Just seams
tio have met up with him at the
. 4 _. . .
river, and the old man steered him
up hetre. He aeked me wheTe the old
man's claim was. and said he want
ed to go over and see him. He was
taking Hiram's wolf and his gun up
to hlm. I told hlm I hadn't heard of
the claim, that It must be farther
Inside, and I think I put It over
There'« one thing we can do—'and
that quick."
"And what'« that?"
"Start Chan off tomorrow to the
office In Brad'leyburg and record
this olalm In our name«. We've
waited too long already."
"Ray. you're talking like a man
now," Nelleon agreed. "You and X
stay here and work away, Innocent
a« oan be, on the j^lm. Chan, put
that bottl« away and get to bed.
Taka the trail down first thing to
morrow. Then we can laugh at all
the prospectors that want to come."
Soon after the break of dawn Ben
put hl» pick and shovel on hl«
shoulder, and leiaurely walked up
the creek past Ray's cabin.
The vivid morning light only re
Hi
vv
■it
.V
v"W>
\*fi
«

3
B 1
/'
imp
y
*n
je| > tfSr-'H
Eznun had been shot, murdered
by tbe men who had Jumped his
claim.
vealf< i ,he crime In more dreadful
detail.
Slowly, laboriously, with little out
ward sign of the emotion that rent
his heart, he dug a shallow grave.
Ha threw the last clod and stood
looking down at the upturned earth.
"Sleep good, old Et." he murmured
in simple mass for the dead,
what you said."
Ben worked his way down through
the thickets toward Jeffery Nell
son's cabin. The river flowed quiet
ly here, a long, atlll stretch that af
forded safe boating.
He suddenly drew up short at the
sight of a light, staunch canoe on
the open water. It was a curious
fact that he noticed the craft Itself
before ever he glanced at its occu
pant. He realized that this boat that
afforded him mebns of traversing
this great waterbody, certainly
should be a factor in the forthcom
ing conflict. The boat bad evidently
been the property of Hiram
vine.
Then he noticed, with a strange.
Inexplicable leap of his heart, that
its lone oocupant was Beatrice Nati
son. His eye kindled at the recog
nition, anjl the beginning of a smile
flaahed to his lips. But at once re
membrance came to him, crushing
hlB Jw a * t* 1 ® h8eI crushes a tender
fl « w ®r. The girl was of the enemy
camp, the daughter of the leader of
'the triumvirate of murderers. While
Bh ® berself could have had no part
in the or,mB . Perhaps she already
had S" 11 *? knowledge of It, and at
,e " t she ' rÄ * of h#r fBth ® r ' B hBte<1
blood.
He must stimulate friendship. He
lifted his hat in answer to her gay
signal.
With sure, steady strokes she
pushed the craft close to the little
board landing where Ren atood. She
reached up to him. and In an Instant
was laughing—at nothing In particu
lar but the fun of life—at his side.
The man glanced once at Fenrls,
spoke In command, then turned to
the girl. "All rested from the ride, I
see." he began easily. .
"I never get tired." she responded.
She glanced at the tools 1n his arms.
"I suppose you've found a dozen rich
lodes already this morning."
"Only one." He smiled, signifi
cantly, Into her eyes. Because she
•Til do
Mel
wns n forest girl, unused to flattery
the warm color grew In her brown
cheeks.
"And how was paddling?
The water looks «till enough from
here."
"It's not as still a» It looks, but
It Is easy going for a half-mile each
way. If you aren't an expert boat
man. however—I hardly think—I'd
try It."
"TVhy not? I'm fair enough with
a canoe, of course—but It looks safe
as a lake,"
"But It Isn't." She paused. "Listen
with those keen ears of yours. Mr.
Darby. Don't you hear anything?"
Ben did not need particularly keen
ears to hear; the far-off sound of
surging waters reached him with en
tire clearness. He nodded.
"That's the reason." the girl went
on. "If something should hippen —
and you'd get carried around the
bend—a little farther than you
meant to go—you'd understand. And
we wouldn't see any more of Mr.
Darby around these parts."
His eyes glowed, and he fought off
with difficulty i great preoccupation
that seemed to be^jtayling over him
(Continued In our \nt Issue.)
L
The Old Home Town
By Stanley
I
)
TOO lateT'»
THE- MAIL \
IS CLOSED 'J
HEAD QUARTERS FOE XM7AS C/FFS
i'.- COAL SCUTTLES -FoLL/NÇ P/UT—
g SAVVAS// TUBS - PERFUMES -
~ COCONUTS A NO SUSPENPEES
a HEUTi FCM e»KirII Atom« taaos
i THlS LETTER. IS
GO IN ' EVEN IF
I HAVE TO FLAG»
THAT TRAIN
MYSELF"
- I
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NEVS/T. ( X.
SHES- ,(
AREARity JL v \x\
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WHAT
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WHO IS
AUNT I
SARAH J
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ffXA fTOVTCf
AUNT SARAH PEABODY WAS FURIOUS Today
WHEN STATION AGENT DAD KEYE'S CLOSFD
UP AND TOOK THE MAIL POUCH TO- THE
station an hour before twe fast
mail was Dug- _
\
JACK DAW'S ADVENTURES
BY ELTON

