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The evening times. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1906-1914, February 23, 1914, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042373/1914-02-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO.
WB|
HX PERMANENT CM 10 Bf
DATES FOIt SHOW MEXICO'S HM
Lake Region Event Hereaft- Norwegian Newspaper Cor-
er Will be Held Second
Week in January.
By fixing the l'air and convention
for the same dates each year, it is ex-
pected that better results will be ob-
tained. Ala.i, the' fair has been ad
vanced about a month, and will pro
cede tile Tri-State Grain Grower*"
convention and the North Dakota
Corn and Clover convention, the oth
er leading farm e.vents held annually
te the state.
One of the interesting features in
connection with the. show this year
Is the fact that it was successful, fi
nancially. About $ 1,000 wae expend
ed in staging the show and the con
vention and the association hns a bal
ance in the. treasury.
The association, in its annual meet
ing. also recommended the establish
ment of a. county competition day in
each of the seven counties included in
the Lake Region association. On the
county day, the various school con
tests that are conducted would be
.iudged, and prizes announced. Tt is
proposed to adopt a plan .somewhat
similar to that employed in Barnes
county, where a play day is featured,
«.nd which has been successful.
The present officials of the associa
tion—President F. H. Hyland and
Secretary Charles Plllsbury—doubt
leas will be continued in charge of
the work next year, although the an
nual election has been delayed.
BAD FIRE
powder biscuits that, if once tried,
you will never use any other recipe.
Try it the next time you run short of
lnad* fine tUa recipe. gg
It skla| Pewda* BUcslla
ton* CMps ftour to c»p short"
ming: S level Uaspoonfuls Baking
'mwr about I cup milt or water I
teatpoonful tall.
•Sift three times, the flour, salt snd
osldnjr powder. Work into the flour the
Wofteung, wing lard or hotter for
Worteningr. Then mix to a very soft
^mgh with the milk. The softer the
'Macuit enters the oven, the lighter it
comes out. Never feneed baking powder
piscuits press the dough into shape add
Ju lightly. Cut in small shapes and
flake on a sheet or very shallow pan in
hot oven. la placing biscuits in the
Vans place well
apart, not allowing edges
to touch. Small biscuits sire better than
large ones. Large biscuits do not have
the proper amount of tine to raise and
l)ske.
jHS»e sou seen .the new Cook's Boob?
Primful ofspprttong recipes that simply must
•Beewsftnerery time irthe few simple direc
tion* ate carefully followed. you would gladly
MySOceatt for this valuable book, s*» we send I
npoa receipt of the colored cer- I
tuata packed ine*ety23«en tea of KCBakinc
ftmier. jAocn Mm. Co., Chicago- SauU
sSss do
not have Cook's Book certificates.
OAYS
WHITE
respondent Gives Interest
ing Views on Situation.
-The Fargo, X. X)., 23.—-"Carranza
Devils lake, X. !., Feb.
success attending the ]-akc Region will be the next president of Mexico
Mid-Winter fair and farm convention ami will come into power within two
in Devils l^nUo this year lias resulted
in the decision to make the two fea
tures permanent institutions and, un
der the plan adopted, they will be
held during the second week ot Jan
uary, each year.
-PANAMA CAN
AI. & SOUTH AMKRICA
months," .«aid ,1. Janson Kuhr, staff I
correspondent of "Verden's Gang," of
Christiunia, the oldest and biggest
daily newspaper of Norway, who is a
visitor in the city for a few days. He
liaa just returned from a stay of sev
eral weeks in Mexico, during which
time h« met and interviewed Car-!
rani!a lur
his
Not Civilized,
"The civilized nations of the world
arc in error when they consder Mex
ico a civilized country," continued Mr.
Fulir. "Only 10 per cent of the people
of that country can read and write.
The great majority of the people pre
fer to rob and plunder. Most of these
enlisted in the wars carried on down
there have no conception of what
they are lighting for but are there
only for the opportunity of plunder
which the. life affords.
Without Patriotism.
