OCR Interpretation


The evening times. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, January 29, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042373/1906-01-29/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

i».j
YAOE TWO
CHURCHES
CONVENTION OF THE
T1U ONE OF
ITEREST
I
Fair Attendance Marks. Event
and Interesting Discus-
1
sions Follow.
BANQUET LAST EVENING
At DHVIH Hall ut WliU-li Many ltril-
6, Itant Toasts W«ri (Jivon
pfoi l»y S|M'ltliTS.
*THE ('HOICK OF A WIFK"
at Rev. I-'. K. K. tllllrr. Who
(Tomblnnl Wit. WNiliim nud t'lo-
qiienee lu III* Itemnrkn.
5 lOOtt Kx«ciilivf ConiniiHt'e.
Agricultural College Oliver
Dynes.
Fargo College—Mr. Houghton.
University— E Rogers.
The second annual convention of the
«tudents' department of the Y. M. C. A.
rf North Dakota, which was conclud
ed last evening alter a two-days' ses
sion in this city, was one of unusu:il
interest and fair attendance. In view
ol the fact that this is hut the second
convention, the attendance and inter
est was all that could be desired. The
best possible spirit prevailed and all
the delegates returned home with the
feeling that the meeting lias not been
in vain.
The session which closed yester
day's program was the banquet at
Davis' hall at the university. The
sessions were opened today with a
quiet hour service at 9:30 o'clock at
the Y. M. C. A. building led by Al. T.
Kennedy, the North and South Dako
ta secretary. It was. a meeting de
serving of its name and proved that
Mr. Kennedy is a very successful lead
er of such meetings.
The next number on the program
was the address by W. M, Parsons,
secretary of the international commit
tee of the Y. M. C. A. The address
was one of great interest and of a
helpful nature to the people who
would get in close touch with the
spirit and inner life of the Young
Men's Christian association.
The rally held at the First Method
ist church at 4 o'clock and addressed
by Mr. Parson, was one of great en
thusiasm. The men's 4 o'clock meet
ing was adjourned and all met with
•the students and the male public gen
erally at the Methodist church.
Parson's address was appropriate and
well received.
The day was closed with the meet­
mm.
mmm
''•stoi
ilLil
ing at the Presbyterian church and
an address by Mr. Parsons. The
church was well filled and Mr. Par
sons addressed an intelligent and re
sponsive audience in a manner which
greatly pleased those in attendance.
1
Mr.
HAVING
Saliirilay KrrnlnK'a Smxlun.
The banquet at Davis' hall at the
university was the one social function
of the convention, but it was ample to
meet all requirements and the "U"
contingent did themselves proud.
More than 100 guests sat down to a
substantial and elborate dinner in the
spacious dining hall of the ladies'
dormitory and enjoyed "a feast of
reason/and a flow of soul." After the
things which cheer and sustain the,
inner man, the toastmaster. Prof. \V\
M. Bryant, called the guests to order
and a number of after-dinner speeches
of a most happy nature were indulged
in.
John A. Johnson, chairman of the
convention and student, of the univer
sity, responded in a most happy man
ner to the toast, "Our Guests." The
response was made by A. G. Gorgan
of the Kargo college on "The Open
Doors." He felicitated (irand Forks
and'the university and the Y. M. C. A.
generally for the warm welcome the
delegates had received and the suc
cess of the convention which was be
ing held.
Uev. Frank K. H. Miller responded
in his most happy manner to the toast,
"The Young Man's Choice of a Wife."
He succeeded in a most admirable
way of mingling wit, wisdom and elo
quence. President Merrifield, M. T.
Kennedy and W. M. Persons responded
to their names with impromptu but
happy addresses.
At the conclusion of the banquet,
the guests adjourned to the parlors of
Davis' hall and enjoyed the festivities
of the nations, prepared by the ladies
of the dormatory. It was a unique
and interesting trip through the coun
tries of the world with their costumes
am.' mannerisms.
