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The evening times. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, May 08, 1906, Image 1

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THE EVENING TIMES STANDS FOR
0«AND FOEES AND NORTB OAHO
TA UNDER ALL CIRCUMSTANCES
1, NO. 105.
I 'A»MUiJ
cjv-i
1
mm
The Contents of the 'Safety
Deposit Vaults of the San
Francisco Banks Are Found
to be in Good Condition.
DR. DEV1NE REPORTS'
AMOJTNTOF SUPPLIES
Two Thousand Two Hundred Carloads
of Food Stuffs Have Been
Received Since May 1.
Araociated Pimb to Tlie EvraUs Times.
San Francisco, May 8.—THe safety
deposit boxes in several of the big1
institutions thpt provide Are proof
receptacles for the public were made
accessible yesterday. All the contents
were found Intact
The total amount of goods sent to
this city by the railroads .up to -and
including May 1st, amounts to 2,200
car loads, according to Dr. Edward T.
Devine,. head of, the Red Cross work.
"This represents a large amount of
supplies," he said yesterday "but
nothing like the amount we will need."
BIO FRUIT SHIP E N S
California Orchardlsts Will Receive
Over $10^)00,000 Thfe Year.
Amaclated Pnh to The Ktoilag Tlmn.
San Francisco, May 8.—Prospects
are good for large fruit shipments to
the east during the season which has
just opened. Fully 1,000 cars of green
fruit and grapes will be sent east of
the Rocky Mountains before the spa
son closes next fall. This volume of
business will mean between $10,000,
000 and $12,000,000 to the California
orchardlsts.
1
HEW SAW FRANCISCO.
E. H. Harriman Says it Will be Bigger
md Better Than ETer.
*«»«taled Fmt to The Hvealn* Tlmea.
Omaha, Neb., May 8.—E. H. Harrl
man's special train arrived here at
:2.46 p. m. on what is expected to be
•a, record breaking run from the Paci
fic to the Atlantio coast. The fast
running so far, however, haB been
mostly on the Union Pacific. The (rain
j. Heft Oakland Mole at. :33 o'clock $jin
day night and 8p&rks,Nevada, at 6:47
Monday morning. Forty-six miles an
"hour ma madq jbetwoen Sparks and
Green |Uverf YTyo., and £2.8 miles per
hour between the latter point and
Omaha The lUghest speed was made
between North Platte' and Grand Is
land, in this state. The 133 miles were
/-covered in 114 minutes. Twelve
minutes were consumed in changing
engines here and' Mr. Harriman and
party pulled out oyer the'Northwest
ern expecting to reach Buffalo in time
to catch the Empire State limited
which will take them into New York
!at. 10 o'clock tomorrow night,-making
the run across the. continent in 71
hours and 35 minutes.
-y While here Mr. Harriman made the
following statement to a representa
tive of the Associated Press regarding
'the situation In San Francisco:
"The earthquake was, the worst
since San Farnclsco became a great
..city. This is evidenced by the de-
Vstruction of churches and other build
ings—showing undoubtedly some faul
ty construction—the older houses
erected by.the pioneers and early citi
zens having In maivy cases withstood
the shock, unharmed, as did also the
modern structures.
"It is fortunate that the constmc
^on of many large buildings was only
in comtemplatlon. Their erection can
now be pursued without the assurance
of substantial construction. Indeed,
:'. the experience will result in making
San Francisco the safest city in the
country in which to reside, absolutely
proof against quakes and fires.
"When San Francisco Is rebuilt no
material damage by any future earth
j-'-j'k quake need be feared. Under, the new
laws all buildings will be constructed
under requirements which Will pre
vent Indiscriminate erection o£ faulty
structures and which will promote the
possible artistic or architectural effecty
by providing' that the height of the
:V
buildings shall not exceed one and
one-half times the width of the street,
and also that avenues shall- be widen
ed, which will enable not only the
beautifying of the city, but will pre
vent the spread of fires in the future,
and make possible a clearer means
of communication or transportation,
"Following the experience of Chi
cago and Baltimore which has suffered
from great destructive fires, it is reai
sonable to expect that San Francisco
upon reconstruction, within a reason
able .time, will undoubtedly have reach-
••«d a point .far'beyond that which it
'"occupied' before, the earthquake and
fire.- r,'/:v
"1%e presen!pe of the-United States
('It? troilP8 ifW* '.»• great. advantage and
theic being so promptly and :ably
^handled by General. Funston, backed
1
UP
SB""
subsequently by. a. man like Major
]i General Greely, Jbo took lp hand the.
