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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, January 03, 1923, LATE NEWS EDITION, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1923-01-03/ed-1/seq-8/

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'AEL CABATim
NEft SEDVICKjsa
©PAR
At'«*
SYNOPSIS .
CAPTAIN BLOOD, physician and ad
venturer. Ip convicted, unjustly, on
a charge of treason
James of England. with Jerem>
Pitt, a yotina ahlpmaater, he 1« eent
and guardian of Arabella Blah op
who 1« as sweet and beautiful as her,
uncle It ugly and vindictive. Blood
te given an unusual" degree of free
dom when he successfully treats Gov
ernor Steed and his wife for Illness
They fetched from her hold over
a score of English seamen as bat
tered and broken as the ship her
self. and together with these some
half-dozen Spaniards, the only sur
vivors of a boarding party from the
Spanish galleon that had Invaded
tho English ship and found Itself
unable to retreat. These wounded
men were conveyed to a long shed
on the wharf, and the medical skin
of Bridgetown was summoned to
their aid. Peter Blood was ordered
to bear a hand In this work, and
partly because he spoke Castilian—
and he spoke It as fluently as his
own native tongue— partly because
of his Inferior condition as a slave.
he was given the Spaniards for his
patients.
With the assistance of one of the
Negroes sent to the shed for the
purpose, he was In the act of set
ting a broken leg, when a deep, gruff
voice, that he had come to know
and dislike as he had never dis
liked the voice of living man, ab
ruptly challenged him.
"What »re you doing there?"
"I am setting a broken leg." he
answered, without pausing In his
labors.
The Colonel delivered himself In
a roar. His long bamboo cane was
raised to strike. Peter Blood's blue
eyes caught the flash of M. and he
spoke quickly to arrest the blow.
"I am acting upon the express
orders of Governor Steed."
.... . .
"Governor Steed! he »choed.
Then he lowered hi* cane, swung
round, and without another word to I
Blood rolled away toward the other
-v.
Waa standing at the moment.
It was two days latsr when the
ladies of Bridgetown, the wives and
daughters of her planter* and mer
chanta paid their first visit of char
!ty to the wharf, bringing their gifts
to the wounded seamen.
Again Peter Blood was
ministering to tho sufferers In his
care, moving among those unfor
tunate Spaniards whom no one
heeded. Rising suddenly from the
re-dreaslng of a wound, he saw to
his surprise that one lady detached
from the general throng, and was
placing eome plantains and a bundle
of succulent sugar cane on the cloak
that served one of his patients for
a coverlet. She was elegantly dress
ed in lavender silk and was follow
ed by a half-naked Negro carrying
a basket.
Peter Blood, stripped of his coat.
• the Sleeves of his ooaireo shirt rolled
to the rtbow, and holding a bloody
; rag In his hand, stood at a gaze a
moment. The lady, turning now to
confront him, her lips parting In a
smile of recognition, was Arabella
Bishop.
"The man's a Spaniard." said he.
in the tone of one who correct»« a
"misapprehension, and also tinged
never so faintly by something of the
derision that was In his soul.
The smile with whleh she had
been greeting him withered on her
She frowned and Flared at
him a moment, with Increasing
haughtiness.
"So I perceive. But he's a hu
man being none the less." said she.
That answer, and Its Implied re
buke, took him by surprise.
"Tour uncle, the Colonel. Is of a
different opinion." said he, when he
had recovered.
She continued to stare at him.
"Why do you tell mo this?"
"To warn you that you may be In
curring the Colonel's displeasure."
"And you thought, of course, that
I must be of my uncle's mind'"
There was a crispness about her
voice, an ominous challenging spar
kle In her hazel eyes.
Td not willingly be rude to * lady
even in my thoughts." sold he.
But the lady was not satisfied at
"First you Impute to me
Faith!
there,
afl
manlty, and then cowardl-
For a mun who would not willingly
be rude to a lady even In his
thoughts. It's none bad."
Her
boyish laugh trilled cut. but The note (
of it jarred his ears this time.
He saw her now, It seemed to him
for the first time, and saw how he i
had misjudged her.
"Sure, now. how was I to gu
that . . . that Coonel Bishop oenld j
have an angel for his niece?" sold •
he recklessly, for he was reckless '
as men often are In sudden peni
tence.
"You wuidn't. of course
should'nt think you often
aright." Having withered him with
that and her glance, she turned to
her negro and the basket that he.
carried. From this she lifted now
th* fruits and delicacies with which
It was laden, and plied them In
such heaps upon the beds cf the six
Spaniards that by the time she had
so served the last of them her bas
ket was empty, and them was noth
ing left for her own fellow-country
men.
Having thus emptied her basket,
she called her Negro, and without
another word or so much sa ar.crth- j
^ Sr g.ance at Peter Blood, swep; cut
; 3f the place with her head high and |
? ~:hin thrust forward.
