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Jamestown weekly alert. [volume] (Jamestown, Stutsman County, D.T. [N.D.]) 1882-1925, December 07, 1893, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042405/1893-12-07/ed-1/seq-6/

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CHRISTIAN WORKERS
ATLANTA ENTERTAINS AN IMPOR­
TANT EVANGELICAL CONVENTION.
Delegates l'rom All l'urt* of tlie Civili/oil
Worlil—Okjertu anil l«lhnilsof th« So­
ciety—Previous Convent Ions—Governor
Nortlim'a Zealous Work.
The eighth animal convention of the
International Christiun Workers' associ­
ation meets iu Atlanta this month, am*
judging from the history of its previous
conventions, ought to confer incalculable
benefit upon that enterprising and hos­
pitable southern city. The first of these
conventions was held in Chicago in 1886,
the next in New York city in 1887, and
the following ones respectively in Detroit
in 1888, Buffalo in 1889, Hartford in
1880, Washington in 1891 and Boston iu
1892. The good effected by the meetings
was plainly noticeable in all these cities,
the number of conversions ascribable to
the immediate influence of the Boston
convention alone being estimated at up­
ward of 50,000. It is perfectly reason­
able to predict similar results for At­
lanta and the south.
The Christian workers embraced with­
in the membership of this association be­
long to all denominations and come from
nearly every part of the world. Dele­
gates will be present in Atlanta from all
sections of the United States. Canada,
England, Scotland, India and South Af­
rica, among them some of the most
prominent evangelists of modern times.
The object of the conventions is the
practical exposition of the diverse means
by which Christian workers, men and
women, have been instrumental in win­
ning souls to seek salvation in Christ.
fIn
K1
GOVERNOR NORTHEX.
Pastors enjoy at these meetings especial
opportunities of studying the methods
of those most successful in evangelical
work.
The convention is made up of the most
refined and cultured religious men and
women, and includes men of world wide
renown as ministers, lawyers, physi­
cians, bankers, merchants, and other
professions and callings. More than 800
of them come from the north and Can­
ada, New England being specially well
represented, but of course the large ma­
jority of the delegates are from the
south.
Atlanta has opened wide her gates and
stretched her proverbial hospitality to
its greatest limits to accommodate and
entertain the attendants at the conven­
tion. Sectional and sectarian lines have
been entirely obliterated, and the open
hearted Georgians have gone about pro­
viding for their guests as though they
realized that they might be entertaining
angels unaware. The practical bless­
ing of increased prosperity should wait
on her lavish liberality, and it is not at
all improbable that good results may be
traced to this convention later on from
a material as well as from a purely spir­
itual standpoint.
There is little doubt that many of the
visitors to the convention will be in­
duced to stay or to return and make
their homes in Atlanta. The genial cli­
mate of the city would be sufficiently at­
tractive in itself to insure such a result
even without the spirit of enterprise
that will surprise and captivate north­
ern men. Atlanta is no laggard in the
path of progress, nor are her citizens
blind to their own best interests. The
most prominent of them have made
strenuous efforts for the benefit of the
delegates to the convention, feeling that
it was a duty they owed their guests and
that they were thereby doing what was
also best for themselves.
The invitation to the convention was
extended through the governor of Geor­
gia, the mayor of Atlanta and the board
of trade of the city, and each and all of
them have exerted themselves to the ut­
most to convince their guests they made
no mistake in accepting it. Governor
Nortlien was especially active. He had
a personal interest in the matter as well
as an official one, uniting the earnest
Christian and the chief executive and
working tirelessly in both capacities.
All the meetings of the committees on
preliminaries were held at the executive
mansion, and the governor acted as
chairman of the local board. To him
much credit is due for the success of the
convention, nor should the delegates for­
get the hearty co-operation of Mr. D. E.
Luther, the chairman of the entertain­
ment committee, and Rev. J. C. Collins of
New Haven, the international secretary.
Governor Nortlien is doinggood work
for Georgia and winning the hearty ap­
proval of the people of his state without
regard to party lines. He is recognized
as an upright, dignified and consistent
chief magistrate and esteemed as a safe
and conservative leader. His independ­
ence of judgment and firm adherence to
what he believes to be correct principles
command the respect even of those who
«lo not see things as he does.
