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Jamestown weekly alert. [volume] (Jamestown, Stutsman County, D.T. [N.D.]) 1882-1925, September 03, 1891, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042405/1891-09-03/ed-1/seq-3/

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4
I
LOADING A BIG LINER
HOW STEVEDORES DO THE WORK
OF PLACING THE CARGO.
The Fast Steamer# Suve a Good Deal by
tlrlnging Coal front the Other Side In
Sailing Vessels—Importance of Careful
Loading to a Pnit Steamer.
Did you ever note the fact that one of
the great transatlantic greyhounds sel­
dom remains in port more than a week?
During that short time she is unloaded
and loaded, which, in the case of a ves­
sel like the Majestic or the City of New
York, means the handling of some 15,000
tons of cargo and coal.
Almost all the British steamships send
over the coal to be burned in the east­
ward passage in sailing vessels, only
shipping enough in Liverpool for the
western run. Thus tlioy have more
hold room for freight, for which they get
more money than it costs to send over
coal by sail.
This work of loading a vessel eannot
be done without extreme care. The very
safety in an ocean monster depends in
a great measure on the manner in which
her cargo is stowed.
Nothing is more dangerous to a vessel
than to have its cargo shift in rough
weather, and hence only experienced
men are engaged in the stevedore busi­
ness. The stevedore therefore does not
regard himself as an ordinary laborer
but as a skilled workman. To load and
unload a cargo properly is an art, for a
vessel may be strained in unloading as
well as in loading.
Then, again, the bad loading of a
vessel may not only delay the voyage of
a greyhound, but it may cause her to
labor and roll to such an extent as to
render every passenger on board sea­
sick.
HOW THE WORK IS DISTRIBUTED.
The distribution of weight so that no
undae strain be sustained by the iron
hull of the vessel is the problem that
can be seen successfully solved every day
by one curious enough to spend an hour
on the docks of the great transatlantic
ship companies which dot the North
river up to Twenty-sixth street. The
process is an interesting one.
The boss stevedore, who is responsible
for the carrying on of the work, stations
at each hatch and side port a gang of
men. The gang consists of from ten to
twenty men, the number varying with
the size of the vessel, the character of
the goods to be handled and the distance
they have to be moved.
Each gang is in charge of a "leader."
He receives five cents an hour more than
the men under him when the work is
paid for by the hour, the men receiving
thirty to forty cents an hour for day
work and about sixty cents for night
work.
There is also over the men a foreman,
who is paid by the week and receives
from twenty to thirty dollars, and an
assistant foreman, who is paid by the
time worked. The master stevedore
maps out the duties of each and is re­
sponsible for any mistakes made in stow
ing the cargo.
The duties of the master stevedore are
by no means light, when one considers
the varied character of the goods shipped
daily across the Atlantic. He has to see
that goods are not stowed together
which are likely to injure one another,
and that space is found for everything
that comes along np to the utmost ca­
pacity of the ship.
PAYING FOlt THE WORK.
The duties of the foreman relate to
seeing that the goods are so stowed that
the cargo cannot shift, and that the roll­
ing of the vessel will not damage any
part of it.
The stowing of the vessels of the
White Star, North German Lloyds, the
Inman, Guion and Hull lines is done
under the control of the company. That
of the other lines by contract with mas­
ter stevedores. Some companies pay by
the ton, and others by the package.
When the payment is by the ton the
English ton of 2,240 pounds is the unit
of weight. Light goods which have lit­
tle weight, but take up considerable
space, are paid at so much per forty
cubic feet handled.
Among stevedores cotton is regarded
as the hardest to stow, and railroad iron
as the easiest. The iron rails are laid
across the keel diagonally, and are said
to strengthen the hull.
When the cargo of a liner outward
bound from New York is properly
stowed, she will roll comparatively lit­
tle, as the steerage is largely given up
to cargo. Coming from the other side
the case is reversed. Then the entire
steerage is occupied by passengers, with
the result in rough weather that the ves­
sel will often roll her lee rail almost Tin­
der.—New York Recorder.
Behind the Scenes.
I got back of the scenes in a Detroit
family not long ago, and 1 have ever
since been cogitating as to whether it is
not better to be self respectful than to
have undue pride. This family was
keeping up appearances at the cost of
real comfort. It occupies an excellent
social position, which it has held for
years, but the family income is not 6uch
as to make it easy to be both presentable
and well fed.
