OCR Interpretation


Jamestown weekly alert. [volume] (Jamestown, Stutsman County, D.T. [N.D.]) 1882-1925, May 30, 1889, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042405/1889-05-30/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

UK?
si*''
i&i'
"f
I'
,'
'W
mi
fi.
5'
If
4l
HE
i',-
DR. CRONIN'S CORPSE
Found in a Chicago Sewer, Badly
Decomposed, Covered with
Cuts and Bruises.
The Assassins and the Incentive
lor the Crime Still a Matter
of Conjecture.
The Affair Promises to Become
One ot the Great Murder Mys­
teries of the Age.
Chicago, May 24.—The body of Dr. P.
H. C'ronin, the Irish agitator, who dis­
appeared from his home two weeks ago,
was found in the afternoon at 5 o'clock
in a catch basin on Evanston avenue. A
towel was wrapped about the head, but
the rest of the body was stark naked.
The Catholic charm called the "Agnus
Dei," which the doctor always wore next
his skin, suspended about his neck, was
untouched. On the head were the marks
left by
A Dozen Deep Cuts
which have severed the scalp and in­
dented the skull. It was the opinion of
the police that Cronin was foully mur-
DE. CRONIN.
deretl, and by some man who could not
brin_- himself' to disturb a Catholic
charm. A gang of laborers in the em­
ploy of the Lake View city government
have been cleaning the ditches along
Evanston avenue during the week.
Foreman Henry Roesch and two men
were working on the north side of
Evanston avenue towards Fifty-ninth
street. As they neared the catch basin
at the corner they noticed a strong
Smell of Putrefying Flesh,
and Roesch pried off the top of the catch
basin with his spade and uncovered the
body of Dr. Cronin. It had apparently
been thrown in the basin, for the head
was down and the feet and legs were in
the sewer opening.
The corner of Fifty-ninth street and
Evanston avenue is" about 300 yards
from the Argyle Park station on the Chi­
cago and Evanston branch of the Chi­
cago, Milwaukee and St. Paul railroad.
It is but two or three blocks from the
lake and about nine-tenths of a mile
north from the corner of Sulzer street
and Evanston avenue, where the empty
trunk was found on the day after Cro­
nin disappeared.
Sent to the Morgue.
Immediately upon taking the body
out of the basin Foreman Roesch notified
the Lake View police station and sum­
moned the patrol wagon. The body was
stretched out in the Lake iew morgue,
which occupies the front room in the
basement under the station. Tele­
phone messages were sent to the
city police, and an hour after
the finding of the body a dozen of Cro
nin's friends were at the station. John
E. Scanlon, Mortimer Scanlon and John
F. Scanlon were among the first who
arrived. They
Identified the Body
as that of Cronin upon first sight. Later
it was more positively identified by L.
L. Conklin. the saloonkeeper with whom
Cronin lived, and by James Boland and
Patrick McGary. In the evening Dr. J.
R. Brandt, president of the Cook County
hospital staff, carefully examined the
body and positively identified the body
as that of Cronin. He discovered upon
the head
Numerous Cuts and Bruiaeg
from one to four inches long. The doc­
tor said that the blows must have been
made bp some sharp instrument—per­
haps an ice pick. He said if the instru­
ment had not been sharp the skull would
have been fractured, whereas it was
only indented or marked by the blows.
Dr." Brandt examined the hair found in
the trunk on Evanston avenue and
stated that it was Dr. Cronin's hair.
There are other reasons for believing
that Cronin's body was carried in the
trunk. There was cotton found about
the feet and under the chin of
the corpse of the same qual­
ity as the cotton found in
the trunk and the threads of cloth found
in the cotton in the trunk correspond in
appearance with the threads of the towel
wrapped about Cronin's head.
Iecompo*itiofi
far Advanced.
When this towel was removed part of
Cronin's moustache came with it. show­
ing that decomposition was already far
advanced. The body was much swelled,
owing to its long stay under the water
in the basin. However, there can be no
mistake as to the identification. "It is
Cronin's body," said John F. Scanlon.