The
dignified
and courteous manner in
which he refused to attend a banquet
given to Jay Gould by citizens of Atlan­
ta illustrates the quality of the man.
His letters of explanation set forth that
Mr. Gould'* visit was not of a character
entitling
it
to official recognition and
Mr. Gould's business methods were not
of a kind entitling him to personal con­
sideration. and therefore the governor
must decline to meet him.
C. F. TREDWAY.
THE NEAV CONGRESS.
SOW THE COUNTRY WAS STIRRED
BY THE HAWAIIAN INCIDENT.
Will CoiiKreiut I'phold the Kxecutive?—Th»t
Well Worn (iulteiiu Curse Again-'The
President lias No Bodyguard—General
Capital Giwsip.
WASHINGTON,
Congress la
the
Dec. 1. [Special.]
with us
again. Once more the
legislative wheels are to
The
he
set
tariff question nnd
attention. They think
in motion.
Hawaii are to be
chief topics of interest for
come.
a
Home
time to
Even the tariff lias been completely
overshadowed for Beveral weeks
complications in the Hawaiian
The old adage that party lines
man
by the
kingdom.
are of no
consequence in international matters
does
not hold good in this case, for the Repub­
licans to
are up in arms against
the administration programme.
people have bmi puzzled to know
Some
why the
incident in Hawaii should attract
so much
it has
the
which to a
every man in
been
ed in the pivsi-' far beyond
exploit­
its
importance.
They point to the fact that the population
of
entire Hawaiian kingdom is
great as that of one
not as
of
our fourth
cities, while the wealth
exceeded by that of many of
class
of
the
islands
is
our large and
prosperous agricultural counties.
It
the importance of the incident,
is
not
but the sen­
timent of it, that has caused the people for
the time being to overlook even
the
tariff,
greater or less extent
interests
the
country, directly
on
and
financially. It is always so with our for­
eign incidents. Our little brush with Chili,
which brought
a possibility
of war,
stirred the aountry to its depths. Wash­
ington was all excitement. Every other
man here wanted to go to war. So it was,
too, when we had
a
row with the Italian
government concerning the lynchings
in
New Orleans. The slightest speck of trou­
ble on the foreign horizon always causes
our people to prick up their ears.
l'robable Action of Congress.
No one can tell what congress will do in
the Hawaiian matter. There is no longer
talk of impeaching the president or pur­
suing any such extreme course as that
which was advocated by a few hot heads.
If President Cleveland insists upon au­
thority from congress to coerce the Hawai
ians into restoration of the queen, he is
not likely to get it. The house, with its
large Democratic majority, would doubt­
less support the president's policy, but the
best observers here doubt if the senate
would follow suit. The Democratic ma­
jority in the senate is very slender, and
with quite a number of Democratic sena­
tors the administration is not on good
terms. Several of these Democrats have
already expressed themselves in opposition
to the administration's Hawaiian policy.
What we in Washington are expecting is
a committee of inquiry from the senate,
or something of that sort. Whatever ac­
tion is taken by congress is not likely to
be of an extreme nature, for the general
instinct of congress is to uphold the exec­
utive in his dealings with foreign nations.
There have been but few exceptions to
this rule in our history.
A Washington paper calls attention to
the fact thatGuiteau'scurseupon the jury
and all the men who had anything to do
with his conviction, which he delivered
with so much fierceness in the courtroom,
has not been followed by any dire effects
upon the men against whom it was aimed.
Of course a number of the persons who fig­
ured conspicuously in the trial have died,
but all from natural causes. The only in­
stance in which anything like a tragedy
has occurred in the careers of the men at
whom the assassin leveled his curses is
that of Juryman Michael Sheehan, who
has been incarcerated in an insane asylum
for several years, where he will doubtless
remain as long as he lives. Another of the
jurors has died, but the remaining 10 are
in good health and are enjoying a fair
share of prosperity. One man connected
with the trial ended his life by suicide, it
is said, but he was Charles II. Reed, Gui
teau's counsel.
Dangerous Characters.
It is not generally known that the police
of Washington keep a number of men un­
der surveillance all the time for possible
protection of the life of the president of
the United States. At least four such
men are under constant watch in this city.
