OCR Interpretation


The evening times. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, October 16, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042373/1906-10-16/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16. 1906.
STATE 6MB MB
St. John 1B to have a new paper—
the first Issue to be given to the pub
lic thi$ week.
Ward county has the largest en
rollment of school children of any
county in the state.
So many people are going to Will
iston that it is impossible for them to
And sleeping quarters.
The Deerding Enterprise says whis
key is retailed there nearly as -openly
as though there were licensed saloons.
The Grafton News and Times is
unable to find the democratic North
star since Hearst got astride the party
mule.
A negro laborer at WilUston was
stripped of his clothing and robbed
by four white thugs. The latter were
caught.
The Bowbells Bulletin' thinks Ward
county needB a new court house about
as much as a well man needs an un
dertaker.
Two more Ward county homestead
ers have been arrested by the federal
authorities for perjury in making fin
al proofs.
The Starkweather Times knocks the
republican party while its editor acts
as chairamn of the county central
committee.
The Lidgerwood Broadaxe favors
the election of Charles E. "Fish" to
the supreme bench. The Broadaxe al
ways was "fishy."
Many of the state editors are tak
ing special courses In football slang
so as to be able to write good reports
of the local games.
The Pembina Pioneer-Express heap
ed coals of fire on Walt Taylor's head
when it expressed the wish that he
would in time be a "granny."
Republicans on the Missouri slope
say the campaign lacks interest be
cause opposition to the democrats is
like taking candy from a kid.
Ramsey county democrats, not hav
ing enough men to go round to the
county officers, have placed three re
publican candidates on their ticket.
James Kolar, a carpenter employed
In the construction of the Hillsboro
court house, fell 18 feet and escaped
without a broken bone. He weighs
232 pounds.
On complaint of Nic Rustat, John
W. Rogers, the village marshal of
Tolley, was arrested, charged with
willfully and feloniously allowing a
prisoner to escape.
Silver Dick Shadrlck, the drummer
who is stumping the state for the
democratic party, should exhibit his
order books made during the Cleve
land starvation period.
The Mayville Tribune has just dis
covered that It Is 25 years old. The
first Issue of the paper was printed
at Casselton, sent partly by train and
partly by wagon to its home.
A Lidgerwood character known as
"30 days" died suddenly and it was
found that his liver was several times
too large. There is some fear that
Andrews' spleen is overgrown, too.
The Northwood Gleaner prints the
republican ticket, lauds the democrats
and their platform and practically ad
vises Its readers to vote for whom they
durn please. That's Independent Jour
nalism with a vengeance.
Judge Goss has issued a writ of
mandamus requiring the county com
missioners of McKenzle co.unty to sub
mit the location of the county seat to
a vote of the people at the coming
election.
As a result of a row over a poker
game played ill a blind pig at Nanson
Jens Chrlstianson stabbed Jacob Bert,
in the neck, the knife blade penetrat
ing the windpipe and severing some
of the smaller blood vessels. Berg
fell on the street where the assault
was made, which was about 200 feet
from the blind pig. He bled until al
most at the point of death before a
physician arrived.
An injunction was awarded the
Northwest Bridge company in its suit
against the county commissioners of
Ward county restraining them from
awarding a contract for the construc
tion of several bridges in the county
to Neil McDougal. "It appears the
county advertised for bids and they
were opened at a session''of the com
missioners and none of them were
allowed the contract but that a con
tract was let later to Nell McDougal.
THIS IS MY BIRTHDAY.
flea. lVm. R. Shatter.
$
Major-General William Rufus Shat
ter, U. S. "A., retired, was. born at
Galesbur, Mich., Oct. 16, 1835. His
early youth was spent on a farm and
his only education was such as was
afforded by the district schools. He
was a diligent student, however, and.
improved his spare time by reading all
books that came in his way. He was
teaching school when the war broke
out in 1861 and gave up his position
to become first lieutenant* in the Sev
enth Michigan Infantry. He sereved
through the entire war and at its close
was brevetted brigadier-general for
gallant and meritorious services.
