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The Glasgow courier. [volume] (Glasgow, Mont.) 1913-current, August 04, 1922, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042379/1922-08-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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Plan on Coming to Glas
Gow During Chautauqua
Veck.—August 6th to 11th
— Six Big Joyous Days
Wo Misc.
^ «"«* ~mn%
The Glasgow Courier
Don't Forget the Glasgow
Chautauqua Dates — Aug
6th to 11th—Six Big Days
of Splendid Entertainment
VOLUME XVIII.
GLASGOW, VALLEY COUNTY, MONTANA, AUGUST 4, 1922.
NUMBER 15
COUNTY WILL HARVEST
SPLENDID GRAIN CROP
All Small Grains Promise Handsome Yield with. Harvest
on Winter Wheat and Rye Practically Completed. —
County Yield Estimated at 3,000,000 Bushels of Wheat
with Flax, Barley and Corn all in Excellent Condition.
Plan to Handle Labor Situation Through Agent.
Judging from the traffic on the
roads to the northern part of the coun- ]
ty the past week Valley county is en
tering up to one of the largest har
vests since 1915. L. A. Hanson of
Baylor has sold sixteen headers so
far this season and his territory is
Baylor and Opheim. The Case Thresh
ing Machine company is having trou
ble to get threshing machines in fast
enough. Their local manager reports
30 separators and 12 tractors sold this
summer. Last Thursday the reporter
met six headers on their way out of
Nashua. All this goes to show how
the farmers are preparing themselves
to handle this year's crop. The state
crop report shows that the state is to
harvest as big a crop as it did in 1915
and Valley county is not going to less
en the state's average.
The winter wheat and rye harvest is
over and some little threshing done.
From results thus far, indications are
that winter wheat is of extra No. 1,
being of good weight and color and
yielding 20 to 25 bushels to the acre.
Fall rye is not far behind, with a yield
of 15 to 18 bushels, with exceptionally
large, well filled and plump kernels.
This grain was all stubbled in and with
those yields the spring wheat prospect
is promising. The winter wheat and
rye has good, long straw and has stood
up well.
The acreage of spring wheat is
above the average this year and with
present prospects Valley county should
produce 3,000,000 bushels of wheat this
year. The average of Marquis is much
increased over last year and the dur
uras have lost to a similar extent. From
general observation 80 to 85 per cent
of the wheat in the county will be
Marquis.
It is no uncommon sight to see 80
to 100 acre fields of Maiquis standing
on an average over four feet high and
pared summer fallow or corn land,
with heads averaging 6 to 8 kernels to
the row and 8 to 10 rows long.
These fields are on properly pre
This year better than any other shows
up the good farming methods. Men
who are practicing the proper method
of tillage are receiving rewards for
their labor with interest. The wheat
harvest is on in the southern part of
the county with satisfaction to the
grower.
will be on next week in Baylor, Lars
lan and Lustre communities and a
week later at Opheim, Glentana and
Thoeny. Two communities in the
county deserve special mention for
generally good crops—Vandalia and
Lustre. There are several fields in
these communities that will make 30
bushels and more. For heart failure a
person should ride through these com
munities and take a look at some of
the fields of Marquis. If you are in
the Lustre community look at Mr.
Dahl's or Mr. Olfert's fields and there
are many others too. At Vandalia
Mr. Reed and several of his neighbors
have splendid fields.
Flax is very promising in filling and
the stands are heavy. The acreage is
much increased over last year. The
crop has just finished blooming, with
some fields about ready to harvest.
Victory oats looks by far the more
promising than any other variety. The
acreage is about normal but the fields
promise above the normal yield. There
is a great growth of straw and the
heads are in preparation
Barley, where the right kind of bar
ley is being raised, is a surprise to
everyone. Most people complain of
barley being short, but they should see
the field of A. A. Dick of Lustre. It
stands over four feet on the average
and promises a yield of 60 bushels to
the acre. Think of the hog and stock
feed that Mr. Dick is producing per
acre with his registered Hannchen bar
ley. Everyone would raise a few acres
of barley if they could see Mr. Dick's
field.
The corn crop is good and the acre
age is above normal. Lots of fields
are all tasseled out and some are al
ready silked out. The encouraging
fact about corn is that the fields are
growing larger. A few years ago it
was common to see two to five acre
fields, now it is 10 to 25 and some 80
acre fields. This is one crop that the
farmer can always depend upon as a
feed crop and should be grown more
and used as a form of insurance re
serve in stock feeding.