Pater watched her departure. I
Then he fetched a sigh.
CHAPTER VI
Plans of Escape
After thst Arabella Bishop went
dally to the shed on the wharf with
, gifts of fruits, and later money and
of wearing apparel for the Spanish
? prisoners. But she contrived eo to
:lme her visits that Peter »ood nev
guess
u
er again met her there. Also his
- own visits were growing shorter In a
measure as hla patients healed.
One day, whether by accident or
L
*
SL. .
1 design, Peter Blood came striding
h -, f hn „.
down the wharf a full nail hour
earlier than usual, and so met Misa
. • ..
Bishop just Issuing from the shed.
He doffed his hat and stood aside to
j, 6r she took It, chin
* * / * **
in the air, and eyes which disdained
to look anywhsro where the sight of
him was possible.
As he was leaving an hour or so
later, Whacker, the younger of the
other two physicians, Joined him—an
unprecedented condescension this
for hitherto neither of them had ad
dressed him beyond an occasional
and sturdy "good-dayl"
"It you are for Colonel Bishop's
I'll walk with you a little way, Doc
tor Blood." arid he.
Dr. Whacker drew closer to him
as they stepped along the wharf. He
lowered his voles to a confidential
tone,
starting out over the sea, your soul
In your eyes! Don't I know what
you are thinking?
escape from this hell of slavery, you
could exercise the profession of
which you axe an ornament as n
free men with pleasure and profit
to yourself.
"How often have I not seen you
If you could
Lower still came the
voice until It was no more than «
whisper. "It Is none so far now to
the Dutch settlement of Curaono.
At this time of the year the voyng*
may safely be undertaken In a light
craft. And Curacao need be no
more than a stepping-stone to tho
great world, which would lie open to
you once you were delivered from
this bondage."
"I have no money. And for that
a handsome sum would be neces.
«ary"
Whilst Dr. Whacker was profes -1
sing that his heart bled (or a brother
dootor languishing In slavery. Peter
Btood pou nced like a hawk upon the Î
!ohv , OU( , truth. Whacker
co i, ea ^ |edNrtrM be rld of
thr#atenB<I t t h
and his
one
R ^ t u ^
I Blood laughed "If I should be
caught and brought back, they'd clip
| my wings and brand me for life"
"Surely the thing Is worth a little
rJgk7 - Mors tumuJous than ever
waB fhe twmpter's voice.
tragic mark upon the young seaman. I
His erstwhile bright alertness ws*
all departed. His face was growing]
vacuous, his eyes were dull and
lack-lustre, and he moved In a !
cringing, furtive manner. like an
over-beaten dog. But the man was
still there, not yet dormant, but
merely torpid from a surfeit of des
pair; and the man In him promptly
shook off ^hat torpidity and awoke
at the first words Blood spoke to him |
-hat night
"Escape?" he panted. "O God!" I
'He took hi* head In his hands, and j
fell to sobbing like a child.
Among ths privileges enjoyed by
was that of a hut to himself.
a-d they were alone In this.
iConflnued In Our Next Issue)
'ISurely," Blood agreed,
asks more than courage
imoney. A sloop might be bought fori
twenty pounds, perhaps."
"It shall be forthcoming. It shall
be a loan, which you shall repay us
—repay me, when you can."
That betraying "us" so hastily re- j
trleved completed Blood's
standing. The other doctor was also
In the business.
They were approaching the peo
Qulckly, but
expressed his
knew that no
"But It
It asks
under
pled part of the mole,
eloquently, "Blood
thanks, where he
thanks were due.
"We will talk of this again, air—
tomorrow," he
concluded.
"You
have opened for me the gates of
hope."
He was In haste now to be alone |
Also he must consult another. Al
ready he had hit upon that other.
For such a voyage a navigator would 1
be necessary, and a navigator wasj
ready to hla hand In Jeremy Pitt. As
a result Blood was betimes that j
evening In the spacious stockade
that enclosed the huts of the slaves |
together with the big white bouse of
the ovebseer. and he found an op
portunity of a few words with Pitt,
unobserved by the others.
"Tonight «-hen all ars asleep,
eome to my cabin. I have some
thing to say to you."
The six months of plantation life
In Barbados had made an almost
woke and wept.
'k
QUESTIONS
and Bible Aniwert
a ;neea«M ctmMtgn to the» \r *ner veer« I
Does God deal with us after our
sins?—Psalm I0S:8-I2.
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A
! The Old Home Town
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JACK DAW'S ADVENTURES
BY ELTON
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The peculiar sights were very Interesting to Jack. In fact. Mldget
vllle looked like a toyland village, with Its little streets and tiny
houses and stores. "How would you like to have so:-: ling to eat?"
asked one of the midgets, as they came to a bakery. That would be
fine." replied Jack.