As a consequence, while a dinner is
now and then given to friends the fam­
ily fare is very scanty, and while there
is good clothing to wear for state occa­
sions, this is carefully preserved, and
when no one is about shabbiness is the
rule. It seems to me that it is wiser and
more dignified for one to accept his cir­
cumstances as they come to him, and not
attempt to lead a $10,000 life on a $2,000
Income.—Detroit Free Press.
Til* 'Ijrpewrllwr rouaner.
Among small inventions is an app»
ratas for cleansing the type in typewrit­
ers. It consists of a revolving brush
that can be attached to the machine,
and which operates parallel with the
typo bars. The type is not only cleansed,
but polished, and the work is said to be
more quickly accomplished than by the
•ordinary hanlbrash method.-
ii
TWO
ALTERNATIVES.
4 Shrewd Young Man OhooMa An
fair but the Expensive One.
A young man came to this city some
time ago with no capital, but with an
experienced and expert knack of getting
rid of money. Ho brought letters in
troducing him to the favorable attention
of several rich and influential New York
business men. His relatives in the west
—persons of good social standing and
some means—were very glad to grant
such courtesies to liiin in consideration
of his departure from their immediate
neighborhood. IIo hud proved an ex
pensive indulgence for them.
One of the gentlemen upon whom the
young man called
WHS
The young man was not thin skinned,
and this letter did not offend him. He
smiled as he read the closing sentence,
and stepping into the office of a friendly
broker, lie penned the following note:
RESPECTED Snt—Accept my cordial thanks
for your kindness. Of the two alternatives
that you sugRcst I am obliged to accept tho
latter. I shall ceaso drawing checks on your
bank. With kindest regards, etc.
The kind hearted bank president was
somewhat nonplussed by this reply, .and
he showed the note to his cashier. That
practical functionary looked over his
gold rimmed glasses at his superior and
said: "Umpli! well, that is pretty slick.
But yon
have
got. rid of him cheaper
than 1 t.hm' von would."—New York
Times
What Vertigo Comes From.
One of the principal causes of the
more serious forms of vertigo, or dizzi­
ness, is a diseased condition of the in­
most portion of the ear, the labyrinth.
Vertigo
of
result
greater or less severity may
from
pressure,
whatever disturbs the blood
either
within the labyrinth or
in the middle ear. Similar effects are
also produced by false impressions re­
ceived through the eye, or through the
sense of touch, and by disease of the
spinal cord.
Since the great nerve which goes to
the stomach is at its cerebral center inti­
mately associated with the auditory
nerve, disturbance of the stomach may
cause the vertigo, and ou the other hand,
a disturbance of the auditory nerve may
occasion nausea or vomiting. Vertigo
is sometimes brought on by paralysis of
a single muscle of the eye, or even by
the temporary weakness of an overtaxed
ocular muscle.
The form of vertigo now known as
"Meniere's disease" is that form which
the famous Dean Swift suffered, and
under which he often appeared like a
staggering drunkard. The patient on
rising in the morning feels as if the
room were whirling round, or as if he
were floating or sinking. Sometimes he
falls when attacked, but he never loses
consciousness. There are noises—some­
times quite loud—in the ear and more
or less deafness. There may be also
faintness and vomiting. The attacks in­
cline to be repeated with increasing fre­
quency. In the intervals, however, the
patient remains welL—Youth's Com­
panion.
Those New Net Dren-wa.
"Have you seen the new net dresses?
I don't like them, they are two com­
municative."
"Why, for pity's sake, what do you
mean
"Just what I say, they are too com­
municative. You buy one, and see what
a fix you will be in. 1 have one, and
every time I put it on I wish 1 never had
been born. Everything sticks to it. If
you sit on the beach when you get up
yon are covered with shells, minnows,
dirt. If you chat confidentially with a
young man and get interested and sit a
little near him, the wool from his suit
clings to the netting, and every one of
your friends knows right away with
whom you have been spending your
time. Oh, they are horrid things! The
merchants are advertising them big, but
I wouldn't have another for any money."
The speakers were two women ravag­
ing the Broadway dry goods stores for
wardrobes for a season at Newport.—
New York Recorder.
Contagious Disease.