The United States, Germany, Nor
way, Iceland, Japan, Egypt and the
American colonies of 177G were all
represented, the latter were a little
gray. The Egyptians sold trinkets
and told fortunes. Each of the other
nations sold such edibles as are truly
representative of the country. The
girls were all attired in national cos
tumes.
A Study ok* (urea.
At the First Methodist church last
evening the subject considered by the
Epworth league at their meeting at
5:30 o'clock was, "Corea, The Prog
ress of Two Decades." The results
of the 20 years of missionary work on
that far-off island of the Orient was
reviewed and found to be most grati
fying. The lesson was one full of
inspiration anil missionary zeal.
and helpful sermon and was listened
to by a full church.
Baptist Aid "Society.
The Ladies' Aid society of the First
Baptist church will meet. Wednesday
afternoon at the home of Mrs. C. K.
Gargin, S7f pelmont avenue.
PERIL TO THE
CHURCH
From tlu* Questionable Ethical .Stan*
1
Secretary II. M. Tuttle of the Grand
Forks Y. M. C. A. responded in his
most happy vein to "Our Brother
hood." If there is any man in the
northwest who lives and breathes for
the association, it is Harry Tattle, and
his speech rellected his great earnest
ness.
1
Iter, lturns Preached.
I Yesterday at the First Methodist
church, the Rev. M. Burns, presiding
elder of the Grand Forks district of
the Methodist church, preached the
morning service. It was a practical
Furniture
been in the
furniture and piano
business for twenty
years in this city, we can offer
the veiy best in our several lines
and at prices that can not be
duplicated. Our connection
with one of the leading furni
ture concerns of Grand Rap
ids, the center of furniture
manufacturing business of the
country, enables us to give
prices lower than any other
house in the Northwest and
to make a specialty of furnish
ing hotels, homes and public
institutions, and to offer such
terms as to make it an induce
ment to buy from us.
Wholesale and Retail Fur
niture and Piano Dealer
thirds of Business Men Who Be­
came Famous
The Homiletical Review calls atten
tion to a growing divergence between
the ministers and the people on the
question of business methods. It
says, "Broadly speaking, today the
clergy of the country are far more
alive than the laity to the perils to
institutional religion which inhere in
alliance between men of wealth with
questionable ethical records and
agencies created to stand for spiritual
ideals. This is natural in view of tho
fact, that the clergy are not wrapped
tip in the meshes of a system which
I leaves few men free moral agents
arter they once get in the toils, hut
the fact is one which does not call for
a retreat of the clergyman .to the lay-
man's position, but a continual call
from the clergyman to the layman to
close the gap and ascend."
1
it is significant that the internation
al Sunday school lessons for this year
are upon the life of Christ, through
the whole twelve months: It is esti
mated that not less than 20,000,000
I persons will this year be studying the
life of Christ. Besides the regular
courses there are offered advance
series of lessons on the subject proni
inent among these are the courses of
the American institute of sacred, lit
erature, the Bible study union and a
course prepared by the Congregation
al denomination. The Springfleld Re
publican says in its religious depart-
1
ment. which is written from a rather
extremely liberal point of view and
is supposed to be under Unitarian in
fluence: "Out of this fresh concen
tration of thought upon Jesus ought to
come results large and far reaching.
The religious revival so eagerly 'de
sired will be hastened, for, as a dis
tinguished scholar has said, 'The way
to know God better is to know Christ
better.' The ethical revival already
here will gain in sweep and thorough
ness in proportion as Jesus' ideas of
righteous behavior are made to shine
forth before the eyes of" all the peo
pie." It is st question why the life of
Christ is not given a far greater pro
portion of time than lias been the case
in Sunday school instruction, especi
ally of children and youth. Three
fourths of the time should not lie too
much. That this has not been the case
is probably due to the notion that
all parts of holy scripture are some
how of equal value. The spiritual im-
pression of the life of Christ as re
corded in (he gospels is beyond coni
parison greater than that of any or
all other scripture, upon the minds
of the voting. While the church lias
indeed found the latter part of the
new testament indispensable in teach
ing what, the attitude of the believer
should be to Christ and His gospel
that teaching cannot be at all under
stood without the knowledge of who
Christ is as the object of faith and of
what His gospel is as learned from
His own words. Nor is it possible for
the minds of children and young peo
pie to grasp easily the thought of Paul,
for example, directly from his own
words. Nor can teachers be found in
most churches of sufficient training
to be able to teach other parts of the
Bible, except the first three gospels.
