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The evening times. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, December 22, 1906, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042373/1906-12-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22,1906.
Tfet mi Capgfe l^i||
'4 that rids thi iynw «f
ctli fry actlag a catkaitt*
howals
AT VE
R-tuse wm mi wars Iwtmi
threat, tan aadkMMkltl llN MM
'vtlkHllMmiriltrlkiHeaMkHllW'
sis. tmi nm aw mim inimm
fcll UnllTI Iwif l4 *M Ikl MlglMl
Uinii»omipii,wnii»iiiiniwn
ty null merles mm kewels,
•U Cosfhs, OtHi, Omk Whea*a«
usiimM
HEAVY AND
SHELF::
W. S. WEBEB.
Tlckat Agent
Telephone 67
Train
No.
1
Arrive*.
S:00 p.m.
S:0C a.m.
7:80 a.m.
11:01 p.m
S
ts
IS
S:0lp.m
10:4S p.m
•111
•1ST
•SOS
•SOI
•1SS
1S:SS p.m.
7:SSp.m.
11:41 p.m.
S4
10
•US 7:4| a.m.
1SS 7:41p.m.
•140 10:6S a.m.
•SOS 1:40 p.m.
•SOS 7:10 p.m.
Trains N«T 111,
other trains dally.
Ask the scent
Dakota" and tne N,
O I IN A
LAXATIVE COUGH SYFKJP
LAXATIVE
"war
•v«f MM*.
HONEMAR
THE DAOOTAH PHARMACY
OPfeNS DECEMBER 1st
NOW REAIiY FOR PUPILS
MISS FENSKA, 310 Kittson Ave.
Money to Loan
At Lowest Rates Upon North Dakota Fanas. Local
Agents Wanted. Partial Payments Permitted
GEO. B. CLIFFORD & GO.
GRAND FORKS, N. D.
FARM LOANS
Unlimited Funds for Loans on Good Farms at
Lowest Rate of Interest and with On or Before Privileges
CALL OB WRITE
DAVID H. BEECHER
Oiioa Nitloaal Bask Baildia|, Graad Fork*, N. D.
Grand Forks Monument Works
Goal and Wood Foraaces,
Cutlery, Glass,
Stoves, Tinware, Nails,
Saddlery,
Telephone 484.
J. F. BRANDT,
SCHOOL
R. JEFFREY, Prtp.
Marble and Uranite loiimtili aad
Head Stones. Cemetery Fencing.
411 klads of Foreign aad Domestic
Granite.
Snperb Styles and Designs.
Residence Phone Trl-State MSM.
Office Phone Trl-State 292S.
HARDWARE
Sheet Metal Manufacturer,
Paints and Oils,
House Furnishing Goods,
Etc., Etc.
218 DeMers Ave.
T^^H^^Rete^Lb^Co.
IS SELLING
DRY OAKWOOD AND
....DRY PINE SLABS....
Cheaper than anybody else in the city. We
have them both sawed and in four feet lengths.
C. SORENSON, Agent.
East Grand Forks
BOTH PHONES
Mo. 24
Corn
Winter wheat
Spring wheat
Oats
Barley
Rye
Buckwheat
Flax seed
Rice
Potatoes
W. B. SINGLAIM
Freight Afni
Telephone 30
TNCCOMfORUMC WAV
WRST AMD WORTH BOUND.
Departs.
S:1E p.m.—For throush points west.
1:16 a-m.—IJocal (or points west to lflnot.
—From St. Paul via Fargo.
1S:S0 p.m.—Local for points west to Spokane
—Local from Duluth, Greenbush and Crooks ton.
11:00 p.m.— Connects with No. S at Larlmore.
S:S0 a.m.—For Ardoch, Grafton and Winnipeg.
8:45 a.m.—For Bmerado, Larlmore and Hannah.
S:00 p.m.—For Hmerado, Larlmore, Mayville.
4:4i p.m.—For Ardoch, Oratton and WalhaJla Una
•AST AND SOOTH BOUND.
1S:40 p.m.—For St. Paul and Chicago via Fargo.
8:25 p-m.—For St. Paul and Duluth via Crookston.
11:01 a.m.—For St Paul via Crookston, (or Winnipeg via
Crookston.