Individual resistance to contagion is
none the less remarkable. A physician
or nurse will be brought into the most
intimate contact with a case of contagi­
ous disease without contracting it, while
the same patient may communicate it to
a person passing him in the street, in the
early stages of his trouble, before it has
developed sufficiently to cause any
alarm. We have known of a most ma­
lignant attack of diphtheria communi­
cated to a druggist by a person calling
at the store before his disease had fully
developed itself and a lady suffering
from the mumps succeeded in communi­
cating them to a sympathizing neighbor
who stopped for a moment at the door
to inquire after her health, while other
members of the family residing in the
same house remained unaffected.
a
the president of a
flourishing down town bank. This bank
president had been tho intimato friend
of the young man's father, and, without
thinking of tho consequences, be offered
to do anything in his power to advance
the interests of the son of his old friend.
The young man had "a business scheme"
in his head and he Wanted credit at the
bank until his expected remittances ar
rived. Tho hank president told him
that he might draw up to $1,000.
The checks came in promptly for large
and small amounts until the young
man's overdrawn account amounted to
$1,150. The hard headed cashier then
went to tho president and suggested
that tho bank ought to have some col­
lateral. He frankly admitted that he
had no confidence in either the young
man's schemes or his intentions. The
president saw the force of his cashier's
suggestion, but, still chary of offending
his old friend's son, lie wrote a personal
letter to the young man, saying:
MY DK.'.II YOUNG FRIEND—It has been a
pleasure for mo to accommodate you with a
small lino of credit at tho bank. Sufficient
time, however, lias ehipscd, I think, to enable
you to realize ou your own resources, and 1
trust that you are now «blo to mako a settle­
ment. In fact, 1 am constrained to say that
you must either make your account good or
ceaso drawiutr checks o« the bank.
Mow One Regimental Pet IVas Secured.
The Ninety-fifth Derbyshire (now the
Second Battalion Derbyshire regiment),
possessed at one time a highly prized
pet. It was on the 80th of March, 1858,
that Major and Brevet Lieutenant Col­
onel Raines of the Ninety-fifth foot, led
the third assaulting column at the Capture
of Kotah, and important fortified city of
Rajpootana. The assault had proved
successful Kotah was taken, and the
Ninety-fifth, under Colonel Raines, was
engaged in clearing the streets, when a
private of the Grenadier company no­
ticed a fine black ram tethered in a
garden.
It was a magnificent animal, with
enormous curved horns—one, in fact, of
tho famous breed of Rajpootana "fight­
ing ram." Colonel Raines' attention be­
ing drawn to this ram, it struck him
how very well it would look marching
at the head of the Ninety-fifth: so, as
there was no actual fighting going on at
th«it moment, he ordered the Grenadier
to take possession of the animal.
The order was readily oheved, and
thus the Ninety-fifth acquired this hand­
some representation of tkeir county
badge (tho "Derby Ram"), for the ram
proved a willing prisoner, showing not
the slightest disposition to resent his
compulsory enlistment into her Britan­
nic majesty's service. The Ninety-fifth
highly approved of their prize. The
ram was forthwith dubbed "Derby I,"
and handed over to the cure of the big
drummer, who from that time became
his "comrade."—London Art Journal.
Chill's Curious Currency.
The money of Chili at present is pe­
culiar. It consists of small tags of
pasteboard, on which a man writes the
value for which he is willing to redeem
it, putting his name on the back. It
then begin,3 to circulate, unt.il it finally
gets back to the source from which it
emanated.—Boston Traveler.
CCpvpiGHTtl®*"
What's that? A new inventio
which works all the year round
iii-jirisin'—these days are not lik
n!(l times. Bleedin' wns i!
•:Iy remedy them days. But r.
}*ou say, Dr. Pierce's
ilcdical Discovery is a true rc-i::i\.
for the blood."
It's not like the sarsaparillas, t:
arc said to be trood for tho 1
March, April and Jlav.
^Golden Medical Discovery"
equally well at all times, in a I!
^ons and in all cases of bloorl-tu
humors, no matter what Uk
name or nature.
"Golden Medical Discoveryv
tho only Blood and Liver
by druggists, (juarnntn
benefit or cure in every cast, I
trial, or money paid for
bo promptly refunded.
Dispensary Medical Assncist i-1
Proprietors, No. 663 Main Stive
Buffalo, N. Y.
Jealer
Ask my agents for W. L. Deaglas Shoes,
not for Mile In yoar place ask yonr
to send for catalogue, secare the
agency, and get them for yoa.
EVTAKE NO SUBSTITUTE. -«J
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE
I 84.00 nnil 91.73 school shoes
.worn by the boys everywhere they sell
on their merits, ns the Increasing sales show.
