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The evening times. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, July 02, 1906, Image 1

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THE EVENING TIKES STANDS FOB
ettAND FORKS AND NORTH DAKO
TA UNDER ALL CIRCUMSTANCES
VOL. 1, NO. 151.
Of England Rejoice at Unfav
orable Criticism of American
Howes and Use Same to
Room Their Product.
AMERICAN GOODS
TABOOED ARROAD
ij
Unsanitary Cntttlois English
Slaughter Houses Exposed—
1
WMIing Industry Collapse.
1: By G. C. Sander.
Washington, D. C., Juiy 2.—Mr.
.Charles A. Gibson, clerk to the house
committee on agriculture, returned on
Monday last from a trip to England.
5, Mr. Gibson landed in Liverpool on the
day that the Nelll-Reynolds report on
the Chicago packing houses wa^ pub
lished and he says that the English
..'papers (even including the one time
ti conservative London Times) were
fllled with all sorts of sensational re
ports "as to the alleged' unsanitary
conditions in every American packing
house.
"The English meat packers (though
really packers of American grown
meat in most cases) were prompt to
seize the opportunity," said Mr. Glb
son today, "and they are working upon
the prejudices of the people for all
they are worth. In Liverpool the re
tail stores or shops display placards
in which attention is conspicuously
called to the alleged fact that 'no
American meats
rare
English concern. The Chicago', Kan
sas City and other packing plants lft
this country are scrubbed out twice
dally. But Friday is "wash day" for
Liverpool, and only brooms, shovels,
etc., are used on other days. Candor
impels me to say, however, that the
pens where live cattle are kept are
beyond reproach and have no super
iors, so far as my knowledge and
experience goes.
"England Is awaking -to the neces
sity of looking Into the sanitary condl
tions of her own packing establish
ments," continued Mr. Gibson.
''Throughout the United Kingdom
smelling committees are at work at
the present time, and they have plenty
to smell. English newspapers, doctors
and sanitary Officials have already
shown up a frightful state of affairs
existing even in 'the highest grade
hotels and restaurants of. London and
other large cities—saying that 'nothing
is wasted' even the scraps left on the
plates of the guests of these high
class establishments doing further
duty on new customers under different
(and of course, fresh) titles. Horses
too old tor work are slaughtered by
the thousand and are converted into
sausage and canned meats, even the
muscular portions of whales are thus
treated."
"Whales? Have you not been telling
stories to the mariners during your
voyage?"
"I am simply quoting English auth
ority,. The Manchester Mail of June
8th—the very day Of the publication
of the Neill report—published a col
umn article under the caption 'The
Newfoundland Whaling Collapse.'
"Here is a portion of the article:
'In the history of modern industrial
enterprise no collapse has been more
remarkable, even though on a small
scale, than that of the whaling indus
try in Newfoundland. Inaugurated in
1896 it shortly attained enormous mag
nitude,. but is now In the throeB of
dissolution.
"Modern whaling, as practiced in
Newfoundland, represents the chase of
the rorqual,: or racer whale, the speed
iest ofallthe tribe of oetaceans, and
one which htthertd could be. pursued
ttpcause .of Its alertness and speed,
"today the whale is' chased by small
(Coattaved 01 Pace 8.)
"S*-
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sold here.' Cir-
'culars are distributed everywhere an
nouncing the points of alleged super
iority of English packed goods over
those put up in this country and yet
the killing floors of the places where
cattle are' killed across the river from
Liverpool are in the! most filthy and
unsanitary state. The killing floors
are paved with cobble stones with
wide spaces between them. The offal,
hides, paunches, stomachs, horns, feet
and manure are all thrown to the
ground and the flesh from the heads
'is removed there. I asked the fore
man how these places are cleaned up
•V and he said: 'No killing is permitted
on Friday—on that day the dock board
takes charge and the floors are washed
out.' That's the difference between
an American slaughter house and ah
ATTY. JEROME ASSUMES
WORK OF THAW CASE
A—elated Pma im The Inilic Tine*.
New York, July 2.—With
the return of District At
torney Jerome from hlB vacation
In the country, the Investigation
into the Thaw-White tragery was
given renewed Impetus today.
