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Evening journal. [volume] (Wilmington, Del.) 1888-1932, January 20, 1923, FINAL EDITION, Image 13

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042354/1923-01-20/ed-1/seq-13/

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i
SPORTS
"Tum nt lb«' diamond (tunic ho won
Ida fame.
The ••strike" ont king himself,
was he;
At bowllnif lu» should have been a
star, hut
Not even a spare could he see.
Itrave and ••lion" hearted lad was he,
A truly "catty" Buy.
Bnt when It came to basketball
lie didn't have the eye.
7; (F
A)l
..
(
r
' S- *I !T
im
W}
wS
-M.
It
l&ut LM.ÏÏS
vgy y
t uv°oii » -oatie/K-* Dv LVAKiS
Greatest First Year Pitcher I Ever Saiio

EX-DOM do recruit!
pitcher» enjoy a
big season In their
first year In the
majore.
Rarely does a
■•rookie" break In
as a regular in his
first year. Usually
he alts on the
bench the greater part of the season,
t occasionally filling In as a relief
pitcher in a game that seems lost.
Herman Piliette of the Detroit
team of 1922, was one of the few ex
* options to the rule. I'illette came
to Detroit In a deal with Portland,
whereby the Tigers secured Pitchers
Johnson and Piliette. Johnson was
*• reckoned as the star—Piliette as the |
w recruit with promise.
Conditions on the Detroit team
* last year were Just the reverse.
Piliette was the outstanding young |
pitcher of the major league.
*•, won 19 games and lost 12. Date In
the season ho seemed to be suffering
;
:
■ i
He
i hit from overwork and wasn't quite |
so effective.
Piliette had a big year, so did j
Charley Robertson, of the Chicago
. «'hits S»*- who achieved undying
fame with h.s no-run-no-hit game,
in which not a player reached first.
„ Pete Donahue, in his first complete
year at Cincinnati, was the b'.g noise
among the young pitchers In the Na
.
While the work of this trio of |
pitchers mentioned was high-class, j
still I can recall no recruit pitcher j
* who made such a sensational debut j
or enjoyed so big a season as did
Pitcher Harry Krause, with the ;
> Athletics in 1909.
In 1908 the Athletics finished sixth
with aepercenlage of .444. Just three
points in advance of Washington,
' that finished seventh. In 1909, the |
Athletics surprised the baseball ;
« w orld by finishing aecond, com - 1
pletely upsetting the expert dope.
. tlinal
As unexpected as was the «bowing
of the Athletics, It was no more so
than the pitching of Harry Krause,
I umpired in a great many of the
games pitched by Krause in the
> spring and I want to go on record
LAUREL HKiH BOYS
AND f.IRLS BOTH WIN
»
Special to The Evening Journal.
LAUREL, Jan. 20.—The Laurel
High School boys' basketball team
defeated the SelbyvlUe High boys.
61 to 21 . last night, whlls the girls'
trim of laAiirvl High defeated the
The line
. Solbyvlll* girla, «9 to 2 .
ups follow;
4
BoyV Score.
—Goal
Field Foul Pts.
t IaiuppI
Elllortt. F .2
Oordy. F. ....
* Ellis. C.
Wootten, O. ..
Hitchens. O. .
pusey, F .
Callaway. F. .
4
0
0
12
.. <
0
:■ :
9
..14
.. 3
.. 0
.. 0
.. 0
0
0
0
0
"
0
Wolfe, O.
Chipman, F. .
Wright. F .0
p
..
•. 0
0
0
0
61
... .26
Totals . ..
—Goals—
Field Foul Pts.
Sclbyrllle
Beechnian, F. ..... 6
*| Todd. F .
Robinson. O. .
Day. O.
. Long, O.
' * Hill. F .
Rogers, O. ....
Lewis, O.
15
3
2
0
.. 1
2
0
.. 1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
. i
0
0
... 0
0
0
0
21
3
Totals ...
Girls' Score
I
—Goals—
Field Foul Pts.
"
?
0
Laurel
. R:gg!n. F .18
* * E. Lowe, F .2
B. Lowe. C. ..
James, ß. C. ,,
Hastings. O.
Ralph, O.
39
3
«
. 7
0
.. 5
. 0
0
0
I
?
