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The evening times. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, June 30, 1906, Image 10

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042373/1906-06-30/ed-1/seq-10/

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*ACtt TEN
fc.
Fargo and Moorhead and the study of
the latest, most improved and scien
tific methods of agriculture which will
be exhibited to them at the A. C., de
riving both pleasure and profit from
the experience.
Interest in these excursions is stead
ily increasing. The farmers are realiz
ing more and more the advantages
which are offered them of receiving
instruction from those who make it
their life work to discover improved
methods of cultivation and they are
taking advantage of them.
The mere nominal fare which the
railroads offer makes the trip still
more attractive, and many who could
not otherwise afford a trip to the city
are glad to size the opportunity to
come. It is expected that fully 3,500
farmers from the different counties in
the state will take part in the excur
sions this year.
NORTHERN PACIFIC SCHEDULE.
Tlrartiday, July 5»
Pembina County—Coach leaves Pem
bina Thursday, July 5, at 4:02 p. m.
Arrives in Fargo on No. 5 at 7:20 a.
m. Returning leaves Fargo at 9:40 p.
m., on No. 8. Geo. A. McCrea, conduc
tor. Drayton.
Ransom County—Coach leaves En
glevale Thursday, July 5, on No. 10S
at 4:07 p. m. Arrives in Fargo Satur
day, July 7, at 8:30 a. m. Ernest Bill
ings, Lisbon.
Sunday, July 8.
Stark County—Coach leaves Dickin
son on No. 4 Sunday, July 8, at 10:27
a. m. Arrives in Fargo at 10:55 p. m.
Returning leaves Fargo Tuesday, July
10, at 7:40 a. m., on No. 5. A. L. Ayers,
Dickinson.
Monday, July 0.
McLean County—Coach leaves Bis
marck on No. 4 Monday, July 9, at
3:43 p. m. Aarrives at Fargo at 10:55
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Wednes
day, July 11, at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5.
L. M. Wallin, Washburn.
Foster County—Coach leaves Car
rlngton on No. 138 Monday, July 9, at
1:35 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 7:30 p.
jn. on No. 8. Returning leaves Fargo
July 11 at 7:40 p. m. on No. 5. Moore
Pryor, Carrington.
La Moure County—Coach leaves La
Moure on No. 108 Monday, July 9, at
3:20 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 7:05 p.
•in. Returning leaves Fargo Wednesday
July 11, at 8:30 a. m. B. N. Stone, La
Moure.
Griggs and Foster Counties—Coach
leaves McHenry on No. 118 Monday,
July 9, at 1:40 p. m. Arrives at Fargo
at 7:30 p. m. on No. 8. Returning
leaves Fargo Wednesday, July 11, at
1
:WMtr'
EXCURSIONS
Schedule of Farmers' Trips to Agricultural College An
nounced by President J. H. Worst.
After several delays and consider
able hard work. President Worst of
the agricultural college at Fargo has
succeeded in completing the necessary
arrangements for the farmers' excur
sions and has outlined a schedule.
The excursions will begin July 5, and
continue until July 19. Farmers from
all over the state will flock to Fargo
at that time. They will combine en
joyment of the trip, sightseeing in
-iBKrttn, Maaufacturera 4 Mkcn of-
CA1SPN*TID
BEVERAGES OF EVERY
DESCRIMON CIDERS MALT
MINERAL WATERS PHOSPHATES
FOUNTAIN SYRUPS ROOT BEFER
7:40 a. m. on No. 5. Maynard Crane,
Coopers town.
Wedneaday, July 11.
Billings County Coach leaves
Beach on No. 4 Wednesday, July 11,
at 8:12 a. m. Arrives at Fargo 10:55
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Friday,
July 13, at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. A. L.
Martin, Beach.
Burleigh County—Coach leaves Bis
marck on No. 4 Wednesday, July 11,
at 3:43 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 10:55
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Friday,
July 13, at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. M.
H. Jewell, Bismarck.
La Moure County Coach leaves
Eilgeley on No. 108 Wednesday, July
11, at 2:30 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at
7:05 p. m. Returning leaves Fargo
Friday. July 13, at 8:30 a. m. Shiels
& Weaver, Edgeley.