They .are not believed to be dangerous
characters and have no criminal inten­
tions, so far as is known. But they are
persons whose minds have become more
or less unbalanced, and who at times
evince a desire to see the president on some
imaginary business. One of these sus­
pects is an old man, with a flowing white
beard and sad eyes. Every day while con­
gress is in session he goes to the capitol,
calls at that part of the senate lobby lo­
cated near the president's room and asks
the doorkeeper "if the president has come
up yet." Time and again he has been told
that the president does not come to the
capitoi except during the closing hours
of a congress, or once in two years. But
day after day the old man appears, always
making the same inquiry and always turn­
ing away without a word of comment
when the stereotyped explanation is re­
peated to him. He may be and probably
is innocent of any intention to do wrong,
but on the day the president, does visit the
capitol this old man will not be allowed
within the building, and the police have
him under their eye to such an extent that
if he were to attempt to enter the execu­
tive mansion he would be interfered with.
If not arrested, he would be coaxed away,
and then be warned not to return.
That Celebrated Bodyguard.
A
sensational story was printed some
lime ago to the effect that President Cleve­
land had employed a regular bodyguard
who was constantly by the side of the
president's person to protect him in case
of trouble. The only foundation for the
•tory is the fact that for about a week,
while still living at Woodley, bis country
place, the president asked to have an offi­
cer detailed to ride back and forth with
him to and from the White House. Po­
liceman Rhodes was detailed for this pur­
pose, and for a few days he rode on horse­
back in front of the president's carriage
along the lonely road from the city to
Woodley. When the president moved into
town, be had no further use for the
services
of his bodyguard, and Officer Rhodes is
new back on bis regular beat.
A submarine bridge is projected to
cross the bed of the strait of Oresnnd,
between Denmark and Sweden. It is to
be half tunnel and half tube, the latter
resting upon piles. It will be five miles
lonsr.
AN ASSISTANT SENATOR.
Unw Mrs. IVft'er A Id* Her Husband I«
tlio r«rfor.aaww «l It I« 1'nblUi Outlet).
Senator Peffer's wife is quite as much
of a politician in her way as her husband
ia in his, and is of the greatest assistance
to him in the performance of his duties
at the national
capital. She
does most of his
reading for him,
going through
the papers sys­
tematically. and
a in scrap
books of the ma­
terial that she
MRS. PEFFER. knows is likely to
be of service to him in his work. Her judg­
ment in such matters is unusually good,
for she takes a most ardent interest in
public affairs, and has done so from girl­
hood, when she used to read of them to
her father, as she has done for her hus­
band for many years.
Mrs. Peffer was born in Pennsylvania
in 1832. Her father, William Barker,
built the first paper mill in Cumberland
county, and about it grew up a small
settlement which was for a long time
known as Papertown, but which has
since assumed the more pretentious
name of Mount Holly Springs. There
Mrs. Peffer met her husband and mar­
ried him in 1852. They lived in several
western towns before finally locating in
Topeka, where their home now is, and
where two married daughters and two
unmarried sons remain when the sena­
tor's duties call him to the capital.
The unmarried daughter, Miss Nellie,
and the youngest son, Jacob, are with
their parents in Washington. The for­
mer is her father's secretary and clerk to
his committed and the latter is a page
in the senate, so that the whole house­
hold may be said to be as deeply inter­
ested in politics as the head of it. Mrs.
Peffer thinks it her duty to help her hus­
band look out for his constituents, but
fails to seo how that duty can be fur­
thered by attending the society "func­
tions" of Washington, so she does not at­
tend them, but confines her social inter­
course to receiving and returning the
call.* of those whom she sympathizes
with and likes. She is simply an unaf­
fected, motherly sori of woman, with
head full of good common sense.
In London there are 11,000 cabs, over
15,000 drivers and L'o.000 horses, and al­
together some 120.000 human beings de­
pend upon the cab industry.
Uacy was sicic, wr •»avt* ner C*/stA.1a
*h sue was a ('hiM, sh»» cried for Casto* ia
she Ixn'ame Miss, "lung to Castoria.
hoi she had Children sho iMvethem Custom
Children Cry for
Pitcher's Castoria.
Children Cry for
Pitcher's Castoria.
Children Cry for
Pitcher's Castoria.
SUMMONS.
STATU OK XOKTII DAKOTA, I
County of Caes.
district court. Third judicial district
The Travelers Insurance Company
of Hartford, Connecticut, a corpor-1
ation
Plaintiff.
vs.