The present indications are that
there may be a shortage of labor. Ev
ery effort possible is being made by
the county agent, state labor office and
federal labor bureau to correct the
condition. If it gets critical plans wili
be worked out to recruit labor from
the towns to help take care of the
crops so they will not spoil.
A large number of headers will he
used and this means that grain will
be stacked. This will help to relieve
the situation which might develop if
grain congestion at the local elevators
occurs due to the railroad strike. It
would be well for farmers to consider
that point and either stack their grain
or be prepared to store it on their
farms. With the second largest crop
in the history of the state to remove
this last question is worth thought.
as
a
The harvest of spring wheat
a
if
It
LOCAL OIL COMPANY
DRILLING LINE BUTTE
Glasgow Exploration Company Has
Well Down 100 Feet on Lime
Butte Structure.
With a hole now down about one
hundred feet and good progress being
made each day the heads of the Glas
gow Exploration company, now drilling
for oil on the Lime Butte structure,
southwest of Glasgow, are very much
elated over the prospects of early suc
cess.
The past week has been the incor
poration of the old organization known
as the Glasgow Oil & Gas company,
into a new company known as the
Glasgow Exploration company. The
reason, as explained by the incorpora
tors, is that under the state corpora
tion laws every investor is absolutely
safe from any and all claims that may
arise in event of any failure of the
company to meet its obligations. In
other words the investor who puts in
a certain sum of money cannot be as
sessed or levied on in any way for ad
ditional funds if those funds are need
ed. It was with the idea of safety to
the investor that the change was de
cided upon and completed.
The capital stock of the new organi
zation is set at $50,000 in shares of
one dollar each. The incorporators
are Albert Nelson, H. A. Yotter and
Henry Carpenter. R. S. McKellar is
attorney for the organization. Until
N.
gow
met
gow
and
few
of
of
is
, - . , ... ri »
election^ of permanent officers H. A.,
Yotter is acting secretary and treas
urer.
The fact that a big gas producer
was brought in on the Bowdoin field
Wednesday and that there have been
several inquiries and offers to buy
acreage of the local company, holds
forth a very bright outlook for suc
cess on the site selected. Experienced
drillers are in charge of the well un
der the supervision of Albert Nelson.
Careful drilling has been the watch
word, with a view to all the depth pos
s j b ] e ; n the shortest time.
Exhibits of known shale and oil for
mations of the formations and the log
from the well will be on exhibition
at the offices of the Glasgow Explor
ation company in the Yotter building.
Interested parties are invited to call
and have the formations explained and
are at liberty to compare to log of
well at any time. At present the
drill is penetrating a rocky Shevling
formation at a depth of about one hun
dred feet.
FIRST ANNUAL CORN AND
POTATO SHOW AT MALTA
At a meeting of county agents of
northern Montana and representatives
of the State College, held at Fort As
sinniboine recently, Malta was chosen
for the first annual northern Montana
corn and potato show to be held during
the month of November, the week prior,
to the state corn show at Miles City. |
The counties of Hill, Blaine, Phillips,
Valley and Roosevelt have definitely
agreed to finance a corn and potato
show, these being the only counties
represented at the meeting, but other
counties will doubtless come in as the
matter was left open as that any por
tion of northern Montana may exhibit.
Details for the show are now in course
of preparation and will be announced
later.
Northern Montana has taken rapid
strides to the front as a corn and po
tato section during the last few years
and the chief purpose of this show will
be to provide an educational means
for stimulating interest in these crops.
Exhibits will be limited to standard
varieties of corn, spuds and small
grain as adopted by the different coun
ty Farm Bureaus in the northern part
of the state. Arrangements are be
ing made to make this one of the
largest shows of its kind in the state
and every county on the high line has
guaranteed a definite number of ex
hibits together with funds from which
to finance the show. The Great Nor
thern railway will be asked to co
operate.
EDWARDS WILL RUN FOR
THE SENATE IN ROSEBUD
Forsyth, July 31.—John E. Edwards
of Forsythe, whose term as state sen- j
ator from Rosebud county expires this j
year, has announced that he will enter
the Republican primaries August 29 ,
seeking nomination as a candidate for j
that office for another term.
In his announcement Mr. Edwards
states that he is opposed to any form
of actional taxation or the creating
of any commission involving additional
expense for the government of county
or state. Mr. Edwards further pledges
his every effort, if elected, will be di
rected toward the advancement of the
interests of labor and the industries of
Montana, believing that the prosperity
of each is essential to the well-being
of the other.