8:00 p.m.—For St Paul via Fargo and Willmar
S:10 a.m.—For Crookston, Greenbush and Duluth.
8:10 a.m.—Local (or pol
—From Wlnnlp
—Local from tl
—Local (rom Mayville and Larlmore.
—Local (rom Hannah and Larlmore.
US, 1SS, 140, S01, SOS, SOS and SOS dally except Sunday, all
for tbe sailing dates o( the steamships "Minnesota and
points south to Fargo
nnlpeg, Oratton and Ardook
Walhalla and Oratton.
T. K. Seattle to Japan and China.
A. CRAIQ,
P. T. If. St. Paul, Minn.
Washington, Dec. 22.—The final estimates of the crop reporting board of
the bureau of statistics of the department of agriculture (In which prelim
inary estimates made earlier in the year are revised and and corrected),
indicate the acreage, production and value in 1906 of the farm crops of the
United States to be as follows:
Crop Acreage
96,737,581
29,599,961
17,705,868
30,958,768
6,323,757
2,001,904
798,206
2,505,927
575,014
3,013,150
Hay I... 42,476,224
Tobacco 796 099
LARGE FLOCKS TOGETHER,
'How many hens can we safely put
together in one house or flock?' 'Will
hens lay as well when kept in one
large flock, giving proportionate room,
as, for instance, in a large barn or
other building where every bird can
go where it likes, as when housed
separately in smaller apartmentB?'
Many have asked these questions, and
most of those who have tried to ans
wer them have decided in favor of
small flocks kept separately. In order
to test the matter T/racticaf|ly anid
definitely, 'Mapes, the egg man,' is
now putting up a two-story hen barn
.24x36 feet in which 500 hens will be
kept and handled as one flock. Com
menting on this venture, the Rural
New Yorker says editorially: 'Mapes
the hen man has often said that he
thinks he can keep 500 or more hens
in one house. Critics have said: Why
don't you try it and see? Now that
is what Mapes intends to do. The
house has been started. M»
Mapes will not hesitate to tell the
truth. Last winter he had the cour
age to report that on some days his
1,400 hens did not lay an egg. The
working out of this experiment, show
ing how hens can stand a crowd, will
be one of the most interesting features
of the coming year.' City born and
bred as we were, our first observa
tions in wholesale poultry keeping
were made on the estate of an uncle
in Germany. The poultry house was
a large, round, three-story stone
tower, hundreds of hens (of the com
mon barnyard stock, mostly) occupy
ing the ground floor as a laying room
and the second floor as roosting room,
the loft being occupied by large flocks
of pigeons. This tower stood nearly
in the centre of a several-acre yard
tightly enclosed on one side by the
stately mansion, dairy building and
bakery, on another by the cattle
barns, on the third by the horse
stables, shops, hay barns, etc., and on
the fourth by an extra square, with
yard, for the sheep barns and dwell
ings for shepherds. The hens had
free range over the yards and the
fields without, and, of course, good
care generally. The egg yield was
never failing, and the flock was con
sidered very profitable, especially as
they were kept largely as scaveng
ers, there being so much waste stuff,
scattered grains, etc., on the farm
of several thousand acres. No farmer
large or small, at that time, how
ever, ever thought of dividing his hens
in small flocks kept separately. All
were kept together in one flock, and
even these "dunghills" just shelled out
the eggs. A few years ago one of our
neighbors, who has now moved out of
town, but is 8till keeping 'poultry,
kept from 500 to 600 hens, mostly
Leghorns and Leghorn mixtures, in
one building, a common farm barn
originally intended for the common
farm uses, with horse and cattle
stables, hay mow, etc. This barn had
been fixed up for the purposes of a
large poultry house. A tight floor had
been put in for the second story,
which latter was used for roosting,
laying and hatching rooms. Grains
and beef scraps were bought from first
hand at wholesale and the whole un
dertaking was carried on in aa eco
nomical and business-like manner. In
short, it was made this man's chief
business, and he managed to make a
fair living from it, and support him
self, wife and several children in a
modest way. Persoually, from what
we have seen elsewhere, we have not
the least doubt .that it is entirely pos
sible and feasible to keep 500 hens in
one large flock with profit, provided all
other essentiol conditions of success
in poultry management are supplied.