/fepE'rtu systematizing and regulation of the
(GMtiaied ob Mie 4.)
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W.
A Sensational Murder Where a
.Kurdish Chieftaii^Fixes His
,,Vt Teeth in His Victim's Throat
and Holds on Like Bull Dog.
s-wx'M
BOTH PRpMINENT
AFRICAN OFFICIALS
The Murderer Watt Recently Exiled to
Tripoli From Constantinople
and Is a Bad Man. I
Aawtclatp* Pkh Cable to/The Gvnlu
Tlmea.
Constantinople, May 8.—Nedjim Ed
din Beya, procurator general or Vila
yet of Tripoli, JVorth Africa, has been
murdered in a highly sensational man
ner, by All Shatnyi Pasha, former
military governor of Scutari. Accord
lng to the reports received here All
Shamyl, whb is a Kurdish chieftain
and who recently was-exiled to Tripoli
on the charge of being
SUDDEN DEATH OH
161
TRAIN
H. G. Potts of $t. Paul Enroute
'Home From Idaho Expires
vi. Near Knox. /.,:y
Sjpeetal to The Bvealac Time*.
Devils Lake, N. D., May 8.—Harry:
S. Potts of St Paul, a well-known bus
iness man of that city and an old-time
friend of C. S. Fisher, the banker of
this cliy, died suddenly on.G. N. train
No. last evening and'the remains are
at present in this city, but will be'
shipped to St. Paul for interment
Mr. Potts was apparently in good
health when the train went through
Williston, but .Was suddenly taken ill
and his death soon followed. Deceas
ed was 56 years of age and was re
turning from a buamess trip to Idaho.
Company D, North Dakota National
Guard, was mustered out here today
by-Major Berg of Grand Forks for rea
sons known only to those in authority.
Efforts are being made to organize a
new company and the equipment will
not leave the city for the present, at
least i.
COL. FRANK J. POWELL
Famous Indian Scout Dies tfn Train
of Heart Disease.
AMoelated Plena to The Eniliig Tlm».
Elpaso, Texas, May 8.^-Col. Frank
D. Powell, the famous Indian scout,
known as "White Beaver," died yes
terday on the train east bound from
Los Angeles of heart disease. Col.
Powell hftd been in charge of Col. Wil
liam F. Cody's interests at Cody, Wyo.,
for several' year4
KttLEB.-f
Man and Son Lose Their Lives WbOe
Stealing a Ride.
Aaaoclated presa to 1'he Ernlif Time*.
Boone, Iowa, May 8.—Albert David
son of Champion, Wis., was killed and
his son. Earl, fatally injured yesterday
afternoon in the Northwestern rail
road yards. They were ste&Iiiig rides
on a freight train loaded with radiator
pipes. The switch engine shunted the
cars and the pipes shifted, crushing
both men. They had been on a visit
to their father's sister at Harvard, 111,
-j
THE ELKDfS AMENDMENT.
Discussed in Senate and Amendment to
It Offered.*
Aaaedated Preaa to The Evealag Times.
Washington, May 8!—The discussion
of the Eikins amendment to the rail
road rate bill was resumed in the sen
ate today. This amendment proposes
to prevent interstate carriers from
owning and operating cotfl mines" or
dealing In the commodities which they
transport Senator McCumber offered
a substitute for the Eikins amendment
which he claimed to be simpler, while
accomplishing the s^me purpose. Sen
ator Dryden opposed the Eikins pro
vision.
1
'*v
tP
vconcerned
in
the murder of Redvan Pasha at Con
stantinople,- was undergoing an ex
amination when- he suddenly rushed
uion the procurator general, fixed his
.teeth In his throat and held on like
a bull dog until his victim was throt
tled to death.
be*®
over" ft?S^I?S^iVethe^'iOB,0r,^ern0r
mms
Representatives of Various
Jewish Organizations Meet
in Philadelphia.
AtaochMFnu to Tie BVeetiig Tfirn
Philadelphia, Pa., May 8.-^The third
biennial sesslpn of the National con
ference of Jewish charities opened in
this city, to continue till Thursday.