"I knew it the minute I entered the
room and was as certain of it then as I
am now, after making a most careful
examination. I believe he' was the vic­
tim of the
Foulest of Mnrderg.
I believe that the fact that the 'Agnus
Dei' was untouched is most significant.
I believe that the suspicion that we have
all along entertained as to the manner
of his death was well grounded, and I
expect to see the perpetrators of the
deed brought to justice. Cronin's friends
and fellow-workers will spare no money
or pains to bring about such a result and
will not stop until the instigators as well
IB the perpetrators of the crime are dis­
covered."
Foolhardy Adventurers.
DENVER, May 11.—G. R. Agassiz, of
Boston, a nephew of the late Professor
Agassiz, and C. P. Curtis, of Boston.
Thursday started! from Glen wood Springs
in a fifteen-foot boat on a trip down the
Grand river through the Colorado can­
yon. The current down the canyon is
thirty or forty miles an hour. Hunters
say they cannot go farther than Grand
Junction, but Agassiz wants to go
through the Grand canyon. If they at­
tempt tliis.
they
their hands.
will take their lives in
WIRE WORMS AND THEIR RAVAGES.
Professor Comstook's Experiments and
Their Results.
Prominent among farm pests are wire
worms, which occur in all parts of our
country. There is scarcely a cultivated
plant that is not more or less infested by
them, and. working, as they do, beneath
the surface of the ground, they are ex­
tremely difficult to reach and destroy.
The noxious wire worms are slender
grubs of a yellowish white color and un­
usually hard bodies The form and
density of their bodies suggest their com­
mon name. The body consi:-'. -. of the
head and twelve segments The head is
distinct and extended horizon tui'.v lint
with no neck. Wire worms are the L-rvie
of click beetles, and the members of u'lis
family are easily recognized by the iorui
of their bodies and by a peculiar habit
that has given them the popular names
or click beetles, snapping bugs ahd skip­
jacks.
Without going into the details of ex­
periments made at the Cornell University
station by Professor Comstock, it is suf­
ficient to say that the most feasible
method of preventing the ravages of the
worms was found to be in trapping and
poisoning the beetles before they had
laid their eggs rather than in attempting
to destroy the larva? after they are par­
tially grown. Fresh clover and sweet­
ened jornmeal dough were the most at­
tractive baits. The best results in poison­
ing were with small bunches of freshly
cut clover dipped in a solution of Paris
green and covered with boards to pre­
vent the drying out of the clover. Such
poisoned baits can easily be distributed
once or twice a week in the early part of
summer, and it is recommended that,
where troublesome, these pests be fought
in that way
Other experiments demonstrated that
the beetles (iy both by day and by night
but are most active in the night time
also that, although they liy readily, they
seek their food chiefly by running over
the surface of the ground. Experience
at the station and the testimony of writers
on the subject show that these wire
worms are much more likely to do seri­
ous injury in land that ^as remained in
grass a number of years, and upon low
grounds of a peaty quality and black
color.
Points in Churning.
The food on which a cow is fed has
considerable influence on the length of
time required in churning. Generally
when the extra food given is rich in
nitrogen the butter comes quicker than
when such food as potatoes, distillers'
slops, etc., is made the sole extra food.
A prolific cause of trouble in fall and
winter that retards churning, is that the
milk and cream are not kept at an even
temperature. If the milk is aflowed to
freeze and thaw, or to fall to a low
temperature while being set for cream,
there is much difficulty in getting the
butter speedily.
As high an authority as Willard says:
"ililk and cream should not be allowed
to fall below fifty degrees." The author­
ity quoted suggests that when no con­
veniences are had for keeping the milk
at the proper temperature while the
cream is rising in cold weather, fairly
good results may be obtained by scald­
ing the milk by placing it in a pan over
hot water on the stove. As soon as a
little crinkle is observed remove the pan
to a room of moderate temperature, or
where the temperature does not fall
below fifty degrees. The cream will not
only rise rapidly, but will generally
churn with facility. Do not scald too
much or the amount of cream will be
diminished.