Dated at Kar _'o, N. 1.. this iStli day of
August, l*«.
11. r. SOI'THAHO
Plaintiff's Attorney.
First Pub. Nov. SO, !*!«.
NOTICE-TIMBER CULTURE.
1 S. Land Office,
Fareo, X. I)., Nov. 27th, 1898.
arpo
Complaint having been entered at this office
by I.ewis iiaenen against liordenM. Hicks for
failure to comply with law as to timber culture
lintry Xo. .Vil9 dated May 1st, imi, ti|on the
northeast quarter of section 10, in township 188,
N. of Kange 64 \V„ in Stutsman comity, X. D.,
with a view of the cancellation of the said entry
contestant alleging that the said liordeii M.
I licks broke ten itcres of said tract and planted
same to trees several years ago, but that since
July, 18S9, nothing has been done thereon by
said Hicks or any one for him and that lire has
run through the ten acres planted to trees two
different times. That same has grown lip to
grass and weeds, have not been cultivated or
protected and are killed out by fire and grass
and that tlie condition at the date of contesting,
viz.- Nov 25th. 1893, of said tract is that as
above described. And that said tract is not
cared for as required by the timber culture law.
That said parties are hereby summoned to ap­
pear before Dorinan Bala win. Jr.. a notary
public in and for Stutsman countv, N. D., at his
office in Jamestown on the 26th dav of January,
1894, at 10 o'clock a. ra to respond and furnlsn
testimony concerning said alleged failure, hear­
ing before this office on ttie 31st day of January,
1894, at 10 o'clock a. in.
NKIIKMIAH DAVIS,
Receiver.
F. liAi.mviw, Attorney for Plaintiff.
First Pub Nov. .O. '»3.
NOTICE—FORECLOSURE SALE.
Default exists In payment of $21W.M now due
on a mortgage dated August .1th. 1889. inade by
Harbara Cumber, mortgagor, to Keystone Mort
gage Company, mortgagee, on southeast quarter
of northeast quarter and lots one, two andthree
of section four, township 187 N, range 8* w. in
Stutsman county, North Dakota, duly recorded In
records of said countv on August 10th, 1889, In
book "H" page MM duly assigned to R. Elwood
Mclntlre. Said mortgage will be fore­
closed by sale of said lands on Saturday, Jan­
uary 1th. 18IH, at 2 o'clock p. m., at front door
of court house In Jamestowr, in said county, by
sheriff thereof, to satisfy said debt, interest and
all costs.
Dated November 15th 189S.
R. KIAVOOD INTIRK,
Assignee.
.1. M. l.aw*on, Attorney.
First Pub. Nov. «, ISM
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE.
Default having been made in the conditions of
a certain mortgage containing a power of sale,
dated January s!8th. A. D. 18H5, and duly re­
corded In the office of the register of deeds
In and for Ntutsmnu county, Dakota, January
aith. A. D. 1885. In Hook of mortgages, on
page iw, wherebv John II. tSoffinetandTneresla
(ioltlnet. Ills wife, mortgagors, mortgaged to
Mary K. Taylor, mortgagee, all of lotllfteen, in
block twenty-three, of Lloyd's 2nd addition to
citvof Jamestown. Dakota, according to the
certified plat thereof on tile and of record in the
office of tins register ol deeds In and for said
.Stutsman county. Dakota, by which default the
power of sale has become o|cratlve, and no
action or proceedings at law having been insti­
tuted to recover the debt secured by said mort­
gage or any part thereof, and there is claimed to
be due and unpaid on said mortgage at the
date of this notice, fifty-five dollars.
Now, therefore, noti els hereby given that by
virtue of said power of sale, said mortgage will
he foreclosed and the said premises sold at pub­
lic auction, by the sheriff of Stutsman county,
North Dakota, or hy his deputy, on the 13th day
of January, A 1. 1894, at S o'clock p. m., at the
front door of the court house In the city of
Jamestown, Stutsman county, North Dakota, to
pav said debt, Interest, attorney's fees as stipu­
lated In said mortgage, and disbursements al­
lowed by law.
Dated November 28th, 1893.
MARY K.
110
.Summons.
