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Jamestown weekly alert. [volume] (Jamestown, Stutsman County, D.T. [N.D.]) 1882-1925, January 10, 1895, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042405/1895-01-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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Many Important Matters For
the State Legislature to
Consider.
ECONOMY THE WATCHWORD.
Free and Uniform Text Book
System Strongly Recom­
mended.
GOVERNOR ALLAN'S MESSAGE.
GEXTLKMEN or- THK fc'MN'ATK AND JIOCSE
OF 1 1".
PI IKK NT
AT IV K.S:
I .^reeubly to the pr«jviriions of tlic coa
"fflitutiou, the legislative assembly of the
State of North Dakota has convened to
consider measures pertaining to tlie peo­
ple and tlie state. The coniidenco of your
constituents in cboosiivj you to exercise
the functions of tlie legislative branch of
our state government, is a sacred trust.
Oflicials change, bur, the government
continues. As the mantle of your prede­
cessors has fallen upon yoa wiihout.
blame
01*
blemish, in like manner may you
be enabled to transmit it to your success­
ors, unstained by di honor.
The true basis of government, is found in
1,unstai"the nature of men themselves. They
The tr have desires, wills, ideas and character,
and have invested you with the authority
to speak for them. Your intercourse with
your constituents l!us made von familiar
with these characteristics. They may
have importuned von to secure the passim
#^f measures which, in their individual
capacity, they deem necessary to their
best interests. An honest effort,
to secure them is commendable.
But it is your duty to determine
by conference whether the best interests
of the state will be served by such meas­
ures should it be necessary to abandon
the effort for the general welfare, you do
not prove recreant to the trust reposed on
you, but rise to the dignity of broad
minded and liberal legislators, which
will secure for you the plaudits of an in
telligent constituency. A grave respon-i
bility, therefore, rests upon you, and
the discharge of that duty I invoke the
assistance of Almighty God.
For your guidance you have the results
of the four legislative assemblies of the
state and those of the territory. Many
measures then operative would to-day he
inadeduate and unsatisfactory. In the
march of civili/.-ition legi dative assemblies
as well as individuals are required to con­
tribute. A conservative policy lias always
characterized tho American people, giving
our state and federal governments
strength at home, and securing respect
abroad. There are those who demand the
repeal of laws beca.usc of their ancient
origin others demand the enactment of
laws that will embo.iy the most, advatced
ideals bat the greatest number ia Vhat
conservative class that finds the golien
medium between the two extremes, pos­
sessing that disposition of mind which
neither reveres what is old or admijes
what is new, simply because it is old or
new, but submits every question to tie
test of strict examination upon its intrin­
sic merits.
It is to be hoped, gentlemen, that in
your intercourse with your constituents
you have been impressed with the neces­
sity of as economical a session as is compat­
ible with public interests. Being compelled
to practice the most rigid economy, on
account of financial depression and the
low price of their products, they expect a
reasonable degree of frugality on the part
of their representatives.
I desire at this time to commend the
people of the state, through you, for the
admirable manner in which they deported
peopl themselves during the unfortunate dis
admit turbances during the past year. Though
themse inconvenienced and made material losers
turbai by reason of such disturbances, the people
incon of this state have faithfully kept the com
by ret pact entered into with the general govern
of thii ment when admitted into the union. They
pact et have proven themselves worthy of all the
ment' righto and privileges of statehood.
have jfy honorable predecessor has submitted
riglitfc
a
report of the executive office during his
My incumbency, together with a report of the
I arej
fine
vari
my
rndi
but.
liev
stat
various departments of state. It is not
my purpose to recommend numerous or
radical measures for your consideration,
but to pursue a conservative course, be­
lieving it to be to the best interests of the
state.
APPROPRIATIONS.
Reference has previously been made to
the demands of the people for an econom
Re1 ical administration. This is made imper
the ative by reason of the condition of our
ical 1 finances and the inability to increase the
ativ limit of indebtedness. The negntive vote
lir^ of the. people upon the constitutional
ih amendment increasing the debt limit
of must be accepted as a direct expression of
an their wishes regarding indebtedness.