A Good Wagon Jack.
The following description and illustra­
tion of a wagon jack is contributed by
Ohio Farmer. To make one like the
model take two pieces 2\ inches wide
and 3 feet 2 inches long, and two pieces
of the same width, 24 feet long. Make
the handle or lever of tough wood. The
notched piece is made out of a board
four inches wide, and cut to the desired
height of jack, which is determined by
the wagon or vehicle. Cover the notches
with hoop iron, to preserve them from
bruising and mashing. Five bolts are
needed
A SATISFACTORY WAGON JACK.
The cut shows just how to make this
jack which will raise a wheel with a
heavy load on a wagon if necessary It
is wide at the base, so that a wagon can­
not move forward or backward while it
is in use. Make it of seasoned elm, if
practicable, painfit. and keep ir under
cover.
Agricultural Stations and Scii-joU.
A bill, has been introduced into the
New York legislature which appropriates
S30.000 to establish schools for teaching
the art and practice of dairying includ­
ing the best modes of making and
cheese. The schools are to be in charge
of the dairy commissioners of the state
skilled professors and tutors are to be
employed. The art of raising poultry is
to be included.
Maryland has an agriculturist college
and experiment station, but as yet no
state board of agriculture. At a recent
meeting of the Farmers' association it
was decided to recommend legislation to
secure the creation of a state board.
The weight of opinion at the recent
Vermont dairymen's convention seemed
to be that warming water fes* stock pays
well, except where warm spring or well
water is supplied in warm stables.
Napoleon Homestead: A party of four
representing a colony of 2i families of
German-Austrians, have been in this lo­
cality this week seeking a location for
their colony. Wo understand that they
were successful in finding land to suit
them, tnd went away well pleased, and
will return in one week to decide upon
their permanent settlement. We are
glitd to report such a boom in immigra­
tion- By those parties settling in Logan
county, means that they will be followed
by many move of their people!
^JACOBSOH"
FOR TURFMEN.
AU THE PLEADING
O S E E N
USE NO OTHER KEMKDY.
For Sale by Druggists and Dealers.
THE CHARLES A. VOGELER CO.. Baltimore. Md.
SEVENTH
MEMORY
MARVELOUS
DISCOVERY.
Oily Granite 8y«te« (fHeaarr Training.
Four B*«ka Lcme4 ia we rnuUif.
Blind wuderinc cared.
Every child and adnlt (rmtly benefitted*
Great inducement* to Coneepondence Classes,
Proepeetni, with opinions of Dr. Win. A. Han.
lend, the world-famed Specialist in Mind Useuea
•aniel ftreenlenf Thompson, the treat Psychol-
Benjamin, and others, sent mat free by
Prof. I.OISKTTE, 231Fifth Are., N. Y.
WEAK, UNDEVELOPED PARTS
or THE HTTMAK BODY EHULBOED, DEVELOPED
STRENGTHENED, Etc., In «o interesting advertisementtonf
r.ttia our pa par. Ia reply to inquirSe* we wilUaj tbatthere
ft no cvidSuftc of l.tim'jsig cl-out Ou the contrary, tbe
iflvertixers
g»t u&led c«rru1ir«.
pAST
You should read TUBCHI­
CAGO
DAILY Nnwsbecausc
you can afford it. Pricc
doesn't stand in the way. It's
really the cheapest thing on
earth. One cent means prac­
tically nothing—until you spend
it. Then you may make it mean
a great deal, according as you
invest it. A thing is cheap if it
costs little, and is worth much.
THE DAILY NEWS isliUc a tele­
graph from the whole world to
your brain. To keep it in con­
stant working order costs you
but one cent a day. That's why
it's cheap—because it renders
a great service for an insignifi­
cant price.
day-
POINT
:i million a week—and it costs by mail
25
BLOBB ^1£W£I('
The new vegetablo remedy for the cure
of Dyspepsia, Indigestion. Siclc and Ner­
vous Headache, Female "Weakness. Rheu­
matism, Catarrh, Dropsy, Scrofula, Pimples
and Face Eruptions and Blood, Liver and
Kidney diseases. It purifies the blood and
through it acts upon all org-ans and tissues
of the body, and strengthens and builds up
the system while it eradicates disease. It
is the most economical blood purifier and
pleasant to take. Price SI Six bottles $0.
