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The Glasgow courier. [volume] (Glasgow, Mont.) 1913-current, August 25, 1922, Image 1

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Don't Forget to Register
Now for the November
Election. If You Are Not
Registered You Can't Vote.
the Glasgow Courier
I ■ ■— f
Dont Forget to Regisl
Now for the November
Election. If You Are Not
Registered You Can't Vote.
VOLUME XVIII.
S
GLASGOW, VALLEY COUNTY, MONTANA, AUGUST 25, 1922.
NUMBER 18
X
CARL W. RIDDICK FOR UNITED STATES SENATOR
BALLOTS ARE
READY TO SHIP
SUPPLIES FOR PRIMARY ELEC
TION BEING PREPARED BY
COUNTY CLERK.
HOW BALLOT WILL LOOK
Complete List of Candidates Who Com
pleted Filing. Polls Open from
12:00 Noon to 7:00 O'clock
in the Evening.
County Clerk and Recorder Lou E.
Bretzke has all of the ballots and
election supplies for the various pre
cincts in Valley county boxed up and
ready to send out tomorrow. Supplies
for some of the far outlying precincts
have already been shipped in order to
insure their delivery before election
day.
There are thirty-nine polling places
in the county and each ballot box of
supplies contains a complete list of
the necessary supplies for conducting
the election. Two ballot boxes are
sent to each precinct and twice as
many official ballots and sample bal
lots are sent out as there are regis
tered voters in the precinct.
Following is a list of the candidates
for the different offices who completed
their filings and whose names will
appear on the official ballot:
REPUBLICAN BALLOT
For United States Senator:
J. W. Anderson.
Charles N. Pray.
Wellington D. Rankin.
Carl W. Riddick.
Dr. J. C. F. Siegfriedt.
For Representative in Congress, Sec
ond Congressional District:
J. M. Burlingame.
Oscar J. Collins.
John J. Fleming.
P. R. Flint.
Fred C. Gabriel.
George H. Kirk.
Scott Leavitt.
Jerome G. Locke.
Harrison F. McConnell.
For Chief Justice of the Supreme
Court:
Lew. L. Callaway.
George W. Farr.
Frank N. Utter.
For Associate Justice of the Supreme
Court :
Miles J. Cavanaugh.
Albert P. Stark.
Jess H. Stevens.
For Railroad and Public Service Com
missioner:
Daniel Bdyle.
Walter B. Sands.
For Clerk of Supreme Court:
Dana M. Easton.
For State Senator:
R. C. Arnold.
John Etchart.
Matt Murray.
c. M. Peterson.
For State Representatives:
F. B. Gillette.
K. H. Knudsvig.
Wm. M. Ruff corn.
MATT MURRAY, FOR STATE SENATOR
* ..
m
ODPOSed to Increased Taxation of Agricultural Montana
jjj anV form
For County Commissioner:
Carl J. Anderson.
For Sheriff:
C. A. Hall.
H. H. Seeley.
James R. Stephens.
For Clerk and Recorder:
J. W. Barr.
Lou E. Bretzke.
C. W. Kampfer.
For County Treasurer:
W. L. Frazier.
J. J. Hägen.
For County Attorney:
Clarence H. Roberts.
Lincoln Working.
For County Assessor:
B. H. Cottrell.
Earl Moran.
For Superintendent of Schools:
Lillian Betz.
Olivia Forster-Patton.
For County Surveyor.
W. H. Mann.
For County Coroner:
(Vote for One)
Chas. E. Peterson.
DEMOCRATIC BALLOT
For United States Senator:
James F. O'Connor.
Tom Stout.
Hugh R. Wells.
Burton K. Wheeler.
For Representative in Congress, Sec
ond Congressional District:
Preston B. Moss.
For Chief Justice of Supreme Court
(Vote for One)
Joseph P. Donnelly.
Joseph R. Jackson.
John W. Stanton.
For Associate Justice of the Supreme
Court:
John A. Matthews.
Arthur G. Waite.
For Railroad and Public Service Com
missioner:
Jess E. Allen.
J. W. "Jim" Drake.
E. J. Johnson.
For Clerk of the Supreme Court:
J. T. Carroll.
For State Senator:
Peter Peterson.
For State Representatives:
W. H. Patterson.
M. Sektnan.
Mrs. John Willis.
For County Commissioner:
S. E. Feezell.
For Sheriff:
Julien W. Haydon.