111 Yoii have not only to provide for the
th_ur support of the state government and its
institutions, but for the liquidation
«*P' of warrants now outstanding and
inst unpifd for want of funds. We can
of not iftnore the fact that the appropriations
unn*
0f
port
stitt
favc
wil'
thtllegislative assembly were in excess
l»c of tlieVevcnues of the" state. Those en
°f 1 trustw with the management of the iinan
°f .* cial (Wairs of the state have been embar
tr rassiJl by reason of such. That experience
ch ehowd be of benefit to all concerned in the
mafter of appropriations.
maintain the credit of the state is es-
Vsential: and the only way to do so is to
To keep the expenses within the limits the
•wrtif revenues.
keep In making appropriations for thesup
wver port and maintenance of the various in-
In gtitutions of the state no one should be
favored to such an extent that the others
will be neglected.
The question is a grave one, requiring
careful consideration aud the test of busi­
ness principles rather than sentiment. I
do
not
desire to uerplex you with an enu­
meration of remedies which may prove
-tpf*
rv
r%
**"*y
4
inadequate. You have studied the situa­
tion and are con vers-ant with the needs of
the state and its institutions, I desire-to
co-operate with you in whatever will prove
to be the most businesslike proposition to
obtainsatisfactory solution of the ques­
tion.
FREE AND UNIFORM TEXT BOOKS.
Though the commonwealth of North
Dakota is young, yet a system of public
schools has been established, as abiding
and progressive as that of older states.
Men are not actuated solely by mercenary
motives in choosing homes for themselves
and families. That which contributes to
the development of morals and intelli­
gence is always considered, and tho etlici
euesr of the public schools of a state is au
fncej,(ivo less than its farm resources,
lint TVV.- SIUJICTS mi'ive the careful"
consideration and thorough investigation
that those that pertain to the public
schools receive, for all riganl this institu­
tion as the promoter of morality, patriot­
ism and citizenship. That careful and
prudent consideration often amounting to
reluctance on the part of a legislaior when
considering measures pertaining to schools
is rather to be commended than con­
demned, for by his conservatism he pro­
tects the schools from innovations.
Liberal expenditures for the support of
Schools have alwayscharaclenzed the peo­
ple of this state. Nov.- that the state is
furnishing no incnisulerab!-' part of the
funds to maintain the thereby re­
lieving the people of a ..o-.ding tax,
it is proper to cons: It e4'io: of free
and uniform text i.'ci. Yi't* money nec­
essary to provide these /. be raised by
taxation. Nevertliel it is a question of
economy. If each patr of the public
school contributed to a text-book fund
what he expends for school books in one
year, the amount, so contributed would
furnish books for the use of an tq4i.il num­
ber cf pupils for a period of live years, and
the tost would be reduced in alike ratio.
It, may be urged as an objection that
ma.iy would not contribute to the fund to
provide these books. I am convinced that
th« number thus mentioned would not be
greater than the number annually fur­
nished books by the various school officers
tlroughout the state. Such persons re­
quire books to be furnished yearly the ex­
penditure, as suggested, would be suffi
dent for a number of years.
Kducation being for the benefit of the
state and community, as well as for the
individual, it is expedient that those able
to contribute should do so, but at the
same time as economically as possible.
To lessen the expeji-e upon those possess­
ing the means n? .-®.i oi-t public schools,
those vast giants of public domain were
made to esta.-lish a permanent fund.
The right, of suilrage has been extended
to some who perhaps are not able to use
it intelligently. It is too late to disfran­
chise them, and the only course to pursue
is to educate them and their successors.
In so doing they fire educated for the in­
terests and service of the state.
Placii:- free and uniform text books in
thepubi»: schools of North Dakota will
make them all that the term "free" sig­
nifies, comprehending tuition, furniture,
apparatus and libraries. It will s,id in en­
forcing the law of compulsory attendance,
as it removes one of the obstacles to its
enforcement—inability to procure books.
It will teach the class most in need of the
instruction the principle consistent with
independent and dignified manhood, that
whatever a man's condition may be he is
entitled to the means of improving it.