Totals ...
69
....32
5
Goali
Sclbyrllle
# IlTrlckson, F . 0
>.) Rogers. F . 0
... 0
... 0
Field Foul Pts.
i
i
1
McCabe. C. ...
Baker, S. C. ..
» Hudson, O. ..
Morris, G. ...
0
0
0
0
n
... 0
0
• î
*
Totals ...
... 0
2
Changeable effects In taffeta in
^ colors, with gold and sliver, are
favored for the bouffant dance frock
with plain bodice and full skirt.
*
Oh, Pay!
v. j
S|x»rtlvartnsr "itli the flvmn
Hal. marks took nnoth«*p kih!
<lon drop liiKt night. Anil what
• a flop!
"!>clr!m< % iifnl" Doelze*, high
HWjtmnt of the Tiger?». Him half
. champion« of the City Howling
Ijengue, hit n cool hut lowly
even hundred in the flrnt game
of the match with the Wild
Cali
nql the Sal unlay Evening
jl Post variety—nt McKee's alleys
last night.
No doubl Sergeant Von Der
Doelze eoulil sing you "Asleep
in Hie Deep." with many liill
iilitita but the fact Hint lie hit «
v mean Hill Is iiorthy of note any
old time. Marks made a splen
did recovery »ml lie almost
mode .Vm even with the slight
1 4M» start.
t
t
IS
4
* ^ s fll'l
<A V
%
a ' Fh
\)
f •
\
I
un f r
<r r
SSta
sWJL
r 4
y
Pi
pjtclier work better,
his great work was largely Instru
mental in keeping the Athletic. in
the race.
Krause made his debut May 8
J909. In a game against Washington.
and ab ut out his opponents, winning'
j to 0 . Ho won his second gome by
The critics began to sit up end
take notice, and continued to do so
f 0 r some time, as Krause won his!
first 10 games, the most remarkable
winning streak ever staged by a re-1
emit In his major league debut.
Six of the victories were shutout»/
Only five runs were made by the
opposition in 10 games. Three of
the victories were scored at the ex-;
pense of Detroit, pennant winner the
preceding year. St. Louis finally
beat him In 11 Innings.
'game did Krause allow more than
He acted like
a veteran from the very start and
the same score over Chicago.
In no one
six hits,
1 Unquestionably. the first year
debut of Southpaw Harry Krause
rates as the most unusual I ever
saw—it Is unique in major league
clrclqg.
,
i
i
!
« V 1 RJ IW JL I IIH
;
9pf
.
2 *
!
l£ 22 SjUM
•el
Well how's everybody after
When It come« to enter-.
party?
talnlng, we'II say Dave is one hun
dred per and some to throw in. a
regular bomb shell of fun.
Mrs. Definbaugh and family.
(they could put that little word "Wel
come" to shame.
And as
for
make you feel that way. ;
The amusement for the evening !
constated of various games, such as i
paas the plate, spin the handker - 1
(chief and others
It was unneces
sary to have It on the door mat to
too to
mention.
Dancing also a few selec-1
tlons on the piano by our old stand
by "Leatherette Cloudy It music)
Is a sin. don't a.k us about him. he|
ought to be ashamed. Charles Daw
son and family were present. Ot
"Charlie" was somewhat
having to neglect official
Mr»,
course
worried.
duties to attend. Mr. and
Schweizer did not attend due to the
Hlness of their son.
Ths last party was given at the!
home of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Ware.
on Wednesday night and a good
crowd was there even though several
wore absent due to sickness. '
The party was sure a success.
Naturally, how could it be otherwise,
with our friends Mr, and Mrs. Ware.
and helpers at the helm.
"Big Bill" and "Geo. the Come-j
dlan," tried their luck on a "Harp."|
but the energy required to manipu-j
late It, seemed to get th« best of
them; thougii they held out long■
enough for a member of the party
to exhibit a few of the modem dance
The usual games were play
steps.
ed. as none has been able to bring
forth any new. ones that could takej
their place.
The "Midget," was one of the)
main attractions of the evening, bc " ;
"ling a funmakcr of note, and the !
smallest rider of our organization. ;
Luncheon was served and of course ;
missed that part of the en
It would be a viola-j
rules and regulations, 1
no one
tertalnment.
lion of our
considering what a spread it was.