Senator Edwards, who has resided in
Montana since it became a state, has
for nearly 20 years been associated
with the industrial life and develop
ment of Rosebud county. He is rated
as one of the leading financiers, stock
men and farmers of the eastern end of
the state, in the development of which
he has played an important part. He
has long been active in politics, hav
ing been first elected to the general
assembly more than 14 years ago, and
is now serving his fifth term as a
member of the upper branch.
EDITORS ARE WELCOMED
is
When the special train carrying the
N. E. A. members pulled into Glas
gow last Saturday afternoon they were
met at the depot by a crowd of Glas
gow's most beautiful maidens, all car
rying gorgeous baskets of cut flowers
which were loaded onto the train, with
cards welcoming the members to Glas
gow and extending good wishes for the
balance of their journey. Other evi
dences of good will were in abundance
and the party departed feeling that the
few minutes in Glasgow had been well
spent. From here the editorial party
proceeded to Wolf Point and from
there to Chicago where the special
train was broken up.
FRANK LINDEKE DEAD
The many Valley county friends of
Frank Lindeke were shocked to learn
of his death Sunday morning at St
Paul, Minn., where he has resided for
some time. Mr. Lindeke was a resident
of this county in the early days, at
one time being engaged in the sheep
business here with his brother, Wil
liam.
FIRST SHIPMENT OF STOCK
TO BE MADE SEPTEMBER 7
The Milk River Cooperative Live
stock Shipping association will make
its first shipment of stock the first
Thursday in September providing the
railroad situation is cleared by that
time. If interested in shipping stock
direct to the association write to Sher
man Barger of Nashua. Mr. Barger
is manager of the association and he
accompanies all stock to the stock
yards and personally sees to the sale,
A., ^ Barge / is an old hand in the stock
business and thoroughly understands
the loading, shipping and sale of live
stock. He knows the ups and downs
^ ^
of
SHOEMAKER IN CHARGE
OF FARM LABOR OFFICE
I
Glasgow Man to Bainville to Supervise j
Distribution of Farm Labor for
Northeastern Montana.
j
j
For the distribution of harvest hands i
of
distribution of the farm hands in the
| counties of Phillips, Valley, Daniels,
Sheridan, Roosevelt, Richland, Dawson,
for the wheat growing sections of
northeastern Montana an employment
office to be managed on a co-operative
plan by the federal farm labor bureau
and the Montana department of agri
culture was opened at Bainville Aug
ust 1. The office is in charge of W.
B. Shoemaker of this city under salary
from the state. His duties will be
principally those of assigning men to
the various sections of northeastern
Montana where their services are the
most urgently required. The work of
securing the men will be handled by
the federal farm labor bureau under
the direction of George E. Tucker, who
has established offices at Fargo,» N. D.
Mr. Shoemaker will administer the
the
McCone and Garfield.
The work of securing farm hands
for the harvesting and threshing sea
sons in Montana is being undertaken
jointly by the federal bureau and the
state department of agriculture under
C. D. Greenfield, Jr., director of the
division of labor and publicity.
• •. .*
m
im
MILK RIVER VALLEY BANK
Which Re-opened for Business Tuesday, August 1st.
I
;
I
PRIMARY VOTE III
STATE DECREASED
|STATE REGISTRATION IS LESS
BY 6000 THAN AT THE 1920
ELECTION.
COUNTY LIST IS OFF 817
Total Primary Registration for State
224,236.—All Counties Report Ex
cept Blaine and Powder River.
Valley Among First In.
a
in
There is a smaller number of regis
tered voters in Montana by about 6,000
for the primary election on August 2ft
than there was two years ago, ac
cording to figures available at the of
fice of the secretary of state at Hel
ena, the total registered votes this
year being approximately 224,236. The
total registration for the primaries in
1920 was 230,221. In November, 1920,
the total registration was 261,258.
Figures for all counties in Montana
have been reported to the secretary of
state except for Blaine and Powder
River. In computing the total the sec
retary of state has used for Blaine and
Powder River counties the figures of
two years ago.
The total vote cast for the two gu
bernatorial candidates in the general
election two years ago was 185,988.
The combined vote for the two places
in the lower house of congress at that
time was 185,007.