Cass County—Coach leaves Tower
City on No. 8 Wednesday, July 11, at
5:47 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 7:30
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Friday,
July 13, 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. F. S. Tal
cott, Buffalo.
Low Round Trip Rates All Summer
via
It's the most delightful trip in the world
e",OT
0,1
Thurmln.v, .Inly 12.
Benson County (Oberon Branch)—
Coach leaves Rhodes on No. 148
Thursday, July 12, at 7:00 a. m. Ar
rives at Fargo at 7:30 p. m. on No. S.
Returning leaves Fargo Saturday,
July 14, at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. A. A.
Lindahl, Maddock.
Sunday, July 15.
Morton County—Coach leaves Sims
on No. 4 Sunday, July 15, at 1:01 p.
in. Arrives at Fargo at 10:55 p. ni.
Returning leaves Fargo Tuesday, July
17, at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. J. R. Gil
breath, Mandan.
Kidder County—Coach leaves Steele
on No. 4 Sunday, July 15, at 5:12 p.
m. Arrives at Fargo 10:55 p. m. Re
turning leaves Fargo Tuesday, July 17,
at 7:40 a. m. on No. 5. P. J. Lyon,
Steele.
Monday, July 16.
Benson County Coach leaves
Brinsmade on No. 138 Monday, July
16, at 10:40 a. m. Arrives at Fargo
7:30 p. m. on No. 8. Returning leaves
Fargo Wednesday, July 18, at 7:40
a. m. H. U. Thomas, Oberon.
Wells County—Coach leaves Bow
don on No. 168 Monday, July 16, at
11:15 a. m. Arrives at Fargo at 10:55
p. m. on No. 4. Returning leaves Far
go Wednesday, July 18, at 7:40 a. ni.
on No. 5. J. A. Regan, Fessenden.
Barnes County—Coach leaves San
born on No. 8, Monday, July 16, at
4:46 p. m. Arirves at Fargo 7:30 p. m.
Returning leaves Fargo Tuesday, July
17, at 5:35 p. m. on No. 7. S. A. Nye,
Valley City.
Tuesday, July 17,
Stutsman County—Coach leaves Me
dina on No. 4 Tuesday, July 17, at
6:11 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 10:55
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Thurs
day, July 19, at 7:40 a. m. on Np. 5.
W. R. Kellogg, Jamestown.
Emmons County—Coach leaves Lin
ton on No. 173 Tuesday, July 17, at
8:00 a. m. Arrives at Fargo 10:55 p.
m. on No. 4. Returning leaves Fargo
Friday, July 20, at 7:40 a. m. on No.
5. D. R. Streeter, Linton.
Wednenday, July 18.
IDE AMERICAN BOTTLING ASSOGUTION
STRAWBERRY SODA
SARSAPARILLA LRMON SELTZER
GINGER ALE, ETC.. ETC.
Ptalolficc BOX 943. Lonf DUl.nct 'Phone 844.
Spend Your Vacation
IN
Yellowstone
National Park
Barnes County—Coach leaves Val-
Have you tried our
CtBB SODAT No
beverage ever in
creased in popularity
ao rapidly.
4 u*a^
Our drinks are su-
Sle
erlor to any used in
State of North
Dakota.
Our PERFECTO
MALT, non-lntoxl
cating, is known the
state over and is in
demand anmmer and
winter. All drinks
guaranteed to comply
with Pure Food Law.
GRAND FORKS. N. D.
ouln* among the great peak* of
""rroonded by the greatmt of
ndera—geyaern, hot uprlaga, mad pool.,
tinted terrace*,, and beautiful rivers. .The Coachlnx
Trip la the fiaeat In America. The Uteli are excellcnf
It coat, bat little. Ticket. Incladlng "all and
transportation and covering five and one-half dan
wltJria Ike paThf are on vale at
.00
"A
4
.--v.
."'•V
From Grand Forks
and Return
For foil Information call upon or write
D. MULREIN
Local A^ent, Grand Fork*
a A a a
Northern Pacific Railway
A. v.
CIBUSO,
*,
«e
Thuraday, Jul lft.
Stutsman County Coach leaveB
Edmonds on No. 138 Thursday, July
19, at 2:18 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at
7:30 p. m. on No. 8. Returning leaves
Fargo Saturday, July 21, at 7:40 a.
m. on No. 5. W. R. Kellogg, James
town.
