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The Glasgow courier. [volume] (Glasgow, Mont.) 1913-current, August 11, 1922, Image 1

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If looks were daggers
many a female motorist
could take hame enough
cutlery to start a store.
The Glasgow Courier
VOLUME XVIII.
GLASGOW, VALLEY COUNTS^ MONTANA, AUGUST 11, 1922.
ï*T i mTm
m Misc. UlfiAfiY
Because this is the store
age is no reason why your
Store should become a
place of storage.
NUMBER 16
COUNTY TlCuSS
ARE WELL HLLti,
GRIST OF CANDIDATES ON RE
PUBLICAN AND DEMOCRATIC
PRIMARY BALLOTS.
I
^.
FILING CLOSES AUGUST 14
Few Offices on Democratic Ticket Still
Remain Without Candidate, With
Only Three Days Left to
Complete Filings.
With only three days left in which
candidates may complete their filings
the majority of places on both the Re
publican and Democratic ballots have
been filled, with some offices having
as high as four candidates seeking
the nomination. Monday, August 14,
is the last day on which nominating i
petitions may be filed with the clerk
and recorder and those not gettingjn |
under the wire by flve o'clock on that
date will be left out.
A perusal of the following list of
candidates for honors at the primary
is convincing proof that the campaign
will be a hot one from this time on.
Republican.
For State Senator—John Etchart, C.
M. Peterson, R. C. Arnold, Matt Mur
ray.
For State Representative — F. B.
Gillette, K. H. Knudsvig, W. M. Ruff
corn.
For County Commissioner—Carl J.
Anderson, G. L. Wickstrand, Sherman
Barger.
For Sheriff— C. A. Hall, H. H. See
ley, Jas. R. Stephens.
For Clerk and Recorder—J. W. Barr,
Lou E. Bretzke, C. W. Kampfer.
For County Treasurer— W. L. Fra
zier, J. J. Hägen.
For County Attorney—Clarence H.
Roberts, Lincoln Working.
For County Assessor— B. H. Cott
Tell, Earl Moran.
For County Superintendent — Olivia
Forster-Patton, Lillian Betz.
For County Surveyor— W. H. Mann
For County Coroner— Chas. E. Pet
erson.
For Justice of Peace, Glasgow Town
ship— G. W. Rapp.
For Constable, Glasgow Township- -
Lucy K. Space, W. W. Wolfe.
For Constable, Thoeny Township—
John Myhre.
Democratic
For State Senator—Peter Peterson.
For State Representative—M. Sekt
nan, W. H. Patterson, Mrs. John Wil
lis.
For County Commissioner— S. E.
Feezell.
For Sheriff—Frank McPherson, Jul
ian W. Haydon, B. A. McFarland.
For Clerk and Recorder—Charles C.
Taylor.
For County Treasurer—J. L. Trus
cott.
For County Superintendent — Ebba
Dahlquist.
For Constable, Glasgow Township—
W. A. Baynham.
For Constable, Thoeny Township—
W. C. Mumford.
SUFFICIENT HARVEST HANDS
ARE BEING MADE AVAILABLE
The labor situation is being lined up
and reports would indicate that sev
eral thousand men are moving toward
Montana. The U. S. department of
labor and the state labor offices are
now in operation and men are being
received from these sources. "Thous
ands of men are available and are be
ing moved west into the Dakotas and
Montana," writes the U. S. labor office
|
at Aberdeen, S. Dak. Mr. Tucker, who '
is in charge of the office, writes that t
farmers should not get excited, that !
plenty of men are available and are
being moved as fast as possible.
Farmers are requested to leave their (
orders for men and a means of trans- ,
portation at one of the following
places most convenient: M. Eliason, |
Oswego; M. A. Lien, Frazer; either |
bank at Nashua; either bank at Hins-,
dale; either bank at Opheim; either
bank at Glentana; Dr. Miller at Bay
lor. These different places will pool.
their orders once a day and telephone
them to the county agent's office at '
Glasgow where they will be assembled
and men sent out as soon as available. !