Valley county shows a drop off of
817 registered voters since 1920, the
1920 registration for the primaries be
ing 5,153 and the 1922 total being only
4,336. All of the registration lists for
the different precincts in this county
have been printed and sent out, the
Valley county total being one of the
first received at the office of the sec
retary of state.
The reigstration by counties and the
number of precincts in each county for
this year's primaries is as follows:
No. of Regis
Precincts
Beaverhead 23
Big Horn 23
Blaine 29
Broadwater 14
Carbon 29
Carter 21
Cascade 69
Chouteau 49
Custer 42
Daniels 21
Dawson 36
Peer Lodge 18
Fallon 18
I Fergus 79
j Flathead 48
Gallatin 35
'Garfield 38
j Glacier 16
j Golden Valley 15
i Granite 15
i Teton 16
Toole 19
Hill 33
Jefferson 24
Judith Basin 23
Lewis and Clark 49
Liberty 15
Lincoln 26
Madison 30
McCone 35
Meagher 13
Mineral 9
Missoula 50
Musselshell 30
Park 29
Phillips 16
'ondera 18
Powder River 29
Powell 16
Prairie 15
Ravalli 20
Richland ... 33
Rosebud 32
Roosevelt 37
Sanders 17
Sheridan 30
Silver Bow 81
Stillwater 21
Sweet Grass 19
tration
3,282
2,032
3,067
1,637
5,279
1,496
13,291
5,209
4,694
1,687
3,327
6,471
1,776
11,143
8,204
6,925
2,631
2,117
1 ,<
1,745
5,161
2,215
3,762
8,286
1,421
2,589
2,900
?,331
1,302
1,161
10,254
3,896
4,91"
3,854
2,997
1.988
•2,971
1,441
4,067
3,273
2,858
4.445
2.446
3,161
23,956
3,107
1,856
2,796
1,798
Treasure 9
Valley 32
Wheatland 9
Wibaux 15
Yellowstone 47
925
4,336
2,205
1,125
10,523
Total 224,236
HUGH WELLS VISITOR HERE
for*the DeIL°r f atic le! 'nomfnat^fîr j
United States Senator on a platform
advocating light wines and beer, was
a visitor in Glasgow Saturday. Mr.
Wells has a number of old time friends
in Glasgow, having acted as superin
tendent for the HatX outfit south of
the river eighteen years ago. Mr.
Wells is confident of victory at the
primaries and stated to the Courier
that the race was between himself and
B. K. Wheeler of Butte.
What came near to being a fatal I
auto smashup occured just this side
NEAR FATAL ACCIDENT
of Hinsdale Friday afternoon. A mo
torist traveling east attempted to cross
the tracks ahead of No. 28, the east
bound Great Northern mail train. His
car turned off the crossing just as the
train struck and while he was badly
shaken up and the car somewhat dam
aged he escaped without serious in
jury. It is a wise idea for motorists
to give fast mail trains the right of
way.
BOOSTING THOENY FAIR
of
As
vas
„ ,, . . ri un. i
W C. Mumford and A. P. Wheeler
of Thoeny were .n Glasgow the fore
part of the week soliciting advertising to
for a premium list for the Western
Valley County Agricultural and Live
stock Fair which will be held at Thoe
ny September 15 and 16. They in
formed the Courier that elaborate ar
rangements are being made for exhib
its and entertainment for the two days
and extend a cordial invitation to the
people of Glasgow and vicinity to at
tend.
MILES CAVANAUGH IS
VISITOR IN GLASGOW
Miles J. Cavanaugh of Butte, candi
date for Republican nomination for
associate juustice of the supreme
court, was a pleasant caller in Glas
gow Sunday. Mr. Cavanaugh was a
member of the 17th legislative assem
bly from Silver Bow county in the
lower house and has been regularly
employed as special counsel for the
c-ity of Butte for the past several
years.
tee
if
TWO BIG DAYS PLAN OF
OPHEIM'S CELEBRATION
North Country Town Will Put on Two
Gala Days of Baseball, Horse Rac
ing and Other Sports.
"You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet," is
the slogan of the live wire bunch of
boosters from Opheim who are ar
ranging for the big two day celebration
and International Baseball tournament
which will be held in that city next
Monday and Tuesday, August 7 and 8.
Business men of Opheim have put up
$1,000.00 in prizes and some of the
fastest baseball teams in Canada are
expected to come across the line to
try for some of the prize money
In addition to baseball each day the j
committee has aranged for entertain
ment every minute, including horse
racing, bucking contests, street sports,
dancing and band concerts. In fact they
promise to have something doing every
minute of the day and most of the
night. Glasgow people are planning
on attending in force.
