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The evening times. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, March 09, 1906, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
THIS DATE IN HISTORY
1403—Bajazot I., Sultan of Turkey,
died.
1451—Amerigo Vespucci born. Died
Feb. 22, 1512.
1566—David Ilizzio murdered.
1609—William Warner, English poet,
died.
1616—Francis Beaumont, dramatist,
died.
1661—Cardinal Jules Mazarin, pre
mier of France, died. Born July 14,
1602.
1678—Ghent surrendered to Louis
XIV.
1759—Mirabeau born. Died April 2,
mi.
1757—Dr. Joseph Franz Gall, found
er of phrenology, born.
1759—Treaty between Russia and
.Sweden for neutrality of the Baltic.
1-773—Commodore Isaac Hull born.
Died Feb. 13, 1843.
1796—Napoleon Bonaparte married
:-1812—John Henry's plot to dismem
ber the Union discovered.
1830—Petroleum discovered In Ken
tucky. Bottled and sold as a medicine.
1847—Battle of Vera Cruz
J862—Battle of the Monitor and
Merrimac in the James river.
1867—Recognition of the Derby min
istry-
1874—Millard Fillmore died. Born
Jan. 7, 1800.
1882—Admiral James H. Spotts, IJ.
S. N., died at Falkland Islands.
1885—United States hotel burned at
Steubenville, Ohio.
1888—Emperor William I., of Ger
many, died.
1892—Business suspended in North
'west by a violent blizzard.
1895—Belgian and French ministers
expelled by Venezuelan government
1905—Senator William B. Bate of
Tennessee, died.
.'ij'-
&
Sentiment to Be Inculcated.
"Let reverence of law be breathed by
every mother to the lisping: babe that
Bu
rattles in her lap let it be taught in
schools, seminaries and colleges
let it be written In primers, spelling
books and almanacs let it be preached
from pulpits and proclaimed in legis
lative halls and enforced in courts of
justice in short, let It becomc the
political religion of the nation."
—Abraham, Lincoln.
POLITICAL JUDAS.
Two years ago when Mr. Duis was
making his first race for the mayor
alty tie was opposed then, as now, by
a republican—Mr. Lander. The Herald
at that time was an active supporter
of the latter gentleman, and in its
issue of March 25th, 1904, under the
caption of "Non-Partisanship," it said,
editorially:
"Non-partisanship in a municipal
campaign is all right, if partisanship
is kept out of the contest. Otherwise
1
not. There is some attempt at pres
ent to make capital out of the alleged
non-partisanship character of Mr.
Duis' candidacy for mayor. Mr. Duig
i" a democrat, and he has a right to
he. He is a member of the state cen
tral committee of his party, as he has
right to be. No one ever accused
him of being indifferent to the welfare
of his party, and the fact that he saw
fit to delegate his powers to another at
the meeting of the committee on Wed
nesday, must be ascribed to a desire
tc canvass on the streets for votes,
lather than to party indifference. Just
before the announcement of his can
didacy a petition was circulated for
-him by democrats, and among those
who urged him to become a candidate
are men of such pronounced party
views that in their eyes republican
ism is one of the greatest crimes on
the calendar. One of the earnest and
ardent supporters of Mr. Duis, is B.
S. Brynjolfson, chairman of the state
central committee, and everybody
knows what sort of 'non-partisan' he
k. No one denies the right of the can
didate or any of his supporters to
their own political views, or to mem
bership in any party to which they
see fit to belong. But to apply the
term 'non-partisan" to the present ef
forts of the democrats is misleading.
Its purpose fs manifest If the demo
crats can hold together in a fairly
solid mass, and a sufficient number of
republicans can be deluded by the
'non-partisan' cry the chances of the
democratic candidate will be greatly
Improved."
The Evening Times is free to con
fess that it is of the number that are
unable-" to see wherein the condition
of affairs .in municipal politics has in
any wise changed sincfc the campaign
Of 1904.
Mr. Dui6 "Is the same' democratic
partisan now as then true it is that
he has occupied the mayor's chair for
the past two years, but what, if any
thing, has he done in hisjOfflcial capay
city ii the interest of the. city thai
Alight not or would1not have been ac
^jpbmjtlished. had the executive office
been vacant for( that period? Inject,
wherein his Mayor Duis been aught
but offi^Cflgure WaA?