Two years after he was mustered out
of the volunteer service he entered
the regular army as lieutenant-colo
nel. On March 2, 1867, he was brevet
ted colonel and given the congression
al medal of honor for gallant cervice
at at the battle of Pair Oaks, Va. The
years after the war were spent in
service mostly at the army posts of
the frontier. At the outbreak of the
war with Spain General Shatter was
in charge of the department of Cali
fornia. In May, 1898, he was made
major-general of volunteers and was
sent to Cuba, where he commanded
the military operations that ended in
the capitulation of Gen. Linares' army
and the surrender of Santiago de
Cuba. Upon returning to the United
States General Shatter commanded
the departments of California and Co
lumbia, until his retiremt from active
service June 30, 1901. Since that date
he has made his home at Bakersfield,
California.
Jealousy before marriage menas sus
picion afterward.
When the size of a baseball diamond
is figured up it will be found to be nine
by nine.
Of Interest
TWO RECIPES.
French Chicken Soup.
Cut up a chicken as for a fricassee
and dredge thickly with flour. Fry a
sliced onion In bacon fat, remove on
ion and brown the chicken brown
also one quart of sliced okra pods.
Place the chicken, onion and okra in
a kettle, cover with boiling water, add
one quart sliced tomatoes. Simmer un
til chicken is tender. Remove larger
bones and all the fat, add salt and
cayenne and a very little sugar. Serve
without straining and with boiled rice.
Staffed Mushrooms.
Select the largest sized mushrooms
and peel them. Chop fine half a cup
of chicken or veal, season it well, and
fill the cup with the mushroms. But
ter the lower side and stand them in
a baking dish in the oven with a
cover over them. Baste with melted
butter and water as they cook for half
an hour then let them cook without
uncovering ten minutes more.
Fashion Frivols.
The Parisian fad for shawl-like drn
peries has brought out some exquisite
shawl scarfs in crepe, in soft lace
and in silk, the crepe and silk scarfs
being elaborately embroidered.
Heavy, coarse net, gorgeously em
broidered with gold thread in Egyp
tian fashion, is made in wide bands
which are inset most effectively in
cloth.
Dally Thought.
Stay, stay at home my heart and rest
Home-keeping hearts are happiest
For those that wander they know
not where,
Are full of trouble and full of care.
To stay at home is best.
—Longfellow.
Training a Child.
"Tasks set to children should be
moderate," said a wise woman edu
cator the other day. "Over-exertion
is hurtful, both physical and intel
lectually and even morally. But it is
of the utmost importance that children
should be required to fulfil their tasks
correctly and punctually. This will
train them for an exact and faithful
discharge of their duties in after life.
A great step is gained when a child
has learned that there is no necessary
connection between liking a thing and
doing it. By directing a child's at
tention to a fault, and thus giving it
a local habitation and a name, you
may often fix it in him more firmly
when, by drawing his thoughts and
afTections to other things, and seeking
to build up an opposite virtue, you
would be much more likely to subdue
the fault."
Militant Cliurch Women.
Because the cream for a social at
Cherokee, Kan., failed to arive, ten
society women got into- a fuss with
the local druggist of whom It was
ordered and pounded him so that a
physician had to be called. Then they
tackled the express hauler and one of
the sisters got a black eye. The free
zer with the cream was simply car
ried by and came back on the next
train, but the social, which was to
raise funds for the church, had broken
up.—Kansas City Journal.'
Gibson's Definition of "Lad},"
"1 diaed with Charles Dana Gibson
at Princess' restaurant in London dur
ing the season," said a Chicagoan.
"The lofty, spacious dining room
was filled with women in pale gowns,
their hair uncovered and their arms
and necks bare, and though these
women were fashionable, aristocratic
they smoked cigarets with their coffee
as they watched the bioscope pictures
that went .on at one end of the big
room and as they listened to the sing
ing that went on at the other..
"Amid all this feminine smoking we
Americans began to discuss and to
define the word 'lady.' Was it lady
like to smoke? What was a lady?