"The inhabitants of Mexico are a
race of mixed blood, Spanish and In
dian. They are a la«y. vicious type,
embodying the worst element of the
Spanish race and of the Indians of
Mexico. There are of course a few ex
ceptions, but they are few and patriot
ism is absolutely lacking, among the
Huse proportion of the people.
Carranza Intelligent,
"Carrama. is one of the lbost in
telligent inei) I have ever met. He can
speak live Kuropean languages flu
ently, has studied the governments of
most of the civilized nations of the
world and he is well versed in law.
Carranza himself told me that the
people of Mexico are not fit for self
government but must be ruled by an
iron hand.
"He told me that he proposes to
rule them thus when he has the pow-
•M.- er and he will kill federals who are
Fire Tabes Barn and Stock of Chaffee
now
Chaffee, X. P., Feb JiS.—A fire oo- quarter. lie declared it to be his firm
curred on the Gray farm, one mile resolve to wage a war of extermina
«a*t and one mile uoi'tU of Knibclen. tion of all opposition until the land is
Ham Hildas', who is the renter of the thoroughly pacified.
farm, lost nil his thirteen head of
horses, harness fuid feed. All that he
(Ot out of the barn was two cows.
The loss to Mr. Friday is about $3,
R00 to (4,000, with very little or no
Insurance. The building was owned by
9Sr. Gray, of Casselton.
SCHOOL HEAD SUES
OuMdtoo KdncMor Wants Damages
for Alleged Assault.
CaaseMon. N. U.. Feb. 23.—Ag
ETeved because of alleged bad treat- -v
snent of his children. G. O. Dairympie wl!f'i
is reported to havo severely assaulted jj.® t,
Prof. N. Sauvrain, the head of the I
local schools. The latter has inatitut
ed a suit for damages against Mr. XL w« ml
nuiymple when the matter will be!8"1"8
thoroughly ventilated in the courts.
The assault and the damage suit have
Iboth caused considerable comment
and the sentiment of the people is
considerably divided.
If IX SEVATORIAIi RACE.
Minnewaukan, N. D.. Feb. 23.—A. J.
.Kirkelde has announced th^,t he is a
candidate for state senator of Ben
tton county. Mr. Kirkeide is a pioneer
«t the county and was state senator
during the legislative seeslons of 190S
Itnd 1907.
PROF. ANDREW'S RESIGNS.
Valley City, N. D., Feb. 23.—Prof.
Charlton Andrews of the state normal
school's department of English, has
resigned to accept an editorial posi
tion with The New York Tribune. He
«U engaged in newspaper work at
Chicago and Indianapolis before com.
tag here. He will leave March 1 for
New York.
Bating Powder Biscuits
liiht Fcathsr
^Nft.JmmHMeKenMieHill, Editor ef
tkt Boston Cooking School Magazine
tjadpe in so far ahead of ordinary ba
opposing him and all outlaw
farmer. baudp are to be exterminated without
Madero a Martyr.
"Madero is regarded as a martyr
ly Carranza and his followers and the
rebel leader says he has evidence that
Madero and his vice president were
murdered the tame day arrested and
in the palace. Madero failed to retain
his power in Mexico because he was a
dreamer and thought that he could
teach the Mexicans by talking to them
instead of driving them with the gun
and bayonet. Carranza will not make
this mistake."
"Huerta knows that bis end Is near
and he is gathering all the money he
ho 1,ecarne
ma,ke
m,Ulons
preHdent."
HELD POUR HOURS
Operator at Pumping Station Has to
Walt TIU KniHne Runs Down
to Free Injured Hand.
Churchs Ferry, X. D„ Feb. 2S.—
S. J. Hanson, who has charge of the
Great Northern pumping station at
thl» place, met with a very serious
accident. He had started the engine
which is located on the first floor and
had gone up stairs aad was working
with the machinery when the thumb
of his right hand was caught in the
gearing which caused the machine
to stop, but the engine running at
full speed did not allow the machin
ery to loosen to permit Mr. Hanson
to free his hand. There was no other
person in the station at the time, so
it was a waiting proposition with him.