Why should the Herald, whose edif
tor haa ever pbeed tm being on6 Of the^
•.' .' /.: •••.•••• ."••
THE EVENING TIMES
I JAKUABY,
PRINTED EVERY WEEK DAY IN THE TEAS
THE TIMES NJBUSBING COMPANY (INOORPORATED)
WWII——AMP womiw
H. H. LAHPHAM. EDROB.
•.J.
WM. H. ALEXANDER. CBCDUIini HlMtB
tililiwll wiiiiiinilnlliiin In Tin ffiimlin Tlnna tin ml l~nit» TI T1
SUBSCRIPTION KATES
DAILY
I Tor in Advance (4.00
"™tl" in advance Ut
(both by carrier .40
Waek by caerier. .15
WEEKLY
Om Year in advance tl.00
Six Month* In advance .15
Three Xonthi in advance to
One year not in advance ........ LCD
Bnbacriben desiring addreaa ehanced.tnuat aend former addreaa aa!weiTaa new one
•tared as second-class matter at the postoffice at Grand Forks, North Dakota.
FRIDAY EVENING. MARCH 0. 1906
chief priests of the republican San
hedrim in North Dakota, support one
high in the councils of the democratic
j'arty of the state when his Opponent
is a loyal and consistent republican,
has
been a tried and true official in the past,
one against whose probity and ability
naught of a derogatory character can
successfully be alleged, a heavy muni
cipal tax payer and one thaji whom
no man can have the welfare of the
city more at heart?
The political course of the Herald
has ever been, like that of the "heath
en Chinee," decidedly peculiar, al
though it never required long or
prduous search to discover the motive
for its party recreancy, and no doubt
tut that in this instance it? is merely
3. case of history repeating itself.
THE PERMANENT CLASS.
The advance guard of the immigra
tion to North Dakota is beginning to
arrive, and while, like the robins,
there are only a few'to be seen, they
are an indication of what the state
may expect during the present sea
son.
Those who have feared that the rush
to the cheaper lands of the Canadian
northwest would to some extent, in
jure the prospects of this state have
little foundation upon which to base
these forebodings.
There will be a great rush to Can
ada, probably the greatest ever known
in the history of the west except in
the opening of some of the Indian
reservations in the last few years. But
there will be plenty of people to stop
in North Dakota.
Many of those who are going into
Canada are from the new states of the
west. They are those who having
taken advantage of the opportunities
of a new country and realized the
advantages of the change in property
values from nothing to those of the
richest country in the world, are ready
to seek a second fortune by the same
process.
These are as good as citizens as
can be found anywhere, and are the
pride of any community.
But there is another class just as
progressive and just as energetic who
do not care to endure the privations
of frontier life and are ready to step
in the places of those who are moving
on, or to locate in a country which
has passed beyond the primary stage
of development.
These are usually men of some
means who having accumulated a
competence sufficient for themselves
in the older states, are going into the
newer ones where their capital in
-sested in cheaper lands will give their
children a larger inheritance.
These are the people who give
permanency to a country. They are
tot possessed of that restless spirit of
caring push which makes them un
happy when once the excitement of
new conquests Was paled.
On the contrary they are surround
ing themselves in that period of life
when the leaf begins to turn to gold,
with the opportunities for their chil
dren's success in life, and as these
will remain until they too must seek
a widening field as did their parents,
the country is given a character of
(permanency
by their presence.
In a large measure this is the class
that is now coming to this state. They
are nien with families who desire the
advantages of schools and churches
and societies, and who prefer the op
portunities offered by these in this
state combined with the splendid op
portunities for certain success, in a
reasonabe degree to the chance of suc
cess or failure in a larger degree with
the uncertainties leaning toward fail
ure, without the opportunities men
tioned.
When these people come into the
state they become at once citizens in
truth as well as in fact. The pros
perity of the state becomes', at once a
jart of their ambition. They do not
tuild for a day or a year, but for a
life.