"I think Mr. Gibson's definition of a
lady was the best that was given.
'A lady,' he said, ignoring the
smoke question altogether, 'is a wo
man who always remembers others
and never forgets herself.' "—Philadel
phia Bulletin.
Riding Astride.
Riding horseback astride for women
has become so much the rage in high
society here now. says a London cable
to the New York American, that even
His Highness Sayajl Rae III., the
Gaekwar of Baroda, who recently
toured the United States, has ordered
a divided skirt for his daughter, the
Princess Indlraji. This order has
been given to a fashionable Regent
street habit maker.
For the last five years efforts have
been made to Introduce the divided
skirt for women and the mode of rid
ing astride. But, while many women
struck out in that direction, It never
became "the style" until quite recently
when Lady Castlereagh was seen In
Hyde Park astride a horse and in di
vided skirts. Since that time it has
been quite the thing, and now nearly
all women are beginning to adopt, it.
Among others of the nobility who
have taken up the mode are Lady Con
stance Stewart Richardson and the
Duchess of Westminster.
The new style of riding has been
attacked in the London and provin
cial press generally, except, of course,
in the fashionable papers, which
chronicle only that which society de
crees.
Riding masters have expressed their
disapproval of the new style of horse
womanship. They say that the side
saddle is not only the safest style of
riding, but also is the easiest and most
comfortable. They point out that the
pommels are constructed in such a
way that unless a woman faints or
absolutely loses all her nerve, she can
not fall off.
Panama May See Mrs. Roosevelt.
Mrs. Roosevelt contemplates accom
panying the President on his proposed
trip to Panama, if his original plans
hold good and the trip is undertaken
next month. The trip will probably
last a month. Mrs. Roosevelt has not
been out since she returned from Oys
ter Bay. She was somewhat fatigued
from the journey, and has been rest
ing. Archibald started to the Friends'
School yesterday and Quentin is again
in his class in the Force public school.
—Washington dispatch in Philadelphia
Ledger.
Novelty Velvets.
It's a day for velvets, for the suits
and costnmes worn to receptions and
teas—suits made with skirts that trail
softly ofter you, of velvets plain or In
some of the well-nigh Indescribable
new color mixtures, which are as dif
ferent from anything we've seen be
fore in the velvet line as day is from
night. For velvets have been exper
imented with—juggled with, you
might say—until they have taken on
strange new qualities.
Two colors are combined in a way
that seems nothing in the world but
a copy of the wonderful new tricks
in weave that have 'revolutionized
cloth and suitings. As that change
of weaves is impossible with velvet,
the effect is got in some more subtle
way, but got it is, no matter how.
Stripes and checks and plaids are
all echoed in the novelty velvets—only
echoed, though, for they are kept soft
and indistinct and sombre in tone.
Plenty of black and white effects are
seen in them, rendered subtle instead
of startling by the soft, deep pile of
tho stuff.
But, of course, being novelties, they
appeal only to a limited class, the
plain colors used for nine out of ten
of the handsomest suits.
'/'Velvet" means not only velvet, but
velveteen as well, for if you're not too
well blessed with this world's goods,
velvet suits are an expensive luxury
that entail no end of minor expenses,
while velveteen has a world of wear
in It.
And corduroys are coming to the
front, having been crowded behind so
manv other materials for so long a
while. Some stunning French suits
are made of it—the kind with the wide
wale—and are trimed with a lot «f
little straps of it fastened down with
buttons. One brown suit was partic
ularly pretty, made without a particle
if trimming except these little straps
and the buttons.
Comparatively few of the velvet suits
are trimmed wlth.anything but lace or
braid or buttons nothing else seems
to set them off in a way at once effec
tive and perfectly in keeping with the
character of the material. Plenty of
them have no trimming at all, the
rich beauty of the velvet given ample
opportunity to display itself in the
long, sweeping folds of the trailing
skirt.