He met with the accident about 11
a. m. and was held there until 3 in
the afternoon, at which time the en
gne becoming exhausted for lack of
gasoline, slowed down, allowing the
machinery to give enough so that he
was able to take his hand out.
BANK HELPS FARMERS
Baking Powder Biscuits nade by this eration with the farmers in this sec-!
-1 "on to change to diversified farming ..r ... ..
and engage in stock raising. The'
First National bank here is offering g.lac®
raising.
IS A CANDIDATE
Mirnewaukan, N. D., Feb.
Rheumatism
is
dangerout
if. neglected.
SLOAN'S
LINIMENT
—fine far hmtagand MhH—.
*f-C,Wkr' ButUont, Antbany.R.U
writee: ''For years aulfeied &oiii
rhmimatism. Mr hips would swell to
eaormoDs proportiooa and knee lobita
Ktues
ia me awfully. I uaed six orcUt
of your
NEWEST CRUISING STEAMER
BSSTI AIIDFIITirW
LAURENTIC
MARCH4
CASTER CRUISE APRIL
STAR
LIME
ceMmOadLtataSt
and wa*
cured."
VDIMBOHB!
A
8. K. Cavaer
CM—«• 1M*I Agssls
"5:,
•vt
tfKY0'
What Every Woman Doesn't Know.
Loo** Hot*,nwo.,
fcHATtta WftMMA.
IKTUtaUp'lVr&WE
FoicT we aim
HUM&*y now
first TIME f«e
/UNPC*. I
IMTH I
MAO A. NAHO AU.
eneN'M* T&o!
MHT that
WCt"!
7uiT
MviCtebt*
wu
mm
T'oerr
UttWHH
FAR60 WELCOMES
BISH0PJ.P. TYLER
Large Crowd at Gethsemane
Cathedral to Hear First
Address of New Head.
Fargo, N. D., Feb. 23.—John Poyntz
Tyler, recently consecrated bishop for
the diocese of North Dakota, preach
ed in the state for the first time yes
terday morning. Every pew at Geth
semane cathedral was filled and the
frank, open manner with which the
new bishop expressed his appreciation
of the manner in which he had been
received and told of the plans he has
for the work to be carried on in his
district, carried with It the appealing
force of the works of a strong man.
Formerly Associated.
Dean Dewitt Dowling, who was for
merly associated with Bishop Tyler in
Philadelphia, spoke of that associa
tion in presenting the bishop to the
parishioners, and spoke with feeling
of the thrill of joy which he experi
enced when advised that his old asso
ciate would be bishop of this diocese.
Position of Responsibilities.
"When the New York assemblage
laid handB on'me and ordered me to
come to North Dakota, I was confus
ed," said Bishop Tyler. "I never
dreamed for a moment that that as
semblage would call me to fill a po
sition so fraught with responsibilities
and cares, but at the same time I was
filled with delights and joys unnum
bered at the position I at present oc-
Carrlngton's Financial Institutions: cupy. After a conference with my
Assist to Diversified Farming. wife we decided that it would be
Carrington, N. D., Feb. 23.—The weakness not to accept the call and I
banks of Carrington and other towns resigned my parish and sent in my
this county are working in co-op- acceptance and am here.
WILL MIB* VN PI»«
aa?.rV?t
somg to try to fill the
whicAm?
to furnish full purchase price To attempt to do such a thing is fool
farmers desiring to engage in stock'
l8hne88»
TlAOrt
1
Lessen the risk of heart affec
tions, ease thn frightful pain, and
limber up the swollen muselesand
stiff, lame joints, with penetrat
ing, never-failing
yt.?
Predecessor occupied,
but
I
am
A*
23.—-Ed-
soing to make a
place of my own. My aim and am'
bition Is to be a good and faithful
bishop.
"While serving you here I shall try
to win a place in your affections and
irAii Vior« In mina am
and is well posted on county affairs. Dean Dowling have been in the past hroueht bv the vif'» Wh*n th« d! TT
The new bishop thanked the mem-it0
flowers and telegrams received upon iHrst
Gave Fine Sermon.
"I come to you gladly and willingly,
and propose ythe grace of God to
fill my position to the best of my
ability."