They are interested in making per
manent homes and surrounding them
selves with every comfort of life. They
want to make the land not only yield
a competence for themselves but they
want to leave it as an heritage to
their children,, capable of yielding to
them abundantly for their labor.
These are the people who want to
drain the Red" river valley that It
may furnish wealth producing homes
for their sons who want to Irrigate
the semi-arid iands. in the west that\
there the desert maybe made to blos
,bo6 like tthe ^rose who are building
•the brick blocks' la. tfe .cities and
towns on the sites of tar papered
shacks and lumber sheds who want
the educational Institutions the best
in the land, and who want the entire
Btate dotted with farm houses in which
luxury is the rule rather than the ex
ception.
There are plenty of such people in
the state today, and more are com
ing. Newer fields will attract the
pioneers but the class that gives a
community its permanency will stop
by the! hundreds in North Dakota.
A WOKE OF PROGRESS.
The educational facilities of a Btate
are measured by the people who ad
minister its school affairs.
In this particular it is plehsing to
note that at the recent national edu
cational meeting at Louisville North
Dakota made a showing of which any
state might be proud. In fact, this
state was far in advance of any other
—even those states which boast of
their educational systems.
There were seventy county super
intendents present at the meeting and
twenty-one, or almost a third of them,
were from North Dakota.
The reason for this lies deeper than
the surface. With all the yellow
journalism about corruption in fetate
and county politics, and the cry of
the political howling dervishes for
reform, the men who have been
charged with the administration of the
educational affairs of the state are
thoroughly competent to do so.
Men holding the position of county
superintendents in this state are head
and shoulders above those filling simi
lar positions in nearly every other
state. They are interested in their
work and in the advancement of the
schools. Twenty-one of them were
willing to travel nearly two thousand
miles to attend a meeting at which
they might hope to secure new ideas
for the improvement of their work.
The other states sent an average of
a little more than one each.
Education should be the substance,
not the shadow, and the showing made
by the county superintendents at
Louisville, while reflecting the high
est credit on the state, goes deeper
than this. It shows, in contrast with
other states, that those in charge of
our educational institutions, especial
ly those of an elementary character,
are enthusiastically zealous in the
promotion of their work. And as the
lesults to be derived from the edu
cational system of a state are depend
ent almost entirely upon' the zeal of
those charged with its administration,
the advanced position of the state in
matters educational was proclaimed
in thunder tones at the meeting of
the nation's eduoators at Louisville.
A KING AMONG MEN.
In these days when the bad in the
world finds so much publicity that the
people almost forget that good exists
and that the sun shines, it is refresh
ing to read about Duke Carl Theodore
of Bavaria.
He isn't much to look at.
No medals cover his breast He has
not led an army on to victory. And as
for scandal, with which every court in
Europe reeks—Duke Carl Theodore is
2 gentleman.
He has been famous for many years
and has just performed his five thou
sandth successful optical operation.
In Munich he has expended $1,250,
000 in building and maintaining hos
pitals. He asks no fee from patients
of any class and the poor are his
special care. His wife, who was the
Princess Maria of Portugal, aids him
in his work.
You cannot estimate what such a
man means to the world. There is no
standard by whijh to measure. He
could pursue pleasure. He can live
in an atmosphere of luxury speed in
flying automobiles ride in special
trains travel in floating palaces.
Bu# because of the wonderful im
I-ulsc for good that abides in- his
breast: because of the divine desire
to be of use to his kind, he has worked
and made his efforts to count.
Think of restoring to 5,000 human
beings the flowers, the blue sky, the
faces Qf loved ones, pictures, scenery,
ambition, courage, hope, life itself.
That Is the story of Duke Carl Theo
dore-of Bavaria.
Twenty-five years of patient, skill
ful labor—all for others.
It is a record fit for the pages of
the Great Book of ife. It is enough
to make one forget that wrong exists
in the world.Ast. Paul News.
The. open letter of ex-Mayor John.
Dinnie to Mayor Duis, which appears
elsewhere in these columns, as does
also Mr. Dinnie's catagorical reply to
a list of questions propounded by
Duis' organ, the senile .Plalndealer,
will undoubtedly entail nb end of ex
plaining on the part of the mayor's
corps of street corner and back alley
era tors.