Cloudy gave out toward the last
the surprise of all present,
worry he won't be that way for long.
Don't
HIGH GIRLIES
WIN OVER FRIENDS
Wilmington High School Girls'
basketball team found llttl« or no
opposition in the Wilmington
Friends' School fair fossers yester
day afternoon In the High School
gymnasium. The Cherry and XVhlte
lassies won by the lop-sided score
of 38 to 4.
Friends' School was held without
a field goal during the entime time
of play, the four points being the
result of foul tosses. The greater
experience, coaching and excellent
team-work of the High School tex
tet stood out at all times and the
ball was In the possession of the
Cherry and White nearly all of the
time.
( Railroad companies compel semi
annual eye examinations for all of
1 their trainmen.
DOVE« IMS
Til NEW CASTLE
—.
Speedy Inter-Scholastic
Cage Game Goes to Fish
town Boys
McKNITT STARS
WITH 19 POINTS
] Special to The Evening Journal.
NEW CASTLE. Jan. 20—The
I Dover High School varsity baeket
j ball team, came to town accompa
nied by rootere and fans. 200 Strong
last night Intending to cop the first
Inter-schoiaetlc game from the local'
1 five. The returned home aadder
but wiser, carrying the short end of'
a 23 to 15 score. During the first
half It was nip and tuck. McKnltt,
captain ,and center of the local con
tingent. who has been out of the
fame for two weeks, starred with
i 19 points, 13 of which were made
j from the 15-foot line. He miseed
only 3 out of 1* tries tor points
j from this line. Hayes, center for
i Dover, starred for the visitors with
It was the most hotly
,__ . . .
«»ntemsd game seen on ho Armory,
! and refereed a fine game. The
score; .
:
j MeKnitt. f • . 3
Leach, f ...
j Kerns, f ...
I King, o ....
McKnltt, c .
Wilson, g ..
Berry.
Totals. 5
Dover High
Maloney, f .
Helm f .
(Dally, f .
McVey. f .
g points
Now Castle
Field Fouls Pts
13
19
.. 0
.. 1 ,
.. 0
0
0
0
2
~|
13
0 1
2 j
J }
0
0
.. 0
.. 0
0
0
0
2
2 i
... 1
0
g ...
13
0
... 0
... 1
... 0
... 1
0
o
0
Haye«, c .
Wright, g
«
8
0
1
1
Hock, g .
0
0
»\
Totals ....
Score by halves—
New Castle .
Dover .
... 4
7
1 «
IS
23
8
7
15
SALISBURY TAKES WALLOP
Special to The Evening Journal.
SEAPORD. Jan 20 —Seaford ba«
ketball team handed Salisbury, cage
men a severe Jolt, Thursday night, at
Thompson's Auditorium hère, 53 to
The Salisbury quintet was out
played at every angle of the game.
Goal«
Field Foul
17.
Senfonl
lyowden. forward ... .10
Pts.
i
21
Marvel, forward .... 6
the(Krahe. centre . 6
Goodling. guard .... 2
Rolhrock. guard .... 2
0
12
n
12
0
4
o
4
Pts.
2
2
9
4
01

17
Totals
26
53
1
Goal«
Field Foul
Salisbury
Boggs, forward . 1
Porter, forward
Downing, centre .... 4
»ones, guard
Benson, guard . 0
0
1
0
1
7
0
0
Totals .
8
1
Referee—Carpenter.
• "
NEIGHBORHOOD STUMBLES.
»••»hborhood was forced to ac
cept a drubbing from the hands of
p enn A. C In the N. H. L. P. Cage
Teague last night at
hood House. 42 to 26.
night for Penn A. C. In basket shoot
Score:
the Nelghhor
It was a big
!ng with 20 two timers.
Penn A. C.
P- Bullen, f
)-P Donnelly, f ...... 8
3V. Bullen, c ..
Elwood, g ....
A. Donnelly, g . 1
Field Fouls Pts
.. • 1 11
0
18
... 5
0
18
«
0
«
3
1
Total
20
2
42
Neighborhood
Paradise, f. 4
Viscount, f . 1
DlSnbltlno c .
Carbone, g ...