B. A. McFarland.
Frank McPherson.
For Clerk and Recorder:
Charles C. Taylor.
For County Treasurer:
J. L. Truscott.
For County Attorney:
J. T. Shea.
NICK MUNSON INJURED
IN RUNAWAY ACCIDENT
Nicholas Munson, pioneer rancher
residing east of Glasgow, was badly
injured Saturday when a team which
he had hitched to a hayrack ran away
throwing him off the rack, breaking
one leg and several ribs.
Munson was a considerable distance
from any help when the accident oc
curred and was obliged to crawl near
ly a mile to the river where he pro
cured a row boat and floated down to
a point in the river where he could
summon assistance. He is at present
; resting easily and on the road to re
covery at the General hospital in this
j city.
RIDDICK GIVES
SUPPORT TO ALL
FA RM M EASURES
The farmer members of the Riddick
for-Senator club of Fergus county,
composed of men and women who have
long known Congressman Riddick as
a farmer, county assessor and member
of congress, recently issued the follow
ing statement to the farmers of Mon
tana. Among the members of the ex
ecutive committee of this club are
John Quiekenden, president of the
Taxpayers association and Mrs. A. F.
Burnson, president of the Farm Bu
reau of Fergus county. The state
ment of these friends and neighbors of
Mr. Riddick follows:
"To the Farmers of Montana:
Agriculture is the foundation of
prosperity in the nation and state.
Unless and until it is put on a paying
basis there will be no return of good
times.
"In recognition of this fact Presi
dent Harding's administration has
sought to use all proper and effective
means to promote the interests of the
farmer.
"The Honorable Carl W. Riddick has
been a consistent supporter of the
program of the administration, and in
pursuance of this policy has supported
every measure for the betterment of
agriculture.
"Among these measures are the
Emergency Tariff bill, especially de
signed for the protection of agricul
ture; the Agricultural Credits Act,
which enabled the War Finance Cor
poration to lend money to the farmers
and livestock growers and provided a
billion-dollar revolving fund for that
purpose; the amendment of the Farm
Loan Bank Act, increasing the funds
available for its operation in the sum
kxf tfwerity-five million dollars; the
law regulating grain exchanges and
dealing in "futures"; the Packers and
Stockyards Act; the Co-operative Mar
keting Act; the Seed Loan Act, and
other legislation beneficial to agricul
ture.
"Mr. Riddick's experience in Mon
tana has given him a full appreciation
of the needs of the farmers, and he is
TO VOTERS OF VALLEY COUNTY
In the Glasgow Democrat of August 18th, 1922, ap
pears an article over the "signature" of "Political Adver
tisement" wherein is set forth by several stockmen and far
n mers residents of the district north of Hinsdale that stock
rustling has become so bad in that vicinity that it is neces
sary that they go out of business, unless one, J. R. Steph
ens be nominated and elected sheriff of this county.
I am therefore taking the opportunity of making this
statement in bëhalf of my office. Since January 3rd, 1921,
the day upon which I took office, there has been only one
complaint of anything in the nature of stock stealing
made to me by any of the gentlemen whose names appear
at the bottom of the article mentioned. This complaint was
immediately and vigorously followed up at a very consid
erable expense to the taxpayers, only to find that the
missing cattle had strayed to another part of the range.
If any of the gentlemen who signed the statement in
the Democrat will make a complaint to this office, same
will be immediately and thoroughly investigated.
CHAS. A. HALL,
Sheriff of Valley County.
(Paid Political Advertisement)
COMMITTEE NAHES FOR
BIG FAIR AT THOENY
All Working Hard to Make Western
Valley County Agricultural
Fair a Hummer.
I
Plans are practically completed and
committees have been appointed for j
the big Western Valley County Agri- 1
cultural and Stock Show which will j
be held at Thoeny, September 15th and >
16th. This will be the only event of
its kind staged in Valley county this
year and the committees promise that
the "doin's" will include all of the
thrills and features of the regular;
county fair. J ,
The Courier has just issued a hand- i
some 36 page premium list which will
be in the hands of exhibitors the early
part of next week. j
Following is a list of the officers :
and committees in charge of the big !
event .
A. P. Wheeler, President; James
Butcher, vice president, and W. C.
Mumford, secretary and treasurer.
General: James Butcher, W. C.
Mumford, J. A. Hentz, Oral Miller and
Frank VanWagenen.