Attaches of the district attorney's
office had been engaged in whip
ping into shape Information con
cernlng the case already at hand
and everything was in preparation
to be submitted to the chief upon
his arrival. Thaw passed a very
comfortable night In his cell in
the Tombs and today appeared to
be in better condition that at any
time since he was arrested for
shooting Stanford White a week
ago. The prisoner's wife called
at the usual hour today and spent
some time with him.
WARREN MURDER
AT LAST
Lindroth Made a Gun and Shot
Himself With Weapon is
the Opinion.
Special to The Evening Time*.
Warren, Minn., July 2.—G. Canna
han, assistant superintendent of a
Minneapolis detective agency, has ex
ploded the verdict of murder returned
by the coroner's jury in the case of
Andrew Lindroth, who was found dead
in a blacksmith shop three weeks ago.
All the, suspects have been released by
the authorities and the grand jury ad
journed today after returning a report
of no' bill.
Lindroth became despondent over
his debts and the fact that he could
not stop .drinking, and told several
persons that he was not going to. live
long. Mr: Cannahan found a piece of
gas pipe about five feet long, which
gave evidence of having been fired
off" and' it was taken to Minnesota's
state chemist, who found therein
traces of burnt powder.
The theory is that Lindroth took
this pipe, plugged one end with putty,
placed a fuse through it and after
loading with powder and a large bul
let held this Improvised weapon to his
breast and fired it.
This clears up the mystery which
has caused no end of excitement in
this town. The county attorney and
sheriff have been blamed and ridiculed,
and proceedings threatened to secure
their removal from office, because it
was said they desired to shield a sup
posed guilty person.
The grand jury report exonerates
everybody connected with the matter
and satisfactorily settles the'Warren
.murder mystery.
Banquet Tonight.
London, July 2.—At the Hotel Cecil
tonight a brilliant banquet will be
given in celebration of Dominion day.
Lord Strathcona will preside and the
attendance will include many notable
public men. among them the delegates
to the congress of Chambers of Com
merce.
YOI TH ARRESTED FOR
WEARING A RED SCARF
Berlin, July 2.—Wearing a red
necktie, the badge of socialism, is
the offense charged against a
young man named Thomas at
Leipzig.
He attended school and shocked
.: the political feelings of the teach
ers by his scarlet scarf, and, fur
thermore, refused to take it off
when ordered. The offending tie
was confiscated by a policeman
and Thomas was haled before the
judge.
He was charged under a law of
the revolutionary period of 1849
against wearing republican colors,
.but on account of his youth, Thom
as was acquitted with a caution.
When a woman has a pretty flower
garden her neighbors are liable to
say: "She is mighty stingy with her
flowers."
NAMED
CANAL COMMISSION
Aswelatel Prm to The fivealag Tinea.
Washington, July 2.—Because of the failure of the senate
to confirm the Isthmian canal commission, President Roose
velt lias named a new commission c.onsisting of Theodore P.
Shonts, chairman John P.Stevens, Governor Chas. E.
Magooq, Brigadier General Peter C. Haines, U. S. A retired
Mordeca Indicott, civil engineer U. S. N. and Benjamin M.
Pen-odd, members, Stevens replaces Brigadier General Oswald
P. Earnest, who retired from active service in the ariny last
week and'will hereafter devote practically his entire time to
international water ways commission.
Joseph Bucklin Bishop, who was sedretary of the old
commission and a member of the commission, will be secre
tary to the new body but not one of the United States mem
bers. The salaries of the members will continue the same as
heretofore Mr. Stevens will continue as chief engineer of the
commission.but will not receive any extra compensation for
hie services as a member of the commission.
wy-vm.„
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4? H. $'
4
LOOM
ffi
L-^ -V"*i
REST AT OYSTER BAY
IS
DESIRE
Official Cares Laid Aside for
the Day Photographer
Has Detective Arrested.
luMlateiTKM to The Evening Time*.
Oyster Bay, L. I., July 2.—Whatever
official business President Roosevelt
transacts today will be done over tele
phone between Sagamore Hill and the
executive offices at Oyster Bay. This
means that the president is to have as
complete relief from the cares of his
office as the circumstances will permit,
and unless some important demand is
made upon him through official chan
nels he will spend the day undisturb
ed. The president is to have many
such days throughout the summer, and
visits from statesmen and politicians
are to be made "as scarce as can be,"
according to Secretary Loeb.