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SEA fERVK E
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Suddenly the elephant grabbed one of them and tossed him Into
the air. The little hoop landed on the floor of the cage and bounced
right up on his feet again. "Why, they don't aeem to mind being
thrown around," said Jack. "No," replied the trainer, "they never
mind what happens."
"You see," he continued, "that's because they are the little Don't
Olve-a-Hoops, and nothing ever bothers them." Then Jack saw the
Hoopland camel coming down the road. He was told to climb on Its
back so he could rest up and ride back to the Honorable Heeza Hoop'«
house.
Unlike all the other hoops in the land, the camel traveled on foot
instead of rolling along. This was because he was made of two hoops.
Instead of one, and he never could keep the two rolling together.
"And now," said Heeza Hoop, when they arrived, 'You must prepare
to leave." Continued.
$ALE$MAN $AM
A Community Present
BY SWAN
•this is mohahLV th' lmt Time, i'll cuts A
tt non MAIN 50 l Think TUKT IW>Te *0 OF THE. J
FOLK* tWH EkXbK. dad A CHKDTna* TOE5S.KT WE. I
(KLL OO&HEK CHIP m PWO 60S HIM a rebl A I
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MX RlfeHTTHEN
WE'LL TaH.6 UP THE— |
COLLLCTiOH RIGHT NOW
AND GO Tt> TOWN MID I
BUT NlM SODE- '
TH-NG. - WHAT J
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FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
A Shattered Idol
BY BLOSSER
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Helen Goes the Limit
DOINGS OF THE DUFFS
BY ALLMAN
NOW. MOTHER IS GOING DOWN Town \
j I TO GET DADDY'S CHRISTMAS PRESENT/^
AND ) WANT YOU To 0E A?
, Good Boy and mind oliYIA^^
I OR 1 WON'T TAKE You OVER
^ TO SEE OUR. NEW HOME -
. /
VES,HELEN - I SEE-GET
YOUR BANK BOOK OUT OF THE
TOP DRAWER OF YOUR DESK
AND SEE WHAT YOUR. BALANCE " ! |
IS- I 5EE - YOU WANT TO -jf fj KjHl
F1N0 OUT HOW MUCH YOU ) bf PM |l
HAVE IM THEBANvi- J HI 1 '®
, ALL RIGHT WAIT
LN. A MINUTE
I'LL BET YOU'LL BE GLAD
WHEN YOU GET IN YOUR
NEW HOME - HAVE A BIG
VARD TO PLAY )N - HAVE
A NEW ROOM TO SLEEP
IN - HAVE A LOT OF NICE
BOVS AnDGIRLS TO PLAY
WITH-A- OH THERE'S
—l_, "THE PHONE? P
f HELLO, HELEM, I FounD^
f IT - YOU HAVE A
r BALANCE OF NINETY
5EVEN DOLLARS AND
5DCTV.CENTS- SPEND IT
" ALL ON HIM - HE'S WORTH
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4
THE ONE-MAN WOMAN
If Dan Could Tell
By Ruth Agnes Abeling
I.
SYNOPSIS,
gedy
the life of
of all cam« aud
' Tne greateat tra