In these the personality and teaching
o. YOUNG
Kil®
1
O 4-t i'V??
THE EVENING TIMES, GRAND FORKS, N. D.
of the Master so dpmfhate all critical
and theological questions that any
person of deep religious experience
and sound judgment can teach the life
of Christ usefully if not adequately.
The joy with which thig year of study
of Christ's life is received should lead
to a much stronger emphasis upon this
part of the Bible for Sunday school
study.
in connection with the two hun
dredth anniversary of Benjamin
Franklin's birth, who is in some re
snects the greatest American, atten
tion is called to the creed which he
drew up before he was 20, as contain
ing "the fundamental points of ail true
religion." It comprises the belief in
the creative (tower and beneficence of
the one true God, who has a right to
our worship and service, in the im
mortality of the soul and in the jus
tice of that power which presides over
the soul's destinies. With' all respect
to Franklin and allowance for the re
ligious influence around him, how dif
ficult, cold and unsatisfying is this
type of religion compared with Jesus'
profoundly simple massage that God
is our Father. From that faith in God
as our Father grow life and social re
lations, comfort, strength and hope
that surpass infinitely anything that
can be derived from Franklin's creed.
It is because Jesus' gospel of God as
our- Father has been so corrupted and
overloaded, that men like Franklin
have been driven to creeds that do not
satisfy, while these creeds are yet
nearer to Christ's gospel than the hard
theologies which the churches have
often taught.
All Are Invited.
On Friday afternoon, February 2,
from 3 to 5 o'clock the ladies of the
W. C. T. U. of Grand Forks will en
tertain the missionary, societies of all
of the churches of the city at the
church parlors of the Baptist church.
An elaborate program will be carried
out, which will consist of music, mat
ters of interest to the missionary so
cieties. and a delicious lunch. A
large gathering of the ladies inter
ested, in the work of missions is ex
pected.
Sacred Literature Institute.
The Sacred Literature institute will
assemble tills evening at 8 o'clock for
the first post-holiday Bible lecture.
Prof. Vernon P. Squires of the uni
versity will speak on, "Paul's Last
Visit to Jerusalem and the Appeal to
Caesar." The meeting will be in the
church parlors. An especial effort
will be made to enroll a large num
ber of new students this evening.
Large Primary Class.
The First Methodist, church had 78
children in the primary department
yesterday. The Sunday school of the
church is growing rapidly, especially
the primary department and the
young men's class. The latter is
making a special effort at the present
time to reach the 100 mark.
Baptist Prayer Sleeting.
The prayer meeting of the Baptist
church will be held as usual this
week in the church parlors at 7:30
o'clock Wednesday evening. The sub
ject will be, "Jesus Ambitious for His
Disciples."
Subject at the 1. E. Church.
The subject for the midweek pray
er service at the Firhtshrdluho„nup
er service at the First Methodist
church Wednesday evening at 7:30
^^/TTH the beginning of the new year we wish
to announce that we are prepared to offer
special bargains in
FURNITURE
PIANOS
ORGANS
Sewing Machines, Musical In
sir
ments, Draperies, Carpets, Talking
Machines and Records
clock, (is "Consecration in Service,"
Isa. 6:1-8.
Large
The offering made by the First Bap
tist cnurch of Grand Forks for the
Home Missionary society, has amount
ed to $121.65 to date. Another $50 is
looked for by the pastor.
Civil Service Examinations.
A Scries of Opportunities Mill He
Given to Grand Forks People
to Enter Service.