Tartagilo. g . 0
Brank,
Field Fouls Pts
2
10
0
2
.. 5
1
11
.. 1
3
1
0
0
n
0
0
g
. , , , .. „
a Church League basketball game
in tbe Second Division last night at
Cookman gym, 22 to IS. The game
hard-fought but the Presbyter
Ian* held sway at most stages.
Score:
Total
Referee—Wills.
11
28
4
WESTMINSTER ON TOP.
Westminster defeated Eaatiake In
Field Fouls Pts.
T>. Blake, f. 3
Olower, f.
'Dursteln. c
W. Blake, c . 1
TrH)It, s ....
ft
0
... 0
0
0
3
0
8
6
:
... 0
1
0
2
Jones, g
22
9
6
Total
KaMlake
Field Fouls Pts.
... 1
... 1
Slirllth, f ....
Clemo, f .
Jones, c .
Townsend, g ...
Middleton, g . «
2
0
7
5
4
. a
o
0
.. 0
o
0
IS
0
(
1
Total
Referee—Conoway.
RODGERS TO MEET CAMPO.
Roche
(linger ho» been signed to meet Pedro
Campo the Philippine at the Adel
phla A. C.. Thirty-ninth and Market
streets. In Philadelphia, next Thurs
day night, according to "Diamond"
Lew Bailey, matchmaker of the club.
The bout Is billed for eight rounds,
the semi-windup on the card. Rodg
ers is considered one of the hardest
hitting men In his class.
Rodgers, Wilmington fist
Coir hoy Fighter Seeks
Chance to Show Fistic
Wares in New York
f \
UP
■ 11
I »'V;
|
I
|
j
I
I
*
Æ
*
l
l
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J
1
I
f
I
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Cowboy Bill Williams, Welterweight lighter, on Hie Mount, "Snowball."
■%
r
M
». é-.
m
«
l
■V
f
*

*
tes. *
I
*
tb
X 5
iîL.
Presenting Bill William», cowboy
the
William. hails from Malden.
Okla., and seeks to display hla fistic
wares before the critical New
Yorkers.
The cowboy flsrhter made hla New
York entrance in a most dramatic
He rode down Broadway
welterwelghter fighter from
plains.
manner.
to Madison Square Garden, where
I
I
I
Umpire Springs New
One — I oca I Jn terference
National
League umpire, who worked in the
Paclflc Coast last year, is nothing if
not original.
Byron. like the late Tim Hurst,
stands out as one of the characters
of the game. He Is different.
They do say that he can dig up
more technicalities than any other
umpire In the business.
For a time Byron worked In the
International League Jack Dunn.
owner and manager of the Boston
Bill Byron, former
club, tells this one about Byron.
Dunn was coaching at first base.
The batter with two out and three
on. hit a high foul fly to the first
baseman. Dunn kept backing away
with the first baseman, who was
pursuing the ball, trying to create
the Impression that he was making
every effort to get out of his way.
At the Same time Dunn kept yelling.
"l It!"
plays.
- - - ■ - r
ill O / P FT f
/#OW »V ll flCTPr r ClVCPfl
1 UL IMUJt'l I fllLi U
Umpire to CatI Game
"The funniest situation I ever saw
staged on the ball field, happened in
Cleveland back In 1908 or 1907." says
Charley O'Leary, now assistant to
Miller Huggins at New York.
"I was playing shortstop for De
trolt at the time. When the game
started It looked like rain. Cleveland
made three runs In the last of the
fourth. It looked as if we were
beaten and of course we decided to
play for rain.
"Billy Evans was doing the um
piring. In the first of the fifth it
started to sprinkle and we started
to do everything possible to delay
the game and annoy the umpire.
"Evans refused to be annoped,
and when our side was finally re
tlred It was raining pretty hard,
That made it a ball game and we
were anxious for Bill to call it.
" 'Nothing doing.' hs replied, 'you
boys enjoyed yourself so much the
last inning. It's a shame to deprive
you of your fun.'
"We played the next three innings
in a driving rain. There was no
■H
3

"J
•=
BANCROFT LEAGUE
EVEREST
. 171 167 184— 522
. 190 1 66 188— 541
. 154 167 186— 507
. 186 155 120— 4SI
. 190 179 158— 526
Dillon ...