But velvet, while its present pop
ularity is marked, doesn't hold the
field alone at all. Beautiful cloths and
suitings have come out that rival vel
vet for richness broadcloths embroid
ered in their own color, the design
growing larger and heavier toward the
hem, and beautiful, indescribable
stuffs, made different by weave or
some wonderful trick or color deep
ened into shadows or lifted into lights
in an elusive, fascinating way.
Farty Frocks.
Just how materials for debutante
and evening frocks can grow lighter
and more diaphanous is a problem
that the great manufacturers must
dream out. For, w.ith an over-increas
ing tendency toward everything of the
sort, and an insistent demand all the
while- for something new, the ones
now existing, many and varied as they
are, are sure to be eclipsed by some
wonderful new creation, so filmy that
it will seem as much more ethereal
than chiffon as chiffon is than silk.
Mousseliness—things tinted as del
icately as a soap-bubble and printed
with shadowy flowers that blur softly
into the background—and chiffons, and
the whole tribe of mulls, make the
prettiest of the receiving gowns worn
by debutantes. There's nothing rad
ically new in them, but the way they
ar« mads is as new and as interesting
as can be.
Whatever the gown is to be made
of—whichever, rather, for it's mod
erately certain to be of a variant of
one of the three—it is lined and inter
lined, the strip ruffled and flounced
with chiffon—chiffon used so lavishly
that the. only question seems to be
how to pile more on.
Such a conclusion of soft stuff as it
all makes! But it gives the cloudiest
effect imaginable, with never a par
ticle of stiffness about it, and is so
cleverly balanced that even where it
is fullest there is not the slightest
hint of bunchiness—that quality fatal
to the lovliest "creation."
$
$ WOMAN'S STRANGE JOKE.
Package She Called Valuable Sur
prised Lawyers and Bankers $
$
There is such a thing as carrying
a joke too far. Six years ago an En
glish woman who was traveling in
Canada deposited in the vaults of a
Toronto trust company a parcel care
fully bound and secured with a num
ber of imposing seals. It was under
stood that the parcel contained jewels
of great value, and therefore it was
guarded with zealous care
A few weeks ago the English woman
died, and a clause in her will made
mention of the deposit in trust in Tor
onto. After due process of law it was
ordered that the seals be broken in
the Canadian city. Heirs in the old
land and one In afar distant point In
Canada'sent their respective lawyers
to be present at the opening of the
valuable package. On the day appoint
ed the lawyers assembled in a private
office of the trust company. Here is a
correspondent's description of the
scene that followed:
"Red seals on the outside of the
bundle were first broken, then an ar
ray of green colored seals were en
countered After this wrapping came
fold after fold of paper. Then the
lawyers saw an oblong pasteboard box,
also carefully sealed. The excitement
was almost intense. Beads of per
spiration stood out on the learned
brows of the privileged few present.
With the unfolding of each successive
wrapping around the box they ex
pected to see the glitter of gold and
the luster of diamonds. At last, with
nervous fingers, it was opened the
treasure seemed near at hand. Two
more folds of paper were undone, and
several pair of legal eyes saw an in
nocent and faded pair of corsets."
Nothing is known of the motive for
leaving the faded pair of corsets in a
trust deposit vault We may assume
that the English woman was eccentric
and wished to play a prank on her
relatives. If so, the joke was a suc
cess—although she may not be able
to appreciate it. There is material
for a novel in this incident. Wiikie
Collins or Charles Reade would have
based an exciting "three decker" on it.
and had Conan Doyle foolishly decided
not to write more Sherlock Holmes
stories he could expand the episode
into a most baffling detective problem.
—Rochester Post-Express.
Financial.
Mr. Tyte Physt—"More money?
What have you done with that dollar
I gave you last week?"
Mrs. Tyte Physt. ."That's in the sav
ings bank, but I can't draw the inter
est on it till next January. I want
another dollar to run the house on in
the meantime."—Chicago Tribune.
A man amy put all his property in
his wife's name, but he must take
care of his reputation himself.
THE EVENING TIMES, GRAND FORKS, N. D.
'Hifr
FOR RENT.
FOR RENT—FIVE-ROOM HOUSE ON
Dakota Avenue between Third and
Fourth Streets.