Tom Coleman and George Brown
have been engaged as marshals of the
day, which insures the crowd that
things will be kept moving.
Rev. Wm. Pippy and family spent
Thursday at Tampico visiting with Mr.
and Mrs. A. I). Kroft and friends.
MILK RIVER VALLEY BANK
RE OPENS FOR BUSINESS
Glasgow Banking Institution Which Closed Doors Early in
Spring Completes Negotiations and Re-opens August
1st With Strong Reserve. — Local Stockholders Pur
chase Selway Interests. — New Officers Elected. — S.
C. Small Remains as Cashier.
Tuesday morning, August 1, the
PLANS ARE COMPLETED
J
'

FftP PW Ä ÏTT A flOfl A WPPlf
I UIV UIHUIHUUUH ItLLA
I
Committees Report Over Half of Quota
Season Tickets Necessary
Already Sold.
I
The committee in charge of the ar
rangements for the Chautauqua report
today that they are proceeding nicely
with the sale of tickets and the getting |
of the tent and equipment into place. '
As a result of the house to house can
vas in the residential section slightly ,
over half of the money needed to fin
ance the Chautauqua this year was
raised by the sale of tickets. The com
Imittee hopes to more than raise the
balance b the sale of ticketg to the
, e in the down town gections and
to the business houses.
The big tent to house the Chautau
qua will arrive in Glasgow on train 1
No. 4 Saturday evening. The commit
tee is planning to raise the big top
early Sunday morning and a consider
able number of men are needed to as
sist in this part of the work. Mr.
Ackerman, chairman of the committee,
promises if help enough is secured that
if help enough is secured that every
body can get away in time'"for'Ihe ;
morning church services. |
Tickets are on sale at several of i
the stores up town at a price of two j
dollars and fifty cents for the adult
season ticket entitling the holder to ■
admission to all twelve of the pro
grams. The children's tickets sell for
one dollar and an admission charge of
fifty cents will govern for single ad
missions. The committee chairman
said today, that if every Chautauqua
booster would do his or her part the
affair would go over big. Mrs. Reed,
from the Chautauqua organization, ar
rived in Glasgow yesterday to assist
in completing the arrangements and
the sale of tickets.
MRS. A. H. PETTIS DIES
AT STATE SANITARIUM
j n the north country, where she was
One of the recent sad events was
the death of Mrs. A. H. Pettis, who
was well known in this city and in
the north county where she made her
home. Mrs. Pettis, who was formerly
Mrs. Katz, had been suffering from a
serious form of nerve trouble for the
past ten years, and following a com
plete breakdown which occurred about
two weeks ago, she was taken to the
state sanitarium at Warm Springs on
Saturday, July 22, dying at that place
Monday, July 31.
Maude Annette Paston Pettis was
born at St. Peter, Lesueur county,
Minn., on February 24, 1878. Her girl
hood and early married life were spent
in her native state and it was not until
the year 1913 that she, with her fam
ily, took up residence on a homestead
still living previous to her death.
Mrs. Pettis possessed many splendid
traits of character and was kind heart
ed and generous and will be greatly
missed by a wide circle of friends and
acquaintances in Glasgow, as well as
in the north country. She is survived
by a daughter, Miss Rivka Katz, a
foster daughter, Miss Elmeada Katz,
who is a graduate surgical nurse of
the Deaconess hospital at this place
and a mother, Mrs. Effie M. Poston,
who was very ill at the hospital at the
time of her daughter's death.
The body was shipped from Warm
Springs to Williston where the de
ceased had requested to be buried be-1
side Mr. Katz who died in 1916.
Mrs. Poston, Miss Rivka Katz and
Miss Elmeada Katz left for Williston
where funeral services are to be held
this afternoon under the auspices of
the Congregational church of that city.
MRS. LUCY K. SPACE IS A
CANDIDATE FOR CONSTABLE
Mrs. Lucy K. Space of Glasgow is
circulating her petition for the Repub
lican nomination for the office of con
stable at the August primaries. Mrs.
Space states that she feels that this
office can be competently filled by a
w/kmnn hn* a icnif;»rl h»r infonHnn
woman and has signified her intention
of making a thorough campaign for the
office.