KATE) WARD, the girl who had been
destined to walk ln tragto path«. In
her youth she ran away from home
after a misunderstanding with her
i mother. Then camo life In the big
! city, her love of
DAX WARD, her marriage to him, hie
• death and- finally her return to the
! home of her childhood. Her mother,
»he learned, was dead. Kate settled
down to care for her old father.
JUSTIN PARSONS. Then the other
woman appeared.
CHINATOWN ALICE, who declared
that Dan Ward waa the father of her
I child.
ICate Ward gazed at the girl, fas
cinated by the grotesque effect of
j her bravado and her childishness.
I Then her eyes turned to Dorothy
jand lingered there. *
Dorothy was beautiful. Small of
I frame, well rounded as to legs and
j arms, brown of eye and hair, with a
delicately lovely mouth. There was
j something strangely like Dan about
her, Kate thought; there was the
same odd combination of spirituality
and daring. Kate had loved that in
Dan. The child brought it all back
too plainly. The sight of her opened
the old wounds and set them throb
bing afresh.
"Chinatown Alice," she echoed,
scaroeiy hearing her owh voice.
"Chinatown Alice," the girl re
peated and then laughed. There nas|got
no mirth In the cackling sound,
I simply a rattling end Jarring of vocal
tones.
"And what—did you want me to
do?" Kate questioned, "did you want
me to—to take the child, keep her?"
falterlngiy.
"But I couldn't do that, you
know," Kate found hot*self rushing
"I couldn't—oh, I couldn't!"
Her hands over her eyes, shut out
the sight of little Dorothy, who still
sat on the lounge and watched the
two women with wide, wondering
eyes.
on.
/P
%
r
1 »
in all the world!"
&
#
0
"Oh—Dan—Dan, If yon could
only oorno hack and tell me about
It!"
}
'Take her!
broke In. 'Take the only thing I've
Take her!" Alice
"I may be a Chinaman's woman," j
bitterly. "Maybe there Isn't much :
that I care for any more, or much of !
a show for me, but—I'll keep mv |
child!
"There are other things you could j
do',' her voice had lost its fury and |
her thin, white face was wistful. "If |
I had a little money I could send her
to a nice school where she could
take lessons and learn things I didn't
have a chance at.
"And she could «till be with me j
nights," she added.
Kate Ward oouldn't remember !
how the Interview with Chinatown
Suddenly she found
Alice ended,
herself upstairs in the little room
under the coves—the same little
room which had known her sorrow
twelve year» before—and there she
gave way to her grief.
• ■Oh—-Dan—Dan," she was talking
aloud, "if you could only come back
and tell me about it—I understood
it all while you were here—all of the
other people blamed you for
and knew you
heart—but this,
I can't—I can't live on
memory of yçu is gone now.
things
—I understood you
weren't untrue at
oh. Dan,
even my -
I can't cherish it—knowing that—
cared for someone else.
stood high in the
rain-wash? I
you
Outside, the sun
The little,
heavens.
bathed In golden glory.
The grass
cottage was
There were no shadows.
in the strong light, swayed
The
brilliant
slightly in a gentle bn-eae.
heaven-kissing pines were scintii
Nature
as at peace.
under the eaves
lant.
But In the room
Kate Ward suffered.
Finally the door was pushed open
A hand lay lightly on her shoulder.
To Be Continued )
(Copyright, 1982, NEA Service)
BIBLE THOUGHT
FOR TODAY —
I Bible Thoegbt, owmoiH.fd. will pro». » j
i! pitoS« baittae in elW r««

e
THE GOD OF PEACE:—
Now the God of peace, . . .
perfect in every
make you
good work to do hi? will.—
Hebrews 13:20, 21.
QUESTIONS
and Bible Answers
What are some of the leading
of a real
1
li If Parents will etjeotiraz« chikîrsnto took tip jg
Ï and memorize the Bible AnsRe^.it wiuprov* g
j|apriceless bentage to them ir after Tcar, J|j >
characteristics
Christian?—Psalm 13:1-5.

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