The secretary will not begin his
daily visits to the president until to
morrow. An echo of the slight dis
turbance at the station when the pres
ident arrived yesterday came today
when Clarence Le Gendre, a photog
rapher for the New York World, swore
due a warrant against James Sloan of
the president's secret service staff at
Oyster Bay. The war'rant was served
when Sloan returned from Sagamore
Hill. McQuaid, a village constable,
placed Sloan' under arrest. He was
taken at once before Squire Franklin
and asked for a continuance of the
case. The squire released Sloan on
his own recognizance, telling' him to
appear next Monday to plead to the
warrant which charges him with as
sault in-the third degree. LeGendre
says that SlOah hit hint- oft'the chin,
just he^'had clospd ,tbe,8hotter -of
bis camera and sec'iived jjicture of
the p^sldent..
I'' .• yuO.NJC^.
•^^|ni^A!f |||3»IStER. V.
Enrlqke Cfti Mendozn to
Wa8h(njgton, July ^.-^Enrique Course
tez has been named, (jgfo^bian niinisr.:
ter to the United SUtt^' io succeed
Diego Mondoza. The state 'department
lias been adVised by American Minis
ter Barrett at Bogota that the appoint
ment of Cortez followed the initiation
of preliminary 'negotiations at Bogota
looking toward the framing of trea
ties between the United States and Col
ombia Intended to settle all disputes
and Inaugurate a new era of friendly
relations.
rsor/ffffm
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ptsTorrK*
THE WEATHER.
North Dakota.
Fair tonight and
Tuesday. Warmer
Tuesday in west por
tions.
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A SQUARE DEAL FOR ALL
THE EVENING TIMES
GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA, MONDAY, JULY 2, 1906
READY TO BE COMPARED:
SENATOR LODGE AS
WITNESS BEFORE
Investigation of Campaign
Contributions Brings Prom
inent Witnesses.
Amoclated Fku to The Evening Time*.
Boston, July 2.—United States Sen
ator Henry Cabot Lodge, who was
summoned to appear-before the grand
jury of Suffolk county in investigation
into campaign contributions by Dis
trict Attorney John B. Moran, came to
the courthouse today. The senator
had been called to appear tomorrow,
but arrangement was made to meet the
district attorney today instead.
Mr. Moran was busy, and after
greeting Senator Lodge, asked him to
wait until he was at liberty.
The investigation is the develop
ment of the case o'f Robert G. Proctor,
who last week was convicted of the
larceny of $225 which John C. Best
gen of Quiucy claimed he had given
Proctor, who was Senator Lodge's
secretary, as a contribution to the re
publican state campaign fund in 1904.
Several prominent republicans, in
cluding officers of the state committee,
were summoned to appear before the
grand jury tomorrow.
DOMINION DAY CELEBRATED.
Aanoclated Prean to The Evening Time*.
Winnipeg, Man., July 2.—Reports
from many points throughout western
Canada indicate an unusually wide
celebration of Dominion day today.
Business was generally suspended and
the day given over to sports and fes
tivities.
EXPOSITION, GRAND FORKS, NORTH DAKOTA, JULY 31 TO AUG. 3
////*,!
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ft
APPEAL BONDS IN
THE REBATE GASES
PERFECTED
Final Steps in U. S. District
Court at Kansas City—
Other Bills.
Amoclated Pre»» to The Evening Time*.
Kansas City, July 2.—Final steps in
the United States district court here
in the rebate cases were taWen today
when the appeal bonds were perfected
upon the behalf of seven convicted in
dividuals and concerns and when bills
of exception were filed for the Chicago,
Burlington and Quincy Railroad com
pany and Geo. L. Thomas, the New
York broker and his chief clerk, L. B.
Taggart. Bills of exception has pre
viously been presented in the case of
the Armour, Swift, Cudah.v and Xelson
Morris Packing companies. The next
step will be the filing of bills of ex
ceptions with the court of appeals
which will be done at St. Louis on
August 21. In the case of the Burling
ton railroad, the exceptions taken ap
ply particularly to the allegation of the
defendant that the interstate com
merce act does not apply to export
rates which question is involved and
that this district court lacks jurisdic
tion. The particular exception is tak
en to the portions of the charge to
the jury made by Judge Smith McPher
son who presided at the trials.