Grains and Vegetables: J. A. Hentz, !
aii «« w n
I Allen Johnson, W. C. Mumford.
j
'
!
!
j
!
I
CARL W. RIDDICK
one of the recognized champions of
the agricultural interests in Congress.
He has received the public commenda
tion of Senator Capper of Kansas, the
recognized leader of the farm bloc in
the senate, and of Mr. J. R. Howard,
president of the Farm Bureau Feder
ation. Both of these men say that Mr.
Riddick has been absolutely right in
his support of agricultural interests.
"Mr. Riddick's supporters believe
that his support of all proper mea
Livestock: H. M. Ketzenbarger, Jno.
S. Lee.
Race Track and Grounds: Al Cham
bers, W. L. Whiting, J. E. Struthers,
A. C. Parkhurst.
Horse Races: Henry Barthélémy,
Allen Johnson.
Auto Races: Floyd Minor, W. L.
Whiting.
Ball Games: J. M Thoeny, John
I Myhre.
Concessions: J. M. Thoeny, John S.
A1 cumbers.
j D ' ance: piovd Minor, A. P. Wheeler,
1 barbccue: a. p. Wheeler.
j Advertising: J. A. Hentz, W. L.
> whitin „ A 1 Chambers, W. C. Mum
ford John Myhre> Frank V anWag
enen
^ an(] 0r(Ier; j E Xesbitt, Bert
Seeley g A . Dickinson.
Min ô r Sports: F. Van Wagenen, J.
'A. Hentz.
i School Exhi bits: Ebba Dahlquist,
A]ice Thoeny , Nellie Glasmann.
Home Econom ics: Marie Lee, Olga
j chambers, Winifred Whiting.
: „ . . ,, cfo . 0 . n- , •
! _ C °" r ov p!„ w ,l n i
E. F. Simmons, Koy Barr, Wilbur Dol
son ' George
Superintendent of Committees: A.
P. Wheeler.
Attorney Otis A. Hallett, of the
firm of Norris, Hurd, Rhoades & Hal
! lett, returned Tuesday morning from
Inn automobile trip to Great Falls.
j an automobile trip to Great Falls.
sures designed to promote the agricul
tural interests in his state and the
United States entitles him to. the sup
port of the farmers of Montana. It
has never before happened that the
farmers of this state have had an op
portunity to cast their votes for con
gressman or senator for one who has
himself been a farmer and who has
been consistent in his support of all
measures intended to promote agri
cultural prosperity."
POPULAR ENGINEER
SUCCUMBS ON DUTY
P. O'Brien, Pioneer Great Northern
Engineer, Stricken While on
Regular Run.
. J. P. O'Brien, well known in Glas
' gow and pioneer engineer on this di
j vision of the Great Northern, died at
! the Deaconess hospital in this city
Tuesday night, following an acute at
tack of stomach trouble with which
he was stricken while on his run be
tween here and Havre Tuesday morn
| ing. Mr. O'Brien become violently ill
between Glasgow and Malta and was
j taken from the train here, the fireman
on duty taking the train into Wolf
! Point.
I Mr. O'Brien has been an engineer on
I the system for the past 35 years, com
ing to Glasgow at the same time as
G. W. Rapp, a veteran engineer still
residing 1 in Glasgow. He is a member
of the Brotherhood of Locomotive En
gineers.
Mrs. O'Brien and daughter, Eliza
beth, came down from Havre Tuesday
evening and took the body back to
Havre where interment was made in
the Havre cemetery this morning.
LOCAL THEATRE INSTALLS
A LARGE PIPE ORGAN
Beginning next Sunday, Glasgow's
notion picture fans will be able to
hear at each performance music of a
class which is usually expected only
at much larger theatres. Mr. Wharton,
proprietor of the Orpheum theatre in
this city, is installing the size of Wur
litzer pipe organ especially adapted to
small theatres. This pipe organ is
complete in every respect, and has
violin, piano, flute, drums, orchestra
and bird whistle attachments, also the
tremolo organ effect attachment. The
organ will first be heard Sunday ev
ening, when a concert will be given
preceeding the 7:30 show. The organ
will be played both by the agent in
stalling it and Mr. Wharton himself.
Mr. Wharton is to be commended on
this effort to make the Orpheum a
high-class theatre, and there is no
doubt that this splendid music will
improve the already excellent perform
ances.
!