Following these remarks the bish
iop preached a powerful sermon, talc
ling as his text a portion of the ser
mon on the mount.
ALLEGED ELOPEMENT
Canadian Couple, Closely IMtled,
Said to Have Tied to North Dakota.
Hankinson, N. P., Feb. 23.—ISlop
lug with a woman who was his broth
er's wife and his wife's sister, James
Marshall is being sought by tjtiQ Can
adian authorities. Marshall was
resident of Kenaston, Sask., where
he is said to have deserted his wife
and children and left with a woman
who was both a sister to his wife and
wife to his brother. She also, it is
said, deserted her husband and chil
dren.
Marshall and the woman were here
the greater part of December and
went to Glenwood, Minn., and later to
Minneapolis. The laws of Canada nrq
vide heavy penalties for desertion of
wife and children and Marshall will
be bitterly. prosecuted if located.
HAS BAD FALL
IT
Loading Ice in
CM.
Milton. N. D., Feb. 2$.—Tom Gilles
pie met with a painful accident while
loading Ice In a freight car. As he
was dragging a large chunk of Ice
{along the floor, the tongs slipped and
he was violently dashed against two
layers Of ice, already placed in one
of- ther car.. His.
head was dsshqd
IMritfifclh* cortier of one cake and WS
side against the edge of another. He
was rendered unconscious by the fall.
&
s-
IIIH
DECREE GRANTED
Action Brought by Wife is Decided In
Favor of the Husband.
Mandan, N. 15., Feb. 28.—A final
detailed adjustment of the Schantz
divorce case was effected
heart as you have in mine. I am! buildings in I"«ew York city for taxable
itor F. X. Klrsch of The Warwick here at your service for Jesus Christ's i!? P«rP°ses for 1914. illustrates in a cer
Sentinel has announced that he is a sake, and I hope to serve you to the
candidate for county treasurer of Ben- fullest extent under his guidance.
son county. He has been publisher! Is Appreciative.
of The Sentinel for over eight years,, "The relation between myself and fr
tim
I OT frtp sniYia 11 a ha]ni» nxifrtnollif
the most pleasant, and it is the will ,^g^aby^hen the de- Central station, at a valuation of $17.-
of God that we are again brought to- mldP in tlvnr nf huHhan.i YhZ 690,000. Then follows the Pennsylvania
gether. I feel in myself a hearty ^v ,.virtPnn»TntrLnntrt ^?l^' 5«atlon'
response to the attitude of the dean.", to noint ^o lnc-nmtf^ °f i1}?
point
bers of the parish for tho manner in: TT '•Bn assessed valuation of $12,415,000,
which he had been received, for the i„
A
man
his acceptance of the office but most Mutual Life with $10,000,000, and
of all for the special services held! Women form alliances with each fourteen other office buildings, be
!throughout the diocese, asking that!other for offensive and defensive pur- tween $10,000,000 and $15,000,000.
the blessings of God might accompany
him in his now work.
poses.
Cream
of Rye
Nature's
Breakfast Food
Correc+s
Indieestion
Banishes
Cons+ina+ion
,JL* •^rr-
*rr*
•JUST HAVTTINE
FOIt MACK. -1
PROMtfEDTW
Miff US «*D HWMt
tCT It SHARP. OA
BSEM RUMNH^
WteTTy BAD
Few MAHOS
THE EVENING TIMES. GRAND FORKS, N. t. MONDAY. FEBRUARY 23, 114
—By Webster.
TMCIMCDCUTAC,
BOYS THOUGHT VWO
BC FTBFTVRVMT. A
LVTTLC
LUMCH
(0U DMC£
CTTAM
IN
"YOU*. COFTBC .MFCCUTWJ
WHAT OtCKY WamAt
OOCSHT KNOW
VVMCM To BRlNfr
LUNCH AT
A POKCR.
SHE'S BELLE OF THE NAVAL ACADEMY
Miss Rhoda Fullam.
?A«-Ty
**uHan» is the pretty daughter of the superintendent ot
the United States naval academy at Annapolis. She Is now the belle ot
society there.