FOR RENT—FIVE-ROOM FURNISHED
flat in the New Hampshire Block.
Inquire at the office of Dr. Harlan,
Clifford Annex.
FOR RENT—SIX-ROOM HOUSE ON
Chestnut St., furnished or unfur
nished. modern except heat. Inquire
of "B," Times Office.
FOR RENT—FINE NEW MODERN
house, 1404 Cheyenne Ave. Apply St.
Hllnire Lumber Co.
FURNISHED ROOMS.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT AT
304 Chestnut St.
FOR RENT—FURNISHED FRONT
room, elose in use of bath might
furnish board. Phone N. \V. 587-M.
WANTED—A SUITE OF 2 OR 3 ROOMb
for light housekeeping. Address
Times Office.
LOST AND FOUND.
FOUND—A GOLD LOCKET WITH
word ."Jack" engraved on outside.
Owner can have same by proving
property and paying for this adver
tisement. Call at this office.
TWAIN ON "SPELLIV
Speaks at Associated Press Dinner at
Waldorf.
Mark Twain spoke on "Reformed
Spellin" at the dinner of the news
paper editors of the United States,
comprising the Associated Press of
America, held at the Waldorf recently.
Melville E. Stone, general manager of
the Associated Press, was the toast
master. With Mr. Stone at the guests'
table also sat General Horace Por
ter, former ambassador to France, who
replied to the toast, "Our Guests
Henry A. Shute of Exeter, N. H., the
author of "A Real Boy's Diary," told
of "Critics," while Professor George
E. Vincent of Chicago university,
spoke of the "Purely Academic." Mr.
Twain said in part
I am here to make an appeal to the
nations in behalf of the simplified
spelling. I have come here because
they cannot all be reached, except
through you. There are only two
forces that can carry light to all the
corners of the globe—only two—the
sun in the heavens and the Associated
Press down here. I may seem to be
flattering the sun, but I do not mean
it so, I am meaning only to be just
and fair all round. You speak with a
million voices no one can reach so
many races, so many hearts, and in
tellects as you, except Rudyard
Kipling, and he cannot do it without
your help.
If the Associated Press will adopt
and use our simplified forms and thus
spread them to the ends of the earth,
covering the whole spacious planet
with them as with a garden of flow
ers, our difficulties are at an end.
Every day of the 365 the only pages
of the world's countless newspapers
that are read by all the human beings
and angels and devils that can read,
are those pages that are built out of
Associated ..Press dispatches. And
so I beg you, I beseech you—oh, I
implore you—to spell them in our sim
plified forms. Do this daily, constant
ly, persistently, for three months
only three months—it is all I ask.
The Infallible result? Victory, victory
all down the line.
Do I seem to be seeking the good
of the world? That is the idea. It is
my public attitude privately I am
merely seeking my own profit. We
all do it, but it is sound, and it is
virtuous, for no public interest is any
thing other or nobler than a massed
accumulation of private interests. In
1S83, when the simplified spelling
movement first tried to make a noise,
I was indifferent to it More, I even
irreverently scoffed at it. What I
needed was an object lesson, you see
it is the only way to teach some peo
ple. Very well, I got it. At that time
I was scrambling along, earning the
family's bread on magazine work at
7 cents a word, compound words at
single rates, just as it is in the dark
present. I was the property of a mag
azine, a 7-cent slave under a boiler
iron contract. One day there came a
note from the editor requiring me to
write ten pages on this revolting text
"Considerations concerning the al
leged subterranean holophotal extem
poraneousness of the conchylfaceous
8uperimbrlcation of the ornithorhyn
cus, as foreshadowed by the unintelli
gibility of its plesiosaurian anisodac
tylous aspects."
Ten pages of that. Each and every
word a seventeen jointed vestibnled
railroad train. Seven cents a word.