Oliver County Coach leaves New
Salem on No. 4 Thursday, July 19, at
1:21 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at 10:55
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Satur
day, July 21, at 7:40 a. m. on No.
5. Chas. M. Whitmer, Yucca.
Eddy County—Coach leaves Shey
enne on No. 13$ Thursday, July 19, at
11:51 a. m. Arrives at Fargo at 7:30
p. m. on No. 8. Returning leaves Far
go Saturday, July 21, at 7:40 a. m.
C. J. Maddux, New Rockford.
GREAT NORTHERN SCHEDULE.
Thuraday, July ,1.
East Richland County—Coach No.
7. Coach leaves Wahpeton on No. 13
Thursday, July 5, at (about) 6:30 p.
m. Arrive Fargo at 8:00 p. m. Re
turning leave Fargo July 6 at 10:38
p. m. on No. 10. R. J. Hughes, Wah
peton.
Kr llny, July 4.
Trail County—Coach No. 1. Coach
leaves Buxton on No. 112 Friday, July
6, at 9:48 p. m. Arrives in Fargo at
11:30 a. m. Returning leave Forga on
No. Ill at 8:IS p. m.
Coach leave Hillsboro on No. 112
Friday July 6, at 10:05 a. m. Return
ing leave Fargo on No. Ill at 8:18
p. m.
Sunday. July 8.
Williston on Train No. 6, Sunday, July
8. at 6:30 a. m. Arrive Fargo on No.
10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leave
Fargo Tuesday July 10, at 5:05 a. m.
on No. 9. D. B. Metzen, Williston, A.
E. Hughes, Ray.
Monday, July 0.
Glenville Branch—Coach leaves
Sherwood on No. 218 Monday, July 9,
at 7:15 a. in. Arrive Nos. 6 and 10 at
10:38 p. ni. Returning leave Fargo
Wednesday, July 11, at 5:05 a. in. )n
No. 9. S. H. Sleeper, Mohall.
Bottineau County—Coach leave Ant
ler on No. 214 Monday, July 9, at 8:55
a. m. Arrive Fargo Nos. 6 and 10 at
30:38 p. m. Returning leave Fargo .on
Wednesday, July 11, at 5:05 a. m. on
No. 9. J. F. Jenson, Westhope.
Rolette County—Coach leaves St.
John on No. 210 Monday July 9, at
6:45 a.m. Arrive Fargo on Nos. 6 and
10 at 10.38 p. m. Returning leave Far
go Wednesday, July 11, at 5:05 a. m.
on No. 9. Thomas Henderson, Rolla.
Cavil ier County—Coach leaves Han
nah on No. 206 on Monday, July 9, at
2:25 p. m. Arrive Fargo on No. 10 at
10:38 p. m. Returning leave Fargo
Wednesday July 11, at 5:05 a. m. on
No. 9. Peter Reid, Langdon.
Pembina County—Coach leave Neche
on No. 138 Monday, July 9, at 5:10 p.
m. Arrive Fargo on No. 110 at 10:38
p. m. Returning leave Fargo Wednes
day, July 11, at 8:05 a. m. on No. 9,
W. J. Burke, Bathgate.
Sargent County—Coach leave Ha
vana on No. 336 Monday, July 9, at
8:25 a. ni. Arrive Fargo at 8:00 p. m.
on No. 13. Returning leave Fargo
Wednesday, July 11, at 8:00 a. ni. on
No. 14 J. E. Hudson, Havana.
Wedae*da% Jnly 11.
Walsh County—Coach leaves Edin
burgt on No. 206 Wednesday, July 11,
at 4:22 p. m. Arrive Fargo Nos. 6
and 10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leave
Fargo Friday, July 13, at 5:05 a. ni. on
Xo. 9. J. A. Vernon, Conway.
Towner Count}-—Coach leaves Perth
on No. 210 Wednesday, July 11, at 7:27
a. m. Arrive Fargo on Nos. 6 and 10
at 10:38 p. m. Returning leave Fargo
Friday, July 13, at 5:05 a. m. on No. 9.