Xaver Fuehs and Edward J. Bios
sum,
Defendants,
The State of North Hakota to the aliove named
Defendants:
You and each of you are hereby summoned and
required toanswer the complaint of the plaintiff
in the above entitled action, which was tiled in
the office of the clerk of the district court of said
county, on the !Hth day of August. lH(3,and to
serve a copy of your "answer to said com­
plaint upon the subscriber, at his office in
the city of Kargo, in Cass county, X. D., within
thirty (lays after the service ol this summons
upon you, exclusive of the day of such service
and if vou fail to answer the saiii complaint
within that time, the plaintiff will apply to the
court for the relief demanded in said com­
plaint
TAYLOR,
Mortgagee.
Alfred Steel, Attorney, .Jamestown. N. Dak.
First publication, Nov. 30,1893.
PROBATE NOTICE.
STATU OF NORTH DAKOTA, I
County of Stutsman.
In the county court.
In the matter ol the estate of Benjamin S.
Wright, deceased:
By order of said court:
Notice is herebv given that on the 15th day of
December, 1893, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon or
as soon tnereafter as counsel can be heard, at
the office of the judge of said court at .lames
town, in said county, will be heard the petition
of Edwin A Merrill iu said matter, praying that
a certain instrument be filed and recorded as
the last will of said deceased and that letters of
administration with the will annexed be issued
to Edward P. Wells and at the same time will
be heard the proofs of said instrument.
Dated Nov. 22, 1893.
BDIIAR W. CAMI-,
Attorney for Petitioner.
First Pub. Nov. 23, 1893.
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE.
Default having been made in the conditions of
a certain mortgage executed and delivered by
Otto Johnson (a widower) mortgagor,
to Oliver H. Holt, mortgagee, dated the
3rd day of April, 1P90, and recorded in the
office of the register of deeds of the county of
Stutsman, in the state of North Dakota, on
the 4th day of April, 1890, at 1:50 o'clock p. m.,
in book of mortgages, at page 84, and duly as­
signed to Swan P. Anderson by assignment, duly
recorded iu the office of the register of deeds of
Stutsman county, aforesaid, on which there is
claimeu to be due. with inter-st, taxes and in­
surance paid at the date of this notice, the
amount ot three hundred six and 00-100 (§306.60)
dollars, and
action or proceeding has been
instituted, at law or in equity, to recover the debt
secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof.
Notice is given, that by virtue of the power of
sale contained iu said mortgage and the statute
in such case made and provided, the said mort­
gage will be foreclosed by a sale of the mort­
gaged premises therein described, which sf'.le
will be made at the front door of the court house
iti Jamestown, in the countv of Stutsman, and
state of North Dakota, at public auction by the
sheriff of said county, on Saturday, the 6th day
of January, A. D. 1894, at 2 o'clock p. m., to the
highest bidder, for cash, to satisfy the amount
which shall then le due on said mortgage, with
interest thereon, costs and expenses of sale,
taxes, and twenty-live dollars attorney's fees as
stinulated in said mortgage
in case of foreclosure.
The premises described in said mortgage, and
so to be sold, are the tracts or parcels of land
situated in the county of Stutsman and state of
North Dakota, and known and described as fol­
lows. to-wit:
All of lot numbered one hundred forty-live
(145) of Jones & Vennum's addition to the city
of Jamestown, according to the certilied plat
thereof on file In the office of the register of deeds
in and for said countv of Stutsman,
Dated November 22nd, 1893.
SWAN P. ANDERSON,
Assignee of Mortgagee.
R. A. Bill, Attorney for assignee «if mort­
gagee. Jamestown, N. D.
First Pub. Nov. 23,1893.
NOTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE.
Whereas, default has been made in conditions
of a certain mortgage dated 4th day of Novem­
ber, 1892, executed by Owen Hargraves, mort­
gagor, to Lewis T. Hamilton, mortgagee which
mortgage was duly assigned to T. A. Dixon,
who is now the owner thereof and, whereas, th
amount claimed to be due on said mortgage at
the date of this notice is the sum of three
hundred fifty-six dollars. Now. therefore, notice
Is hereby given that by virtue of the power of
sale contained in said mortgage, and in pur­
suance of the statute in such case made, the said
mortgage will be foreclosed by the sale of th4
mortgaged premises therein described, at public
auction at the front door of the court house in
the city of Jamestown, Stutsman countv. North
Dakota, on the 16th day of December, A. D.