I would recommend such legislation as
may be necessary to provide a system of
free and uniform text books for each
county in the state.
WOMAN SUFFRAGE.
IJndcr Section 122, Article of the Con
stitution, the legislature is empowered to
extend the right of suffrage to women.
This question lias engaged the attention of
the legislature' of the Territory of Dakota,
as well as the constitutional convention of
North Dakota.
Women are citizens. Their civil rights
are not inferior to those of men, but with
regard to their political rights, they form
almost a positive exception to the general
doctrine of equality. They obey laws and
contribute taxes, and it is political justice
(and political justice always pays) that
those who are subject to law and con­
tribute taxes should have a voice in their
enactment and in the distribution of the
taxes.
The elective franchise has been extended
and restrictions removed as men have
demonstrated their ability to exercise it,
and as the right to its possession became
apparent.
A partial recognition has been given by
grauting women the right to participate in
school matters. In the exercise of this
privilege women have demonstrated their
ability to discharge greater suffrage con
sciontoiusly, and vo the best interests of
the body politic and themselves.
I would recommend to your favorable
consideration the extension of suffrage to
women, in munic.p.il matters at least.
GOOD ROADS.
The attention being pnid to the subject
of good roads in many states, agricultural
as well as manufacturing, is evidence of
its importance. In the development of a
state tlie proper building and improve­
ment of highways is one of the lasi ques­
tions to receive consideration, though ihey
are of gre it importance to all industries.
Streams and railroads are the arteries of
commerce, and public highways are the
tributaries. From the farm and the fac
iory come the articles to be transported.
With the low price that commodities often
command, it is necessary that they be
marketed as cheaply and quickly as possi­
ble. Every item of expense that can be
saved in delivering to the lines of trans­
portation will augment the profit of the
producer.
While the people of this state may not
now feel the need of judicious improve­
ments of highways, I believe that the day
is not far distant when they will realize
that the subject should have received
earlier and more careful attention.
These improvements are often obiected
[Concluded 00 Fifth Page.]
rj
VOL XVIII JAMESTOWN, NORTH DAKOTA, THURSDAY JANUARY JO 1895
5" rJSPP^^^:W
ripB5"w^(w
LEGISLATURE ORGANIZES.
J. C. Gill of Cass, Unanimously
Elected Speaker of the
House.
Only Fight on Chief Clerk,
J. M. Devine of LaMoure,
Secures it.
Little Prosoect of a L-ively
Session. Conservatism
to be Followed.
BISMARCK, Jan. 8lb.—The republican
caucus met at 10 o'clock this morning
and ruade a slate, which is somewhat in
the nature of a surprise. They decided
upon J. M. Devine, of LaMoure, for chief
cieik and turned down Oliver and
titevens.
At high noon Major Hamilton called
tfce house to order, after which prayer
was offered by Rev. Spoor. Roll-call fol­
lowed. Tho oath was then administered
by Judge Bartholomew of the supreme
bench.
Prosser of Cass, nominated Gill for
epeuker. Major Edwards seconded the
nomination and paid a high tribute.
ClieeriDg followed. Gill was unanimous­
ly elected. He was conducted to the
chair by a committee consisting of Ed­
wards and Prosser, and acknowledged in
a short speech, the honor conferred.
The remainder of the officers are:
Chief clerk, J. M. Devine of LaMoure
H. E. Savage of Grand Forks, assistant
J. Howard of Grand Forke, enrolling
clerk V. Morgan of Richland county,
bill clerk Bessie Waggoner, of Bur­
leigh county, stenographer Fred
Snore of Minnewaukan, sergeant
O. A. Boynton, Jamestown, messenger
Faradin of Mercer county, watchman
II. Barton, a one armed soldier, door­
keeper J. Miller of Bottineau, post­
master A. Durrie of Burleigh, chaplain.
R. N. Stevens of Bismarck, was nomi­
nated for clerk of the judiciary commit­
tee. On motion later the name was
withdrawn. Chas. S. Buck of New Rock
ford, was elected journal clerk.
The only light was on J. M. Devine.