H. H. Thompson, Cando.
Western Ward County—Coach
leaves White Earth on No. 6 Wednes
day, July 11, at 8:05 a. m. Arrive Far
go on No. 10 at 10:38 p. m. Return
ing leave Fargo Friday. July 13, at
5:05 a. ni. on No. 9. Olaf Hagenson,
Palermo.
Western Richland County—Coach
leaves Lidgerwood on 336 Wednesday,
July 11, at 10:35 a. m. Arrive Fargo
at-8:00 p. m. on No. 13 Returning
leave Fargo Friday, July 13, at S:00
a. m. on No. 14 W. C. Forman, Hank
inson.
Eastern Walsh County—Coach leave
Auburn on No. 138 Wednesday, July
11, at 6:13 p. m. Arrive Fargo on No.
10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leave Far
go Friday, July 13, at 5:05 a. m. on No.
9. H. G. Sprague, Grafton.
TburNdny, July 12.
Ramsey County Coach leaves
Churches Ferry on No. 6 Thursday,
July 12, at 3:05 p. m. Arrives at Far
go at 10:38 p. m. Returning leaves
Fargo Saturday, July 14, at 5:05 a.
m. on No. 9. Henry Hale, Devils
iake.
Pierce County—Coach leaves Rugby
on No. 6 Thursday, July 12, at 1:30 p.
m. Arrives at Fargo on No. 10 at 10:38
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Satur
day, July 14, at 5:05 a. m. on No.
9. H. C. Hurd, Rugby.
Sunday, July IS.
Ward County—Coach leaves Minot
Chief Dayolheasala's
MOHAWK REMEDIES
State Agent: GUS MYERS.
320 S. Third St., Grand Forks, N.
McGOEY & HANRAHAN
Electrical Contractors
Estimates Furnished
Repair Work Promptly Attended to
Oifico 10 S. 3rd St.
Both Phones 525
SEALS
Either Pocket
or Dealt....
:y
r»$:
THE EVENDia
'tN
ley City on No. 8. Wednesday, July 18,
at 5:15 p. m. Arrives at Fargo at.7:30
p. m. Returnign leaves Fargo Thurs
day, July 19 at 5:35 p. m. on No. 7.
S. A. Nye, Valley City.
Grand Fork*. N.
Leave Order*
Rubber Stamps
Write for Catalog
CADWXLL, The Stamp
feut recks, *. n.
GRAND
on Train No. 6 Sunday, July 15, at
11:00 a. m. Arrives at Fargo on No. 10
at 10:38 p. m. Returning leaves Far
go Tuesday, July 17, 5 :05 a. m. on No.
9. T. P. Kuiaas, Mlnot.
Monday, July la.
Nelson County—Coach leaves Lako
ta on No. 6 Monday, July 16, at 5:00
p. ra. Arrives In Fargo on No. 10 at
10:38 p. m. Returning leaves Fargo
Wednesday, July 18, at 5:05 a. m. on
No. 9. J. S. Metcalf, Lakota.
Towner Branch—tioach leaves Max
bass on No. 21.. Monday, July 16, at
10:15 a. m. Arrives at Fargo on No.
10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leaves
Fargo Wednesday, July 18, at 5:05
a. m. on No. 9. J. M. Vatsvog, Upham.
Western Pembina County Coach
leaves Walhalla on No. 140 Monday,
July 16, at 7:25 a. m. Arrives in Far
go on No. 10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning
leaves Fargo Wednesday, July 18, at
5:05 a. m. on No. 9. Chas. H. Lee,
Walhalla.
Aneta Branch—Coach leaevs Aneta
on No. 196 Monday, July 16, at 6:30
a. m. Arrives in Fargo at 10:30 a. m.
Returning leaves Fargo same day at
6:20 p. m. J. P. Sundquist, Aneta.
Sarles Branch—Coach leaves Sarles
on No. 208 Monday, July 16, at 7:15
a. m. Arrives at Fargo on No. 10 at
10:38 p. ni. Returning leaves Fargo
Wednesday, July 18, at 5:05 a. m. on
No. 9. Stuart G. Watt, Sarles.
York Branch—Coach leaves Thorn
on No. 212 Monday, July 16, at 11:25
a. m. Arrives in Fargo on No. 6 and
10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leaves
Fargo Wednesday, July 18, at 5:05 a.
m. on No. 9. H. T. Willey, Dunseith.
Tuesday, Jnly 17.