Smith ...
Mahoney
Wood ..,
Stewart
ISt— 2 M 0
Totals . 891
FOLDING ROOM
* ti
159— in
143—. 472
173 — ,snî
160— 293
120— 429
. 125
. ik:. n:
. 171 155
. 155 173
Wolff .
Foster
Ferguson
Booth ..
Blind ...
Blind ...
Totals . 77S 783 756—2261
i
. 154 155
.125 ...
KENTMERK
. 171 142 164— 477
. 166 182 137— 485
. 187 165 159— 511
. 189 195 185— 569
172 228— 626
. 135 18« 199— 5«ft
. 158 187 184— S«9
. 172 173 193— 538
«93 »8 782—2173'
Lynch ...
Kanz ....
Baldwin
Chappell .
Totals . 713 684 «45—2042
OFFICE
Bamberger . 228
Fisher ....
McKelvey
Jamison ..
Totals
he made known Ms desire to meetj
any welterweight in the country.
The entire Journey from Malden.
Okla., to New York was made on hi.
mount. "Snowbail "
William, has been assured »hat
he will he given a chance ,to .how,,
at the Gaj'den Just aa soon as he
reports himself ready to step Into
the rln*, which ought to be within
the next two weeks.
I GÖT »T
[
|
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I
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I

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-U
The fielder finally permitted Dunn
to lake it. feeling some other player
on his side was trying to maks the
catch.
Dunn's great surprise hs heard By
ron call the batter out.
"What for?" Dunn asked.
"Interference," replied Byron.
"WHst kind?" gald Dunn.
"Vocal and on your part " replied
Byron, and It went, thereby adding
The ball fell safe, but to
r
I CA /
\
v
f
MAN
MU
|
I
j
chance of either side making a run,
i
|
j
"Finally. Herman Schaefer, now
. dead, borrowed a raincoat and um
j brella from a fan and appeared at
| his position at second In that re
r
* c '
w\
s
k
\
1 »
Evans let on he enjoyed the rain and
was deaf to our entreaties to call It.
galia.
"He was the funniest sight I ever
j
; saw on the bail field, raincoat but
Î toned high up. umbrella in one hand,
! "That was too much for Evan
^ he called it."
giove on the other.
i
1
ENGINEERS DEPT.
112
144— 249
197— 4<1
154— 511S
154— 478
Sutton
Miller . 133 191
Ferguson . 185 172
Gibbons . 153 169
Totals . 595 514 589—1798 Î
FINISHING DEPT.
. 118 15« 189— 473
.158 17? 177— 505 ;
. 208 245 208— ««I I
. 133 173 152— 458
Wrlls . .
I Mahoney
' -brome
Booth ...
I
I
Total.. 6.5 718 ~708—2097*
CITY LEAGUE
i
I
I
INDIANS
.... 147 179 186— 512
. 17« 182 173— 535
. 150 19« 176— 516
.... 16« 188 2 « 6 — 634
.... 118 186 189— 493
.... 12 12 12— 38
Booth .
Smith ....
Jacobs ...
Kanz .
Stillwell ..
Handicap
Totals ....
McGInniss ..
Oreensteln .,
Galhreath ...
McCall -
757 937 9(2— 2*4«
ELKS
.. 147 125 183— 445
.. 155 158 193— 606
.. 170 187 151— 5«8
.. 18« 14« 191— 491
LOVELL POLES
SALLIES THKOIGH
Camden Catholic High
School Loses by One
Point
AI <sD TPM IMPH
I KIUIVII PI
LOCAL RESERVES
Camden Catholic High threw a
scare Into the Saleslanum camp
in a Catholic High School League
basketball game in St. Joseph's
Hall last night, the Sallies winning
out by the proverbial whisker. 26
to 25. It might have been that the
Jerseymen were taken too lightly
after the easy victory the Sallies
scored over them In the fli t game
of the season on the Camden court,
The preliminary game between the
reserve teams was also decided by
one point in favor of Salealanum. 18
to 17.
The boys from the Vlctrola vll
lag» came within an ace of winning,
Joe Lovell's field goal in the last
ten eeconds of play being the Ufa
saver for the Sollies. After the
visitors began strutting their stuff
which was of a much Improved va
riety over that displayed at the
previous meeting between the teams
the game developed Info one of the
most brilliant basketball battle«
seen In a local cage this season.