Prepared by J. W. COI,K & CO.,
Black Kiver Falls, Wis.
Sold by Druggists and Dealers in Medicine.
FOR SAI.K BY
BALDWIN & SMITH
ABSTRACTS OF
TITLE!
Of any pieces of Keal
Estate in StutsjiiaT
county furnished, on
short notice.
L. B. MINES.,
(Room 2 Doolittle Block.)
Jamestown, Dakota.
'hte!.'.y{ Jorcfl. Interested peraoDStn*y
EUIVXEUKAL C«., 6 3*
Mi? a. 1 tr.fticulqrw, by writing to tbt
St.. P-uffclo, K. Y.—Toledo Dally 3^
Great English Remedy.
Hs*- Murray's Specific.
A guaranteed euro for all nervous
diseases, sueli us Weak Memory,
Loss of Brain Power, Ilvsteria
Headache, I'ain in the
ii
u:k, Xer
vous prostration. Wakefulness
I.ucorrliha-a,universal Lassitude
Seminal Weakness, Impotenc
and general loss of
jtower
of
ALL PRECEDENT
th
r^-." T^Wnp. GenerativeOrgans In eitliersex
caused lv indiscretion or overexertion, and
wh'.cli ultimately lead'to PreinatureJOld A«e, In
sanity and Consumption. ?1 .(*' a Trade Hark.
lox, or six boxes for .?r.00. fent
by mail on receipt of price. Full
particulars in pamphlet, sent free
to every applicant.
We Guarantee Six lloxen
cure any case. For every 95
order received, we send six boxes
with a wiitlen Ktiarimlce to re­
fund the money if our K|ieelie
Does not effect a cure. After Ttkingt
at
Address all communications to the Sole Mariu
facturers, THK MUEBAV MWUCIKK CO.,
.Kansas City, Mo.
Sold iii Jamestown by
WONN^NBERG WIS
OBIN "W. FBAKCT8 H. O. SOUTHABD.
FRANCIS & SOUTHARD,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. -f.
FARGO. DAK.
Attention given to Land Office
matters.
Roomfi 1,2 and 3. Bed River Bank
Building.
Over Two Million Dis rilrateil.
Louisiana State Lottery Company
Incorporated by the Legislature, for Kiluca
tional and charitable purposes, ami Its franchise
niitde a part of the present. State Constitution,
in 1879, by an overwhelming popular vote.
Its (litAN1) EXTRAORDINARY
Dli.VWlXGS take place Scml-Aimuully,
^.June and December), and it* GilAND
SINGI.K Nl'.UISKK DRAWINGS take
place in each of the other ten moutlix of lie
year, ami
hit
all drawn in public, at llio
Academy of Music, New Orleans, La.
"We do hereby certify that we supervise the
arrangements lor all the Monthly and Kenii An
nual irawini:.s ol' The Louisiana State Lottery
company, auii in jierson manage and control the
drawing's iiiemsv.ive*, mul tii« sr.ii.c rc con­
ducted with howe.sty, fairness and in good faith
toward all parties, and we authorize the Compa­
ny to use this certificate, with fae similies of our
signatures attached, in its advertisements."
Commusionerri.
We the undersigned Banks and Hankers will
pay all prizes drawn in The Louisiana State Lot­
teries which may be presented at our counters.
R. WALMSLKV, Pres. I.U. N'at'l Ilk
PIERRE LANAtX. Pres. State N'at'l Ilk.
A. BALDWIN, Pres. New Orleans Nat Ilk
CARI. KOHN, Pres. Union National ltank.
MAMMOTH1PA
cts.
1 month, four monlhs Jr.oo,—one
cent a day.