The conference comprises representa
tives of the various Jewish charitable
organizations of the country, and was
formed several years ago for the pur
pose of securing co-operations of the
country Jn "efforts to improce the
system of charity and to curb cer
tain evils which the various organi
zations frequently have to contend
with. The discussions will cover a
wide range of interesting subjects
having to do with causes of poverty
and means of removing them and of
aiding the needy.
Prominent ^among those on. the pro
gram for papers or addresses are Dr.
Boris IX Bogen, superintendent of the
United Hebrew Charities of Cincin
nati Eugene 8. Benjamin, president
of the Baron De Hirsch Fund A. W.
Rich, presideht of the Wisconsin
agricultural society Dr. I. I. Leucht
New Orleans, Rabbi A. R. Levy'of
Chicago, Rabbi Simon Peiser ot Cleve
land, Dr. Lee K. .Frankel of New
York, and Dr. Joseph Kratiskopf, presi
dent of the National farm school,
Doylestown, Pa.
SHORTAGE OF COAL.
Owing to the MarMe Strike the Sup
ply of Soft Coal Is Getting Low.
Aaaeclatcd ,Preaa to The Evealag Tlaea.
ft"
Slipst'lur, Wis.. May 8.—Owing to
lake shipping conditions growing out'
of the marine strike, soft coal prices*
for Youghiogheny, Pittsburg and West
Virginia grades of coal F. O. B. on
docks at the head of the lakes have
been advanced about 50 cents over last
year's prices. They are $3.30 for three-
quarter run of pile and $3.50 for
screened lump. While the receipts
were a deluge at the opening of navi
gation it Us claimed that if the marine
strike lasts until June 1. there will be
less coal on docks than in early April.
If travel, were made by stage coach
there would,be few North Dakotans in
California.
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ANOTHER MANUFACTORY yFOR GRAND FORKS-WATCH GRAND FORKS GROW!
A SQUARE DEAL FOR ALL
THE EVENING TIMES, GRAND FORKS, N. D. TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1906.
POLITICAL
GMMflY
WHO WILL BE FATTED?
In Which One Striker is Killed
and Two Wounded by
Deputies.
Asanetote* Mh to The Bvealag Tiinea.
Pueblo, Col., May 8.—In a riot be
tween the striking smelter employes
at the Pueblo smelter and deputy sher
iffs this morning, one striker is report
ed killed and two seriously wounded.
Two deputies were badly beaten.
Deputy sheriffs today fired into a
crowd of riotous strikers at the
Pueblo smelter. Mike Merino, an Ital
ian, was killed and two other strikers
were seriously wounded. Two depu
ties were previously badly beaten in
an effort to disarm the strikers. The
deputies are still on guard at the
smelter, but no further trouble is ex
pected The trouble arose over the in
auguration of the eight hour day,
CASE OF MURDER
OR OF SUICIDE
Aaaoclated Preaa to The BnaUti Tlmea.
New York( May 8.—Police of
ficials who have been investigat
lng the mysterious death of
Charles L. Spier, confidential
agent of H. H. Rogers, who was
found dead in his home in Staten
Island yesterday, regprted today
that the evidence indicated that
Spier had committed suicide.
Coroner Mathew CapiU said to
day tint he is positive that the
wound which caused Spier's death
couia not have been inflicted by
himself and that Spier was un
doubtedly murdered.
I S.W/7 J1EJ1L
HOUGHTON IMPLEMENT
T*B WBATHKIL
North Dakota
Fair tonight and
Wednesday slowly
rising temperatures
frost In east
tlon tonight.
01
jfoNto %£•%& *,%. -,s?j
he'"
tnrn
porT
$
'he
The Province of Hunan Water
Swept—All Foreigners
Are Safe.
AaaoclateaL Preaa to The BremlniT'Tlmea.
Washington, May 8.—The state de
partment today received the following
cablet1':-,: fro
11
the
at
",
V."
TIMES
inSttrgm"
BIG FLOOD III mm
CAUSESGREAT
American consul
HanUai:, China:
"InrncnsH f!oo! in five Hun prov
ince. Great loss of iife and property.
All
fureig-nei's safe."
FINAL DECREE
In the Cttsicllonc Case- Will' Now be
Speedily Secured.
AMU'llitnl. I'reMx Oablfc tO'Ttir. ISvckUme
Timca.
Paris, May S.—Conclusion of elec
tions permitted the Cftstellane case to
be taken up today for final inquiries as
to the possibility of'reconciliation be
tween CotAitess. formerly Anna Gould,
and Count- Boni. This was considered
a formality as the oarties are not dis
posed to become reconciled. After the
present papers are served, the tawyers
expect that in future the proceedings
will move briskly and that the final
decree will' be rendered without a
contest.