Camden's passing waa of the
highest order, and only through
ability to cage long goals from the
field did Saleslanum manage to
emerge victors.
"Barf Sheehan, the speedy little
forward of the Camden tram, was j
w J th ° u ' " -loubt the individual star ,
° f ** w.!*«. m
/J"* k " f n ' hU tMm ln
th , work of sh „„y
nd <w> am „ p i e a , 0 od out promt
nently
For the Gold and
•-a let- .a nn m
Field Foul Pts.
Gillespie, forward ... 2
10
14
Grant, forward
Sheehy. cented
Kerrigan, guard
Lovell, guard ..
Fahey, guard . .
Battle, guard . 0
o
o
•>
...3
0
«
1
o
1
0
1
2
0
0
Totals
8
10
28
Camden Cathoiln
Pts
_I
Field Foql
J. Sheehan, forward.. 3
B. Sheehan, forward.. 8
Barry, center. 2
n
a
0
Hampton, guard ....
O'Neil, guard .
. 0
0
. i
7
Totals 1. 9
Referee—Ross.
7
25
Saleslanum Reserve« had to fight
to the last to nose out the Camden
Reserves.
This is th# first victory In the
Reserve League for the Gold and
White Juniors. Ed Conlin and Mc
Call showed best for the winners.
Smith and McLaughlin played best
for the Camden youngster»,
Saleslanum Reserves
Field Fouls Pts
Conlin. f.
McCall, f
0
McCardle. f. «
0
0
6
12
... 1
10
.
McGrath, g .
.
0
0
0
0
0
Lemon, g
1 «
Total
4
10
Camden Rc-crvcs
G. Smith, f
McLaughlin, f . 0
Barrett, f ....
Heusel. o . .N. 1
McNulty, g
J. Smith, g
' :
2
0
4
1
... 1
2
0
n
<
*
lit be
2
»
IT
8
8
Total
Referee—Harrington.
CITY CAGE LEAGUE.
Details for the second half of the
schedule of the City Basketball
league, which starts its final round
of games on Monday night,
arranged at a meeting of the league
In the Pioneers' quarters. Ninth and
Market streets, tomorrow afternoon.
The meeting will start at 2 o'clock.
125 137 178— 44«
Cralgue
767 757 «78—2390
Elks won roll-off of first game tie.
. WILD ™* r VTR
. 127 128 119—
. 16« 160 136—
. 162 175 184— 5<U
. 122 14« 143— 411
. 185 175 183— 523
, SO 50 60— 150
Totals
Sackett ■..
Pugh .
Whitehead
Horem ...
Ijunlen ...
Handicap
Totals . 812 832 775—2419
TIGERS
. 190 178 151— 819
Taylor ...
. 173 204 152— 629
. 100 199 193— 482
. 169 203 181—553
Carson ..
Doelze ..
Good ....
931 835—2553
787
Totals
KHVAMS
. 156 132 145— 433
.. 125 165 147— 437
. 158 148 127— 4.33
. 137 135 122— 394
. 18« 15« 127— 4«9
8 —
Totals . 770 744 «78-2190
DELAWARE CANOE CLUB _
. 203 170 181— 553
_ -j 7 n
156— 393
128— 440
Stein .
Souder ....
Homer ....
Harshman
Booker ....
Handicap
' '
"
1 alls
137
1*3
. 102 133
. 140 172
. 195 163
Ban* .
U*>ng .
Tot *'» . 776 855 ' 5, - : ' 65
168— 4J7
_j,
189— 519
142— 142!
BRAVES
.... 169 165 173— 497
.... 160 159
.... 135 14«
.... 144 130
... 202 148
Riley .
L. Howett
P Howett ..
Dale .
McKee .
Herpel .
Totals . «10 73 8 7 76—2323
SENATORS
. 179 124 203— 50«
. 137 13« 142— 409
. 187 183 143— 493
. 133 132 114— 379
. 192 147 169— 509
. 19 19 19— 57
Pieros ....
Butler ....
Drukker ..
Nesblt ....
McCall ...