The office will be in daily touch with I
the U. S. Labor office and the state
labor office and will get the men as
fast as available. j
John Tattan, U. S. mail carrier for
the north country, is making a very
reasonable rate for transportation, as
are also the trucks, and farmers should
make arrangements to get the men
out when they place their calls. It is
better to get the men a few days
ahead of time as it is not always pos
sible to get all the men that billed
sible to get all the men that are cal
led for the same day the call is put
in.
Remember, men are coming and do
no t. get excited and raise their wages
—they are too high now.
W. D. MILLER WITHDRAWS
FROM COMMISSIONER RACE
W. D. Miller, of Saco, who has rep
resented the east end of the county
on the board of county commissioners
since the county was organized, an
nounced last week he would withdraw
from the race for the office and not
permit his name to go on the ballot.
Mr. Miller has made an excellent coun
ty commissioner and has many friends
who will regret his decision to quit
the political game. In his withdrawal,
he says he is stepping down and out
^ -favor of Henry H. Hedges, whom
. > ommends to the voters of the
cou. Mr. Hedges is an old-timer in
Phillips county, having resided here
for many years, and at one time was
in the ranching business with H. G.
Robinson of this city.—Malta Enter
prise.
THRESHERMEN OF COUNTY
MET HERE LAST SATURDAY
The threshermen of Valley county
met last Saturday and had a very in
teresting meeting following the gen
eral meeting. Matters of much impor
tance to threshermen, such as legisla
tion regarding bridges and roads, li
censes for threshermen to further good
threshing and plans for a thresher
men's school in November or December
of this year.
I
ious for a school to be held for two
or three days this winter. The asso
nation was formed for educational j
purposes and the men are anxious to
have the association con tinue to oper
i ate Jn that manner . ^ secretary
L ld fee leased to have sug g es tion3
| relative to the school from anyo ne.
Ne]g Cotto Secretary-Treasurer.
-
OPHEIM CELEBRATION
DRAWS LARGE CROWDS
International Baseball Contests Hard
Fought, with Scobey Carrying
Off First Money.
The big celebration and baseball j
tournament held at Opheim Monday j
and Tuesday drew crowds from all,
sections of northeastern Montana and
southern Saskatchewan.
One thousand dollars was put up as
a baseball prize and teams from As
sinniboine, Scobey, Glasgow and Op
heim entered the tournament. Scobey
took the first game of the tournament
from Opheim and Glasgow lost in the
first round with Assinniboine Monday |
Scobey wrested first place from the ]
fast Assinniboine club by a score of |
afternoon
Tuesday morning Glasgow defeated
the Opheim club winning third mon
ey in the tournament and that after
noon in a hard fought game which was
decided in the last half of the ninth,
9-7. Each and every game was hotly
contested from start to finish. Davis
and Isaacs officiated as umpires
throughout the tournament and gave
universal satisfaction.
Following the ball games each day
exhibits of wild west riding, racing
and bucking contests were given, with
a big bowery dance each evening. Tom
Coleman, who was marshal of the
day, came in yesterday and reports
that the committee in charge of the
celebration were delighted with the at
tendance and returns, and spoke words
of praise for the efficient manner in
which all of the details of the big
affair were handled by the business
men of Opheim. A large crowd of
Glasgow people attended both days
and were unanimous in praise of the
hospitality extended by the Opheim
citizens.
CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAM
EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD
All Numbers Please, With Play "Turn
To the Right" Best On List. Ju
nior Chautauqua Tonight
| The series of Chautauqua programs
' presented in Glasgow, each year, are
t looked forward to with the keenest
! anticipation because they are not on
ly a source of entertainment but are
[highly educational as well and also ser
( ve to promote the "community get- to
, gether" spirit which is of value es
pecially in the smaller cities.
| It seems to be the general consen
| sus of opinion that the programs which
have been given so far this year are
the best ever and it is gratifying to
know that the attendance has been
such that up to the time of going to
press there is only a small deficit with
' every prospect of this being met af
ter the programs of today, which pro
! mise to be very fine, are given.