SOME BIG FIGURES.
Assessed Valuation of Buildings In
New York for Taxable Purposes.
(Buffalo Courier.)
anli waniAv ^onnoll for Mrs. Schantz tain way the almost incomprehensible
and Hanley & Sullivan for Mr., magnitude of the wealth of the me
scnantz. tropolis.
The assessed valuation of the great
The case for divorce has been pend- Heading the list for the next year
,7r~ ««=*. »«j»i
aBSessnlent
1
1
to Incompatibility. polltan Life stands at the head with
girls idea of an affinity is the. followed by the Hudson Terminal of-
to propose. lice building, "with $2,250,000, and the
of the Grand
wlth a
offlc®
At the head of the hotels still stands
the Waldorf-Astoria, with an assess
ment ot $13,170,000 next, the McAl
pln, with $10,200,000 third, the Plaxa.
with $7,600,000 fourth, the Baltimore
with $6,000,000 fifth, the RlU-Carl
ton, with $5,170,000, and there are
fourteen hotels with assessments be
tween $5,000,000 and $2,000,000.
?f the bank buildings, the 'Bank
«K8O^TA5A
w,th 41,1
assessment of
$6,800,000. followed by the National
City hank, with $5,500,000, and ten
bank buildings between $5,000,000
and $2,000,000. *'T
At the head of the theaters and'
amusement houses stands the Metro
politan opera house, with an assess
ment of $8,120,000 next Madison
Square Garden, with $3,000,000 the
Hippodr.ome, with $2,250,000 the New
York theater, with $2,250,000. and
$1 ooohoooer*
between
,9'.th?
^.000,000 and
club
houses the University
club leads, with $2,100,000. The Bel
nord Is at the head of the apartment
houses with $3,550,000, and there are
ten between $3,500,000 and $1,000,600.
Of residences, W. A. Clark's stands at
the top with $4,000,000 assessed valu
ation next, A. a. Vanderbllt's with
$8,350,000 Henry C. Frlclc's with
*2.650,000 Andrew Carnegie's with
$2,300,000, and twelve residences be
tween $^,000,000 and $1,000,000.
•VT "^HORSE
Adams, N. D., Feb. 28.——Ata epidem
ic of Influenza seems tq have struck
Southwest Adams among the horses,
and Dr. Grady, of Lankin, haa been
called to attend them. John Bowman
had the hardest luck, all but one ot
his homes having taken it.
a,
MHONRL GUMD
CHjffNHM ENDji
Tharaldson Elected Presi
dent of Millitaiy Associa*
tion For Coming Year
Fargo, N. D., Feb. 33.—The adop
tion of resolutions favoring a fixed
military policy for the United States
with reference to the army and navy
and an increase in appropriations
from #50© peryear to $760 per year
for each company, featured the final
session of the North Dakota National
Guard association convention which
closed Saturday afternoon.
Thanks Extended.
The committee on resolutions also
extended thanks to the city of Fargo,
the Commercial club and Co. for
the entertainment and the manner in
which the visiting representatives
were treated while in the city. A
vote of thanks was also extended to
MaJ Stedeman, Lieutenant Turner and
Lieutenant Herron, recular army rep
resentatives at the meeting, tor their
valuable contributions and advice to
wards the betterment ot conditions in
the national guard. It was further
resolved that the paper which was
rsad before the meeting by Lieutenant
Turner should oe printed and distri
buted among the commissioned and
non-commissioned officers of the or
ganlsatlon.
California Trip.
The committee on the Panama-Pa
cific encampment reported favorably
uid in accordance with the advice of
•Col. J. ,H. Fraine, who attended the
meeting in Chicago at which time the
advisability of holding the annual en
campment for 1916 at Saa Francisco
was.Wwn up by the-representatives
of all the national guard bodies.
During the afternoon session offi
cers for the ensuing year were elect
ed. Col. Thomas H. Tharaldson of
Bismarck was elected president
PV.
Boys of Hillsboro vice
g•icklnson,C.vice
resident Oapt. G. A. Tullefson of
president: W. A.
stlckney of Bismarck, secretary, and
Iafson of' Mlnot, treasurer.