Aneta Branch, Steele County—Coach
leaves Sharon on No. 196 Tuesday,
July 17, at 6:46 a. m. Arrive at Fargo
at 10:30 a. m. Returning leaves
Fargo Tuesday, July 17, at 6:20 p.
m. W. H. Potter, Finley.
Wedaeaday, Jnly 18.
McHenry County Coach leaves
Nodwich on No. 6 Wednesday, July
18, at 11:33 a. m. Arrive at Fargo on
No. 10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning leave
on No. 9. Dalton McDonald, Towner.
Cass County—Coach leaves Page on
No. 196 Wednesday, July 18, at 8:16
a. m. Arrives at Fargo at 10:30 a. m.
Returning leaves argo Wednesday,
July 18, at 6:20 p. m. E. S. Davis,
Page.
Tharaday, Jaljr JO.
Benson Branch—Coach leaves Knox
on No. 6 Thursday, July 19, at 2:03
p. m. Arrives at Fargo on No. 10 at
10:38 p. m. Returning leaves Fargo
Saturday, July 21, at 5:05 a. m. on
No. 9. Lewis Pond, Churches Ferry.
Eastern Grand Forks County—Coach
leaves Ardoch on No. 138 Thursday,
July 19, at 6:58 p. m. Arrives in Far
go on No. 10 at 10:38 p. m. Returning
leaves Fargo Saturday, July 21, at
5:05 a. m. on No. 9. J. D. Bacon,
Grand Forks.
Western Grand Forks County
Coach leaves Niagara on No. 6 Thurs
day, July 19, at 5:51 p. m. Arrives at
Fargo on No. 10 at 10:38 p. m. Return
ing leaves Fargo Saturday, July 21,
at 5:05 on No. 9. J. Dexter Pierce,
Larimore.
Ramsey County Starkweather
Branch—Coach leaves Devils Lake on
No. 6 Thursday, July 19, at 3:55 p.
m. Arrives in Fargo on No. 10 at 10:38
p. m. Returning leaves Fargo Satur
day, July 21 at 5:05 a. m. on No. 9.
Homer Resler, Starkweather.
DOGS TO MATCH.
Must he Like Shoes and Have a Jew
eted Collar.
No woman is in fashion now unless
she has a dog to match.
This sounds foolish—and it is. Wo
men are often silly, which is one rea
son why men love them so.
ANew York woman with more mon
ey and leisure, than sense, started it.
She appeared in public with a white
fox terrier. The dog wore a necklace
of blue enamel beads, and the woman
wore enamel shoes of the same color.
Betcher life every woman on Fifth
avenue wanted shoes just like the
first one's, and a necklace like the
dogs. So, the fashion started.
It is belated in reaching Grand
Forks, but it has arrived. Shoe deal
ers have samples of enamel shoes of
various delicate shades. The neck
laces are on their way to the depart
ment stores.
It is also ultra-swagger to wear
stockings of blue or white or pink to
match the shoes and necklace. The
stockings should be worked with
flowered vines.
t'HAMPIOJi "RIOT KILLER."
M. Louis Lepine the Man Who Quelled
the Paris May-Day Strikes.
(Paris Letter to the London Kxpress.)
A spare, wiry little man, 60 years
old, with iron gray hair, a white goa
tee beard and kindly wrinkles round
his piercing dark brown eyes. Those
drak brown eyes, which in spite of
their velvty softness have no languor
in them, and see everything at once,
are as characteristic of the policeman
as is the mouth which shuts with the
snap of a steel trap, and eyes and
mouth are the most characteristic
things about the personality of M.
Louis Lepine, the prefect of the Paris
police and th eprotector of Paris.
The evildoers of Paris fear him, but
they like him. It was amusing to
watch the crowd on the Place de la
Republique on May Day, when the
dusk was closing in and a number of
Belleville "Apaches" swelled the mob.
The mob was pushing up against the
police lines, anJ had begun to look
nasty. The police, who had been fair
ly rough all day, were losing their
tempers altogether. Then an electric
landaulet whizzed up, and before it
had stopped M. Lepine, in his black
trock coat and top hat, was out of it
and in among the crowd.