1893, at 10 o'clock a. m., by the sheriff of said
county. The said premises are described in
said mortgage as follows: Lots numbered one,
two, three and four of section thirty, township
one hundred and forty north of range sixty-six,
west of the Fifth principal meridian, and con­
taining one hundred aiul lifty-four ana forty-six
hundredths acres.
Dated November 9th, 1893.
T. A. DIXOX,
Assignee.
M.J. Barrett, attorney for assignee.
First Pub. Nov. 9, 1893.
NOTICE-TIMBER CULTURE.
L'nited States Land Office I
Fargo, N. D., November 14tli. 1893.
Complaint having been entered at this office
by Peder Nelson against Patrick H. Devancah
for failure to comply with law as to timber cul­
ture entry Xo. 7,109, dated June
17,1882, upon the
southeast quarter section 14, township 111, north
range 65, west, in Stutsman countv. North
Dakota, with a view to the cancellation of said
entry contestant alleging that the said Patrick
11. Devannali some time prior te 1888 planted 10
acres or about that to trees. That since October,
188H, and down to date, viz August 21st, 1893,
nothing lias been done thereon. Said trees
have not been cultivated or cared for and fire
has run through them several times. That since
October, 1M, said Patrick II. Devaunah.or no
one for him, has done anything on said trees,
that said tract is not cared for as required by
timber culture law, the said parties are hereby
summoned to appear before Dorman Baldwin,
Jr., a notary public in and for Stutsman county,
N. I)., at his office in Jamestown on the 17th
day of January, 1894. at 10 o'clock a. in., to
respond and furnish testimony concerning said
alleged failure, hearing before this office on the
22ndday of January, 1894, at 10 o'clock, n. in.
NKHKMIAII DAVIS.
F. BAI.DWIN. Receiver.
Attorney for Plaintiff.
(First publication Nov. Ditto. 18WU
EDGAR W. CAMP
Attorney and
Oounsellor-at-Law
Office in Doolittle Block
PETER PEARSON
COLLECTIONS,
Jamestown, N. D,
riw'i Remedy for Catarrh l» the
Best, Kaaleat to Cu, aod Qfreapeat.
C/\TX\
Sold by Dronrlata or aent bjr malL
10c. E. T. Hizeltlne, Warren, Pa.
pftyour
CaROCt^
for" t,
and insist on having it.
Made only by
INSURANCE,
all prices and terms. Correspondence solicited.
S
WISCONSIN CENTRAL LINES.
(Northern Pacific It. K. Co.. Lessee.)
DROP
USA
IdWR^VASaSTtMW
STIVtNS MM NT
LINE.
AND HCBVE 111 RETURN
fuuinrasrwion mommm
TM Flittsr funino wxmts in
TrtE NOKmWBT
G)ASC POND
CHICAGO. ILL
Oen1 fas* aTrrt Abt.
wixonari
12.45pm
125pm
10.30am
1.45pm
7.15am
6.8Spiu
7.15pm
4.05pm
7.05pm
10.05a'
GmtSElU A
(IIIGM0
IL. A.TBST T1MB
Two Through Trains Daily.
LvMlnnciipolisAr
Lv. :St. Paul.. Ar
I.v .Duluth.. .Ar
Lv.Ashland.. .Ar
Ar. .Chicago.. Lv
8 40am
8.00am
11.10am
8.05am
5.00pm
5.45pm
5.00pm
7.35pm
4.80pm
11.45"
Tickets sold and baggage checked through
to all points in the United States and Canada.
Close connections made in Chicago with all
trains going East and South.
For full information apply to vour nearest
tickot agent or .IAS. C. t'ONlJ,
Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Act., Chicago, IU.
Diamonds,
Watches,
Clocks,
Silverware,
Spectacles
Our stock is large and
prices low.
REPAIRING A SPECIALTY.
A. G. TELLNER,
The Jeweler.
Livery,
Feed and
Sale Stables.
Eastern and Western
Horses for sale at all times.
MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE.