TamW£K^\
WING
At the Academy of Music, New Orleans, Tues­
day, June is, lsSfl,
Cadital Prize, $600,000
100,0U0 Tickets at 840 Halves *20
Quarters !?10 Eighths So Twen­
tieths 82 Fortieths SI.
LIST OF PHIZES.
1 Vrue-'f
$1100.000
is..„
§000,000
1 Prize ol '.'00,000 is l'00,000
1 Prize of 100,000 is 100.000
1 Prize of .iO.OOO is
2 Prizes of 20.000 are '-iO.OCO
5 Prizes of 10,009 are 50 000
10 Prizes of ri.OiKt are fi0,00u
25 Prizes (-if 000 are 50,000
100 Prizes of NOO are 80.000
200 Prizes of 600 are li'O.OOO
500 Prizes of 400 are 2X1.000
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
100 Prizes of .91000 are
if
0,000
100 Prizes of SSOO are S3,000
100 Prizes of S-100 are 40.000
TWO N'I'MR.KJ! TKUMINAI.S.
1.998 Prizes of S-'OO are So'Jn,ii00
3,144 Prizes amounting to $S,15!),(00
AGENTS WANTED.
{3f~ Koit CI.UN Hates, or anv further infor­
mation desired, write legibly to the undersigned,
clearly stating your residence, witli State, Coun
tv. Street and'Xuinber. More rapid return mail
delivery will be assured by vour enclosing an
Envelope bearing your full address.
IMPORTANT.
Address M. A. DAUPHIN,
New Orleans, I.a.
Or M. A. DAUPHIN,
Washington, D. C.
liy ordinary letter, containing Money )rtl«*r
issued by a'll Express Companies, New York Kx
change, Draft, or Postal Note.
Address Registered Letters Containing
Money, to
NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL HANK,
New Orleans, La,
r^-REMEMRER, that the 'pavment of
Prizes is GUARANTEED BY FOUR NAT­
IONAL RANKS of New Orleans, and the
Tickets are signed by the President of an Inst!
tutlon, wnose chartered rights are recognized in
the highest Courts therefore, beware of any
imitations or anonymous schemes.
ONE DOLLAR is the price of the smallest
part or fraction of a ticket ISSUED BY US in
any drawing. Anything in our name offered for
less than a dollar is a swindle.
Northern Pacific
RAILROAD.
THE DIRECT LINE BETWEEN
ST. PAUL,
MINNEAPOLIS,
OB DULUTH
Minnesota, Dakota, Montana
Idaho, Washington Territory,
OREGON,
British Columbia, Puget Sound,
AND ALASKA.
Express Trains Daily, to which are attached
Pullman Palace Sleepers
AND ELEGANT DINING CAES.
No Change of Cars
BETWEEN
St. Paul and Portland,
ON ANY CLASS OF TICKET.
EMIGRANT SLEEPERS FREE.
The Only AU Rail Lin© to the
"YELLOWSTONE PARK,"
For all information as to Tline, Hates, etc..
Address
OH AS S. FEE,
General Pass. 4e't. St. Paul. Miun
LAKE SIDE FIRE ARMS MFG.
OOMPANT.
6f MAKKKET ST., CHICAGO, Ililj.
E O E S
SMITH & WESSON PATTERN,
38 Calibre.
Single Action, Shell Extracting.. .$5 0$
Double Action 6 ®0
Double Action, Self-Ejecting 7 60
Made of the best material, in the beet
possible manner. Every arm warranted.
Any of the above sent C. O. D. by Ex­
press, with privilege of examination be­
fore paying.
FOUR JiEW STATES.
South Dakota, North Dakota, Mon­
tana, Washington.
On February 25,1889, tile president signet] tlie
bill creat-injr South JJakoia, North Jhikota, Mon­
tana, and Washington, states of the Union.