He did not say much. He just glanc
ed aiound him with those quick-see
ing brown eyes of his. "Calm is what
I would recommend,' 'he said. "There
must be a few of you whose con
sciences are not quite clear, and if my
men arrest any of th^se, well—"
And the crowd yelled "Vive Lepine."
M. Lepine is an insatiable worker.
He is invariably up at 5 a. m., and
even before that if there be any need
for him. It is a mystery when he
finds time for sleep, for his appetite
for the details of the work of his dif
ficult charge is terrific, and he rarely
if ever goes to bed early.
"The bad characteristics are most
wakeful at hours when we respectable
citizens ought to be asleep," is one of
his favorite sayings. "Therefore, we
who have to make sleep possible for
respectable citizens may never sleep
with more than one eye at a time,"
and he certainly acts up to that ax
iom.
.Altogether, M. Lepine has proved
himself to be the right man in the
right place. His calm, under all cir
cumstances, and the rapidity with
which he follows up quick thought
with quicker action have, as well as
his unfailing clear and juBt Judgment
endeared him to the Parisians, and
Paris without "Papa Lepine," as the
Parisians call him, would cease almost
to be the Paris which we know.
THE HIE
Will Aggregate Over Twenty
-. five Billions of Dollars II
For 1906.
The world's international commerce
will aggregate fully 25 billions of dol
lars in the year 1906. In 1900 it ag
gregated, in round terms, 20 billions
in 1890, 17% billions in 1880, 14%
billions in 1870,10% billions in 1860,
7% billions, and in 850, 4 billions.
By the term "world's international
commerce" is meant the imports plus
the exports of all countries of the
world from which tsatlstlcal trade re
ports were available at the dates
named.
These figures, which show an enor
mous increase and indicate that the
trade between nations in the present
year will be six times as much as in
1850, two and one-half times as much,
as in 1870, and 25 per cent more than
in 1900, are based upon careful ag
gretions of the Imports and exports
of the various countries of the world
made by the department of commerce
and labor through its bureau of stat
istics.
The aggregation covers the latest
available year. In some cases the
figures are those of 1905 In others,
1904, and in a few cases those of 1903.
This aggregation, recently made, gives
a grand total of a little more than 24
billions. Later figures are. however,
being accumulated constantly by the
bureau of statistics, and these are so
adjusted that it is possible to com
pare the monthly average of the im
ports of the principal countries down
to and Including part of 1906. A com
parison of these monthly averages of
imports and exports with those of the
corresponding periods of the preced
ing year justifies the assertion that
the total international commerce of
the year 1906 will be fully 25 billions
of dollars.
An examination of tehse figures of
imports and exports of the principal
countries of the world and the month
ly average of theiT exports and Im
ports gives some interesting facts.
This monthly average is necessarily
adopted as a method of comparison
of trade conditions among the various
countries, because their fiscal years
end at such varying dates that it is
quite impossible to compare the totals
for complete years and bring the cal
culation down to the present moment.
By taking the monthly average for
that part of the fiscal year already
completed, however, a comparison of
the trade of the various countries
with their own trade in a correspond
ing period of last year is possible, and
it is also practicable to compare the
monthly average of one country with
any other of the thirty countries in
cluded in this list which the bureau
of statistics publishes each month in
its Monthly Summary of Commerce
and Finance.
An examination of this table with
the purpose of comparing the world's
commerce at the present moment
with that of a year ago shoxrs that
the average monthly exports of Ar
gentina have increased from 21% mil
lions to practically 26 millions those
of Austria-Hungary from 27 millions
to 37 millions per month those of
Belgium from 30% millions to 34%
millions, those of Canada from 16%
millions to 20% millions, those of
France from 64% millions to 72 1-3
millions, those of Germany from 103%
millions to 110% millions, those of
China from 11% millions to practi
cally 14 millions, those of Cuba from
7% millions to 9% millions, those of
Mexico from 6% millions to practi
cally 10 millions, those of European
Russia from 41 millions to 43% mil
lions those of the United K^igdom
from 127 millions to 143% millions,
and those of the United States from
125 millions to 147 millions per month.