We are tempted to make the trial our
selves but in order to have every
chance and every advantage, we would
(and will) keep nothing else but pure
bred Hamburgs (Silver Spangled in
our caBe). We believe that with no
other fowl can we get more eggs, and
get them at less coin.. The eggs an.
small, it is true. But in winter, and
in summer, too, an egg is an egg."
The above from Practical Farmer,
has many good points but we think if
we had 1,400 hens that at any time in
the year did not lay an egg, wc should
"sit up and pay attention" till they
oid. In such a case there must b«»
something radically wrong with the
management somewhere not less than
500 of a flock of this size should have
been early hatched pullets, and very
many of these pullets should have be
gun laying before cold weather set in,
and if not over-crowded, and If prop
erly fed, the layer part of them would
keep laying right through. The year
olds, too, should be laying some all
the time except possibly In the height
of moulting.
The number, if properly housed and
handled, should have little to do with
the egg production. We visited, the
past summer. In California, one flock
of 2,700 laying hens kept on less than
two-thirds of an acre, and they were
laying hens, bright and healthful as a
flock of ten on a tena-cre lot. The
size of a flock that can profitably be
THE EVENING TIMES, GRAND FORKS, N. D.
and Farm
RIM. ESTIMATE OF CROPS OF COUNTRY
Production
Farm Value
Dec. 11, 1906
$1,166,626,479
336,435,081
153,897,679
306,292,978
74,235,997
19,671,243
8,727,443
26,899,165
16,121,298
167,547,392
592,539,671
68,232,647
2,927,416,091
492,888,004
242,372,966
964,904,522
178,916,484
33,374,833
14,641,937
26,576,146
17,854,768
308,038,382
57,143,959
682,428,530
(Cereals computed In bushels, hay in tons, tobacco In pounds).
Hie average weight per bushel is shown by reports received by the
bureau to be 56.5 pounds for spring wheat, 59.2 pounds for winter wheat,
and 32.0 pounds for oats.
kept depends wholly upon the build
ings, ventilation, food and manage
ment, not upon numbers.
WHY CREAM VARIES IK TEST.
It is not an unusual thing that
cream will vary from two per cent to
eight per cent in a single week, and
those who have not made a study
of the causes will at once say: "This
can't be, it must be a mistake." Yet
it is no mistake, and a little observa
tion and study will undoubtedly re
veal the reason.
Let us, as a guide for such study,
call your attention to a few of these
causes:
1st. Let it be understood that the
cream screw does not have all to do
with the density of cream produced.
The cream screw may never be mov
ed and yet the test of richness of the
cream will vary accordingly as con
ditions change. In the spring, milk
is generally thinner than in summer,
fall or winter, and when this is the
case the cream produced by the sepa
rator will also be thinner. At other
seasons when the milk is richer the
cream wijl be richer also and of
higher screw which remained in the
same position on both occasions.
2d. The temperature at which
milk is separated makes a difference,
viz: The colder the milk the thicker
the cream, and the warmer the milk
the thinner the cream.
3d. The higher the speed at which
a separator is run the thicker the
cream slower motion produces thin
ner cream.
4th. The practice of flushing the
machine after skimming has its ef
feet inasmuch as about the same
amount ot water or skim milk is
used on the smaller skimming as on
the larger, and thus the cream of the
smaller skimming is unduly thinned
down to a lower test.
5th. To feed a separator fast will
produce a thinner cream slow feed
will produce the reverse.
6th. In some makes of separators
a foreign substance will accumulate
around the cream screw, causing the
machine to gradually deliver a richer
cream until this obstruction is sud
denly flushed away, when the separa
tor will at once deliver a much thin
ner cream.
There are other reasons and com
binations of reasons' why cream will
vary in test from day to day and
from season to season, none however,
but can be accounted for on the farm
if conditions are closely observed and
studied. The Babcock test machine
records every variation in the rich
ness of cream, but does not te'i
why.
German compositors have arranged
a new agreement with the master
printers, which is to be in force for
five years. The claim of the men was
for a 15 per cent increase of tariff
rates. They have obtained 10 per cent
increase a week, a reduction of hours
from nine a day to eight and a half.