I saw starvation staring the family
in the face. I went to the editor, and
I took a stenographer along, so as to
have the interview down In black and
white. 1 said "Read that text, Jack
son. and let it go on the record read
it out loud." He read it: "Consider
ation Concerning the Alleged Sub
terranean Holophotal Extemporane
ousness of the Conchyliaceous Super
imbrication of the Orithorhyncus, as
Foreshadowed by the Unintelligibility
of Its Plesiosaurian Anisodactylous
Aspects."
I said "You want ten pages of
those rumbling, great, long, summer
thunder peals, and you expect to get
them at 7 cents a peal?"
He said: "A word's a word, and 7
cents is the contract: what are you
going to do about it?"
I said: "Jackson, this is cold-blood
ed oppression. What's an average
English word?"
He said: "Six letters."
I said: "Nothing of the kind that's
French, and includes the spaces be
tween the words an average English
word is four letters and a half. By
hai'd, honest labor I have dug all the
large words out of my vocabulary and
shaved it down till the average is
three letters and a half. 1 can put
1,200 words on your iage and there's
not another man alive that can come
within 200 of it. My page is worth
$84 to me. It takes exactly as lc.ig
to fill youi" magazine page with long
words as It does with short ones—
four hours. Now, then, look at the
criminal injustice ol' this requirement
of yours. I am careful. I am economi
cal of my time and labor. For the
family's sake I've got to be. So
never write metropolis for 7 cents, be
cause I can get the same money for
city. I never write "policeman, be
cause I can get. the same price for
cop. And so on and so on. I never
write valetudinarian at all, for not
even hunger and the wretchedness can
humble me to the point where 1 will
do a word like that for 7 cents. I
wouldn't do it for 15. Examine your
obscene text, please count the
words." He counted and said it was
twenty-four. I asked him to count
the letters. He made it 203.
CLASSIFIED ADS CLASSIFIED ADS
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS.
DR. J. D. TAYLOR,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office In St. John's Block.
Office hours: 9 to 10 a. m., 1 to 3 p. m.
7 to 8 p. m.
DRS. FLETCHER &
SAUNDERSON,
Successors to
Dr. Robert S. Ramsey
DENTIST.
Clifford Annex. Grand Forks, N J).
DR. ORR SANDERS,
DR. MAY E. SANDERS,
Chronic and acute diseases success
fully treated. Treatment at home
If desired. Suite 56, Security
Block. Both phones 542.
Grand Forks, North Dakota
DR. L. L. ECKMAN,
DENTIST.
Both Phones—466M.
Graad Forks, North Dakota
JOHN FAWCETT, M.A..M.D.
DISEASES OK WOMEN
AND GENERAL SFRGEON
Office over Stanchfield Store
Phone 261
DR. J. GRASSICK
Office Northwestern Building
Corner DeMers Avenue and Fourth 8t
S. W. RUTLEDGE
HOMEOPATHIC
Physician and Surgeon.
128 & Third St. Grand Forks, N. D.
DR. E. F. ADAMS,
DENTIST.
Office Over Union National Bank.
Phone 191.
DR. F. J. DUGGAN
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON—Spe
cial attention given to diseases of
women. Office. Beare Block. Office
hours, 10 a .m. to 12 m., 2 p. m. to 4
m., p. m. to 8 p. m. Both Phones
ARCHITECTS.
J. W. ROSS
ARCHITECT
and Superintendent of Construction
Offlre 1V6 Third St. Grano Forks, N. D.
R. L. SMITH
ARCHITECT
Both Phones. National Bank Bldg.
W. J. EDWARDS
ARCHITECT
Northwestern Bldg. Grand Forks
Northwestern Phoiid 466L.
WILLIAM ZIMMFiRMAlf
ARCHITECT
Minot,
Sofleld Block
North Dakota
From that day to this I have been a
devoted and hard working member of
the heaven-born institution, the In
ternational Association for the Pre
vention of Cruelty to Authors, and
now I am laboring with Carnegie's
simplified committee, and with my
heart in the work.
Frail Human Life.