MRS. STILEY RETURNS HOME
Mrs. Andrew Stiley, v.ho has been
ill in this city for some time, has so
I far recovered that she was able to re- !
turn to her home north of Hinsdale ;
; Saturday. She was accompanied by
Mr. Stiley and her little son, who have ■
remained here constantly during her
illness. !
j
i
CARNAHAN - LaROCQUE
Fred Carnahan of Saco and Emily
LaRocque of this city were united in
marriage by Judge G. W. Rapp Wed
nesday in the parlors of the Rapp ho
tel. Mr. and Mrs. Carnahan will re
side on a ranch about 50 miles south
I of Glasgow.
Tuesday morning, August 1, the
Milk River Valley Bank of this city
re-opened its doors to the public after
having been closed for several months
due t0 inability to collect on thousands
of dollars in slow loans during the
financial depression of the past few
years. The bank re-opens with sev
eral new officers and showed on the
opening day a 30 per cent plus reserve.
All of the Selway interests in the
institution have been taken over by
local stockholders who, in order to open
the b an k an d comply with every re
'l u "'ement of the state banking depart
roent, were obliged to put up $30,000
| n cash. The entire stock of the bank
' s now held by local business men and
ranchers and Mr. O. A. Bergeson, who
was in charge of the bank during the
time that it was closed, spoke in the
very highest terms of the local men
who have so earnestly and unselfishly
labored to get the bank back on its
feet and re . opened without loss to the
d itors
A directors' meeting was held Mon
day evening and the following officers
elected:
T. H. Markle, president.
John Etehart, 1st vice president.
Alonzo Durell. 2nd vice president.
S. C. Small, cashier.
George Birmingham, ass't cashier.
M. E. Sweitzer, ass't cashier.
The Milk River Valley Bank is one
; ^ the oldest banking institutions in
| county and among its officers are
i number some of the oldest residents in
j the county.
■ FARMERS OF COUNTY SHOULD
ESTABLISH A WAGE SCALE
The farmers and threshermen of
North and South Dakota have met and
established a uniform wage scale of
$3.50 per day. It looks as though the
farmers and threshers of Valley coun
ty should do the same thing. Laborers
are scarce and will not come to Mon
tana unless they get wages that are
equal to the wages where they are
working.
The problem of getting laborers out
i to this country is a large one and each
j ct , mrnun ;ty should establish direct con
nection with the county agent's office
with regard to transportation of la
borers.
Every effort is being made through
state and national employment offices
to get men and it is expected that
the situation will be handled with sat
isfaction. At any rate, no stone is go
ing to be left unturned with regard
to finding laborers and getting them
into the county and out to the farmers."
The farmers' co-operation is asked for
in staying by the uyiform wage scale
and making satisfactory arrange
ments for the transportation of la
borers. MURRAY E. STEBBINS,
County Agent.
HE SLEEPS ALL NIGHT
CLOSE TO A RATTLER
Tom Ammon was in Miles City af
ter repairs for his reaping machine.
He is from the south part of Powder
River county. While on his way in he
camped on Tongue River 14 miles from
the city. When he got up Tuesday
morning to stir up a fire for his coffee
he disturbed a big rattle snake which
had taken possession of a sage brush.
Ammon says he knew the snake was
there but he couldn't see it on account
of the thick grass, but he could hear
it. He poked it out with a stick and
succeeded in killing it. The snake was
nearly four feet long and had 13 rat
ties. He had slept all night on the
ground within five feet of the reptile.
MILLER - LUDINGTON
Frank P. Miller of Battleson and
Miss Vera Ludington of Scobey were
united in marriage Tuesday evening,
August 1, in the parlors of the Rapp
hotel, Judge Rapp officiating. Mr.
and Mrs. Miller will reside in Battle
son.
PLENTYWOOD MAN
FILES FOR CONGRESS
r^ CaT -+y,' ^°"' ns P'entywood has
f . lIed w,th the secretary of state his
declaration of inteition to become in
the August primaries a socialist can
didate for congress in the second dis
trict.
Mr. Collins is at present sheriff of
Sheridan county.
MRS. COTTON CALLED EAST
!
; Mrs. Nels Cotton was called east
Sunday evening by the serious illness
■ of her father, Howard Moses, who is
now residing at his old home near Min
! neapolis. Mr. Moses resided in this
j county for some time and has a num
i her of friends here who will regret to
learn of his illness.
George Clark Newton and Jennie R.
Jones-Ward were united in marriage
at the Methodist parsonage Wednes
day evening, August 2. The ceremony
was witnessed by Mrs. Pippy and Miss
Elsie Illman.

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