South Dakota—The ft'i'ear. l'rairio State, to
which tin St. i'aul, Minneapolis & Manitoba
railway lias three main lines, reaching lCilen
dale, Aberdeen, Huron, Watertown, and Sioux
Kails. Go to South Dakota via the St. I'aul,
Minneapolis & Manitoba railway and pass
through St. I'aul and Minneapolis en route.
Xorth Dakota— Where Is grown the No. 1
Hard Seotcli Fife Wheat: whose, healthful cli­
mate nurtures the most vigorous and brainy civ­
ilization on earth where single counties raise
more wheat,oats and barley than entire stales:
the soil o? whose "fertile prairies is richer than
the valley of the Nile: where the Turtle Moun
tain, Miiiot a'.'d Devils I,:ike land districts invito
the home seeker to secure a free home. Magnifi­
cent daily train service to Fargo, Crand Forks,
(irafton. Devils Lake, liottineau, and all other
important points.
Montana, tlic Golden- Treasures in her
mines of precious metals: wealth in her-t.OOO.OOO
hfcad of live stock profit in her fertile fields,
.producing a larger yield of crops than any other
state or territory the richest country per
inhabitant on earth where prosperity is uni­
versal which has the best paid labor in the
world :i balmy, winter climate, caused liy
warm winds from the Pacific. The St.
I'aul, Minneapolis & .Manitoba railway is
the only railroad passing through continuous
agricultural country from St. Paul and Minne­
apolis to the llocky Mountains. It runs through
the Great Reservation of 18,000,000 acres of land,
free to settlers, in the Milk Kiver Valley. Wood,
water, and coal in abundance no irrigation re­
quired the only line passing through Great
Kalis, with its
1,000.1)00
Washington—The country of tall timber, in­
dented by Pugetl Sound, the Mediterranean of
the Pacific. Do not forget that the St. Paul,
Miimca)olis & Manitoba railway is the only line
which effers a choice of three routes to the Pa­
cific Coast. The Manitoba Pacific route is the
only line by whieli passengers en route for Ta
coma, Portland and San Francisco can pass
ig'
through Port Townsend and Seattle
in 1
IRail-^rety.
ANI THE FAMOUS
'Albert Lea Route-'
Two Through Trains Daily
From St. Paul and Minneapolis
To Chicago.
Without change, connecting with the fast trains
of ail lines for the
East and Southeast*
The Direct and Only Line Kunning Tlirou
Cars between
Minneapolis & DesMoines,
Via Albert Lea and and Fort Dodge.
DIRECT LINE TO WATERTOWN, DAKOTA.
2 SOLID THROUGH TRAINS 2
BKTW HEN
MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. LOUIS
And the Principal cities of Mississippi Valley
connecting in Union Depots witn all
points south and southwest.
MANY HOURS SAVED KSSSI
two trains daily to Leav- 1/ A MC A i'l
enworth and Atchison, fVrYi'OrlO v^.1 1
making connections with the Union Pacific and
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railways.
Close
J. R. WINSLOW,
-DEALER IN—
Lath, Sash, Doors, Mouldings,
Building Paper, Etc., Etc.
)fticc and
tards,
Mk Jamestown.- "A" Patent, Golden Northwest
Gull River Lumber Co.
A N A S A N E A E S I
Lumber, Shingles^Sash, Doors, &c
IVIilis at Cui! River, Minnesota.
Office and Yard—North Side, near N. P.
Elevator Co
horse power cataracts
iimnehse coal veins, and surrounding farming
country of free land through Helena, the capi­
tal city and commercial center of Montana, and
Butte, ttie richest mining camp on earth, to San
Francisto by the Columbia River Valley, Port­
land and Shasta Koute, or Ogden. Utah, to Cal­
ifornia points. Kemember tins is the only line
running dining
cars, sleeping cars and free eoio
nist slee]ers of its own from St. Paul and Minne­
apolis to Great Falls, Helena and Butte. It is
also the shortest line to Butte.
connections made in Union Depots
with all trains of the St. Paul Minneapolis &
Manitoba. Northern Pacific, St. Paul & Duluth
railways, from and to all points north and north*
west.
1
E R.-
Main St., Oo. Northern DakGta levator.
