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Jamestown weekly alert. [volume] (Jamestown, Stutsman County, D.T. [N.D.]) 1882-1925, June 01, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042405/1922-06-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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PUBUSmNG
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Ncirn«V
City »f
Tcl«fku«
Bklly 'AMrt fs iNllvtM In tb«
:jr by carrier *1 month.
advance, J-e#* JS.00
iUy, one year M.OO
•ekly, one year' $1.00
StfME CltY DUPES
The farmert and sftiail-toWn
(oik are n?t the onjy easy marks for
oil -tend "speculators, stbcfc Veiling
fakirs ind get-rich-quick firtlsts. A.
reefcht iawHuit tried in Duluth show
ed $30,000 lost in an oil lease deal,
«nd that eome one got $12,000 prof
it. Eighteen board of trade men
were the victim* and some of them
confessed In he testimony that they,
thought they had a "Vbre tliltejfe'f.'
They invested from $1,000 to J2^
000 each for leases, hut Jbst&A of
getting in on the ground floor tttey
went out by the attic window, be
cause the leases had expired. Some
of the board of trade men were
good sports and took Ihfeir losses
with the best humor they could
tract from the transaction. "Others
kicked and brought the suit against
the promoter, a smooth young man
from Chieftgo, aided tay -a Texas
/anger and a Duluth assistant. When
ihe llpard of Trage men get stuck on
,a "con 'game" the farther Smiles and
smiles.
SHODDY MEN PRESENT
ARGUMENTS
In the effort to secure *, federal
law requiring the designation' ot fab
rics to be truthfully "giveii, as to the
materials of th#Ir composition under
the provisions of, the "truth in fabric
iill", the manufacturers of shoddy
present their side of the case: Eas
tern shoddy manufacturers HeelSre
that there is only a fifth enoti&h
iwooJ grown in the world to cloth the
people in cold climates «nd that the
other four fifths have to be clothed
with garments of re-worked wool, ft
is said that shoddy i« re-worked ac
many as six or pftVen tlhiee.
There has been a marked decrease
fn the number or sheep in the worlds
!j)ut
still the .price of wool hfca reach
ed such a low point that the sheep'
Soned
rowers have, in many cases abari'"
the ihdustr/. and cut down op,
Hold off their flocks. Many manu
facturers, according to the secre
tary of the National Wool Bureau of'
America make their own shoddy, and^
many who use it do not want it
known.
It. is believed there is much great
er amount of shoddy actually used
than estimated by the government,
and other officers of various wool
gnd sheep organizations. Ope oficlftl:
in fL statement estimates that all the
virgin wool in tie world would only
allow 14 ounces a year to every per
son living outside the tropics in-,
other secretary df a wppi manufac
turers association, declares there was,
only enough
WJOOJ
fcroWh to supply a1
pair of knee br-eches to the people
living i» the colder climates. Form-:
er secretary of commerce Redfield,
stated that the annual production Of
Mrgin wool was only onie third,
enough for the annual production of
wool cloth and the deficiency must
be supplied by shoddy
r-
IT'S MCCUMBER OR FRAZIBR
It is announced in Bismarck that
the Independent campaign for the
nomination of Governor R. A. Nes
ta*. and the Independent state ticket,
will begin June 5, when Governor
Nestos will deliver the keynote speech
at some point at the southeastern
part of the state. The primary elec
tion will be on June 28, find there is
less than a month in which to crystal
ize the sentiment of voters of the
state on the questions and the is
sues they will have to decide.
It is hoped that Governor Nestos
will conduct a vigorous and wise
campaign, not only for himself, but
for the other candidates on the In-,
dependent ticket and especially for
the .principles and issues which he
represents in the work of reform and
reconstruction of our state govern
ment..
Mr. Nestos needs ail the support
he c*n get. He needs the same
friends who stood by him in the re
call election. Whethor we all w:ih
it or not, the senatorial election Is
closely involved with the state, elec
tion. In the selection of candidates
for United States senator, the voters
of the state must choose between the
only.two cahdidates who have any
chance of an election. Senator Me
Cumber and Lynn J. Frailer,
This situation is now no doubt as
clear and convincing to Mr. Nestos,
and his friends^ as to every indepeh
dent votejr who is anxious for Mr.