Major Ed wards called attention to the
fact that he already holds the office of
superintendent of schools in LaMoure
county and the constitution provides
against the holding of another
office. L. A. Simpson of Dick­
inson, said Devine would resgn.
the office of superintendent. Hamilton,
on motion, was requested to act as clerk.
Devine qualified. He told "Octopus"
that he would not. The caucus con­
trolled everything.
A large number of Indies were present
and witnessed the proceedings. The
rules of the last house wera adopted.
Tho governor will deliver his message at
tomorrow's session.
The senate organized yesterday as
follows: Haggart, president protem
Fred Falley, secretary E. M. Tuttle,
stenographer ex-Senator WaltoB, ser
geant-at arme R. C. Sanborn, assistant
J. O. Smith, assistant secretary R. C.
Marshall, doorkeeper J. C. Warnock,
bill clerk
G.
S. Ueishus, chief enrolling
clerk A. A. Hill, postmaster
fM?
G.
W.
Strong, messenger M. A. Shirley, clerk.
Judiciary committee—Anna Nelson,
journal clerk
G.
A. Chambers, Chaplain,
Harry McLean, Robert Morris and Ed
Murphy, pages.
BISMARCK,
Jan 6th.—A good many
member? of the legislature and all the
new state officials have arrived, also a
number of candidates for various clerk­
ships. The house will organize Tuesday.
Monday night there will doubtless be
republican caucuses of both senate and
house members for the purpose of elect­
ing officers. No new candidate f^r chief
clerk of the house has developed except
R. N. Stevens who is in tbe field. Major
Hamilton is urged to take the place
again by many members but thinks he
has had the honor and emoluments long
enough for one Dakotan. He has other
important duties at Grand Forks in con­
nection with his office as district attor­
ney. He may remain here for a time in
an advisory position and furnish the
house with whatever assistance he can
also aid in getting the clerical force
fairly underway. Harry Oliver is also a
candidate for clerk of the house.
The candidates for speaker are Major
Edwards and J. C. Gill, no dark horse
yet looming up.
Fred Snore of Benson county is candi­
date for sergent at arms of the house
and reems to have a fair chance. He
served in that capacity in the first bouse,
and made an accommodating officer.
The Btate officers, with the exception
of the governor, will take charge of their
offces Monday at noon, and be sworn in.
The change in governors will not take
place until Wednesday when it is ex­
pected the organization of the legislature
will be completed. Gov. Shortridge
will then read his messnge to the legisla­
ture and Gov. Allin also deliver his in
augural address. Gov. Shortridge will
briefly roview the condition of the state
and furnish the members with a good
many facts and matters of interest, to
consider.
There ie, as usnfJ, at this time but
little advance information as to the work
of the legislature this winter. It is said
that there is little prospect of a specially
lively session, and a conservative courso
is most likely to be adopted.
Major Murphy and wife and children
are at the Lumborn.
Miss Aikin, of Foster, nnd recently of
Stutsman, is a candidate for a clerkship.
O. A. Boynton is nt the capitol get­
ting around araon. th«3 members at the
Sheridan, as usual.
M. II. Jewell arrived todny from Wash­
ington to look after the Tribune iufere&t
during tho .session.
Dennis Hannafin is on hand looking
ten years younger and feeling his politi­
cal oats in great chape.
Senator and Mrs. Fran* White are
preparing to occupy one of the city resi­
de:' during the winter.
One oi the candidates for postmaster
of the house, Mr. Elburg, has a letter
from Postmaster General Wannamaker
endorsing him for any responsible posi
tior.
Jamestown has a small delegation,
consisting of Insurance Commissioner
Fancher, Representatives Nierling and
Gleason, and J. C. Warnock, who will do
newspaper work. Senator Fuller is ex­
pected Monday. J. C. Britton, of the
Edgeley Sentinel, 13 another newspaper
man looking the field over.
I'rof. Devine, of LaMoure, is looking
after the land commissionership, but
under the law it ia a serious question
whether or not the present commissioner
cannot hold for another year. It was
intended to make it a three years' office
for the first appointee, and a two years'
berth thereafter. There may a com­
promise of some kind fixed up.