JAMESTOWN
RUSSELL, MILLER MILLING COMPANY, Proprietors
Manufacturers of FLOUR AND FEED.
THE CELEBRATED BRANDS:
EDGAR W. CAMP,
ATTORNFV
And Counselor at Law.
OFFICE IN DOOLITTLK BLOCK,
JAMESTOWN DAK
The CHICAGO,
MILWAUKEE
& ST. PAUL
ZRa±l"^A7r"a y"..
I N N
NORTHFIELO
FARIBAULT
tSAULT
Free colo-
uist sleepers run through without change or de­
lay. Distance to Pacific coast is same as by
other lines, but prices of tickets are five and ten
tpi
dollars leSc. Take the Seattle route.
For further information, maps, rates and pub­
lications in regard to the resources of the Tour
new states, write or apply to F.I. W'ifitnky,
Gen'l Iv.ss. and Ticket Agent, St. P.. M. & M.
Ky St. Paul,Minn.
MINNEAPOLIS & ST. LOUIS
in
lvClVi L.m DCrlx. a polls & St. Louis railway
are composed of Comfortable Coaches, 51
agnifi
cent Pullman Sleeping Cars, Horton Reclining
Chair Cars, and our lustlv celebrated
PALACE DINING CARS!
ISO lbs of Baggage Checked I'RF.K. Fare al­
ways as low as trie lowest. For Time Tables,
Through Tickets, etc., call upon the nearest
Tickest Agent, or write to
C. H. HOLDRIDGE.
Gen'l Ticket and Pass. Agent,
Minnauoiis Minn.
1-1113
O
AV*ond
£/& ^1
cnfcatO,.CWAT0NNA
DELAWARE
v, MONTICEILO
ANAMO
OVW«A
6ICOURNEY
vTTUMW
'-SEYMOU
1-VJisdtfi
direct Route
&ST°odV^ST
HILUCOTM
IAWSON
N
EXCELSIOR 6PR*8
KANSAS CI
tSoUth'
For tickets, time tables, or any information in
regard to the line, apply to auy ticket agent in
the Northwest, or to W. H.DIXON, Assistant
General Passenger Agent, 162 East Third street,
St. Paul, Minn.
ROSWELL MILLER,
General Manager.
J. F. TUCKER,
Assistant General Manager.
A. V. H. CARPENTER,
Gen'l Pass. A Tkt. Agt
GEO. H. HEAFFOKD,
Ass't Gen'l Pass. & Tk't Agt.
II flTf1A from tlie diary oftour
IV11 I |"V ists, commercial travel
IIU I LU era, business men and
others has revealed:
That the Wisconsin Central has the
unqualified endorsement of all
That the Wisconsin Central has today
the most popular line between Minne­
apolis, St. Paul and Milwaukee and
Chicago 2
That the Wisconsin Central is daily
adding to its admirers as the recognized
Pullman line between Minneapolis,
St. Paul and Milwaukee and Chica-
IThat the Wisconsin Central touches
the most prominent points in Wisconsin,
and that it has more important business
Tenterf on its through line than any
other railway in the Northwest
That the Wisconsin Central has made
t»n enviable ieputation with its peerless
Dining Car Service
That the Wisconsin Central runs fast
trains on which all classes of passengers
are carried with commodious and distinct
accommodation for all
That the Wisconsin Central has rep­
resentatives distributed throughout the
country, who will cheerfully give any in­
formation that may be desired, and that
its terminal agents are specially instruct­
ed to look after the comfort of passengers
who may bo routed via its line.
For detailed information, apply to your
nearest Ticket Agent or to representa­
tives of the road.
Win S. Mellen James Barker,
General Manager, Gen. Tkt. Pass
.Agt.
Louis Eckstein,
As«t. Genl. Passr. & Tkt. Agt.
M1LMAUKEE, WIS.
F. H. ANSON,
Xortliirrnterti PfUixenger^Ageiit.
SUBSCRIBE FOR THE
DAILY ALERT

xml | txt