Handicap
947 71» 790—2352
To'als
INNING
$ *r &■
m> y*
Wl T HH
feu AR PEL
'
By HENRY U. FARRELL
(United Press Sports Editor)
NEW TORK, Jan 20.—(United
Pre "> — Major league club owners
.„»y b e taklbg » dangerous step in
{ puctlng into force a plan by which
; no players will bo aent to non-draft
leagues unie* they become subject
In substance this means, for In
stance, that the New York Yankees,
in dealing with the San Francisco
club of the Pacific Coast League
for a etar plyer, would offer 310,000
cash and four players valued at
120.000,
One of the four players trans
frrred might develop into another
i Kamm or O'Connell, but by the
j terms of Ihs deal, he would be sub
Ject to the draft and ho would have
to be passed on to the majors at
the draft price,
This It a mild form of what
"Squire" Ebbrts, the Brooklyn phil
anthropist, meant when he «uggest
ed •'retaliation" two years ago as
a means of breaking the draft dead
lock.
Instead of breaking the determin
ation of the non-draft, leagues to
go their way independently, the ma
jor leagues In the drastic measures
may cause the three big Class A
l> agues to withdraw entirely from
tftelr agreement with the majors.
and the International League are
not In the same position to become j
The Paclflc Coast League does not
need much more persuasion to cut
loose from the majors and operate
independently a. a
,h " r °"'
major league
Such intentions
were suggested by the far western
club owners at the last meeting of
the mlnrs In Louisville
While the American Association
Sport Tabloids
NEW YORK—Twelve
directors
for the richest golf club In the world
which Is to be opened at tbs Creek
! nn k° n E Island, next summer, have
been named. They are: Vincent
Astor Frank Longfellow Crocker.
I Marshall Field. Harvey D. Gibson,
[ Edward S. Harkness, Richard Howe,
„(Charles B. McDonald. J. P. Morgan,
Herbert L. Pratt, John
Clarence H. klackay
Payne Whitney, all
a. res.
NEW
D. Ryan,
and Harry
mullt-milllon
T OltK—Gene
Saraxen.
world golf champion, will be per
mitted to compete Jn the British
open championship next season. It is
understood.
HThe BriarcIifiTe Lodge
club, which refused him permission
Will reronsider its action, it is said.
Nr,'"' YORK—"Haven't heard a
word about t." Dan McKetrlck. east
ern representative for Jack Demp
sey, said today concerning the re
port that a London syndicate had
offered Dempsey 3200,000 to meet
Joe Beckett.
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y —Joe
Atlantic
Moore, middle
skating champion, established
world's record for three-quarters of
a mile when ho covered the dte
lance In 2.02 2-5 against time.
amateur
a new
I
I
COLUMBUS KNIGHTS
LOSE ON SHORE
Special to The Evening Journal.
CHESTERTOWN, Md.. Jan. 20.
Washington College defeated the
Knights of Columbus of the City
Basketball League. Wilmington, Del.,
here last night by the score of 47 to
27. Intercollegiate rules handi
capped the Wilmington aggregation
somewhat
The score at the end of the first
half was 22 to 16 with Washington
on the long end. The Collegians ex
tended themselves In the final period
to pile up their count. Score;
K. of C.
Field Fouls Pts.
Quinn, f .
Shields, f .
Lovell, c .
....Magill, g .
McCarthy, g ...
2
1
o
2
1
0
5
7
17
... 3
8
0
0
... 0
Doherty, g . 0
0
0
o
Total
7
27
10
Washington College
Field Foula
Pts.
8
Dumschqot, f. 4
u
19
Oordy, c .......
Johnston, g ....
Carrington, g . 2
12
.. 6
0
0
. 2
4
0
4
47
7
20
Total
Referei
meet tomorrow morrning In the Pio
ncers' quarters. Ninth and Market
(streets, at 10.30 o'clock. All man
agcra and captains are requested to
be present. A committee will be ap
pointed to secure a suitable trophy
-Brennan.
CATHOLIC LKACil'E M KITTING.
Tho^CatholIc Indoor League will
to bo presented to the champions of
the league.
RESERVES TO MEET
City Basketball
League will meet tomorrow after
noon at Brownson Hall, Fourth and
Jackson streets. All managers a; e
requested to be present at 2 o'clock.