Golden Grain Biscuit Company. loca
tion of principal place of business at
corner of Alpha avenue and Eighth
street, in the city of Grand Forks,
North Dakota.
NOTICE.
There is delinquent upon the follow
ing described stock of the Golden Grain
Biscuit Company, on account ot an as
sessment levied on the 14th day of Nov
ember, A. D. 1906, the several amounts
set opposite the names of the respec
tive shareholders as follows:
a
3 2
&
I
Names.
No. of Certificates.
s-
01
M. E. Schouweiler, 45
415, 47, 48. 49. for 10
shares each 50. 51 for
5 shares each, 52 for 3
shares 63 $100 $630
C. G. Neils, 21 for
10 shares, 41 for 5
shares 15 $100 $150
B. W. Schouweiler, 55
for 4% shares 4% $100 $45
63 $100
15 *100
4% $100
And in accordance with law and an
order of the Board of Directors, made
on the 14th day of November, 1906, so
many shares of each parcel of such
stock as may be necessary will be sold
at the office of the corporation in Its
building at the corner or Alpha avenue
and Eighth street, in the City of Grand
Forks, in Grand Forks county. North
Dakota on the 7th day of January.
1907, at the hour of ten o'clock in the
forenoon of that day to pay delinquent
assessments thereon together with the
costs of advertising and expenses of
sale.
E. C. BATES.
Secretary.
Location of office, corner of Alpha
avenue and Eighth street In the
City of Grand Forks, North Da
kota.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT OF
ACCOUNT.
State of North Dakota, County of
Grand Forks, in County Court.
In the Matter of the Estate of James
Ryan, Deceased.
Notice is hereby given, that Hugh
P. Ryan, the administrator of the es
tate of James Ryan deceased, has
rendered and presented for settle
ment and filed in the county court his
final account of his administration ot
said estate, and that Monday, the
14th day of January, 1907, being a day
DENTISTS
DR. L. L. ECKMAN,
DENTIST.
Both Phones—466M.
Grand Forks, North Dakota
DRS. FLETCHER &
SAUNDERSON,
Successors to
Dr. Robert S. Ramsey
DENTIST.
Clifford Annex. Grand Forks. N J).
DENTIST.
Office Over Union National Bank.
Phone 1»1.
DR. E. F. ADAMS.
PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS.
DR. J. D. TAYLOR,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office In St. John's Block.
Office honrst 9 to 10 a. I to p. n.
7 to p. in.
JOHN FAWCETT, M.A..
DISEASES Ot WOMEN
AND GENERAL SURGEOft
Office over 8tanchfleld Store
Phone 261
DR. J. GRASSICR
OIBcc Northwestern Building
Corner DeMers Avenue and Fourth St
8. W. RUTLEDGE
HOMEOPATHII
Physician and Surgeon.
128 B. Third St Grand Forks. N.
DR. F. J. DUGGAN
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON—Spe
cial attention given to diseases of
women. Office, Beare Block. Office
hours, 10 a .m. to 12 m.. 2 p. m. to 4
p. ro, 7 p. m. to 8 p. Both Phones
DO-L.
ARCHITECTS.
J. W. ROSS
ARCHITECT
and Superintendent ol Construction
Office 1% Third St. Grano ?orks. N.
R. L. SMITH
ARCHITECT
Both Phones. National Bank Bldg
W. J. EDWARDS
ARCHITECT
Northwestern Bldg. Grand Forks
Northwestern Phono 466L.
OSTEOPATHY
DR. ORR SANDERS,
DR. MAY E. SANDERS,
Chronic and acute diseases success
tally treated. Treatment at home
if desired. Suite 56, Security
Block. Both phones 542.
Grand Forks, North Dakota
of a term of said court, to-wit: of
the January term, A. D. 1907, at 2
o'clock p. m., at the county court
room, in the court house, in the city
of Grand Forks, county of Grand
Forks and state of North Dakota, has
been duly appointed by the judge of
said court for the settlement of said
account, at which time ana place any
person and all persons interested in
said estate, may appear and file his
or their exceptions In writing to said
account and contest the same, and
notice is further given that upon the
settlement of said final account said
estate will be ready for distribution
and will be ordered distributed.
lit is further ordered that notice of
such final settlement and distribution
be given by the publication of this
notice once each week for four sue
cessive weeks in the "Times," a daily
newspaper of general circulation
printed and published in the city and
county of Grand Forks, N. D.