SOW HEMEVS ATTORNEYS
AaiMMlated Preaa to The Uvealog Time*.
Toledo. Ohio, July 2.—Judge Kincaid
today sentenced Clarence Brown and
T. H. Tracy, attorneys for the ice men,
to ten days each in jail for contempt
of court, in filing a motion charging
the judge with misconduct.
r/WTORP.
^x/turE.
IMPRISONED MINERS
RESCUED FROM DEATH
Aaapelated Preaa Cable to The Uvenlac
TlDIMt
London, July 2.—After being
imprisoned for six days in the
flooded Caradoovale (Wales) col-
lierv, two miners of the six origin-
ally imprisoned were rescued alive
this morning and the three bodies
were brought out by rescue par-
ties. The search will be kept up
although ail hope of findiug the
missing man has been abandoned.
The two men rescued were discov-
ered in the old workings having
subsisted on a few candles. One of
them was still able to walk and
the other was delirious during the
last part of his imprisonment. His
recovery is probable though his
mind may be ruined.
menus for
STATE BANKS IRE
Comptroller of the Currency
Grants Permits for North
Dakota Institutions.
By U. C. Snyder.
Washington, D. C., July 2—The
comptroller of the currency has ap
proved the application of Henry C.
DeLaney. Williston, N. D. .I. J. De
lanev, John Bruegger. Ii. M. Atter
berry and E. C. Carroll to organize the
Citizens' National Bank of Williston,
with a capital of $50,000. This appli
cation is in lieu of one to convert the
Citizens' State bank under the title,
"The Second National Bank of Willis
ton." approved May 20.
Hunk of Mllnor.
The comptroller of the currencv has
issued a certificate authorizing the
First National Bank of Mllnor, N. D..
to commence business. The new bank
will employ a capital of $25,000 and
its officers will be H. H. Berg, presi
dent O. B. .lorgenson and H. C. John
son, vice presidents, and A. W. East
man. cashiei1.
Rural Itoule BxlablUHrd.
A rural delivery route was ordered
established today out of Foxholm,
Ward county, to commence service
September 1. This route, to be known
as Route 1, will serve a population of
412 and there are 103 houses along the
route.
i'lirrlern A|i|iolntel.
The following appointments have
been made in the rural carrier force
in North Dakota:
Anamoose, Ernest Simm. regular,
Robert McNamara, substitute, route 1
Anamoose, James M. Mooney, regular,
Mary E. Mooney, substitute, route 4
Cummings, Arthur L. Liileberg. regu
lar, John H. Liileberg, substitute,
route 1.
PANAMA CANAL BONDS.
AxMorluted Preaa to The Evening Time*.
Washington, July 2—Secretary Shaw
today offered to the public $30,000,000
of bonds of the Panama canal loan
authorized by the recent act of con
gress.
MAKE I
YOITR
MIND
TO LIVE TO SEE ISO
Paris. July 2.—M. Jean Finot
has written a book in which he ex
plains how to live 150 years. All
that is needed, says the author, is
the will to do so.
The reason people do not live
longer is because they don't take
proper care of themselves and
economize their forces, he de
clares. People get the notion that
they have got to die at a certain
age and as soon as signs of failing
strength are experienced they do
nothing to combat them, but just
give up. This is absurd, says M.
Finot, for with a proper observ
ance of the rules of hygiene, and
above all the firm determination
to live, there is no reason why
everybody should' not live to be 100
or even 150 years old.
Beer and tobacco are inimical to
longevity, according to M. Finot.
1
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I®!:
THE EVENING TIMES PLATS XO
FAVORITES. IT IS THE PEOPLES
PAPER FROM START TO FINISH.
SIXTEEN PAGES. PRICE
Of Wreck American Line Spec
ial in England Having Best
of Care, No Further Deaths
Reported Today.
BODIES OF VICTIMS
STILL AT STATION
Inquest Mill be Held This Afternoon
and Idcutitu-atkn of (lie Dead
Made hj Officers.