These comparisons, it should be
understood, relate to the monthly
average exportation in the accumu
lated months of the fiscal year of
each country named, compared with
the monthly average of the corre
sponding months of the preceding
year, and. as the' dozen countries
above named are the principal ex
porting countries of the world, it is
quite fair to assume that the world's
total of exports will aggregate in the
lzM3
IP
IN
i»-
'M
itm.:
ewStoriMsr mbra than
thai:of the precofflng
The tact tlwt the total exports have
Increased as ahov* .indicated makes it
Quite apparent that the imports must
ham *1»0 increased, ,and tus cpn.
cluslon ls JustUted by the imi»rt flg
nr«|S, whlch 8hbw that the monthly
average of Argtmtln&'i imports have
Weressed fro® 1ft ttllllon dollars to
niiUlfjns Austria-Hungary's from
ffX wUHohs Belgium's tram
to 51% Ciuiada'B (t»m 19% to
over 22: China's from 17% to 20
Cuba's from 6% to nearly. 8 that, of
fiance from 78 to 85% Germany from
*28* to 133% Italy from 18% to
over 32 Netherlands from 76 to 80%
United Kingdom from 226% to 241%,
and the United States from 93% to
101% millions.
The only countries In the list which
show a falling off in monthly average
in exports being Bulgaria, Greece,
Portugal, and Sweden, and in each of
these cases the reduction is slight,
while the countries which show a re
duction in monthly average of im
ports are Bulgaria, Cape of Good^
Hope, Greece, Japan, Norway, Euro
pean Russia, and Uruguay. These
reductions in both the imports and
exports are small, and relate in most
cases to countries haying a compar
atively small trade, and this will hot
offer any material offset to the en
largement of the total international
commerce indicated" by the monthly
increases of the more Important com
mercial countries.
One Interesting fact which an ex
amination of these figures of average
monthly trade of the principal coun
tries of the world develops is that the
United States now stands clearly at
the head of the world's great export
ing nations. The average monthly ex
portation from the United States in
the nine monthB ending with March
is shown by the bureau of statistics
figures at 147.208,973 the monthly
average from the United Kingdom for
the same period. $143,574,912 the
average from Germany during the
twelve months ending with Decem
ber, 1905, fllO,777,800 the monthly
average from France tor the twelve
month period ending with February,
$72,370,400 that from Netherlands for
the twelve months ending December,'
1904, $66,426,£24 from European Rus
sia for the twelve months ending De
cember. 1905, (43,699,800 British In
dia. the average for the ten months
ending with January. 1906, $41,$67,
524 Canada, for the eight months
ending February, 1906, $20,403,753
China, monthly average for the
twelve month.'? ending December, 1904,
^33,9yo,l and Japan, for the month
of January. 1903, 512,316,707.
An examination of the import col
umn shows that tlie United States,
which rank", first as an exporter,
stands third among the nations as an
importer, ths monthly average of im
portation into the United States for
ths nine monlhs ending with March
being $10J ,506,417 the monthly aver
age into ths United Kingdom in the
same period, $241,390:911 into Ger
many during the twelve months end
ing with December, 1905, $133,478,333
France, $85,423,650 Netherlands, $80,
470,686, and Belgium, $51,682,300,
while in all others of the countries
named the average of imports falls
below the 50-miUion-c|ollar line
Get the habit, read the Times adds.
Quality and Price
..The foHowtng letter from the
Mlchaud Bros., of St. Paul should
appeal to all who are looking:
for QUALITY and not PRICE:
"Mr. Bartles of the BartleB Oil
Co., advises us that he and his
son Mr. Chas. Bartles, have built
a plant at. Grand Forks and th-.
corporated it under the laws of
North Dakota to do busiuesB'4
there as the Bartles Dakota Oil
Co.
"Now, Mr. Bartles and his son
are well known to us, and it
gives us pleasure to state that
we have handled their oil ex
clusively in our business In St.
Paul for nearly four years, pay
ing them from Three to Four
cents per gallon More than the
Standard Oil Co. have offered us,
and are- selling their oil at that
to the dealers.
"We bandied both the Stand
ard's and the Bartles Oils for
awhile, but our customers were
perfectly willing to pay the dif
ference, which was five cents per
gallon in the selling price for the
Bartles Oil, so we grave up hand
ling all otber oils three years ago
and have been handling: only the
Bartles oil since, and have yet to
hear the first complaint asralnst
it. fours truly,
"MICHAUD BROS.,"
BARTLES-DAKOTA OIL CO.