Col. David Ritchie of Valley City,
retiring president of the association,
presided over the meetings Saturday.
'i l? the morning -session Gover
nor B. Hanna addressed the meet
ing. He praised the work of the na
tlonal guard and spoke with enthusi
asm of the pleasant times spent at
the encampments at Camp Hanna at
Devils Lake.
GROW DARING IN THE ALPS.
An Ska of Guldeless Mountaineering1
Is Coming On.
(Boston Transcript)
The general subject of climbing
without a guide is one that is now at
tracting a great deal of attention in
Kurope. An English sporting maga
slne says: "We may date the devel
opment of modern mountaineering
from the birth of guideless climbing.
The pioneers were responsible for a
more radical revolution than they
perhaps anticipated, the result of their
movement being to raise the general
standard of British mountaineering."
The assertion to made that one need
be nothing more than a good walker
to be able to climb with guides to the
top of any peak in the Alps, and it is
added that he who has to depend on
his own .skill, strength and nerve must
have the craftat his fingers' ends. The
guided mountaineer merely needs to
follow his guides and he may do this
cor years and njqt.be able to leadd in a
simple climb or And his way to the
tpp ot an easy snow peak.
There are arguments on both sides.
Certain Alpine clubs are such in truth,
and the criterion for the admission of
a member is whether one is willing to
trust himself on the rope with a can
dldate. But at the same time the let
ting down of the bars of Alpinism by
the preaching of guideless climbing
can only do harm. *Man is prone to do
what he sees some one else do. With
the confidence In his own ability he
tramps bodly where the angels of the
profession tread with greatest cau
tion, and tramps likely through to his
own destruction. A man's life may
be at stake at any moment, if daring
work Is to be undertaken. The guide
is a native of the country. He has
passed his life In some nrofesslon like
that of farming or herding that takes
him out of doors. He learns the me
terological moods of the country as he
do«»s Its geography.
The native learns, through constant
experience, the habits of his cliffs and
glaciers, the meaning of the crevasse
and the delicacy of method reaulred
for determining its location he real
ises the irresponsibility of snow
bridges. He knows of avalanches, and
the accidents and incidents that move
them. He always has in his mind the
language of the mountains and their
surroundings.
The amateur may be able to surpass
the guide In safe daring by the quality
of mind that he can bring to bear.
Nevertheless the sacrifice of life
through incompetent mountaineering
is large. There is in this country a
safe and sane Fourth of July move
ment But the lives saved hardly ex
ceed the mortality of the careless
Alpinist A movement for safe and
ean Alpinism would effect nearly
equal results so far as mere mortality
is concerned. Yet the pendlulum is
swinging away from safety in Alpin
ism it is rather In the direction of
greater daring In proportion to intel
ligence and experience, and inevitab
ly there will be greater losses. Self
confidence effects most startling re
sults. At above 12,000 feet the moun
taineer has met men sauntering along
In a threatening position without util
ising the rope. It was not because
they did not know. Guideless Alpine
climbing may be approved when it is
undertaken by the few whose expe
rience fits them to understand the
dangers of walking over crevassed
glaciers and treacherous ice slopes,
but the achievements of these men
must not be too.highly accepted by the
general tramping public, for in such
practices there may be to them too
great a risk.
I
valuation'of $16,SS0,!
buildings the Metro-
11 O. Hotehldss. Bdltar
mntas. They
Cm* and so«Jp
W.
Gehrke, Bob Strelow and Brick Nel-
ers throughout the south and south
wets districts.
the di»
n£*Js as smooth as a baby's.
Dj.D1.Soapaf**
"m'
y'l-M llilfe,'
t,
WEB
aim
Many Awards in National
.J
Corn Exposition Go to
Flickertail Farmers.
.Dallas, Tex., Feb. 83.—North Da
kotan awards In the itate classes at
the national corn exposition were an
nounced here today by Prof. C. W.