1 1 — ■ —
If you have no room In your
kitchen for scrub palls and buckets,
and do not wish an old-fashioned |
sink closet, have a lattice work with
door, built beneath the sink and
dralnboard. Paint to match the
j
The Reserves
kitchen woodwork.
I
independent
League Is In good shape to go Its
way alone.
Pract'cally all of the valuable
ba n p i ay6r , , ra now be ing develop
Ptl on lhe weHt , r „ CO a»t, and if the
Paclflc coast magnate# deolded
kepp , hrm thay could „
rPa , maJor w i t h patronage
that would enable them to pay big
league salaries.
the Paclflo Coast
to
With few exception« no good play
ers are being turned out by the
American Association, and very few
are being developed In tbs Inter
national Leagus, while the Paclflo
Coast circuit is practically supplying
nil the new blood for the major
leagues.
Some idea of how strong the coast
is becoming can be obtained by
glancing over the Hat of former
Paclflo Coast players who are now
in the big leagues which Includes
such good players as the Meusel
boys. George Kelly, Hack Miller,
Jimmy Caveney, Louis Fonseca, Sam
Hohne, Jimmy O'Connsll, Willie
Kamm. Zeb Terry, Dave Bancroft,
Arnold Statz, Bill Cunningham,
Ralph Couch. Whiter Schmidt. Harry
Heilman, Dutch Keuther, Jimmy
Johnston, Charley Hollocber end
others.
Major league magnates refer mors
and more to the sad condition which
prevents a ball player from rising
In his profession by a transfer from
the minors to the majors.
They do not figure that ball play
ers care little In these days for glory
and that money Is the first consider
ation.
Moat players would rather play
for good money in the minors, where
their responsibility la le* and their
duties not so exacting, than go to
the big time.
HIGHS' SMOKE
ENVELOPS W. C. H.
,
,
LOCal Five StCDS OH GaS Ifl
Last Half of Cage
Play
i
1
SOL I ON VISITORS
IN FIRST INNING
After being held to a doss count
in the opening period, Wilmington
High opened the throttle wide In
the last half and made a runaway
afftilr of It with West Chester High
In the local gymnasium last night,
34 to 11. The Cherry and White
gave the Invaders plenty of respect
at the start and played mostly on
the defensive. The first half ended
with the locals on the lead by the
slight margin of 9 to T.
Wilmington hit a fast stride In
the final half and the result was not
long In doubt. cFour points were all
the boys from up the Concord pike
could garner In this period while
the Cherry end WhKs cagers
whipped tha cords for 23, complete
ly outclassing the boys who hold
three straight wins over the locale.
Two field goals wer« allowed West
Chester' during the entire game in
comparison with the 11 for the Ash
tonlan aggregation. of which
Johnny Roman tossed seven.
The clever playing of Roman In
the second half was mainly re
sponsible for the big lead enjoyed by
Ashton's cohorts at the end of the
game. The little speed merchant
displayed a brilliant article of the
passing game, beside his uncanny
shooting. McLear proved to be the
best scorer for the Weot_ Cheater
combine.
Wilmington
—Goal
Field Foul Pts.
18
12
Llchensteln, forward— S
Roman, forward ..
Fletcher, forward .
Richards, center ...
White, center .0
Stirhth. guard
Fianzer. guard
14
0
7
0
0
0
0
1
0
o
0
0
0
0
0
12
84
IX
Totals
West
—Goals—
Field Foul Pts
7
7
0
McLear, forward
Brinton. forward
Nider, center .. |
Chalfon, guard . 0
Bennett, guard ...
Lige, guard.
Davis, forward ...... 1
Mercer, guard.0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
. 0
0
0
0
2
0
0
. 2
7
11
Total. ...
Referee, Gallagher.
Fight Results
BOSTON—Johnny Dundee, Junior
lightweight champion, won a t.a
round decision from Pepper Mar
tin. New York.
NEW YORK—Carl Tremaine,
Cleveland bantamweight, knocked
out Mike Ballerlno. New York, who
.ubstltotod for Johnny Curtin. In
the second round,
TORONTO—Teddy Joyce, Toronto
bantamweight, knocked out Phil
O'Dowd, Columbu«. In the fourth
round.

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