ARE AFTER GORKEY.
Steps May be Taken to Extradite Him
Fwa United States.
Aaaoclatedi Vxaa Cable to The fSvealaa
Tlmea.
Moscow, May 8.—In addition to the
accusation against Maxim Gorky of
engaging in a politcal propaganda, the
procurator has charged him with par
ticipation in the December uprising
here and it is rumored that his extra
dition from the United States will be
asked for.
The Gost has been confiscated and
prohibited from publishing pictures
taken by an American photographer
showing the life led in prison by Mile.
Splridonovo, who killed Police. Chief
Luzhnoffsky at Tamboff.
When a man keeps his nose above
liquor, he usually has trouble keeping
his head above water.
The Rugby papers soothe each
other's wounded feelings with intel
lectual aquafortis.
FIVE PASSENGER TOURING GAR
Motor guaranteed Twenty-two Horse Power. Doable opposed Cylinders. Force feed Multiple Oiler.
Wheels 31-9 by 30. Ample power. Atfreathill climber. Two Acetlylene Lamps and three Oil
Lampse fine Horn, Engine Completely enclosed, but easily accessible, As a Runabout $1,000.
CO.t
MWM&SSB
Shock is Felt at East Hamptonr
Connecticut, at an Early
Hour This Morning—Lasted
But a Second.
EARTH'S TREMBLINGS
NOTED IN PAST
On High Ridge of the City—Atlantic
Coast May be Visited
Xext
Aaaoclated Preaa to The Bnalig Tlmea.
East Hampton, Conn.. May 8.—Sev
eral families along North High street,
in the northwestern section of this
town, felt a slight tremble of the
earth early today, the "shock" lasting
about a second. This section of town
is located on a high ridge and at dif
ferent times persons being thereabouts
have noticed a quiver of the ground.
Pears are entertaind that the Atlantic
coast may be visited by more serious
demonstrations.
THE ITOCITE
AGREEMENT IS
SIGHED UP
The Operators and Miners Fin
ally Crane Together and
Agree.
AeaeelWe* Prm to The Kveala* Tlmea.
New York, May 8.—The text of the
agreement reached at yesterday's con
ference of the anthracite operators
and miners is as follows:
"Whereas, pursuant to the letter of
aubmiBBion signed by the undersigned
in. 1903 "all questions at jfsue between
the respective companies and their own
employes whether they belong to a
union or not" were submitted to the
anthracite coal strike commission to
decide as to the same and as to the
"conditions of employment between the
respective companies and their own
employes," and the said strike com
mission under date of March 18, 1903,
duly made and filed its award upon
the subject matter of the submission
and provided that said award should
continue in force for three years from
April lr 1903, and the said period has
expired.
Now, therefore, it is stipulated be
tween the undersigned in their own
behalf insofar as they have power to
represent any other parties in inter
est,. that the said award and the pro
visions thereof and any action which
has been since taken pursuant there
to, either by the conciliation board or
otherwise, shall be extended and sball
continue in force for three years from
April 1, 1906, namely until March 31,
1909, in like force and effect as if that
had been originally prescribed as its
duration. That work shall be resumed
as soon as practicable and that all
men who have not committed violence
to person or property shall be re
employed in their old positions.
(Signed) —George P. Baer,
—E. B. Thomas,
—W. H. Truesdale,
—David Willcox,
—John D. Kerr,
—Morris Williams,
—Joseph L. Cake,
—John Mitchell,
—P. D. Nichols,
—John Dempsey,
—W. Dettrey,
—John P. Gallagher,
—John Fahy.
Ratified by Sllnera
Scranton, Pa., May 8.—The conven
tion of anthracite miners re-assembled
here today and ratified the action tak
en by its sub-scale committee, confer
ence with the operators' committee in
New York yesterday afternoon, declar
ing the operative award of the coal
strike commission of 1902 for the fur
ther period of three years ending
March 31, 1909. The convention was
presided over by John Mitchell. The
report of the committee's action was
adopted unanimously. Announcements
were posted at several of the mines o£
the resumption of work Monday.
KICKED OUR FLAG.