Amoclated Preaa Cable to The Evealaa
Tlmea.
Salisbury, Eng., July 2.—The scene
of yesterday's disaster to the Ameri
can line .special from Plymouth, hav
ing on board passengers who were
landed there from the steamer New
York, presents iittle evidence today of
the havoc wrought by the wreck of the
express train .all the wreckage having
been cleared away. The engineering
staff of ihe railroad company is still
seeking an explanation for the imme
diate caa.se, of the accident, but thus
far have been unable to do so or are
not ready to say to what the catastro
phe is attributable. No further deaths
have been recorded, but Robert S.
Critchell of Chicago, and Miss L. S.
Griswold of Heath, near Epsom, pass
ed a bad night. Margaret Rask of
Norfolk street, Park Lane, London,
whose legs have been amputated, and
E. W. Sentell of Brooklyn, N. Y., are
in a daugerous condition at the in
firmary. Mrs. Frank W. Noch of Al
ientown, Pa., and May Hitchcock of
New York passed a fairly good night
and are doing well. The inquest will
begin at 3:30 this afternoon. Only
formal evidence will be taken and the
inquiry will then he adjourned.
The bodies of the dead are still in
the waiting rooms of the railroad sta
tion. Wherever relatives are avail
able, identifications ol the dead will be
made by the doctor and purser of the
New York.
Twenty-three pasesngers were kill
ed and six injured.
Following is the list of the first cabin
passengers dead:
WALTER BARWICK of Toronto,
Ont.
LOl'IS CASSIER, of Trumbull, Conn.
FREDERICK HENRY COSSITT, of
New York.
MRS. C. W. ELPH1CKE. Chicago.
DVDLEY P. HARDING, New York.
^IRS. L. N. HITCHCOCK. New York.
MISS MARY F. HOWIESON, New
York.
REV. E. L. KING. Toronto. -v
FRANK W. KOCH, Allentown. Penn.
JOHN E. M'DOXALD. New York.
C. F. MEEKIN, New York.
C. A. P1PON, Toronto.
MRS. E. W. SENTELL. New York.
MISS BLANCH M. SENTELL. New
York.
MISS GERTRL'DE M. SENTELL,
New York.
MRS. WALTER W. SMITH, Dayton,
Ohio.
.MRS. LILLIAN HVRD WAITE, New
York.
The following second cabin passen
gers are dead:
L.OU1S GEOPPINGER, address un
obtainable.
JlrLES KEELER. address unobtain
able.
W. H. THOMPSON, address unob
tainable.
The following are the first cabin
passengers injured:
G. H. V. Allen, New York city.
Robert S. Critchell, Chicago.
Miss 1. S. Griswold, address unob
tainable.
Miss M. Hitchcock, New York city.
Mrs. Koch. Allentown, Pa.
The following second cabin passen
gers were injured:
Miss M. Rask, address unobtainable.
The train had passed the Salisbury
station platform at very high speed.
At a sharp curve just outside the
station the locomotive jumped the
track and ploughing up the rails
crushed into a westbound freight
train. The engine mounted the gird
ers of the railway bridge over the
River Avon and turned turtle. There
were three passenger coaches in the
train. The first of these shot past the
engine and crashed into the railway
bridge and was smashed into splint
ers, portions of the wreck being hurled
completely over the bridge. The sec
ond and third passenger cars were
toppled over on the line and com
pletely destroyed. The conductor's
van, containing a cook's kitchen, was
(Continued on Page Five.)
CLOUD BURST AND
FLOOD IN LINCOLN
AxKoelnteil Prexa to The Evening Tlmea.
Lincoln, Nel).. July
'2.—A
cloud burst which flooded this
vicinity last night was the heaviest ever known here and caus
ed property losses of many thousands of dollars in Lineoln
alone. In the business streets the water was more than two
feet deep and sewers, being unable to carry off such a quan
tity of water ran into the basements of all the stores causing
losses that range from a few hundred to several thousands. De
partment stores which have displays in their basements are
the haeviest losers. The city pumping stations were flooded
and the water supply was at most places eut off. The dam
age in the residence portions of the city was heavy. All of the
streams in southwestern Nebraska are out of their banks and
the damage to crops is considerable.
"*l
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