I The drama seems to be the most at
tractive form of entertainment to an
average audience and it was not sur
j prising that a capacity house greeted
the presentation of "Turn to the
Right" given by the Keighly players
of New York. It was a privilege for
a Glasgow audience to have this play
' as well given as it is by the Stock
Companies playing in the theatres of
the larger cities.
1 The manager adds much to the suc
cess of chautauqua and Glasgow has
so much enjoyed Mrs Reed, who has
been here during the week in that cap- I
aeity. She possesses an unusual per
sonal magnetism and kindly spirit and i
has taken every occasion to express j
her appreciation of the splendid co-op
eration of the women of Glasbow in j
their floral contributions for stage de- j
coration and general spirit of helpful- !
ness.
1 The superintendent of the junior !
chautauqua is also very pleasing and |
a delightful pageant given by the child
ren of town is one of the features of
anticipation for tonights' program.
j
| Jacob W. Martin and Wm. Martin
were business arrivals here from Fra
ALEXANDER OUT
OF SENATE RACE
MANY CANDIDATES LATE WITH
PETITIONS, WHILE TWO
FAIL TO QUALIFY.
PETITIONS LACK SIGNERS
Anderson and Collins Barely Get Un
der Wire With Petitions Contain
ing Sufficient Signers. Dan
McKay Drops Out.
Helena, Aug. 11.—It was just by a
nose that two of the candidates fori
Republican nomination at the coming I
primaries got under- the wire before
|the closing of the office of Se Cretary
q£ state stewart at 5 0 . c , 0ck p . m .
Wednesday, and at that two candidates
failed to make the grade.
According to law, all filings ^«st '
have been completed on August 9, |
and it was not until a few minutes be
fore the time for the usual closing of
the office that J. W. Anderson of Sid
ney, candidate for United States sen
ator, and Oscar J. Collins of Plenty
wood, candidate for the Republican
nomination for congress from the sec
ond district, reached the office with
their signed petitions.
However, the Republican ticket lost
one candidate for nomination for the
United States senate through the fail
ure of J. C .Alexander of Kalispeli to
complete his filing. Alexander's peti
j tions bore but 833 signatures whereas
j 1.000 were required. The petitions
were also lacking in that Alexander
had qualified in but four counties,
whereas petitions from seven counties
are required.
Of those candidates who had filed
their declarations of intention but who
failed to qualify, E. A. LaBossiere of
Great Falls, who had been announced
Republican
as a candidate for the
| nomination for chief justice, withdrew
when L. L. Callaway of Great Falls
entered the race following the with- j
drawal of Chief Justice Theo. Brant- !
ly- I
Further than the receipt of his dec- !
laration of intention, no papers were |
received to complete the filing of Dan j
McKay of Glasgow, who had an-1
nounced his candidacy for the demo-1
cratic nomination for congress from j
the second district. [
At 4 o'clock p. m., John F. McKay
of Noxon, candidate for the Demo
cratic nomination for congress from
the first district, filed his petitions |
which were still short 51 signatures,
and he left the office in a hurried at- |
tempt to obtain the balance before the i
expiration of the time limit. !
Not one of three socialist candidates I
who had filed their declarations the
previous day, was able to qualify, j
These were Charles Benjamin of Flat, |
candidate for United States senator;
Ole Halvorson of Red Lodge, candi- !
date for railroad commissioner, and j
Claude Scotton of Red Lodge, candi
date for clerk of the supreme court.
Late Wednesday afternoon a bunch of
petitions, insufficient in volume, were
filed in their behalf,
The candidates for state and district
offices who completed their filings
within the specified time and whose
names will appear upon the ballots at
the coming primary election, August
29, follow:
Chief Justice, Democratic—John W.
Stanton, Great Falls; Joseph P. Don
nelly, Havre; Joseph R. Jackson, Butte.
Chief Justice, Republican — L. L.
Callaway, Great Falls; George W.
Farr, Miles City; Frank N. Utter,
Havre.
Associate Justice, Republican—Jess
H. Stevens, Kalispeli; Miles J. Cav
anaugh, Butte; Albert P. Stark, Liv
ingston.
Clerk of Supreme Court—J. T. Car
roll, Billings, Democrat; Dana M.
Easton, Poplar, Republican.
United States Senator, Democratic—
Tom Stout, Lewistown; Hugh R. Wells,
Miles City; James F. O'Connor, Liv
ingston; Burton K. Wheeler, Butte.
United States Senator, Republican—
Charles N. Pray, Great Falls; Welling-j
ton D. Rankin, Helena; Dr. J. C. F.
Siegfriedt, Red Lodge; Carl W. Rid
REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPH OF FATAL TRAIN WRECK
m
s
rAi_
This remarkable photograph, taken within a few minutes after the crash, shows firemen, policemen and
citizens removing the dead and wounded from the wreckage of two passenger trains which collided at Pleasant
Ridge, near Cincinnati, O., killing five passengers ar.d injuring many others. Note the tender of one train driven
half way through the wooden coach.
son » Silver Bow,
dick, Lewistown; J. W. Anderson, Sid
ney.
Congress, Democratic, first district
—Byron E. Cooney, Butte; John M.
Evans, Missoula; Mrs Maggie Smith
Hathaway, Stevensville; Mert S. Gould
Twin Bridges.
Congress, Republican, first district
—Washington Jay McCormick, Mis
soula; John McLaughlin, Stevensville;
Charles F. Juttner, Butte.
Congress, Democratic, second dis
trict—Preston B. Moss, Billings.
Congress, Republican, second dis
trict—J. M. Burlingame, Great Falls:
Scott Leavitt, Great Falls; P. R, Flint,
Great Falls; John J. Fleming, Forest i
Grove; Fred C. Gabriel, Malta; George •
H. Kirk, Benchland; Jerome G. Locke, I
Livingston; Harrison F. McConnell, I
Poplar; Oscar J. Collins, Plentywood. ;
Railroad Commissioner, Democratic
—Jess E. Allen, Lewistown; J. W. !
("Jim") Drake, Lewistown; E. J. John- I
Railroad Commissioner, Republican
I —Daniel Boyle, Helena; Walter B.
° an ds, Chinook.
District Judges, fourth fistrict, Dem
ocratic—John E. Patterson, Missoula;
Republican— E. C. Kurtz, Hamilton;
Charles N. Nadeen, Missoula; James
M. Self, Hamilton. Fifth District,
' Democratic—James' E. Kelly, Boulder!
| Republican _ Lyman H . Bennett, Vir
ginia City; C. W. Robinson, Dillon.
GOVERNOR DIXON HERE
,
Governor Joseph M. Dixon arrived in !
Glasgow Tuesday morning and was :
met by Mayor Otto M. Christinson, J.
W. Wedum and B. P. Langen, who ac
companied him to Opheim where he
spoke at the celebration that after
noon
GREAT NORTHERN READY
TO MOVE MONTANA CROP
Cars Already on the Way to Handle
Big Crop of Treasure State.
Promise Little Delay.
That the Great Northern railway
expects to move crops from its Mon
tana territory without serious delays
j is the assertion of Fred Wear, super
! intendent of the Butte division of that
I road. Where a few days ago there
! was no surplus of cars in sight, now,
| it is said, there are 300 cars en route
j from the east to this section of the
state, and the road's facilities for
pairing equipment are considerably
j improved as compaS'cï^isrfth early last
[ -week.
That the strike situation on the
Great Northern is better now than at
any previous time is the information
furnished Superintendent Wear in a
telegram from C. O. Jenks, St. Paul,
| vice president. New men, ranging in
i numbers from 1 to 70 were added to
! the working forces at all terminals on
I the system, Jenks said, and at the St.
Cloud, Minn., shops the crew was above
j nol 'mal. Before the strike 585 men
| were employed at St. Cloud, and the
force now numbers 644. The St. Cloud
! sho P s are especially equipped for car
j repairing and, with the force now em
P lo yed there, repaired cars will be sent
out in ,ar E e numbers.
" The situation has assumed a phase
!that makes it safe to say we are going
to move the Montana crop," said Su
perintendent Wear. "We are starting
with fewer cars this year than last and
have a larger tonnage to haul, but we
are going to get the crop to market
after a fashion that will permit of
few delays. Cars are coming up from
sources that earlier in the week did
not appear available; the repair crews
are being enlarged daily, and there
now are 300 cars traveling toward our
territory."
It was reported at the Great Falls
offices of the road that 150 men were
added to the Havre shops Friday, and
figures available indicate that the
forces there and at Wolf Point, Cut
Bank and Whitefish are about 50 per
cent of normal. Disturbances have not
been reported at any point on the main
line since the early days of the strike.
LUNDEEN- BRACKEE
Fred Lundeen of Avondale and Miss
Engry Brackee of Clayton, Wise., were
united in marriage in the parlors of
the Rapp hotel Monday, Aug. 7. ,Tudg_>
; G. W. Rapp officiating. Mr. and Mrs.
Lundeen will reside near Avondale.
FLAMES DESTROY
HÄGEN FARM HONE
RANCH HOME OF J. J. HÄGEN
COMPLETE LOSS IN FIRE
WEDNESDAY.
NOTHING SAVED FROH BLAZE
I
I
I
I
I
,
j
I
|
|
Building, Contents and Valuable Pa
pers All Lost in Fire Which
Started from Overheat
ed Range.
Fire which started from an over
heated range, completely destroyed the
J. J- Hägen farm home two miles
northeast of Glasgow Wednesday af
ternoon. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hägen
were away from the house at the time
the fire started, Mrs. Hägen being in
Glasgow attending the Chautauqua,
while Mr. Hagen was about a mile
away cutting grain. Miss Gladys
Hagen was in charge of the house and
was doing some baking in the kitchen
range. A very high wind was blowing
and it is thought the stove became
, overheated, setting fire to the parti
! tion back of the stove.
: The flames gained headway so rapid
ty that it was all that Miss Hägen
could do to get the two younger chil
dren who were with her out of the
house in safety. A wallet, which con
tained valuable papers and liberty
bonds was thrown from an upstairs
window but did not land far enough
away from the burning building to
escape destruction. Luckily the wind
was blowing away from the other
buildings on the place and the flames
did not spread to the barns and gran
ary.
Mr. Hägen estimates that his loss
will be in the neighborhood of $3,500.00
partially covered by insurance. Im
mediately upon learning of the mis
fortune that had befallen the Hägen
family their many friends in Glasgow
made up a large package of clothing
and foodstuffs and sent it out to the
ranch to help out in taking care of
the immediate wants of the family.
PHILLIPS CO. MAN ELUDES
CAPTORS FOR THREE DAYS
Suffering from what is believed to
be shell shock H. Van Edsall, of Malta,
former service man, outwitted' Uhe
members of the sheriff's force for
three days and three nights before
they were able to take him into cus
tody for examination. Fully armed
both day and night the man persistent
ly frustrated plans to make him a
captive in'his ranch home in the Mis
souri river country.
Reports from the sheriff's office at
Malta say that Edsall would leave his
home during the day time and wander
into the woods' always on the alert for
pursuers. Late in the evening he
would return to the ranch, barricade
himself in the house and keep con
stant watch during the night. Fin
ally four deputies succeeded in find
ing Edsall without his guns and he
surrendered without any disturbance.
Edsall was taken to Malta and was
placed in the county jail for observa
tion. His friends say that he has been
mentally deranged since his discharge
from the service and that his condi
tion is gradually becoming worse. He
will probably be committed to the
state insane asylum at Warm Springs
for treatment.
WHEELER VISITS GLASGOW
B. K. Wheeler of Butte, Democratic
candidate for nomination as United
States stenator at the coming pri
maries, was calling on local Democrats
Saturday afternoon. Mr. Wheeler is
confident of victory at the polls on
the 29th. He was a candidate for
governor on the Democratic N. P. L.
ticket in 1920.
GRABS RATTLER BY TAIL:
BEATS SNAKE TO DEATH
H. O. J. Luraas, of Saco, had an un
usual experience with a snake when
going to the Frank Jones ranch one
day recently.
Mr. Luraas stopped to open a gate
that appeared balky and stooped to
pull the post from the ground. When
I he put his hand down in a hurry he
I put it into a big rattler curled right
I at the post. Without stopping to think
I what he was doing he clutched the
, snake in his hand and swung it like a
j rope against the post again and again.