*-Ai
DOTE AID C0HRE1T i.ii|S£
The difference between a ballet and
a ball is the extremity.
V'f
-3rw
t*
THE EVENING TIMES, G&AftD FORKS, M. D.
some one will start on _a hunt tor
Wellman.
A Rnsslah woman carried' dyna
mite in her hair. That's hothlng. Lots
of women carry It on th4lr tongues.
Since the shot has been taken from
Brewer's stoipach there is additional
room for liquid.
The easiest money made Is what
you did not have when your friend
struck you for a loan.
The man at the head of the Isle of
Pines ruction was from Kansas. That
explains the trouble.
A book agent at Moorhead asked a
voman if her husband was in. She
said he was for ten days but it was
nobody's business.
There are more than eight thousand
men in the country engaged „in mak
ing laws, and yet &ome people cannot
get the kind they want.
A Canadian physician says he can
cure bad temper. What a boon for*hus
bands!
There has been a change in medi
cal practice in late years. Doctors do
tot now read death warrants to their
patients.
A bill has been introduced in the
Rhode Island legislature prohibiting
divorce from any cause. What a
llirusf at home industries!
In the Japanese calendar this is
called the time of the kicking horse.
In this country it might have the same
appellation in reference to the mule
one generation back.
Boni threatened to go to work if
the Goulds did not pay up. Neither
has happened.
Arizona's Appeal.
It was decided by the senate on Feb.
27th that the statehood bill, providing
for the creation of one state of Indian
Territory and Oklahoma and another of
Arizona and New Mexico shall c«me to
a vote on. the 9th of March.
No begger she in the mighty hail where
her bay-crowned sifters wait,
No empty-handed pleader for the right
of a free-born state,
No child, with a child's Insistence, de
manding a gilded toy,
But a fair-browed, queenly woman,
strong to create or destroy—
Wise for the need of the sons she has
bred in the school where weaklings
fail,
Where cunning is less than manhood,
and deeds, not words, avail—
With the high, unswerving purpose that
measures and overcomes.
And the faiih in .the Farthest Vision
that bullded her hard-won homes.
Link her, in her clean-proved fitness, in
her right to stand alone—
Secure for whatever future in the
strength that her past has won—
Link her, in her morning beauty, with
another, however fair?
And open your jealous portal and bid
her enter there
with shackles on wrist and ankle, and
dust on her stately head,
And her proud eyes dim with weeping?
No! Bar your doors instead
And seal them fast forever! but let her
go her way—
Uncrowned if you will, but unshackled,
to wait' for a larger day.
Ay! Let her go bare-handed, bound
with no grudging gift.
Back to her own free spaces where her
rock-ribbed mountains lift
Their walls like a sheltering fortress
back to her house and blood.
And we of her blood will go our way
and reckon your judgment good.
We will wait outside your sullen door
till the stars you wear grow dim
As the pale dawn-stars that swim and
fade o'er our mighty Canon's rim,
We will lift no hand for the bays ye
wear, nor covet your robes of state—
But ah! by the skies above us all, we
.will shame ye while we wait!
We will make ye the mold of an empire
here in the land ye scorn.
While ye drowse and dream in your
well-housed ease that states at
your nod are born.
Te have blotted your own beginnings,
and taught your sons to forget
That, ye did tiot spring fat-fed and old
from the powers that bear and
beget.
But the while ye follow your smooth
made roads to a lireside safe of
fears.
Shall come a voice from a land still
young, to sing in your age-dulled
ears
The hero song of a strife as fine as your
fathers' fathers knew,
When they dared the rivers of unmap
ped wilds at the will of a bark
canoe—
The song of the deed in the doing, -of
the work still hot from the hand
Of the yoke of man laid friendly-wise
on the neck of a tameless land.
While your merchandise is weighing,
we will bit and bridle and rein
The floods of the storm-rocked moun
tains and lead them down to the
plain
And the foam-ribbed, dark-hued waters,
tired from that mighty race,
Shall lie at the feet of palm and vine
and know their appointed place
And out of that subtle union, desert
and mountain-flood.
Shall be homes of a nation's choosing,
where no home else had stood.