F. M. Beckford of Laconia, N. H.,
was once arguing a case in the Benk
nap county court, and he opened his
argument as follows:
"Your Honor, and gentlemen of the
jury: This case is one peculiar in cir
cumstances as well as in fact. It came
to me as a legacy from my late broth
er, Colonel T. J. Whipple, who was en
gaged in its preparation at the time of
his death. The county attorney who
brought the case into court has long
since gone to his great reward. The
justice who held the original hearing
has long since passed away. Our at
torney general Barnard, since he be
came interested in the case, has been
called to that land where litigation
is not known. Several of the leading
witnesses, too, are dead'—"
"All of which," said the court, "re
minds us of the uncertainty of human
life. Proceed, or none of us will be
able to see the case through."—Ex
change.
The
Merry
Dance.
"My," exclaimed Mr. Clunisay at the
summer hotel hop, "this floor's aw
fully slippery. It's hard to keep on
your feet."
"Oh!" replied his fair partner, sar
casticaly, "then yon were really trying
to keep on mv feet. I thought it was
accidental."—Philadelphia Press.
J. A. EVANS
Teacher of Pure Italian.
Method of Voice Culture. Pupils will
be received on Tuesday mornings 9
a. m. to 12 and every week day even
ing. Room 62 Security building. Pbone
Getts Music store.
HAVE YOLR
fEETH
Properly attended to now and avoid
pain and digestive disturbances
of more or leas gravity
by consulting
DR. COUVRETT, Dentist
DE MERS AND THIRD STS.
Over Drug Store-
mSGONSII GRAIN STOCK CO.
(Incorporated.)
Desists Is
STOCKS, GRAIN, PROVISIONS
St. Pssl. Snparior, Winnipeg,
Dnlnth, Minneapolis
BRANCH OFFICE
Ns. 16 ClillorJ Bldg.
t.
B. WADSLBY, lit
TAILORS.
WORKING DAY AND NIGHT
First Class Cleaning,
Pressing and Repairing
a BOOBES, Prop.
N. W. 789L Trl-State TO7L
Corner Kittson Ave. and Third St
Grand Forks, North Dakota
PHILIP AMON
Tailor.
SUITS FROM 918 UP.
Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing. Call
and Deliver. Trl-State Phone 181L.
N. W. 349-L.
Buttons made for Ladles' garments.
No. 12 N. Third St. Grand Forks. N. D.
Latest Styles on Hud Perfect Fix Gssrsateed
Paulson Bros.
Merchant Tailors
115 Sosth Third St. GRAND FORKS, N. D.
MANUFACTURERS.
GRAND FORKS MONUMENT
WORKS
R. JEFFREY, Proprietor.
Monuments, Headstones,
Cemetery Fencing
Trl-State 292L 424 DeMers Ave.
Grand Forks, N. D.
DON MCDONALD
TENTS, AWNINGS, SHADES
Waterproof Covers for Harvesters
Threshers and Grain Stacks
Corner DeMers and fifth
Graad Forks, North Dakota
MISS DELA ODEGARD
Phone 755L 503 DeMers Ave.
Bast Grand Forks, Minn.
Manufacturer of high grade cigars
such as
Graad Forks EAGLE8. Globe aad the
A. 0. U. W.
Rasraossen, Be mis & Company
Wholesale
Dry Goods. Notions, Etc.
GRAND fORIS N. DAI0T4
KAUFMANN'S BAKERY,
JACOB KAUFMANN, Prop.
East Grand Forks, Minn. Phone 854.
J. B. WOODLEY.
Wholesale and Retail
HARNESS, WHIPS AND SADDLERY
SUPPLIES.
The largest and most complete stock
of hand made harness in the two cities.
Manufactured of Lappa & Sons pure
oak leather. A nice line of Riding
Saddles 600 pairs of 6-A Horse Blank
ets to select from at Jobbers' prices.
Sole agents for the celebrated wyeth
Horse Collars also a full line of hack
and surrey harness a nice line
of
track and driving harness sweat pads,
whips and summer goods at a Big Re
duction. Call and look them over.
Telephone 1108.
AL COONS, Manager,
Baat
Graad Forks, Mlaaesota.
When a man has eyes like a hog,
watch him.