Nestos'. nomination and. election
The next few days will determine
largely the wllsdom of the leaders,
supporting Mr. Nestos, who have la
bored for the. last six yearo to re
defcm rtforth Dakbta from the mistak
en, an# the unfortunate, administra
tion df. the tfonparitaah* League.
Senator McCumber ^d ,hie suppoH
in the iUrte constitute .positive ele
ment of strength thai no -.leadership
tn our state election can iMord to ig
n6j«, orJoVertook In the "work of nom
inating Governor mtCd tl»e
cai^Atdatea assoeiated with him, June
28
next.
WAR
pridMffaUbii, "feat it is eh-
couraging to note that the Harding
I^MiMtim ia -wt jwiiw: to jgt
Hrb Aiattvr mit witlwttt wgorotfs Ef
forts to recover the stolen millions
and protect the betrayed taxpay-
fij^ieraf ^auj|Hef^ claims that hte.
of miHi to an4H and dBterj
i
1
hat -ha* teen Ho^ae is lnaQequate
'o the 'magnitude of the job and so
far only 16,000 war contracts have
beon audited out,of 100,000. Those
so far audited provi^ a basis for a
reopvM-y of ^^,000,000 and none
of the big contfacto. are included.
Over a billion ^dllars were appro
prated for aviation, oAd not one A
meri^an majchtnjB reaped ttip battle
front. Thete were TOO1 contraet3 for
$100,000 e»cl for aviation material.
&tiVy a few =h«tve been audited.
Washington dispatches statetiiat
cohtractirs and companies were over
paid millions for aircraft services.
Otfe corporation was overpaid $6
500,000 and/one $8,950,000, besides
there are profiteering contracts for
cantonments, ship building-and sup
plies. selling df the government sur
plus supplies, tins harness scandal
anil the sale tff ffi6,000,000 of inept
for f*,000,000. A Washington cor
respondent gives further details as
folR««:
When the war ended Uncle Sam
founil he tu»d bought million pairs
of spurs for 4,7 0»,000 men in army
and navy.
Also 195,000 branding irons, at
fli SPfece, for 1*8,000 horses and
With 5 sets of harpess on hand for
every horse the Government owned.
Uncle Sam had an order, in for many„
more.
ire had 4 sets of currycombs,
brumes and blankets for each horse.
He had "975,000 baddies for these
148,000 horses and an order in for
more.
He had
J/4
million halters and an
order in for another pillion.
There were overpAyraeflts, it. is
claimed of $9,000,000 to (lie Lin
coln-Motor Co. and $1,800,000 in a
SUrWus lumber deal, $'4,000000 in
the wale of the -Bo&ch Magneto Co.
and millions Involved in the «ale of
former German dye patents and for
mulas to the Mechabicnl Foundatrlon.
Congressman Johnson of South
Dakota has taken the lead in this
Investigation and Is quoted as saying
that the surplus lumber deal above
reterrjed to "is typical of "hundreds
eakee of fraudulent War con
tr*«k*." It invoJv.es 150.000,000 feet
of surplus lumber that the govern
ment had it the end of the war. The
luitaber was pjle4 t»p at time when
building operation? were prohibitive
because lumber was held at high
%ttr'prices.
EDUCATION BEST LAW
ENFORCEMENT FACTOR
North Dakota enforcement offic
ials who have had even slight exper
ience in the enforcement of the na
tional and state prohibition laws, un
animously place the responsittllity
for a lax enforcement on pubhc sen
timent. This is, accounted for. be
cause there is a marked division in
public sentiiftont in this matter. We
aye not all built alike, and every
than does not voluntarily undertake
to become his brothers keeper, or as
sume to be the custodian of his.
brother's personal habits. Besides,
a law that for generations has recog
nized the manufacture, sale and u8e
of -liquor as a legitimate business
occupation, and drinking liquor a
personal privilege, under the guise
pf a temporary war emergency
measure, suddenly becomes a per
manent law, that makes the" same oc
cupation and the privileges illegal
and criminal. Such a law is natur
ally difficult to enforce at the start.