We will match the gold of your mining,
with its mint-stamp dulled and
marred
By the tears and blood that have stain
ed it and the hands that have
clutched too hard,
With the gold that no man has lied
for—the gold no woman has made
The price of her truth and honor, ply
ing a shameless trade—
The clean, pure gold of the mountains,
straight from the strong, dark
earth.
With no tang or taint upon it from the
hour of Its primal birth.
The trick of the money-changer, shlft
ing his coins as he wills.
Ye may keep—no Christ was bartered
for the wealth of our lavish hills.
"Yet we are ia little people—too weak
for the cares of state!"
Let us go our. way! When you look
again, ye shall find us, mayhap, too
great.
Cities we lack—and gutters where chil
dren snatch for bread
Numbers—and hordes of starvelings,
toiling but never fed.
Spare pains that would make us greater
in the pattern that ye have set
We hold to the larger measure of the
men that ye forget—
The men who, from trackless forests
and prairies lone and far,
Hewed out' the land where ye sit at
ease and grudge us our fair-won
star.
"There
thou
flings
Lies wide on, the land to its bitter.
shame, ana his- cunning parleylngs
Have deafened, the ears of Justice* that
was blind and slow of .old.
Tet Time, the last Great Judge, is not
bought, or bribed or sold.
And Time and the Race shall Judge us—
not aleague oftrafflcklng men, f.
Selling the trust of the people, to bar
ter it back again
Palming the lites of trillions as a hand
ful of easy epin.
With a single heart to the narrow verge
where craft and statecraft Joln.
:*''m. .v '1 —Sharlot M. Hall.
rel
ugh the net that the trickster
"MiA
N
Walter Wellman will start on a hunt
Jor the poie.in a few months'. Later
f. GRAND OPEBA.
Oiir grad .oj»r& has- come^-Md'1
gone—ahd itww certainly ararttreat
tor ^ie muslc^Wni. 'Xf omnM ttera
A"'
fi
,y
iX
mM
*v
are music-lovers and—music-lovers—
but the audiente last night seemed to
be .of the right kind, as there was very
little disturbance or ^talking to inter
fere with the music.
I
The devil is always supposed to be
fascinating, and Mr, Harrison Bennett
well deserves goodi praise. His mag
nificent bass voice was ably managed
in the "Blidy," grating music of Me
phistophelean and his splendid phy
sique was charyterl8tic of the part
Mi. Maclennon is well known to
many of us, having sung ih "Parsifal"
last year. Faust was wonderfully
interpreted by Mr. Maclennon, his
voice being smooth, full and passloh
ate, the high notes op the tenor sonfgs
being taken with accuracy and ease.
He is a thorough actor, and did not al
low his excellent rendition of his diffi
cult song role to outshine his dramatic
powers
Marguerite—every one likes Mar
guerite, and Miss Miner stirred many
hearts
laBt
nightf when she sang the
well-loved song, "Yet Once Again, Be
loved." Miss Miner's rendition of the
famous "Jewel Song,", and the sever.il
other coloratura selection? was well
worthy of the highest praise. She
showed an excellent control of her
voice.
Mr. Arthur Deane, who sang the
^art of Valentine, did magnificent
work, his "Death Song" being especial
ly fine. His work was much ap
plauded.
v.:
Miss Albright's contralto, as Siebol,
was a little unsympathetic, although
she sang the,"Flower Song" exceed
ingly well.
The trio of Faust, Valentine and Me
phistopheles, in the fourth act, was
a wonderful piece of harmony, and the
executors did fair justice to Gounod's
exquisite rhythm and melody.
The choruses were all that could be
desired, and then (there 'was the or
chestra. Never has a Grand Forks
audience been so spellbound by an
orchestra. About fifty instruments,
truthfully harmonized, wailed and
sobbed and laughed out this music if
Gouijod's, until our very hearts were
full. Mr. Emanuel is a thoVoughly
competent conductor, and had the en
tire cast of singers, as well as the or
chestra, just at hid finger-tips.
STORIES OF THE HOUR
Killed With Kindness.
They were discussing the horrors
that attended on the hanging of Mary
Rogers.
"But she suffered little," said a
physician. "Every murderer who goes
to the'gallows or the electric chair
is drugged to the point almost of un
consciousness. Otherwise the :death
sentence, unendurably hideous, would
be abolished."