Dated this 13th day of December,
1906.
—L. K. Hassell,
Judge of County Court.
—Frank B. Feetham,
Attorney for Administrator.
(Court Seal.)
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT OF
ACCOUNT.
State of North Dakota, County of
Grand Forks, in County Court.
In the matter of the Estate of Eliza
beth Ryan, Deceased.
Notice is hereby given, that Hugh
P. Ryan, the executor of the es
tate of Elizabeth Ryan deceased, has
rendered and presented for settle
ment and filed in the county court his
final account of his administration of
said estate, and that Monday, the
14th day of January, 1907, being a day
of a term of said court, to-wit: of
the January term, A. D. 1907, at 2
o'clock p. ni., at the county court
room, in the court house, in the city
of Grand Forks, county of Grand
Forks and state of North Dakota, has
been duly appointed by the judge of
said court for the settlement of said
account, at which time and place any
person and all persons interested in
said estate, may appear and file his
or their exceptions in writing to said
-account and contest the same, and
notice is further given that upon the
settlement of said final account said
estate will be ready for distribution
and will be ordered distributed.
It is further ordered that notice of
such final settlement and distribution
be given by the publication of this
notice once each week for four suc
cessive weeks In the "Times," a dally
newspaper of general circulation
printed and published in the city and
county of Grand Forks, N. D.
Dated this 13th day of December,
1906.
—L. K. Hassell,
Judge of County Court.
—Frank B. Feetham,
Attorney for Executor.
(Court Seal.)
CLASSIFIED ADS CLASSIFIED HQS
TAILORS.
Lstcst Styles oa Hind Perlccl fit* Oearsatced
Paulson Bros.
Merchant Tailors'
tU Soath Third Si. GRAND F0IIS. N. D.
MANUFACTURERS.
GRAND FORKS MONUMENT
WORKS
B. JEFFREY. Proprietor.
Monuments, Headstones,
Cemetery Fencing
Trl-State 292L 424 DeMers Ave.
Grand Forks, I. D.
DON MCDONALD
TENTS. AWNINGS, SHADES
Waterproof Covers for Harvesters
Threshers and Grain Stacks
Corner DeMers aad Fifth
Grand Forks, North Dakota
MISS
DELA ODEGARD
Phone 766L 60S DeMers Ave.
Blast Gratfd Forks, Minn.
Manufacturer of high grade cigars
«uch as
Wrand Forks EAGLE8, Globe and (he
A. 0. U. W.
H. E. ARMANN
Heating and Ventilating Engineer
Designing of econongcal beating and
ventilating apparatus. Ventilation
means health, vigor and life. Phone
N. W. 1118, Tri-State 514L.
Office Third Floor St. John Block.
Rasmussen, Bemis & Company
WSolMslt
Dry Goods. Notions, Etc.
6BAND rOHS N. DAI0TA
KAUFMANN'S BAKERY,
JACOB KAUFMANS, Prop.
East Grand Forks, Minn. ..Phone SSI.
J. B. WOODLEY.
Wholesale and Retail
HARNESS, WHIPS AND SADDLERY
SUPPLIES.
The largest and most complete stock
ot hand made harness In the two cities.
Manufactured ot Lappe A Sons pure
oak leather. A nice line of Riding
Saddles S00 pairs ot 6-A Horse Blank',
eta to select from at Jobbers' prices.
Sole agents for the celebrated wyeth
Horse Collars also a full line of haok
and surrey harness a. nice line of
track and driving harness sweat pads,
whips and summer goods at a Big Re
duction. Call and look them over.
Telephone 1100.
AL COONS, Manager,
East Grand Forks, Minnesota.
S. G. SKULASON
Attorney at Law.
St John's Block, Third Floor.
N. W. Phone 815L. Tri-State 816.
mm
The Coal That Cooks
your dinner on Christmas day, Sunday
or any other day in the year should
be the best mined to give satisfactory
results. That's your happy prospect
if the coal's carted from this yard. We
won't take a back seat for anybody
when it comes to fuel in good, hard,
clean lumps—sizes to suit—ot anthra
cite coal.