New York, May
Model F, $1,250
8.—An
unknown
man who walked down the main
street of Hoboken kicking an Ameri
can flag along in the dirt, was mobbed
by indignant citizens, clubbed by
policemen, sentenced by the court and
put to work breaking stones in the
penitentiary before the day was over,
General Agents, Grand Porks, N. D.
Silt
it'
lfllllf|:
THE EVENING TIKES PLAYS NO
rAVOEITES. IT IS THE NEON.IS
PAPER MOM START TO FIMSIT
.\$OCV'
i«W
^*rMT PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
si
FEELING OF MISTRUST
IS AGAIN RAMPANT
Obnoxious Fundamental Law Revived
Acta as Red Flag Before Angry
Members.
Amoclated. Preaa Sabfe ta The gTtialaar
Timra.
St. Petersburg, May 8.—The danger
of an early conflict between the gov
ernment and parliament been
greatly increased by what has hap
pened within the last twenty-four
hours. The good impression produced
by the official intimation ot the new
premier that the emperor and govern
ment were sincerely desirous of work
ing in harmony with parliament, which
was accepted in gooa faith by leaders
of the consti\ .tional democrats en
abling them counsel moderation,
has been largely dissipated and in its
place the olu feeling of mistrust has
been revived.
The liberals are utterly dumbfound
ed in view of semi-official assurances
on the subject by the unexpected pro
mulg uii last night of the obnox
ious fundamental law in a slightly
modified form. At one stroke it put
an eud to the chain which the new
cabinet tried to foster, namely,, that
the do-.vuiali of the Witte cabinet was
due tu the imperial disapproval of the
original draft of law.
An article in the law not mentioned
in last night's dispatches exempting
crown lands from taxation, and. ex
propriation and another reserving the
power of amnesty for political prison
ers to the emperor, run counter to the
already expressed will of the majority
and are bound to produce a clash.
The only cemmendable new feature
of the fundamental law is the provision
to the effect that imperial orders must
be countersigned by the president of
the council of ministers and the mem
ber of the cabinet whose department is
effected. But .so long as the cabinet is
not responsible to parliament it 1b
easy for the emperor to dismiss an un
willing minister and replace him by
one who will do hia bidding.
The indignation aroused by the em
peror's attempt to build an artificial
jlykt around the prerogatives of the
crown has been intensified by the as
tounding act of the police last night ih
dispersing a meeting of some of the
members of the lower house of parlia
ment and of the upper house or new
council of the empire^ at the hail, of
the Commercial society.
MAPLE LAKE SEWS.
Notes From the Popular Minnesota
Summer Resort Xear Mentor.
Maple Lake, Minn., May 8.—Sam
Melby of the firm of Melby & Standel,
contractors, is putting up a new cot
tage on Washington Heights.
George Nelson of Fargo is building
a new four-room cottage on the
Heights.
Mat Colton arrived at the lake Sat
urday evening, after a fifty-mile drive
from Grand Forks. N Brown and Col
ton Bros, will conduct the new store
here this summer.
N. Rapin of Crookston expects to be
out shortly to spend the summer at the
collage.
W. G. Smith, came out Saturday and
will spend a few days looking over the
fiotel operations.
A1 Logan goes down to the lake to
morrow with' R. W. Smith.
W. W. Hall arrived last Thursday
after a long drive. He reports the
roads as "fierce."
Ed Smith will operate three large
'buses between Mentor and the lake
this year.
Frank. Kent's new launch has ar
rived, and' though it "bucked" for the
first -couple of days he expects to get
lots of use of it during the summer.
i*
fV*
'-V'vV
5:/!
••V
Of Early Conflict Between Gov
ernment and Parliament is
Apparent.
Lee H«aly of Red Lake Palls will
be the owner of anew launch that will
be on the lake. The Healy family ex
pects- to spend a good share of the
summer at the lake.
A carload of boats for the new Lake
side- hotel is expected this week, also
an 18-foot launch.
Chris Opsahl and wife and A. Soren
son: and wife spent Sunday at the lake.
PLOT TO ASSASSINATE
President Caceres of the Republic of
San Domingo Discovered.
Aaaaeinted Preaa. Cable to The Bfealic
Tlmea.
Republic of Santo Domingo, via
Haytl, May 8.—It became known that
the authorities on Sunday, May 6, dis
covered a plot to assassinate President.
Caceres as he was leaving the theatre.'
Several arrests have been made. Shots
were exchanged last night near this
city between the rural guards and the
supposed revolutionists. The city and
surroundings are calm today.
-i 51?
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