The mental attitude, inherited
tastes, and ideals of personal liberty
of the individual, that have become
fixed in the minds and habits of
thousands of good citi»3ns cannot be
eliminated or reversed at once by
the waving of a legislative wand. It
takes time to create new views fn
the minds of all the-people, and to
obliterate views that have been held
for generations.
In a heart to lieart talk before a
North Dakota law enforcement con
tention at Fargo, Attorney-General
Johnson, of. this state, pointed out
the persistent strength of a senti
ment in many communities that is
opposed to the present federal liqu
or legislation. He said there are
communities where it is difficult to
elect if)Jicers to enforce the law, and
where the enforcement is oonsequent
ly unsatisfactory. Also he said that
unless public sentiment backs up the
law, it Is difficult to get juries to
convict. jHe urged that those who
are impatient at the lack of law en
forcement should consider this con
dition fairly, and that a healthy sen
timent for enforcement will be soon
er obtained when the public con
science is aroused to the need of the
enforcem£0t, both from a moral, le
gal and social standpoint. The pres
ent'ariny of enforcement officials, he
3aid, .are helpless unless public sen
tlment sustains them.
This /statement is manifestly true.
It is not a Quick or easy routs to ed
ucate public senftmeht to this end,
for the'public Is notoriously slow to
accept, what interferees with long
established, habits and customs
The' difficulties of enforcing the
liw in .ibterior rural communities
ire ihuch lejiB than on the outskirts
jthe naMor? fid Un great states like
New Ynrk an.d Nefv, jer3ey, parts of
th'e.natjfon, where jpKiblic seritiment is
jSf sh^f pjV: divl^d, and where men
pe wka^6r Wadsjrorth cif Kew
k/ in, pjiiblic ad^fesses, declare
Oie present ?£de!rft) jaws should
to c6rif!rrm tp' the, wishes
of a ft n*t. a ittRjolrity: of 4he
at^t$it
coiit bprder of the'United St&tes of
fer*. hjirhfifs fthe iprpjtectlpn pf U
mm
FOUHCAL ANWOUNCaaSBNT
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
I am a candidate for member •pf.
the House of Representatives frbtn
the 23Td district, Stutsman County
Ut.on the Republican ticket, ana so
licit your support.
Martin Honiuth.—
KOlt COUNTY COMMJSSIONBB
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-olfe.ction as County Commis
sioner from the First District at the
Primary Election.
A. H. Sherman,-—
FAR COUNTY SUPKRINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
I am a candidate for re-election to
the ojfBce of, County Superintendent
of Schools, subject to the will of tlfe
voters at the primary election in
June.
Harriet E. Perry.
FOR CLERK OF COURT
I am a candidate for re-election as
Clerk of Court at the June Primaries
Your support will be appreciated.
Jcspe M. Cran.—
FOR COUNTY TREASURER
I hereby announce myself as a can
didate for the office of County Treas
urer subject to the will at the voters
at the Primary Election to be held
in June.
George T. Richmond—
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my candidacy
for nomination as County Commis
sioner, first district, at the Primary
Election,. June, 1922.
My lilatforhi, rigid efeonomy in
County affairs and reduction of tax
burdens.
Service
R. M. Donnelly?—
LOUIS ^ELLNEil v FOR STATE'S
ATTORNEY.
POLITICAL ANNOUNCEMENT
Owing to request of many voters,
Male and Female, I hereby announce
my candidacy for County Auditor,
£nd will appreciate your votes at the
Primary Election June 28th.
Andrew Blewett.—•
DANA WRIGHT for SHERIFF.
M.
O. RUUD FOR REGISTER OF
DEEDS.
FOR SHERIFF
I hereby announce my candidacy
for nomination to the office of
Sheriff of Stutsman County, at the
June Primary Election.
3. H. Ross—
FOR STATES ATTORNEY
I am 'Si candidate for nomination
for Statos Attorney of Stutsman
County at the June Primaries.
C. S. Buck.—
EARL REED for CLERK of COURT
FOR SHERIFF
I hereby announce my candidacy
for nomination to the Office of Sher
iff at' Stutsman County at the June
PrlnSit^s.