State Farmers' Alliance Sleeting.
To tho Farmers' Alliance and Industrial
Union of North Dakota:
Your president and secretary make
this call for a meeting of all past and
present members of this organization,
from every part of the state, to meet in
Valley City on J^diesdiy. Jan IGth,
1805, at 2 p. m.
Brother Farmers, although poor, let
this be the effort of our lives to come
and make this the largest and best meet­
ing ever held in tbe state, as questions of
greater importance and more far-reaching
in tbe interest of human progress will be
up for discussion than ever before in our
state, and will be submitted for your
consideration.
Farmers, don't leave this to a few men,
if you have any sympathy for this the
greatest educational institution in Amer­
ica in the interests of farmers and la­
borers.
We make this urgent appeal and hope
that past and present members of tbe
organization will make the sacrifice and
respond to the call from every part of
the state. W. T. MC CULLOCH,
W. F. GRILL, President.
Secretary.
For this occasion the Northern Pacific
railroad has made a rate of one and
one-fifth fare for the round trip, provid­
ing there is an attendance of 75. Full
fare will be paid going and a receipt giv­
en which will entitle the holder to a one
fifth rate on the return. It is probable
that the Soo and the Great Northern
roads will also make low rates for tbe
meeting.
A Mcintosh County 3Iurder.
A dispatch from Ellendale states that
word has been received from Ashley,
Mcintosh ccunty, distant about 40
miles, that a Russian farmer named
Schafer, living four miles northwest of
Ashley, beat his wife almost insensible
and then threw her out of the window.
When she was discovered she was frozen
stiff and it was found her back was
broken by the fall. Schafer skipped out
and at last accounts had not been caught.
The Taxpayers' Part.
Tbe Oakes Republican says: The De­
cember term of court closed last Satur­
day. No business was done except to
decide upon the validity of the drawing
of the last grand jury. As this was de­
cided to be illegally drawn, all the in­
dictments found by it are void. Thus
probably ends the Barrat case, all ex
cept paying about 85,000 expenses. The
taxpayers will do this part later.
THE outlook for flour is brighter and
eight of the mills of the North Dakota
association which have been closed for
some time past will reopeu and resume
grinding.
M.
WEEKLI ALEKT.
OLD AND NEW.
Governor Shortridge Retires
and Governor Allin
Steps In.
Large Audience Listen to the
Reading of the Governors'
Messages.
President White and Associ­
ates Report Proceedings of
Pharmacy Board.
BISMARCK, Jan. 9.—The retiring and
incoming governors delivered their in
augunii addresses before the legislative
assembly today. Gov. Shortridge's mes­
sage was a long document- of 10,000
words. Gov. Alliri's is much shorter.
There v.- a large audience present.
Tho -ages were closely listened to
throughout their entire reading.
Tiie tirst bill introduced in the house
provides for state depositors of public
funds.
The assembly has adjourned until to­
morrow. The committees have not yet
been announced.
A number from Fargo, Valley City
and Grand Forks arrived this rooming
to attend the governor's reception and
the inaugural ball this evening. It
promises to be a big occasion.
Urjigs and Druggists.
Among the reports of business done by
boards in which the state ie interested is
that of the state board of pharmacy, sub­
mitted to the governor by W. S. Parker,
of Lisbon, secretary-treasurer. The mem­
bers of the board are, besides Mr. Parker,
II. E. White, of Jamestown, and H. L.
Haussamen, of Grafton, Mr. White being
president.
The board held two meetings during
the year last passed and examined 21
persons for registered pharmacists, 12 of
which number passed acd 0 were re­
jected. Thirteen persons were granted
registrations certificate from endorse­
ments from other states. Thert) were in
the state, at the date of the report, last
August, '2.13 registered pharmacists. A
number of certificates have been can­
celed for non-payment of dues.
A list of pharmacists is kept by the
secretary, and through it many clerks
have been able to secure employment,
there being a demand for competent
pharmacists at fair wage?.