"No man, alone in a cell with the
knowledge that on a certajji day, at a
certain hour, he is to be killed,, can
keep his nerve.
"He stops eating, he stops sleeping,
in a little while he begins to shriek.
"Then the drugging begins. With
opium or with alcohol he is lulled Into
a torpor. On the day of his death he
is so heavily 'dosed as to be, to all
practical intents and purposes, un
conscious.
"Condemned murderers, as the last
day approaches, ar^ so wild with ter
ror that it takes an incredible lot of
aosing to compose them. I have seen
men untouched by three grains of
morphia, and a pint of whiskey would
l:ave. no more effect on them than a
small beer.
"Thank, goodness, I say, that man is
cl least humane enough, before he
slays hfs brother, to drug the poor fel
low into a stupor. Thank goodness
that, when we kill legally, we kill with
kindness^'
Looking Out for the Company.
Lancia, the chauffeur, crossed the
Atlantic to New York on La Gascogne,''
and one nights in the stroking ropm
of the steamer he "said: 0''
."Your American Railroads are su
perior to ours. The trains go faster,
the cars are more luxurious.-and 4he
management Is wiser.
"I like your system of excess checks
—those checks, each worth a dime,
whiph you give ottj your railroads to
assengers who, having no tickets,
pay cash fares. At first these checks
angered me. I did not like them but
a conductor, with a good natured
(.mile, illustrated their use, with a
"He said that on a little railway in
the south they do not use excess
checks. A friend of his, riding on this
fcailwajr. wlthbut^a ticket, paid his fare
In cash, a matter of. four or five dol
lars. I
"The conductor took the money and
counted it, and theu, Carefully, he put
[art of it In his coat pocket and'the
lest in the''hip pocket of 1iiS/panta-,
loons.
"'Why,' said the pasranger, you*'
divide the money that IrayV f-i
"The conductor, with a frowo^. re-.
tiled:.
'The TOinf^y'sHgot' to get .ion$-:
,,Jc
The horse was instructed to pack
Thbmas'B little toy suit case, and he,
without a whimper, kissed his mother
good-bye and departed.
Quite A .way off Thomas set his bur
den on the ground, and, perched sol
emnly on the curb, chin in hands, fell
into deep thought The spectacle was
too much for the fond mother, who
was watching l^lm from a distance.
Very quietly she started down the
street and tiptoed lip behind Master
Thomas. As.Bhe was hovering on the
lolnt of surprising him with a kiss a
pompous old gentleman appeared:
"6hild," he said, "will you—hum
tell me where Mr', franklin lives?"
Thomas raised his solemn brown
eyes, and regarding the old gentleman
coldly, replied: "You go to h——. I
haVe trouble's of my own."—Harper's
Weekly.
*-p
Tactful.
A Chicagoan waiT praising the late
Marshall Field.
4
"Mr. FJeld was a kindly man," he
said. "He spoke ill of no one. And
when his opinion was asked of a' per
son, and' it was not a favorable opin
ion, he would express it In sucli a
gentle and quaint way that its sting
would
(be
quite lost.
"Once, at a dinner, 1 praised the
conversational talent of a man across
the table. I said to Mr. Field: ':.\£
'Do you know him?'
'I have met him,' the other an
swered.
"'Well, he is'a clever chap,' said I.
'He can talk brilliantly for an hour
at a stretch.'
'Then, when I met him,' said Mr.
Field, 'it must have been thfe begin
ning of the second hour.'"
Old Frenqji Gallantry.
People say that old French gallantry
is rapidly becoming a thing of the
past. Those who are prone to forget
thus our ..national traditions should
take to heart this little lesson from
the Hungarian poet, Jokai: 0
*At a banquet gi^en in his honor the
poet thanked the ladles present, and
ended with the words: "I drink to
you, mesdames. May you live until
my hair turns gray."
The ladies were startled, and barely
knew what to make of the strange
compliment. Then Jokai, taking from
his head a fine wig, revealed a head
entirely bald "My hair, as you see/'
Le continued, "can' never turn gray.".