I j|H jae S3.00, Ilniul-sewed shoe, best
I rJr® Dongola, very stylish equals French
imported shoes costing from $4.00 to $6.00.
1.mlies' si.SO, S'J.OO nnil 91.93 shoe for
Misses are the best flne Dongola. Stylish aud durable.
('tuition*—See that \V. L. Douglas' name aud
price are stamped on the bottom of each shoe.
\V. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton* Mass.
Sold by GKRIFFUST
4
gY|ojKftt!
GFirst
CEftlfPSviEN
THE BEST SHOE IN THE WORLD FOR THE MONEY?
It Is a seamless shoe, with no tacks or wax thread
to hurt the feet made of the best flne calf, stylish
ana easy, and because tee make more shoes or this
grade than any other mamtfacturer. It equals hand
sewed shoes costing from $4.00 to 85.00.
CB OO Genuine llandsewcd, the finest calf
shoe ever offered for $5.00 equals French
Imported shoes which cost from $8.00 to $12.00.
CA OO Ilnntl-Sewcil Welt Shoe, flne calf,
stylish, comfortable and durable. The best
shoe ever offered at this price same grade as cus­
tom-made shoes costing from $6.00 to $9.00.
C4 30 l'ollce SlmiM Farmers, Railroad Men
Nrws and LetterCarrursall wear them flnecaif,
seamless, smooth inside, lieavy three soles, exten­
sion edge. One pair will wear a year.
CO 30 fine cnll'i no better shoe ever offered at
this price one trial will convince those
who want a shoe for comfort nnd service.
SO niul S'J.OO Workliigman's shoes
are very strong and durable. Those who
have given them a trial will wear no other make.
JsCO
ALFRED STEEL,
ElilFINMCIM.
AGE3STT.
Jamestown, N. D.
Fire, Cyclone, Life, Accident and Plate Glass
Insurance. Loans lor Long or Short
Time.
S
ONG ENJOYS
Both the method and results when
Syrup of Figs is taken It Is pleasant
and refreshing to the taste, and acts
gently yet promptly on the Kidneys,
Liver and Bowels, cleanses the sys­
tem effectually, dis^ls colds, head­
aches and fevers and cures habitual
constipation. 8vrup of Figs is the
only remedy^ of its kind ever pro­
duced, pleasing to the taste and ac­
ceptable to the stomach, prompt in
its action and truly beneficial in its
effects, prepared only from the most
healthy ana agreeable substances, its
many excellent qualities commend it
to all and have made it the most
popular remedy known.
Syrup of Figs is for sale in 50c
and $1 bottles by all leading drug­
gists. Any reliable druggist who
may not have it on hand will pro­
cure it promptly for any one who
wishes to try it. Do not accept any
substitute.
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
FRANCISCO, CAL.
LOUISVILLE, K/. NEVJ YORK. N.V
SECRET SOC1ETV DIRECTORY.
KT.—Wilialia
R1st
Comniawlery, No. 4, regular
meetings second Thursday of each month.
!•:. ,r. sch\vklu:nbacii, e. e.
J. ,T. Eddy, KecortliT.
A. M.—
Jamestown Chapter, No. 6, meets
and 3d Monday evenmirs each month.
AmeetsA.
K. A. Bill, Secretary.
I•
O. O. F.—Jamestown Lodge No. 8, meets
every Thursday evening, at 8:00.
OS I AH CAltTER, N. G.
A. B. Ashley, Kec. Secretary.
AO.
U. W.—Ft. Seward Lodge No. 16,
meets cverv Friday evening, at 7:30.
A. BLEWETT.il. AV.
C. It. Flint, Recorder.
Kevery
of II.—Jamestown Lodge No. 3"09, meets
Monday evening, .it 8:00.
J.C. WAliNOCK, Dictator.
W. B. Parish, Reporter.
A It.—W. II. Seward Tost No. 8. meets
and Third Tuesday evenings, of each
montli. F. BIGELOW, Commander.
H. J. Porter, Adjutant.
Wmeets
it. C.—Win. II. Seward Corps No.
2nd and 4th Tuesday evenings each
month. ELIZABETH STETSON, President.
Mrs. F. Bigelow, Secretary.
TO.
G. T.—Jamestown Lodge No. 14, meets
every Tuesday evening, in Odd Fellows
liall. J. E. ANDERSON, C. T.