Gibbs Grain & Fuel Co
Phone 600 Office: 309 Kittson
HAVE YOLB
TEETH
Properly attended to now and avoid
pain and digestive dlatnrbances
ot more or leas gravity
by consulting
DR. COUVRETT. Dentist
DE MERS AND THIBD STS.
Over Drag Store*
PHONE RICE'S 602L
rOR HACKS, DRATS, DAT OB
NIGHT. WR MHBT ALL TRAINS.
Office, 41S Dellers Avenue.
W.
.KIRK, Prop.
vv,
PAGE 8EVE»
MISCELLANEOUS.
B. O. PAULSNESS
Plumbing, Steam and Hot water Fit
jig. Pomps and Windmills. Sewer
ana Water Works Contractor. Lead
and Iron Pipe and Fittings. Brass
Goods, Sewer Pipe, Hose, etc.
GRAND FORKS, N. DAK.
JEFF'S TRANSFER
Both Phonos tl.
Hacks and Livery, dray and trans
fer work, moving pianos a specialty
Only low down moving vans tn tha
city. Day or night calls attended to
promptly. All work guaranteed.
6, W. BARTON. Prop.
61S DeMers Ave. Opp. G. N.
J. LAVERTY
Minnesota Point
Dealer tn Live and Dressed Fostoi
Cash or Commission.
Phone 128L. N. W. O. Address
Grand Forks. Call or writ*.
The City Feed Store
DOWlfEY A PFEIFZB
Flour, Feed. Hay and
Wood of All Kind*
It. W. *Fheae US
Trl-State BSS-L,
129 DeMers Ave.
OS DeMers Av»
GRAND mm
LOGAN CAFE
We Serve Revere Coffee
the Best In the World.
S19 DeMers Ave. Grand Forks, N. D.
MAX RABINOVICH
Money to loan on all
articles ot valne.
Phone 7(41,
O. YOUNG
Vhslssale Faraitot Kim, Cstf**, StwisJ
•srhisss, Bsak sad Office fWaitm
125-137-138 seath Third St.
Grand Forks, North Dakota
TO THOSE WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN
Everyone who jwns a phonograph
and reports their name at Getts* muslo
house will hear of something to their
advantage.
The M. H. Redlclt
HIDE & FUR GO.
Northwestern Dealers In
Fine Northern Furs, Hides, Pelts,
Wool, Tallow, Boots, Etc.
Largest and Oldest Hide and Fur
House In the State.
GRAND FORKS N. DAK.
Bacon & Van Alstine
Livery find Hack Stable
9 TO IS N. FOURTH ST. TELEPHONE 131
Grand Forks, North Dakota
We have a few good country livery horses for sale cheap.
Guarantee Stock Food Company
lacoipsntsi
Capital Stock, 980.000
Manufacturers of Stock foot, Pen»
try Food, Worm Powder, Idee Klllss,
Heave Oare, Pink Bre Remedy, Fevet
Cure, Colic Cure, Gall Cnre, Foot Rest,
edy aad White Liniment
SRA1TO SORRS. t. P.
J. A. EVANS
Teacher of Pare Italian.
Method of Voice Culture. Pupils will
be received on Tuesday mornings fr
a. m. to 12 and every week day even
ing. Room 62 Security building.
Getts Music store.
Columbia Hotel
AND RESTAURANT
Q«t sour hutches ban whil*
it waiting for TOUT tiains N
Open Day and Night
0SCA1 UTODSON. hep't
Batm $1 and $Lt6 par dar
GRAND FORKS, N. DAK.
Osposits O. N. Dapot
SEALS
Either Pocket
or Desk....
Rubber Stamps
Write (or Catalog
CAD WELL, Tha Stamp
Grand Forts, H. B.
GASH
for all Had* ol Jssk, Ceatiftta! el
Scrap bos. Copper aad Inn, Old
lafchir Boots sad Sksss, Isfi el si
llsds, sad Bottle*.
Special Price for Car Load
M. F1SHMAN
N. V. fhtes 81M

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