1 T. W. Lusk.r—
Edmunds, N. Dak.
FOR SHERIFF'
I hereby announce my candidacy
for nomination as sheriff of Stuts
man county at the June primary elec
tion.
Fred Perry-—
FOR SHERIFF
I hereby announce my candidacy
for nomination to the Office of Sher
iff, of Stutsman county at the June
Primary Election.
"Piiid
McRae.—
FOR BOUNTY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my Candidacy
for nomination to the office of!
County Commissioner from the Third
District, at the June Primary elec
tion.
E. F. Kohlscheen.—
Pingree, N. Dak.
HENRY QARDNER FOR-COUNTY
AUDITOR. s
I'X)R COUNTY TREASURER
I am a candidate 'Mor County
Treasurer, at the June Primary.
Wni. ICrekow.—
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my candfdacy
for re-election as County Commis
sioner'fr6m the Third District at the
Primary Election.
Rasscll D. CIiase.—
W.G.JOOS for REGISTER, ot DEEDS
EARL
REED for CLERK of COURT
For ConimlssioKCi' iird i)i trict
I hereby announce,my candidacy fer
tile republican nomination of County
Commissioner of the iird District,
Stutsman County at the' June pri
mary election. ..
jo*m Neva, Courtenay.
Tt-bR XIUVbTi: COAOI1SSIONER
I hereby announce my—candidacy
for nomination tq^ tlt^ Office of.Coun
ty Commissioner frwia-t^e Fifth Dis
trict, the June Pcimiry election.
Auirii^tAVanzck'r-—
Windiibri Nortti Dakota.
fob
:.^i-
copp in?i)trbR
I wish'iip ifhnduniie my candidacy
for ti^e office of County Auditor of
Stutaman County, subject ita the will
ot -t^e TOters at the juixe Primary
Election.
LOST:
'jgretfest
Byroin.O, Hansen.—
Notice Is herpby given that on Wed-r
jldsday, tjie 28th fl£ty
fit
Parly !Voroluatle*i»
To be matte by the Republican Par
ty and by the Democrat Party.
Unless otherwise specified one can
didabe to be nominated-fpr each of the
following offieesf
United States Senator*
Representative in Congress, one from
Second Congressional District.
Governor.
Lieutenant Governor.
Secretary of State.
State Auditor,
State Treasureir.
Attorney General.
Commissioner of Insurance.
Commissioner of Agriculture and La
bor.
Commissioners of Railroads,' Three.
Four Members of the 'Hiinse of Rep
resentatives, from Twenty-third.'X.egis
lative District.
Precinct
V County Officers
Sheriff.
Auditor.
Treasurer.
Clerk of District Co.irft.
Register of Deeds.
States Attorney.
County Judge.
Superintendent of ScaOo,a.
Surveyor.
Coroner.
County Commlssionef-s, J.st, Jra, ana
5th Districts.
1
District Assessors, 4th rtnd oth Dis
tricts.
Justices of the Pcacc, four.
County Constables, four,
Which election will be open at
clock A. M. anfl remain upan contin
uously until 9 o'clock P. M.
Precincts and Plntf* of lloldinK
Election
Alexander, School hoTree on Section
•26, Township 137, Range 66.
Ashland, School house on Section ^3,
Township 142. Range 63.
Bloom, School house on Section 17
Townsllip 140, Range 63.
Bloomenfield, School house on faec
tion U, Township 138, Range 68.
.fiuchanan. Woodman Hall, Town ot
Buchanan.
Chase Lake, 'School house on Sec
tion 14, Towns.hip 141, Range1 69.
Chicago, School house on "Section
Township 139, Range 68. .,n
Conkiin. School house on Section -0.
Township 144, Range _68.
Corinne, Town Hall on Section
Uerber. School house on Section 11,
Township 143, Range .6i.
Glaciei-, School house No. 4 Section
23, Township 144, Rartge 67.
Gray. School house on bection
Township 142, Range 02. ,,0
Griffin, School house on Seotion su,
Township 137, Range 67.
Hidden, School house on Section 8.
Township 141', Range 65.