Among the examinations to be made
by the Grand Forks department of the
national bureau of civil service are
the following:
On Feb. 14 an- examination will he
held to secure, eligibles from which to
fill the position of printing machinery
machinist for the bureau of engrav-'
$3,400. in this case no educational
test will be required and experience
will be the chief factor. Applicants
must be between 18 and 40 years of
age.
An examination will also be held on
Feb. 14 to secure eligibles for a posi
tion as engineman in the quarter
master's department at FortfMcKinley,
Maine, at a salary of $1,000. The ap
plicant must be 20 years of age or
over and be able to handle engines and
electrical machinery.
On Feb. 21 an examination will be
held for the position of plant patholo
gist for service in Porto Rico, at a
salary of $1,200.
On Feb. 21 an examination for the
position of statistical expert in the
geological survey at $1,200 per an
num.
On Feb. 21 an examination for the
position of nautical expert in the hy
drographic office at Washington, at a
salary of $1,000.
On Feb. 21 an examination for the
position of assayer and ore dresser
expert in the geological survey at
$1,000 per annum.
On Feb. 21 an examination for the
position of grinder of sections of
rocks for microscopic study in the
geological surveys at $40 per month.
Feb. 21, examination for the posi
tion of inspector of grazing in the
forest service at $2,500 per annum.
On Feb. 21, examination for the po
sition of draftsman in the surveyor
general's offices in several different
states at a salary of $4 per day.
Full particulars regarding these ex
aminations may be obtained from Jas.
Dunlop, secretary of the board, at the
postofflce in Grand Forks, and blanks
for applications for examination will
be supplied on request.
A Good Story.
A correspondent of the Churchs
Ferry Sun has the following story of
one of the families of Penn:
Deacon Hans Anderson and good
wife have much rich land and a larsru
slock of oattl and horses and are rich
ts was tu*ob of old, who had, we know,
twelve sons, and. indeed, richer, be
t-aiise their twelve children consist of
boys and girl!, healthy, robust, enter
prising, intelligent and upright sueh
as to make up the best members of
society. The oldest boy is in the IT. j-?.
navy, being an efficient ilreman on the
steamship Maryland, now in New York
harbor, and John E. and Andrew at th's
time are attending the Grand Forks
Commercial Union college. Last sum
mer the Anderson boys caught three
small red foxes and raised thorn in an
old well covered wagon box, and sold
them alive a few days ago for $12.
hese boys are so much richer for thev
save their money, as all boys should.
Little ads—"Positions Wanted"—
either male or female—no matter
where you live—are inserted one
week free of charge.
125-127-129 So. 3fd St.
Grand Forks» Worth Dakota
Vvik VY'J l£'
ST
$*»&&
CONCLUDED
HEARING
Testimony Taken in tjic Pine pilnt
fane In Chicago—Time of Taking
Defense's Testimony Sot Xsmed.
Hie taking of testimony for the
paint manufacturers In relation to the
uuustitutional questions raised "in the
hearing on the application for an in
junction restraining the enforcement
of the pure paint law has been con
cluded in Chicago and Food Commis
sioner Ladd, Mrs. Jessie Conover and
Attorney Watson have returned home.
The time and place for the taking of
testimony orithe questions for the de
fense has not been stipulated as yet
but the date which will probably be
agreed upon is February 5 and either
St. Paul or .Minneapolis will be the
place.
The hearing at Chicago was before
Mrs. Jessie Conover who was appoint
ed special master by Judge .Amidon.
Mr. Watson represented the defense.
The witness called by the -paint
manufacturers were Dr. Dudley, ex
pert chemist for the Pennsylvania
Railway company, Mr. Toch, of the
firm of Toch Bros, of New York, and
the division manager of the Patton
Sun Proof Paint Co. The witnesses
testified that sublimed^ white lead,
lithophone, western lead zinc, baryites
and chalk, when mixed in proper pro
portions, are as efficient if not su
perior to white lead and zinc in paints.