It don't pa^ to keep boarders'who:
don't pay. So, pluck up your courage
and tell Mr. and Mrs. Arrears 'that
you need their rooms—as you will if
you use the wants ads. in The Evening
Times.
NORTH DAKOTA.
Whole Tear—for 25c.
You send 2S cents in stamps for a
years subscription to BROW NIB
FARMER and learn all the facts about
North Dakota, where the grreat crowds
are going*. One4 issue Is worth several
times the subscription price for Its
views alone. Address.
BROWN FARMER, Ikfandan, North
Dakota.
FRIDAY, MAKCH 9
ONE NldHT ONLY
BEACH &
BOWERS
Cl
despair of brevk-:
tog her' HtMe boy tf ^eat^
threatened she wo«ld banl»h him from
FIRST PART ENSEMBLE
"Among the Poppies"
PRICES
?:4la,n
11:00 «4m.
V-) i.Tr
IflK
—'tr"
home. The very next day he exploded
"I- am .li*hohas,'' ''iia!d'
the mother, "but I 'have never broken
my word to you, so now you must,
leave home."
1
t-
Pfbfesspma) £arc^s
physicians and bub^hdonb.
JOHN FAWGETT M. H. a
diseases op Moan um
v|L4
eEREUL SBBONM.
paw
a
Ona aitmeinaubtMUL,
-V"
DR. J. GRASSIC*
Office Noriihf/eatara Balldlaf
piS. W. RUTLEDGE "^r
HOMEOPATHlC^^p-
PHYSICIAN AND SUME0K
128So.3rd St. Qnd Porfa.ll. D,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
& M. CAROTHERS
A-.
•ri-ffi Attorney at Law
Itattoaal Buk BiiMiif
ARCHITECTS.
J.W.ROSS
A I E 0
ami SDPEIQffEHDENT OP C0NST1DCTI0II
omoa
irx-5 SouthThikdSt. GKAND FORKS, N.
p. SMITH
Architect
Both' Pboae* NittaulBuk MHHihi
W. J. EDWARDS
ARCHITECT
Northwestern Bonding, Grand Fbch, N. DV
Northwestern 'Piiqm 46C-L
TAILORS.
ROLF BROTHERS
HiOH &LASS SUITS ROR IIENf
BothThoMs
Offleein CUOorl BnOdW:
tui,
a v.i^gcr
THE OLDEST
F1IMIN THE
BUSINESS
0 mom,
Flour," Feed, Hay find!
.V-'? Wood of All Klnitf j.
N. W.*Proi(bSM
TBI-8TATB5SS-L GRAND FOBK8.N.D
TIME CARD OF TRAINS
GRAND FORKS
N
i--'.
$1.00, 75c 50c 25r
TELEPHONE
Arrivaa.
0tp.m.)i
4:l0«.n.
8:06 a.m.
f-y4..r»L_
V'.'ivv
7a
N
^w^FANITQRira.
i: $•',.
TAILORING —r*!!
All Kiaft of Laities and Gents Qotliia4,7Qeaa
and Pretrial
N, W. 361-1 Tri State, 41S.R
PHONE BICE'S TRANSFER
FOB HACKS. DAT OB MIGHT AND BAG
GAGE WAGONB AT ALL HOU8&
PHONE 602L
The City Feed Store
r-
pit If
SOOTH BOUND,
Sw u1'
Minn'eapolte
„and the Bast ».«
To Red Lake Falls
and Fertile (dally
except
NORTH BOUND.
peg~T°
wh^^'NtorP»afeIFIBank?SR^
:iep.m.—For I^rtmoi^, Devils Lake, itinot. Hi™
4:H a.nL—Vor
K+-Vrom
IZ &ui, tapntkpoilt, 8b
Tmav,Br9Ckei
P-nu—For Httlaboro virt
—From
litQ p-tiuZIyor^Bm
er*Sv*
r^AiRerpM9|
BreoXeo^ld^fe, ^aaelt«iwli|a]
1
ii
I
}:16 d. m.
Grafton
an^
WinniiM-Arr,Ve"
35^'
v'l
W, B. SINCLAIR
wior aod
•W&poUaan
_-£ioiik -.Citjf,
Dulntt'Supi
$
Will mar,

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