TO THOSE WHOM IT MAT
CONCERN
Everyone who _pwns a phonograph
and reports their name at Getts' music
house will hear of something to their
advantage.
O. YOUNG
Wfcoittalt Psrsitsr* Pisses, Cirpu, StwiaJ
Hschiscs, Bsak
aad
OtfJct Fsraitsr*
125-127-138 South Third St.
Grand Forks, North Dakota
PHONE RICE'S 602L
FOR HACKS, DRAYS, DAY OR
NIGHT. WE MEET ALL TRAINS.
Office, 415 DeMers Avenue.
W. .KIRK, Prop.
OUR GOAL IS
"HOT STUFF"
once you get it in your stove or
furnace. You get all the heat
that is coining, and you pay no
more for an A1 grade than for
an inferior fuel. If you haven't
ordered your Winter supply we
are at your service.
GIBBS GRAIN & FUEL CO.
Office—309 Kittson Ave.
Phone 600.
MISCELLANEOUS.
K. H. JOHNSON
WALL PAPEB AND PAINTS
Paperhacglng, Sign and Fresco Work
Both Phones 833N 106 4th St &
Grand Forks, North Dakota
B. O. PAULSNESS
Plumbing, Steam and Hot water Fit
tnir. Pumps and Windmills. Sewer
and Water Works Contractor. Lead
and Iron Pipe and Fittings. Brass
Goods, Sewer Pipe, Hose, etc.
GRAND FORKS. N. DAK.
JEFF'S TRANSFER
Both Phones 33.
Hacks and Livery, dray and trans
fer work, moving pianos a specialty.
Only low down moving vans in tho
city. Day or night calls attended to
promptly. All work guaranteed.
G* W. BARTON, Prop.
612 DeMers Ave. Opp. G. N. Depot
J. LAVERTY
Minnesota Point
Dealer in Live' and Dressed Poultry
Cash or Commission.
Phone 123L. N. W. O. Address
Grand Forks. Call or write.
The City Feed Store
DOWNEY & PFEIFER
Flour* Feed, Hay and'
Wood of AH Kindt
If. W. 'Phone 53S
Trl-State S3S-L.
41S DeXen Ave.
GRAND FORKS.
The M. H. Redick
HIDE & FUR GO.
Northwestern Dealers In
Fine Northern Furs, Hides, Pelts,
Wool, Tallow, Roots, Etc.
Largest and Oldest Hide and Fur
House in the State.
GRAND FORKS N. DAK.
Ed. Miencier
9BNBBAL
Contracting
Building
Minot, N. D.
Bacon & Van Alstine
Livery and Hack Stable
TO IS N. FOURTH ST. TELEPHONE 131
Grand Forks, North Dakota
When it comes to getting inside In
formation the surgeon leaves the phy
sician at the post.
Guarantee Stock Food Company
bcsfptfstsd
Capital Stock, 980.000
Manufacturers of Stock Food,
Fan*
try ood. Worm Powder, Uee
Killer,
Qtjre^Plnk Bye Bemedy,
Fever
Core, Colic Cure, Gall Cure, Foot
edy and
Rem­
White Liniment
•RAND KORK8. N. D.
C. 6. MUGG, 0. S„
Grand Forks, warrants every glass
recommended for five years. Will
make special visits to any part of the
State. Write to him.
Columbia Hotel
AND RESTAURANT
Oct your taochas hara white
waitin* for jrour train* N
Open Day and Nlrfht
OSCAB INPDSOW, hop't
n-*— and UJS per day
GRAND FORKS. N. OAK.
Oppoait* G. N. Depot
SEALS
Either Pocket
or Desk
Rubber Stamps
Write for Catalog
CAD WELL, The Stamp
Grand Forks. I.
GASH
For all Iiadb ei Jssk, Coauitia^
Scrsp Ira*. Copper ssd Brass, QM
Ukt Boots ssi Shots, Bsjs ol sB
liads, sad Bottles,
Special Frige for Car lsa
M. FISHMAN
N. W. Host Sir-L

xml | txt