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P^'' YB A SERVIÇ«
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Flip barked loudly when Jack was handed a loaf of bread. Ho.
too was hungry, and when a midget tossed him a bone he swallowed it
whole. Jack's loaf of bread was the size of a bun and Flip's chop was
like a tiny morsel of steak. "We'll have to have a lot more of these,"
said Jack. Continued.
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Jack had hardly started with his little load of midgets, when one
of them shouted, "You'd better slow down or we will be arrested for
speeding." This made Jack laugh, for he waa only walking. Of
course his long steps made the little wagon travel fast. Soon the town
proper waa reached.
FRECKLES AND HIS FRIENDS
A Lesson in Physiology
BY BLOSSER
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SALESMAN SAM
Sam Treats Him Rough
BY SWAN
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DOINGS OF THE DUFFS
No Chance for An Argument
BY ALLMAN
Z HOW DO YOU DO - SAY,
How much vntL rr cost
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GOODS PROM HXCZEL AVE,
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4
THE ONE-MAN WOMAN
KATE FINDS ALICE
By Ruth Agnes Abeling
SYNOPSIS
KATE WARD, following her husband*«
death, returned from the olty to the
village of her childhood to care for
her widower father.
JUSTIN PARSONS. To their cottage
came
CHINATOWN ALICE with the story
that Kate's dead huaband,
DAN WARD, waa the father of Alice*«
child.
DOROTHY. Later came the new« that
Dorothy was very 111 and Kate left
home to visit the laundry of
PINO LOT. with whom Alice
determine what ought to be done for
the child. Sing received her and
beckoned her to a room at the rear
of hla ahop.
lived, to
At a door which opened Into a
dimly lighted room, Kate was left
alone.
Sing Loy had disappeared.
Kate peered In.
The small .windowless enclosure
was walled on four sides by heavy
embroideries on a scarlet back
The bed was canopied and
ground.
draped In brilliant satins, heavy with
still more brilliant embroideries. On
a small, satin-draped stand was a
high, fancifully ornamented pltoher,
from which long pipe stems Issued,
There was just one chair in the
room—a small, straight-backed af
fair In gold leaf.
From the scarlet satin draplngs
of the bed rose a figure. A feminine
It advanced.
figure.
"Alice!" Kate was startled by the
sound, though it was her own voice, j
"Yes!" defiantly, and then: "Te«."|
In a lower tone half apologetic, half]
caustic.
"Have you time to talk to me
now—or are you busy?" Kate asked.;
"Oh, I've got time," flippantly.
"What I don't do now I can do some
other time—I wasn't sold on the
block, you know!"
"How Is Dorothy?" Kate queried.
"Took her to the hospital today."
There waa still a defiant note In her
voice. "That's why I'm here. I'd
be out working If It -wasn't for that.'',
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"Do you know what It Is?" Kate
She was curiously affected
Kate's tone was
From the «onriot enfin drapngs of
the bed pose a flgnre.
asked.
by the. knowledge that little Dorothy
had taken a turn for the worse.
"Lungs," dully.
"Lung trouble?
anxious.
Alice nodded.
"Oh—I Irnew It was coming,'' she
said at Isngth. "This wasn't any
place to bring a kid up. Wet cloth«
Steam. No air. Look at this place!"
Alice's hand swept the gorgeously
satined enclosure.
"It's pretty near got me," she
"Worked here five years.
went on.
Other girl» been here about three]
years. Don't know their name* even!
One of 'em called Pearl. Got twel
kid«, ehe supports 'em—man's gone]
I guess. She's never told us—Uneven
told us what his name was.
"She's just pearl.
"I'm just Alice," continued the!
blond girl. "We lose the rest of our|
names when we begin Ironing shirt
and underwear hero.
"And I guess It's Just as well that!
we do she added listlessly.
Kat« Ward was silent. She studied
the girt—frail and blond—against
her scarlet satin background.
At length she spoke:
'•But you're—youTe hla wife,
aren't you?" she said.
Alice stared at Kata
"His wife—whose wife? Sing
Lioy's?" something of the old bravade
In her tone.
Kate nodded.
"Wlfel Wlfel" Alice laughed,
"Hell, no."
(To Be Continued)
(Copyright, 1922, NBA Service.)
JUST A MOMENT
DAILY STRENGTH AND
CHEER
Complied, by John O. Qulnlua
(The Sunshine Man).
Now, O man, cease a little while
from thy work, withdraw thyself
from thy stormy thoughts, forget
thy weary and burdensome strug
g'ing. give thyself for a time to God,
and rest calmly In him.—Anselm.
The beloved of tho Lord shall
dwell In safety by him; and the
Lord shall cover him all the day
long.—Duet, rxzlll. IS.
Through the day thy love has spared
us;
Now we lay us down to rest:
Through the silent watches guard
us;
Let no foes our peace molesti
Jesus, thou our guardian bei
Sweet It Is to trust In thee.

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