Pugsley of the University of Nebras
ka, in charge of the judging, the ex
hibltors'from North Dakota display
ed a number of fine samples. The
awards in detail are:
Corn, any variety, single ear, first:
S. Thorpe, Mayville second, E: N.
Granlund, Delarmere third, Ole Teid
man. Kindred.
Any variety Denten ears: First, L.
S. Thorpe, MsyvtUe second, Henry
Granlund, Delamere third, Ole Tied
man, Kindred fourth, E. N. Gran
lund, Delamere.
Oats: Peck, winter, first: John
Christiansen, New Salem.
Best sheaf: First, John Christian
sen, New Salem second, Kurts
Brothers, Hazelton third, George
Klein, Mott.
Wheat, peck, winter: First I* S.
Th6rpe, Mayville.
Peck, spring: First S. V. Gregg.
Gladstone second, J. D. SkarvoU'.,
Christine third, Wallace Manlkowsli,
Mooreton.
Durum: First,. C. H. Slebschlag,
Petrel.
Best sheaf: First, John Christian
sen, New Salem second. Chaa. Rob
erts, Dawson third, Kurts Brothers,
Haselton.
Barley: Six-row: First John Chris
tiansen, New Salem.
Two-row: First Joseph Kitchen.
Sentinel Butte.
Best sheaf: First, Kurtz Brothers,
Haselton.
WORKS SUCCESSFULLY
Private Light Plant at Hazelton
Pleases Consumers.
Haselton. N. D.. Feb. 28—The elec
tric light plant which was installed
here by private parttles has been put I
In operatton and Is working success
fully. Practically all of the business
houses of the town and a great many
residences are using the service and
are highly pleased with such a mod
era convenience. Haselton is prob
ably one of the smallest towns In the
state to operate a light plant
BROKEN COLLARBONE
New Roekford Switchman Painfully
Injured In Yard Accident
New Roekford, N. D., Feb. 23.—
James Garvin, who was engaged as
switchman In the Great Northern
yards was seriously Injured while
swltchtng.
The switch engine was backing up
to couple onto a car, while Mr. Gar
vin In stepping between the cars to
open one of the couplers was caught
breaking his arm and securtng a frac
ture of the collar bone.
Every woman likes to go away on
a' visit—if it's only across the street
to borrow an apron pattern.
edies but he got no relief until aMend told
me of her little bey who- was afflicted as
mine and Cuticura Soap and Ointment
cured him. I purchased a box of Cuticura'
8oap and Ointment from our druggist. I'
washed his Usee well with the Cuticura Soap
then put the Cuticura Ointment on right
off. In two months he was entirely curat".
(Signed) Mrs. Daisy Bailey, Oct. 23, 1913.:
In selecting a toilet soap why not procure
one possesring delicate emollient properties
sumdeat to allay minor irritations, remove
redness and roughness, prerat pore-clog
glng, soften and soothe stndtlve conditions.
and promoteddn and scalp
health generally?
Such a soap combined with the purest of
saponaceous Ingredients and most fragrant
and refreshing of flower odon, is Cuticura
Soap. Cuticura Soap 35c. and Cuticura
Ointment 80c. are sold by druggists and
dealers everywhere. Liberal sample of each
mailed free, with 32-p. Skin Book. Address
Poet-card "Cuticura, Dept. T, Boston."
WMen who shave and shampoo with OU.
tlcurs leap wfll Sad tt best for sUn and
seal*.
A. B. RHEINHART
Hardware
I0t If. 3rd St. Grand Stork* K. A,
Editor Tells How
P* D. D. Prescription
Cured His Eczema
Secure* Bellet,
1
l-
'•H
,«- iff-
On Little Boy's Face and Neck*
Painful and Disfiguring. Would
Crack Open, Bleed and Itch. Cu~
ticura Soap and Ointment Cured,
Bait Neb.—"Besema broke out on my
little boy's fsce and neck sad wss very pain
ful st times sad disfiguring. It was worse
In winter. It was In scaly
dry patches on his face
and neck which would
crack open and bleed.
It Itched and was very
unsightly. It hurt the
wont in the day time'
when in the oppi air and
wind.
"I used several rem­
ir
Atoo WMte How An
nmatoD.D.0.
71

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