The secretary has received numerous
complaints of violations of the pharmacy
law and, so far, has investigated most of
the cases. The violators have been found
to have complied with the law. Two con­
victions for violations of the law, how­
ever, were obtained. One in November,
1893, in the case of the state vs. Young
man, of Wheatland, the defendant being
convicted of keeping a drug store with­
out a registered pharmacist in charge. A
fine of §40 and cost# was imposed. The
other case of the same kind was at Har­
vey, Wells county, where Frank Schmitt
zer plead guilty to keeping a drug store
without a registered pharmacist. He
was fined §5 and costs.
Secretary Parker protests against com­
plaints of the violations of the law com­
ing to him signed in anonymous names.
He says, "If the complaint is worth mak­
ing, it is worth a genuine signature and
tLe assistance you owe the public
health."
The receipts of tbe board for pharmacy
renewals, fines and various other items,
for the year ending August, 1894, were
§1,070.32 and tbe total expense $435.49.
At the meeting of the pharmacy board
examinations were conducted in materia
medica, chemistry and pharmacy. The
applicants are questioned and examined
on the identification of drugs, compound­
ing of prescriptions and manufacture of
the pharmaceutical preparations.
Registered pharmacists must notify
the board of any change in their loca­
tion.
.11 appears that the regulations of the
board have been well lived up to, ns a
whole, and the public proteoted to a
large extent from tbe employment of ig­
norant and incompetent clerks in drug
stores and pharmacies.
I'helan's Appointment.
The following dispatch to tbe Fargo
Argus from Bismarck throws additional
light on the appointment of Master
Mechanic Phelan as clerk of the railroad
commission. It says:
Much antagonism was developed Mon
day night and Tuesday morning to the
appointment of Phelan as clerk of the
railroad commission. There were two
two points raised: His fitness was can
ceded, but it was claimed that tbe people
would never believe that it was other
than a railroad appointment, made in
the inlerests of railroads and at their
dictation. Another party claimed that
Phelan had been "let out" by the road
Wj
as
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1
and that he would show them no parti­
ality that his years of experience would
be of great advantage to the commission,
and that that was tbe retison for his se­
lection. His friendship for organized
labor was also ari element mentioned in
his favor, aod it is said that his resigna­
tion--which is said takes effect the 15th
inst— was an outgrowth of-the strike.
But the fear of what the people might
say was the strong point. Another point
was that the newspaper men had done
the party and the state great service
that there were at least three members
of the press who were seeking the ap­
pointment and that it was a slap in the
face of thpse earnest workers for the
party. The question of his republican­
ism was raised, but he was claimed an
earnest republican by some of those who
have been most intimately associated
with him. The fact is he is not a parti
s-an, but is inclined to be independent in
politic?. The opposition Tuesday morn
iDg took active form and may result in
protest, especially from republican sen­
ators.
Mr. Phelan culled on the governor
Tuesday and assured him that his choice
as secretary of the railroad commisson
was not planned by the railroads. The
governor says that other information in­
dicates that organized labor is particu­
larly well pleased with the appointment.
THE STATE LEGISLATURE.
Wliat llie Complexion anl Character of
tlie Senate anl House is.
I)ist. Name County Party.
1 Judson LaMoure. Pembina Rep
0 James Doliie .Pembina Rep
3 William Hillier .Walsh Rep
4 George Clarke Walsh Rep
5 Arnold .Grand Forks... Rep
I) Frank Viet.s .Grand Forks .. Rep
7 .T A Sorley .Grand Forks.. Rep
S It Strom .Traill Rep
John Haggart Cass Rep
l'» 11 Tufts ... .('ass Kep
11 E Young .Cass Ren
12 A Benedict Richland Rejt
13 McCarten .Sargent Pop
14 Patrick II ltourke. Ransom Hep
i: Frank White .Barnes Rep
if. Kingi'l Knger Steele Rep
17 .T Lamb Nelson Rep
is Chas W Plain Cavalier ....Dem
W John Burke .Rolette ... Dem
P.rown .Benson Rep
-1 E Day .... Panisey Rep
*2 1) Davis .Eddy Rep
2'i Bailey Puller .Stutsman Rep
24 Clws'X Valentine LaMoure Hep
25
3
V,' Stevens .Dickey Pop
•Jii •lohn 11 Wis.hek... Mcintosh Rep
£7 Little Burleigh Rep
x'-i A Hanscom .MeHenrv ... Rep
'Jfl Gregory .Ward Rep
30 S Parkins Morton Rep
31 A McGillivry... Stark Rep
HOUSE.
a a
PytrU'k lonran
0
I Win Flemnilug.