V. L. Bennett, Secretary.
FA.—Jamestown
B.<p></p>THE
T. F. Bit ASCII, M. E. H. P.
J. J. Eddy, Secretary.
F. & M.— Jamestown Lodge No. 5,
1st and 3d Wednesday evenings
each
month. T. V. UKANCH, \V. iM.
J.J. Eddy, Secretary.
E. S.—Lady Washington Chapter No. 8,
meets 2d and Itli Fndav evenings
rungs of each
month. ELIZABETH WHITE, W. M.
Farmers Alliance No. 2,
meets first and third Saturdays of each
month. CLINTON WADE, President.
J. W. Goodrich, Secretary.
ROBERT UNDBLOM & CO.
GRAIN
-AND-
PROVISION BROKERS.
Room 13-15, Board ot Trade
CHICAGO.
Northwestern Business Specialty
Solicited.
ATTENTION.
Is directed to the Wisconsin Central Lines as
the direct route to and from Milwaukee,Chicago
and all points East and South. Two through
fast trains with Pullman Yestiluiled Drawing
Sleepers and the Central's famous Dining Cars
attached each way daily, between Minneapolis
and St. Paul and Milwaukee and Chicago.
For tickets, sleeping ear reservations, time
tables and other information, apply to any
ticket agent in the United States or Canada, or
at city offices, corner Washington and Nicollet
Avenues and 1G2 East 3rd Street. St, Paul, or to
F. II Anson, General Northwestern Passenger
Agent, Minneapolis, Minn.
Capital House,
The traveling public will
find good accommodations and
prices reasonable.
Good Sale and Feed Stable in
Connection.
Attentive Hostler day and
niglit.
G. W. Ingiaham, Prop'r
inu
P. WELLS,
Pres.<p></p>JAMES
Elevator Co.
Loans and Collections. 1
Steamship and R. R. Tickets. I
Taxes Paid for Xon-Residents.
Grain and Stock Farms Managed
C*L
i.\ ink uail\ =jr
All?.
WEEKLY ALERT
always Brings Prompt Returns. Ii yon want
to Bit or Sell Anything.wish to Rent l\op
erty or Secure uelp try The Alert's columns.
il1
SANTA CLAU5 SOAP
Tliere'sbanksof violets, Banks of njoaa,
Aijd b&fiks w^ere iriirjers grope
Af|dbdJ)kS
tl)*t liMidle golden coiq,
""FAIRBANK wknTHE BEST SOAP.
^SatoClausSM!
W. LLOl'D, Pres't. I. McK. LLOYD, Vice I'res't. .T. M. LLOYD, Casli'r
THE LLOYD'S NATIONAL BANK,
L.---- if
JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA.
PAID UP CAPITAL, $100,000.00
DO A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS.
JNO.
S.<p></p>RIVER
WATSON, Vice
Pres.<p></p>NATIONAL
JAMESTOWN, DAKOTA.
Paid Up Capital, $50,000
SURPLUS, $5,000.
Qeneral Banking and Exchange Business Pone
GULL RIVER LUMBER CO.,
MANUFAOTUREivS
AND
Lath, Lumber, Shingles, Doors,
COAL, WOOD, LIME, BRICK, ETC.
Mills at Gull River, Minnesota.
Office and Yard—North Side, near the N.
M.C. Groodsill & Co.,
(Successors to Geo. R. Topliff & Company,)
—DEALERS IX—
WOOD, LIME, CEMENT, BRIOK, HAIR AND PLASTER
Anthracite, Bituminus and Smithing Coals,
Agents for Acme Cement Wall Plaster, Patent Stone Chimr.eiis
Curbing, Pipe, Etc,
JAMESTOWN
BUSSELl. MILLER MILLING GCMMNY, Proprietors
Manufacturers of FLOUR AND FEED.
THE CELEBRATED BRANDS:
!lle
of Jamestown. "A" Patent, (.oio'en iiiortliwest
Insurance, Real Estate, Final Proofs,
HOUSES FOR RENT.
W. B. S. TEIMBLE.
YOUR NEIGHBOR
I
I
Geo. I.. WEBSTER,
DEALERS
I AMCQTflWkl
UMIYILOTOWN.
To Subscribe for THE WEEKLY ALERT.
fWlt prints more News of all kinds than any Weekly paper in the state—for $2.00
CATA
THE POSITIVE CURE.
I ELY BROTHERS. 68 Warren rricesoctgj
I UfVN
NORTH DAKOTA.
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BANK,
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