The claim of the paint manufactur
ers in seeking an injunction restrain
ing the director of the North
vDakota
government experiment station from
enforcing the pure paint law, was that
the measure was unconstitutional for
the reason that it provided for the use
of but four ingredients as paint pig
ments whereas other ingredients were
fully as good, and thereby certain
paint manufacturers were discrimin
ated against.
In order to decide the constitutional
question. Judge Amidon asked to
have the evidence on Ahe claim of the
paint manufacturers presented to him
when the matter is again taken up,
February 17. In the meantime a tem
porary restraining order is in effect.
FARMERS' CLUB FOR POLK.
Organization Will
Be Effected
MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 1906
Next
Wednesday.
Crookston Journal: Owing to the
delay in the completion of the new
school building on the Experiment
Farm at Crookston it will be neces
sary to hold the meeting of the Polk
County Farmers' Club on Wednesday
next, Jan. 31se, in the city hall at
Crookston instead of the experimental
farm as was originally planned. All
business men and farmers especially,
with their wives, are invited to be
present. The program following w^ll
be a discussion of practical subjects:
Program.
10:00—Organization and Plans for
Work. County Fair. A discussion.
Noon Intermission.
30_Wha, the School of Agriculture
Will leach.—Win. Robertson.
Clover and Timothy. By one who
has tried them.
l'-eedins the hens.—Gustav Walters.
Drainage.—S. W. Wheeler.
Feeding Prize Steers.—Mr. Lam
bertson of Warren.
Question Box.—Wm. Robertson.
The laboring man or woman who
wants a job can use the want columns
of The Evening Times free.
1
ing been' in business twenty
years we are justified in re
ferring to customers who have
dealt with us during all these
'years ajid are our best pa
today.^^^
Wholesale
and Retail
W. J. EftWARDS
•U
A*
ARCHITECT
Northwestern Bulldlnff, Grand Fork*, N.
Northwestern 'Phone 486-L
DR. J. GRASSICK
Office Northwestern Building
1
1
Corner peMera Avenu^ and Fourth Street,
..
'U ROLF BROTHERS
*£.
Makers of
HIGH CLASS SUITS FOR MEN*
Both 'Phone*
S
Office in Clifford Building:
it
•R. S. ENGE
ST.V
.V ATTORNEY and COUNSELOR
AT LAW
1
OFFICE: 28 CLIFFORD BLOCK 1
R. N. CAROTHERS %'A,
Attorrfey at Law
Natioul Ink BaiMinf
R. L. SMITH
1
Architect
I.
Both Pboies National Baak BaMis£ 'i''
JOSEPH BELL DEREMER
ARCHITECT
looou 7, 8, 9,10 ni 11,Clifford ABBCX
•OTH PHONES
619-M
GRAND FORKS, FET. D_
JOHN FAWCETT, M. A..M. D.
DISEASES Of WOMEN AND
GENERAL SglGEON
OFFICE
OVER STANCHWELDSTORE. TELEPHONE 361^
J.W.ROSS
ARCHITECT
aad SUPERINTENDENT OF CONSTRICTION
OFFICE
11-2SoitTH THIRD ST. GRAND FORKS. N. D.
The City Feed Store
5 DOWNEY & PFEIFER, Psora.
Flour, Feed* Hay and
Wood of All Kinds
N. W."'PHONE 636
TRI-SrATe 536-L
PIANOS
INall
the piano line we carry
the standard makes,
and because we are both
wholesale and retail dealers
are able to sell at prices not
available to others who hail
die these goods. We sell
no cheap grade instruments at
high prices, but the very best
in tone, Workmanship and fin
ish at reasonable rates. Hav-
both-wholesalers and retulera
and with our Grand Rapids connections
are able to supp^ outafche-city custom
ers with better pods 4t lower prices than
it is possible to get from small dealers.
JiV''
&
vi
2:1
I?
%'W
v» tx?:?
•Mv/i
-s
A,"*
J* t$tL
J'l.:
«fl
$
I
422 DKMEBS Ave.
"GRAND FORKS. N.'D
$
%M.r
-j d^-i-
,v,

xml | txt