._^j'iereai" ". Cleinmer, mortgagor.
i1r8,
,,on8«
her?bjr
whose full name Is
mortgaging the premises known as the south­
west quarter of section twenty-four Ol) in town
ship one hundred forty (140) north of range
sixty-three (M) west of the Klfth prlnciiwl
meridian, in Stutsman county, North Dakota,
on which mortgage, and the notes thereby
secared, there Is chimed to be due at the date
of this notice the sum of eight hundred twenty
one dollar* and ninety-six cents. Therefore,
Flven 'hM the uld mortgage
3f» foreciosedby a sale of the said premises
2i...5ub,,L uauctuJn .at front door
of the court house In the city of Jamestown, In
saM county, on the a#th dav of January. A. D.
'"{J', "J jen clock In the forenoon.
Dated November 8th, IMS.
.. f,. SAKAH O. LONC. Mortgagee,
!$y h. W. (amp, tier attorney.
First Pub. Dec. 7, 1MB.
There was a young wife in
Gooo Hope,
Who always used
SANTA CLAU5 SOAR
She once lost her head,
Put her washing to bed,
And her Cherub hung out-on the
rope.
BUT IT WAS WHITE AND
THERE IS NO
N. K. FAIRBANK &. CO. Chicago. S
REAL ESTATE, FINAL PROOFS, HOUSES FOR RENT.
If you have a farm or lot to sell, list with toe my lists are largely distributed
in tfcd east, where they will do most good. Parma to fell in all localities, and
Loans and Gplleotions. Taxes paid for non-residents.
Steamship and R. Tickets. Grain and Stock Farms Managed
CLEAN
ALL THE SAME.
^UNDRy^
Santa CLaU5TOEQUAL
It is the best soap made for every household use, and once
introduced it is always recognized as a friend of the family.
SOLD EVERYWHERE.
SOAP.,
win
W. B. S. TRIMBLE, Jamestown, X. D.
at
Thos. F.Oakes, Henry C.Payne, Henry C.Rouse
RECEIVERS.
N
PACIFIC B.R.
RUNS THROUCH CARS
TO
St. Paul, Minneapolis
Duliitli, Fargo,
Grand Forks, Winnipeg:.
To_
HELENA
BUTTE
SPOKANE
TAGOMA
SEATTLE
PORTLANO
tu«m»
Pullman
Sleeping Cars
Elegant
Dining Cars
STOCKIST
SLEEPING CARS-
TIME SCHEDULE.
NORTHERN PACIFIC—West Bound.
PACIFIC MAIL—Arrives at Jamestown at
4:45 a. m. departs at 4:50 a. in.,
dally.
DAKOTA KXVKKSS—Arrives at Jamestown at
11:00 a. in., daily except Sunday.
East Bound.
ATLANTIC MAIL—Arrives at Jamestown a
10:40 p. m. departs at 10:45 u. in., daily.
DULCTH, ST. PAUL FT MINNKAPOLIS KX
PKKsa—Leaves Jamestown at 4:30 p. m.. Aally
exceptSunday.
JAMES RIVER VALLEY R. R.—Sooth
Bound.
Leave Jamestown for all points south at 8:20
a. ni, daily except Sunday. Arrives from the
south a!.i:l5a.m
JAMESTOWN NORTHERN —North
Bound.
Leaves Jamestown for all points north dally
except Sunday at 7:15 a. m.
Arrives from the north at 4:20 p. m.
For information, time cards, maps and
tickete, call on or write Ticket Agent, N.
P. R. R. at Jamestown, North Dakota, or
CHAS. S. FEE, Uen'l Pass. Agt.
ST. PAUIi. MINN.
oOo
CANADIAN EXCURSIONS
WILL
BE
RUN
-BY THE-
NORTHERN
PACIFIC
RAILROAD
FBOM
POINTS
IN
NORTHERN MINNESOTA.
MANITOBA,
NORTH DAKOTA—
As far west as JAMESTOWN,—
ON
NOVEMBER 21et,
NOVEMBER 28th,
DECEMBER 5th, and
CSTDECE MBEli 11th to 31st, inclusive,
daily, to points in
ONTARIO AND QUEBEC,
AND AS
FAR EAST AS
MONTREAL,
FOR
$-40-00.
Points east of Montreal slightly
higher. Coupon Tickets good for stop­
overs. Call on
E. J. SCHWELLENBACH,
Local Agent,
Or— CHAS. S. FEE,
Q. P. & T. A., N. P. R. R.,
ST. PAUL, MINN.
Legal Blanks
BEST FORMS
LARGEST LINE
LOWEST PRICES .......
AT THki ALERT OFFICE

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