GHAND FORKS. N. D.
-The EveningTlmes
fob and
mm
JJJAre the mo# complete in the State. All
JU classes of work done on short notice
and at reasonable prices. High-class Com-
mercial, Book, Blank Book and Poster
Printing-the Right Wdy
We can also save you money on your pHnt*
ing. Remember this when you have work id
our line, and give us a chance to figure on it
Wmm
mmhM
ITOftDAY.
Ml
The White Hotise
wmm
the Season's
yfe- Dflieades.
:iCfThe
American people
manifested an altogether kindly awl®1
wholly pardonable interest in the daily^ -,'v
llfe of their Chief Executive
members' of his household as constl-^ ?.
tue the "first family of the land." JVirV
more, than a century the WhiteHous».
in Washington, has: been the center
of the .domestic interest of the repub-
Mr. Roosevelt and his family might
be described without offense aB "good.
eaters." They demand the, best—and
get it Aside from formal functions.
however, such as state dinners' to
diplomats and other digtitaries, the
Roosevelt table is not an extravagant
one. For breakfast,' luncheon and din
ner the president and his wife and
children eat about the saihe things
as are eaten by other American
families In. comfortable circumstances.
There is an inflexible rule that viands
shall be wholesome, as' well as apr:
petlzing.
Where the president's family has an
advantage over the families of men
less highly placed Is that the White
House steward gets first pick, as a
rule, of whatever the market affords.
Tradesmen, of course, always are
anxious to secure the White House
patronage. They cannot (advertise
themselves as "Porkchop purveyor, by
royal warrant to His Majesty the
King," as might be done by some lucky
butcher in London or other European
capital but the fact that^they furnlsb
meat, or eggs, or butter to the White
House helps their trade immensely.
Most of the White House marketing
is done at Washington's center market*
reputed to be one of the best In any
city. Every dealer in the market
knows Henry Plnckney, the colored'
Whitev House steward, and he gener
ally gets what he wants, though some
times he has to enter Into scrambels.
with the stewards from the homes of
Vice President Fairbanks and other
notables. A good deal of tact has
to be exercised by the dealers,'espec
ially when the steward from a foreign
embassy makes 'demand for some
tempting edible that has been reserved
for the White House table.
On one day in June the following
were the menus of three White House
meals, 'and they- can be accepted as
fairly representative of what the
president's family eats at thte time
of year:
Breakfast,
Breakfast.
Little Neck Clams
Fruit Salad.
1
11c. It is not necesary, therefore, to
a a or a in a In re
in the matter of what the White House -V
inmates eat. v-• '-v
Tartelettes aux Blackberries vi?
Neapolitan'Ice Cream. rKf. WJJj
'M
Squab has been the most popular
game of the past season on fashion
able tables, and it has been in' demand
at the White House. Eggs play a big
part in the president's bill of fare.
From them there, is no" danger
potmalne poisoning or taint.
5
US-
V-'P#
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4^
"I
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y'u
Oranges and Cantalopes. iv ^.rr- *v,
Cereals.
Eggs, Bacon or Lamb Chops „r
Hot Cakes or Waffles.
Coffee. "Vs
tr*
Stuffed Olives. Celery
Consomme of Chicken ,, \_ i,
Flsh Saute. "i f1 $
Eggs a la Turque.
Spring Lamb.
New Spring Beans, Asparagus anAw
Ma«hed Potatoes
lettuce and TomatoeB .A*M4t,,
Stnawberrles. xc Cream
•V Diner.
Split Pea Soup.
Celery. Olives
Fillet of Bass and Uashed Potatoes
Broiled Turkey. Celery Sauee
Chocolate Fritters a la Vanllle ,•*£
Long Island Duckling
Macaroni au Gratin
Broiled Sweet Potatoes. New String I, I
Beans. «v \l
Stuffed Green Peppers
.*1
Epicure­|$ofInfind
ans of the most exacting kind
eggs an old standby.
There are two large-square tables
in the state dining, room at the White
House. When two gueBts are dined
one of the tables is used, and where
the company is larger, both are decor
ated. The president sits at the east
end of the table and Mrs. Roosevelt
at the west end! The tables are! set
with the dinner pieces, of former
presidents and are changed every day.
&Sht
Wx!,
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