FINE HUNTING FOR FALL
SAYS "DADDY*
MINUGH
. « ... , , ir , ,, ,, ...
Deputy Game Warden 'Daddy M.n
ugh drove in from Malta this morn
ing, accdmpanied by Louis s. Goslin,
a prominent rancher and mine owner
of the Little Rockies. "Daddy 1
ports that the duck hunting this fall
will be the best that it has been in
years. Speaking of fishing in nor
jthern Montana Mr. Minugh said: "We
have just finished planting 100,000
salmon fry, 85,000 black bass and 35,
000 sunfish in the Nelson reservoir,
and in the course of a few years this
reservoir will furnish the greatest
fishing in the state."
JACKSON HERE BOOSTING
SCOBEY HARVEST FESTIV.
J. c. Jackson of Scobey is in Glas
gow today boosting the big harvest
festival which will be staged at Sco
bey on Monday, September 4. Mr.
Jackson is secretary of the arrange
ment committee and'advises that plans
have been made for a full program of
entertainment including airplane
flight, horse racing, street sports and
baseball.
SAM STEPHENSON IS NAMED
PRESIDENT STATE BANKERS
Sam Stephenson, Great Falls, was
elected president of the Montana State
Bankers' association at Missoula last
Saturday. F. E. Stranahan, Ft. Ben
ton, was elected vice president and A.
T. Hibbard, Helena, secretary-treas
urer.
Resolutions adopted indorsed the
Federal Reserve banking system and
I favored a fund for eradicating crop
I destroying insects.
Attorney John Hurly was at Plen
tywood and Poplar on professional
business the fore part of the week.
J. M. BURLINGAME, FOR CONGRESS
j. M. Burlingame has been a resident of Montana and Great Falls
for 32 years; has always been active in the business and political life of
the state. He was the first register of the Great Falls land office, and
it was during his term that the big rush of settlers occurred. For the last
12 years Mr. Burlingame has represented Cascade^ county in the state
senate, having been chosen for that office three times with increasing
majorities. During the past few sessions of the legislature he has been
chairman of the senate judiciary committee, conceeded to be by far the
most important committee of that body. .
Mr. Burlingame is a candidate for congress on the Republican ticket
at the primaries, August 29. He knows Montana and all her needs; is
for Montana and all Montana, and if elected will prove a valuable mem
ber of the house of representatives, and orte who can be depended upon at
all times to work for Montana and her best interests. ,
NEW LEVY SHOWS
3 MILL INCREASE
VALUATION DROPS OFF NEARLY
$2,000,000.00, INCREASING
MILL LEVY.
SCHOOL LEVIES ARE FIXED
At an adjourned meeting of the
board of county commissioners held
last Saturday, the yearly tax levy for
Valley county was fixed by the board.
The new levy shows an increase in the
School District No. 1 Levy Decreases
Half Mill from Last Year's Levy.
Levies of Other Districts
Vary Slightly.
total of three mills over j 1921, but this
is largely compensated for by the
heavy decrease in valuations, which
haye d from $2 , 5>529>29g in 1921
^ $22809(415 this year.
The new levy is as follows:
For Stat* Purposes.
To be ,evie . d u P° n all property subject
taxation, 4 23-40 mills:
General fund, for state pur
poses 3Mi mills
War defence bond fund 3-10 mill
Veterans welfare bond mter
est a . nd sinking fund 3-40 mill
Educational bona interest
and sinking fund 7-10 mill
To be levied upon all livestock subject
I to taxation, 3% mills:
Livestock commission fund .... 1 mill
Livestock bounty fund 1% mill
State livestock sanitary board
fund 1 mill
For County Purposes.
For the county's purpose the board
levied as follows:
Upon all property subject to taxation
in the county, 32% mills:
General fund 12 mills
Poor fund 1 mill
Bridge fund 1% mills
Bond sinking fund 6 mills
Special relief fund 1% mills
Land classification fund .... 1 mill
Agricultural extension fund Vt mill
Insect pest fund % mill
General school fund 6 mills
High school fund 3 mills
Upon all property subject to taxation
outside the corporate limits of cities
and towns:
Road fund 4 mills
Upon all real and personal property
within the boundaries of Hinsdale
fire district:
Hinsdale fire district fund .... 10 mills
Ppon all the real and personal proper
ty within in the corporate limits
of the Town of Nashua, 15 mills:
(Continued on page 4.)

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