2, P. H,
Gus Koth.—
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER
I hereby announce my candidacy
for re-election ,.fts County Commis
sioner from the Fifth District at tl**
Primary flection.
John Kasper.—
FOR STATES ATTORNEY
I hereby anounce my candidacy
for nomination as States Attorney,
ait the June Primaries.
Ypailanti,
June, A-,
^1922, at the iiBu'al polling places:in each
election District within the County
:l
of
Stutsman, a Primary Election Will be
held for the nomination of the cartdl^-:
ates to be voted for at the ensuing,
General Election, to be lield November
7th, 1922.
Compilttte-Mcn Urn onen for llis
At the Primary leach voter may write"l£.
iii the space left on his ticket for that
purpose, the name .of one qualified e
lector who is a member of his own
party and a resident Of his procincti
and the one receiving the higneot num
ber of votes shall be the Precinct Com
mittee-man.
NonPrirtiMnn Nomination
Nominations for the following of-
fices are to be'made pursuant l. v tno
provisions of Chapter 117, Sc.s-Mo'i Laws
of 1919,
Judges of the Supreme Court, three.
•».State Suijerintendent of Public In
struction.
Id,
Township 144, Range 62.
Courtenay, Fire Hall, Village of Cour-
yCorwin, Woodman Hall, Section 1^
Township 138, Range 63. ,tI__
C.usator, School house on Section 1"*
Tpwnship 138, Range 66,
(i
Deer Lake, ^Township Hall, Section.
2VTownshlp 141, Range 66.
Durham, School house No. I Section
9,'H'uwnKhip 143, Range ®3
'JdmundsV Basement of School house
1',thrown of Edmunds,
•.'•"Bldridge, Town Hall in Town of 1j1
oil
^'r'^?nt, Langer's Hall in Village
School house on Section 21
Township 141. Range 63. aD„n„rl
Germania, School house on Section
2!), Township 137, Range 68.
1
Homer, Town Hall on Section i9
Township. 139, Range 63.
Iosco, School house on Section 8,
^tfasfo^PRi«teeA District No.
1
Janics'tov/n?°Fh'at Ward, District No.
2, Basement of Court House. •_
jiimestown, Second ^Ward, District
No. 1, Council Rooms, City
Jamestown, Second .Ward, Districts
Xo. 2 Basement Franklin School.
Jamestown, Third Ward, basement of:
FeAemestolv"aFourth
Range Garage.
Jim River
Vallej
Pauls, School house in Town of Goja
win,.Township 142, Range 67.
Peterson, Siihool iiouse on Section 27,
Township'14P Range 69.
Pingree, Conlin's Hall, in Village of
P'&U)estem,
School house on Section 27.
Township 143, Range 66.
Plaijiview, School house on Secf^n
13. Township 14*2, Range 65.
Roosevdlt, School house on Section
!, Township 143, Range 67.
Sttoitg,
LEMKE
Ward. District
NJamesJtow^°FourthiaWard,
No.
District
^ltesidence of John
G. Kurtz, Section 22^ Township 142
^^K^nsal, Village Hall, Village of Ken-
SaLent'o.n,
School house on Section 21
Tdwnship 138, Range 65.
Lippert, School house on Section £l,
Township 139, Range 65.
Lowery, School house on Section *0,
Township 1.44, Range^JS.
Lyon, School house nw Section 15,.
Township 143, Range 64. „n
Manns, School house Dn Section 20,
Township 137, Range 62
Marstonnioor, Farmers' Hail, Town-
ship, 142, Range 69,
Midway, School house on bectiou
5
Rose, School house on Section. ZT,
Township-141, Range 62.
Round Top, School h«use on Section
28, Township' 142, Range 66.
Severn, Town Hall, Town ofrMillar-
t(?s'harlow,
School house on Sec.tlon 22,'
ToWnaliip 137, Ilange 86.
NOT
ll«
Township 140, Range 64.
Moon LaHe, School house on Section.
20, Township 139, Range 66.
Montpeiier, Stott's Hall, V.lllage of
Montpqlier.
.Newoerry, School house on Section
10, Townehif) 138, Range 69.
.Nogosek, township .Hall on Section
22, Township 144, