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The Glasgow courier. [volume] (Glasgow, Mont.) 1913-current, August 18, 1922, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042379/1922-08-18/ed-1/seq-6/

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CALLAWAY FIRST TO
SOW MONTANA ALFALFA
Father of Judge Callaway of Great
Falle Was Pioneer in the Al
falfa Game.
Considerable controversy is going
on in Montana just now as to who
planted the first alfalfa in the terri
tory. The old timers of Madison coun
ty are unanimous that it was the late
Colonel James E. Callaway, who is re
sponsible for bringing this forage to
Montana in the early seventies. He is
,the father of Judge Lew L. Callaway
of Great Falls, now candidate for
nomination on the Republican ticket
for chief justice of the supreme court
Colonel Callaway entered the cattle
business in Montana nearly 50 years
ago, buying the famous Dr. L. W.
Fordney herd of Shorthorns which was
claimed by many to be the first large
herd of Shorthorns brought to the
territory. At the time of its purchase
by Col. James E. Callaway it was the
largest Shorthorn herd in Montana.
When Judge Lew L. Callaway was
nine years old he started assisting his
father in the care of these cattle, rode
the range, punched the cattle and did
all of the other chores about the pio
neer ranch as did the other men. He
followed this work until he was 22
years old, when he went east to col
lege.
Captain J. V. Stafford of the Can
yon Ferry country, was a pioneer
rancher at the mouth of Avalanche
gulch, in what is now Lewis and Clark
county, and is also said to have been
one of the first to plant and raise al
falfa successfully in Montana, but the
pioneers of the Ruby valley cling to
their story that Colonel Callaway was
the first to plant and raise alfalfa in
the territory. •
Colonel Callaway served in the Civil
War with the 21st Illinois, rising to
the rank of Colonel. During President
Grant's term of office he was appoint
ed secretary of state for Montana and
acted six years, part of the time as
territorial governor. He was a mem
ber of the constitutional conventions
of 1884 and 1889 and was the first
Republican to be speaker of the Mon
tana territorial house, serving in 1884
and 1885. He was department com
mander of the G.A.R. from 1884 to
1889 as well. He resigned the office
of secretary of state when Hayes was
elected and took up the practice of
law.
WOLVES ATTACK BOYS
NEAR ROLLETTE, N. D.
The Turtle Mountain Star, published
at Rolla, Rollette county, North Dako
ta, says that Eugene Brunnette, the
fourteen-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs.
B. Brunnette, of Maryville, was at
tacked a few days ago by a timber wolf
and had his coat torn to pieces. Be
Your Chance
'To Get In On The
Ground Floor
GLASGOW EXPLORATION COMPANY NOW DRILLING
FIRST WELL ON LIME BUTTE STRUCTURE OFFERS
LIMITED AMOUNT OF STOCK TO INVESTORS.
OUR DRILL IS NOW BITING ITS WAY STEADILY TOWARD
THE POTENTIAL PAY SANDS AND WE BELIEVE THAT
WE HAVE ONE OF THE BEST WILD CAT PROPOSITIONS
IN THE ENTIRE STATE, BASED ON REPORTS MADE BY
OUR GEOLOGISTS.
WE INVITE YOUR INVESTIGATION AND OFFER YOU AN
OPPORTUNITY TO GET IN WITH US.
Don't Wait Until the Well Comes In
See Us Today
Glasgow Exploration Company
SUBSCRIPTION BLANK
Glasgow, Montana.
Date 192....
Glasgow Exploration Company,
H. A. Yotter, Secretary,
I (We) hereby subscribe at $1.00 per share for
shares of Glasgow Exploration Company stock and hand
you herewith for
in payment of same.
Signed
Street Box
GLASGOW, MONTANA
OFFICERS
Albert Nelson President
Henry Carpenter Vice President
H. A. Yotter Secretary -Treasurer
City State
Share $1 Each—Fully Paid—Non-Assessable
McCORMICK-WALSKA WEDDING A SENSATION
i
"
/m
V
An international sensation was caused by the wedding, in Paris, of
Harold F. McCormick, muti-millionaire Chicago manufacturer, to Ganna
Walska, divorced wife of Alexander Smith Cochran, multi-millionaire
carpet manufacturer, of Yonkers, N. Y., known at the time of his mar
riage as America's richest bachelor. Mr. McCormick, who' recently was
divorced by his wife, the daughter of John I). Rockefeller, is the father of
seventeen-year-old Mathilde McCormick, who is to wed Max Oser, Swiss
riding master, forty-seven years old. The married life of Ganna Walska
and Cochran lasted only a year. Mr. McCormick met Ganna Walska when
she went to Chicago- to sing a role in the Chicago Opera Co., which he
supported. She never sang, and left Chicago in a huff. McCorniick was
reported recently to have undergone a rejuvenating gland operation.
tween the school house and Mr. Bur
nette's residence there is a vacant
field covered with patches of brush.
The wolvès have made their dens on
this vacant quarter, and are frequent
ly seen in groups of six or more. The
children in going to and from school
have fed them with portions of their
mid-day lunches. The animals became
somewhat tame under this treatment
and one day Eugene got out of the
school rig and tried to frighten a big
and ferocious looking animal which
was near the rig, but the wolf re
fused to be frightened. He started
after the boy who ran with double
speed to the protection of the covered
wagon. Just as he was getting into the
rig the fangs of the wolf penetrated
his coat and tore it from him. About
a week later his brother, Alfred, 19
years old, was attacked in the field,
but found refuge on the back of one
of the horses he was driving.
STATE COLLECTS LICENSE
ON 56,850 AUTOMOBILES
Licenses for 56,850 automobiles
owned and operated in Montana were
taken out during the first seven
months of 1922, according to the rec
ords of Secretary of State Charles T.
Stewart. This is an increase of 1,499
over the number of licenses issued
during the same period last year. A
total of 60,000 is expected before the
end of the year.
The number of licenses has been
materially increased in the last sixty
days by the activities of the state au
tomobile license inspector who has
been operating in eastern Montana and
has brought in to the state treasury
several thousand dollars in that time
from automobile owners who had ne
glected to take out 1922 licenses. His
activities will be transferred soon to
the western part of the state.
Penalty for failure to renew an au
tomobile license is fixed at a maxi
mum of $100 fine. In many cases the
inspector works with the sheriff or
police, who simply tag a car carrying
no license for the current year, forc
ing the owners to report in court
which brings him both the fine and
necessity of procuring the license.
Licenses taken out after August 1
for cars purchased or brought into the
state by residents after that date re
quire payment of only half the year's
fee, but applications received for the
half rate are invaribly sent back to
the applicant for an affidavit that the
car was not owned or used within the
state on or before July 31. This course
according to the secretary of state's
office, brings back the application for
a license with the full fee for a year
in many cases.
PHRASE MISINTERPRETED
A curious case recently arose in one
of the sub-district offices of the Vet
erans' bureau. The widow of a soldier
came in for some back allotments
which were due her and which had
been sent, but owing to a change of
address had been returned to the bu
reau.
When asked where her husbartti was
she hesitated for some time, but at last
replied that she had received a letter
fro mthe adjutant general stating
that he was reported "missing in ac
tion" after one of the battles in
France. She took that to mean that
he had deserted from the service, and
kept the information to herself and
struggled along as best she could.
Although entitled to compensation
she had made no application. How
ever, the proper papers in her ease are
now being completed and she expresses
thankfulness that her husband was
not the deserter she had thought him
to be.
HIGHWAYMEN CAUGHT AT
WIBAUX; ROBBED TOURISTS
One of the highwaymen who held up
a tourist party and relieved them of
all their park souvenirs and about $60
on the Forsyth Flat the first of last
week, was caught at Wibaux by Sher
iff Barclay. Two men were traveling
in a stolen Cadillac touring car at the
rate of about 70 miles an hour when
they attempted to pass through Wi
baux. Sheriff Barclay was watching
for them and tried to stop them as
they passed. This was impossible and
he started after them in a wild chase
but soon learned that it would be im
possible for him to run them down so
decided to shoot up their gas tank. He
succeeded in accomplishing this feat.
The men abandoned the car ar^ one
of them escaped while the other was
captured. Both men are thought to be
desperate characters as the car con
tained several high power rifles and
auto number plates for five states.
One of the men was undoubtedly a
good mechanic as the car was still
locked but had been rewired—Forsyth
Times.
COURTESY ON THE ROAD
Courtesy on the road among mo
torists is akin to safety and a new
"courtesy" series of suggestions is
now being issued for the thousands
of motorists in this section of the
country.
Lack of courtesy, it is pointed out,
often leads to recklessness, which in
turn leads to accidents. Therefore,
Note these New Prices
on U .S.Hres
/""\N July 29,1922, the lowest
^ prices ever quoted on U. S.
Passenger Car Tires went into
effect—Royal Cords included.
These new prices should give
confidence to dealers and car«
owners that no lower basis of
-quality tire prices will prevail.
Bear in mind that these prices
appiy to the most complete
line of quality tires in the J
world. Remember, too — /
a? vom read the follow- /
ing table — that U. S. / /
quality has been posi- / M m
lively maintained. / mm;
VA
Wtk
*-»
m
FABRIC
Chain Usco
Royal
Cord
Plain
Nobby
SIZES
$9.25
$9.75
10.65
18.65
$11.40
13.00
21.35
$ 1 2.55
15.60
23.00
30 x 3 V2
$14.65
30 x 3V2 SS
32 x 3 Vi "
31x4 "
32 x 4 "
14-65
22.95
26.45
29.15
30.05
30.85
37.70
38.55
39.50
40.70
41.55
46.95
49.30
51.85
15.70
16.90
20.45
20.85
21.95
22.40
24.35
25.55
26.05
31.95
33.00
34.00
35.65
36.15
22.45
23.65
24.15
30.05
31.05
32.05
33.55
34.00
34x4
32 x 4Vz
33 x 4'/2
34 x 4 Vi
35 x 4V2
36 x 4'/ 2
33x5
43.20
45.75
39.30
41.70
»b«n / 30x3Vi
s / usco
/ FABRIC
/ 'lO 65
30 x3% Clincher
and Straight Side
Federal Excise Tax on the above has been
absorbed by the manufacturer
The dealer with a full line of U. S.
Tires at these new prices can serve
you better than you have ever
been served before in the his*
tory of the automobile. J
If there ever was any fan- /
cied advantage in shopping /
around for tires it disap* /
peared on July 29 # 1922« /
Royal Cord 14 *2
United States Tires
United States ® Rubber Company
7SSS
Where You
Can Buy
U. S. Tiress
CHAS. E. BEHNER GROSSMAN MOTOR CO.
MAGRUDER MOTOR CO. H. A. YOTTER. Hardware
MEN WANTED
By
GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
MACHINISTS
BLACKSMITHS
BOILERMAKERS
HELPERS
WELDERS
SHEET METAL WORKERS
CAR REPAIRMEN
LINEMEN
LABORERS
COACH CARPENTERS
Permanent jobs at wages
authorized by the United
States Labor Board.
Time and one-half after 8
hours and for Sundays and
" holidays.
Free Transportation
Apply at Nearest Shop or Division Superintendent's Office
I motorists are asked to read the follow
ing courtesy rules and see if they wish
! them :
1. When a man approaching you
from behind sounds his horn as a sig
nal that he wishes to pass, don't "step
on it." Draw over to the side and let
him go by.
2. Do not use more than your half
of the road, thus crowding others into
the ditch.
3. It is not courteous to "steal" a
parking space from a man who is just
getting ready to back into it.
3. Do not imagine that every motor
ist on the road who tries to pass you
is starting a race. He may be on im
portant business.
5. When you pass a man from be
hind going in the same direction do
not cut in directly in front of him.
This is discourteous.
6. Do not shove another man's car
along the curb to make room for yours,
thus jamming his car against the fire
plug or the car ahead.
7. It is discourteous to halt behind
a traffic jam and honk your horn.
8. The correct giving of hand sig
nals is courteous as well as saw.
*•»••******* ******
* ROBERT S. McKELLAR •
* Attorney and •
* Counselor •
* Roome 108 First Nat'l Bank Bldg. *
* Glasgow, Montana •

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