(.Tames A Myers
1 I'eter N Korsmo ...
Jos Coloskv
'i W P, Wood".
W in an
'"(Henry Haiicock
Peter Herh:audson.
.T0I111 I l.erom
6'I
e| si in
O S Wallic
A W Kilwards
1 E S Tyler
IX A Colbv Cass
10-! W Twicliell Cass
E Gilbertson Cass
I I, lhvyer
John E Hodgson
13-I
John Cryan Sargent
Eric Gunderson Ransom
1 Morris Brown Ransom
14
.. Xels Rassmussen.
1 .John A Logan
Nicholas Swenson..
101
Rolin Cooper
17 Linn Bay
John Flack
(James Jennings
19 A McDonald
is
19
1
Lindstrom
O Tofsrud
K.T Walker
1 Frank Prosser
20-]
31
oi)
1 Chas MaeLaclilan..
~-'i Ed Porter
1 Xierling
~3 1 Gleason
24 Sharpe
Andrew Smith
Frank W Brainerd..
1 A Armstrong
1 Geo S Roberts
.v Thomas Richards...
1 Spangberg
25 Anton svensrud
29 John S Murphy
erman Kroeger...
25-
Fred Holritz
31 A Simpson
W
Pembina
Pemlnna
Pembina
Pembina
Walsh
Walsh
Walsh
Walsh
Walsh
Iraiul Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Grand Forks.
Traill
1 raill
Trail!
Traill
Cass
Cass
1 Stephen Eyolfson...
-'/Thomas Cuinati...
()!e L^ifson
'i A Kelloiig
Ole Km!
•i- fieorge Hill
ft W,
NO 24
I
-i
1
Pop
...J)ctn
Pop
... Dem
Rep
....Rep
Rep
.... Rep
Rep
....Rep
Rep
Rep
.. ..Rep
Rep
... .Rep
...Rep
... .Rep
Rep
Rep
....Rep
....Rep
Rep
Rep
Rep
Rep
Cass
Cass
Cass
Richland
Richland
Richland
Sargeni
(JC Gill
1U Hanna
I E Sargent
I E' iek Stnful
lis .lames Purdon
....Rep
Rep
Rep
Rep
Rep
Pop
Pop
Rep
.. ..Rep
...Dem
....Pop
.... Rep
....Rep
Barnes
Barnes
Griggs
Griggs
Xelson
Cavalier
Cavalier
Rolette
Benson
Benson
.Ramsey
Ramsey
Eddy
Eddy
Stutsman
Stutsman
LaMoure
.Dickey
Diekey
Emmons
Kidder
Burleigh
Burleigh
Bottineau
Williams
Morton
Morton
Stark
Pop
... Dem
... Dem
.. ..Rep
—Rep
Rep
....Rep
Rep
...Rep
.... Rep
Rep
—Kep
Rep
Pop
Pop
Rep
.. ..Rep
Rep
....Rep
.... Rep
Rep
Rep
Rep
....Kep
STATE TIPS,
It is said a bill will be introduced at
the coming legislative session dividing
the First Judicial District, with Grand
Forks and Nelson as one district, and
Pembina, Walsh and Cavalier another.
This would give Governor Allin the ap­
pointing of a judge for the last proposed
district.
John D. Rapp and eon, of Oakes, bad
a narrow escape from suffocation by stove
gas-
White bronze is not porous has no
fissures, and will not absorb moisture,
B. S. Russell, agent.
FROM present indications at Washing­
ton, it looks as if more than a majority
of the members will "pass" wheu it comes
to a vote on the pending currency bilL,
8

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