I This stunned the snake, but a most pe
| culiar sensation was felt up Mr. Lu
| raas' arm, whether from fear or the
clammy coldness of the snake, but it
was not until the next day that his
arm felt normal.
FAIRGROUNDS FIRE WILL
NOT HINDER PROGRAM
The fire at the state fair grounds at
Helena recently will not interfere with
the success of the fair this fall, ac
cording to Chester C. Davis, commis
sioner of agriculture and publicity.
The space formerly occupied by the
exhibition building will be cleared of
rubbish and used for a midway. The
exhibitions that do not need the pro
tection of buildings will be housed in
tents, Mr. Davis said.
The general condition of crops thru
out the state indicates that there will
be plenty of farm produce at the fair.
A large attendance is expected.
SHELLY SUSPENDED AS
PROHIBITION DIRECTOR
John Metcalf of Kalispeli Appointed
Acting State Director Pending
an Investigation.
O. H. P. Shelley has been suspended
as prohibition director for the state
of Montana upon order received from
the acting commissioner of internal
revenue at Washington. John Met
calf of Kalispeli has been appointed
as temporary director pending inves
tigation into the charges which led to
Mr. Shelley's suspension.
Mr. Shelley has been acting as pro
hibition director for this state for the
past year, having been appointed by
the president about a year ago.
Details concerning the charges
against the official are not available
at this time.
FINED $20.00 FOR HAVING
GAME IN POSSESSION
Game Warden Minugh has been busy
the past few days rounding up parties
who have young geese in their pos
session. Two men were brought to
Malta the latter part of. last week and
fined $25 for having birds and another
was arrested but has decided to stand
trial. It is against the law to have
wild game birds of any kind and it is
a practice that should be discouraged.
—Malta Enterprise.
TAILOR LOSES LIFE
IN GAS EXPLOSION
Joe Buller of Williston, N. D., a tai
lor, was instantly killed Thursday ev
ening of last week in a gasoline ex
plosion that wrecked the cleaning plant
located in the rear of his tailor estab
lishment.
The force of the explosion was felt
several blocks away and windows were
broken in nearby buildings. Fire broke
out in the cleaning plant but the fire
department succeeded in keeping the
blaze from other buildings.
DIXON ASKED TO HELP
PLAN COAL PRODUCTION
Great Falls Commercial Club Urges
Governor to Take Definite Steps
to Prevent Suffering.
Offering their assistance in any plan
Governor J. M. Dixon may have for
guarding against a fuel shortage in
Montana at the beginning of winter,
the directors of the Great Falls Com
mercial Club Tuesday afternoon ad
dressed a letter to the governor in
which it was urged that adequate ac
tion be taken.
The governor was told in the letter
that coal mining must be resumed in
Montana within the next few weeks if
suffering is to be averted when cold
weather comes. If the governor has
no plan for the producing of coal he
was asked to give the matter atten
tion and initiate action of some kind.
The letter follows:
"The directors of the Great Falls
Commercial club are giving earnest
consideration to the fuel supply of
northern Montana. There is no coal in
the hands of dealers now. There are
only a few cars coming in from out
side the state and none of this is avail
able for general consumption. More
over, we observe that Montana is not
included at all in the arrangements
that have been perfected for federal
distribution.
"It would appear, therefore, that
this state must care for itself if the
present strike of miners continues.,
Coal must be mined in this state, be
ginning at some date during the next
few weeks, or there will be terrible i
suffering in manv places when cold j
I weather comes. There is not a
'ment to lose. !
1 "Have you a plan ? If so, we wish to
; cooperate and assist the state admin
I istration. If you have not given this |
; matter attention, we urge that you do
i so and that there be immediate action (
| of some kind. Otherwise, the homes
of many of our people and the lives of
' some of them will soon be at stake. (
SERIOUS CHARGE
AGAINST BREED
ARCHIE CAMPBELL OF CODY,
WYOMING, ARRESTED AT
OPHEIM,
PLACED UNDER $5.000 BOND
Half Breed Broncho Buster Has Nar
row Escape from Rough Treat
ment at Hands of an En
raged Crowd.
A half breed Indian who gave his
name as Archie Campbell, was arrest
ed at Opheim Monday evening and
lodged in the county jail at Glasgow
charged with attempted rape, the vic
tim being a little six-year-old girl of
a prominent north country farmer.
Campbell, who was one of the riders
at the Opheim stampede, was observed
talking to two little girls and later,
when one of them was missed, an im
mediate search was made for her.
The little tot was found with the
Indian who had gagged her with a hand
kerchief, but who was apprehended in
time to prevent him from carrying out
his designs. Word of the affair spread
rapidly through the large crowd of
people who were at the stampede and
quick action on the part of Sheriff
Hall and his deputies saved the offen
der from some mighty rough treat
ment at the hands of the enraged
crowd.
Campbell was arraigned before
Judge G. W. Rapp yesterday and up
on a plea of not guilty was placed un
der $5,000 bonds, which he has failed
to furnish up to the time of this writ
ing.
REIMCHE - MAY NUPTIALS
Alfred B. Reimche, of Larslan, and
Miss Lucy K. May, or Norfolk, Nebr.,
were united in marriage in Sioux City,
Iowa, July 17, 1922. They arrived in
Nashua Sunday, July 30, and will be
at home in the Larslan community.
Mr. Reimche is a brother of Conrad
and Jacob Reimche, who are well
and favorably known to their many
friends throughout the country. The
Independent joins with all in wishing
the newly married ones a long, happy
and prosperous life.—Nashua Indepen
dent.
TOM STOUT A VISITOR
Tom Stout, ex-congressman from
Montana and editor of the Lewistown
Democrat-News, candidate for the
Democratic nomination for United
States senator, visited Glasgow friends
Wednesday. Tom is acknowledged one
of the strongest contenders in the
senatorial fight and has a strong cot
erie of friends over the state who are
working hard in his interests.
VISITING MR. AND MRS. PIPPY
Mrs. Roy Reider of Kalispeli, her
four boys and niece, are visiting at
the Methodist parsonage. Mrs. Rieder
is a sister of Mrs. Wm. Pippy and
is on her way to Saskatchewan to vis
it her mother. Her niece, Miss Dicky
Barcay, has been attending school in
Kalispeli, and is now on her way to
visit her mother in Swift Current»
Sask.
COURI ER A DS PAY ~ iT
A short time ago Mr. S. S. Leonard
of the U. S. Reclamation Service lost
a purse on the Roosevelt Highway
road near Liberty. An ad was inser
ted in the Courier and this morning
a letter from Arthur Adler at Bottin
eau. North Dakota, advised that he
found the purse and will return same
to Mr. Leonard upon identification.
DR. COLE IS GLASGOW VISITOR
Dr. C. E. Cole, district superintend
ent of the Glacier Park district of the
Methodist church, held the fourth quar
terly conference of the local church
Monday evening. A good representa
tion of the board was present and en
tered into the business of the year
with their characteristic outlook. The
conference year closes August 20, when
the pastor, Wm. Pippy, will go to
Havre for the state session.
STATE PROPERTY VALUES
DROP EIGHTEEN MILLIONS
The total assessed valuation of real
estate, livestock and personal property
in Montana for 1922 is $118,577,854
less than for 1921. Figures returned
from 54 counties in the state to the
board of enualization show real estate
at $923,305,128, as compared with
$906,499,612 in 1921. For personal pro
perty the total this year is $236,579.338
as comnared with $268,801,117 in 1921.
j For livestock the agregate assessed
j valuation is $63.255.878. as compared
with $76.417,469 in 1921.
I These figures for both 1921 and 1922
do rot include the assessed valuation
i nut bv the state board of enualization
j on nhvsical properties of railroads and
mo-jnublic utilities, which last year was
! S2S6.3fiR.119. It has not been deter
mined for 1922.
| Nels Cotton received word Sundav
from Mrs. Cotton at Osseo, Minn., an*
( nonncing the death of her father. How
ard Moses in that city August 6th. Mr.
Moses was well known in Valley coum
( ty.

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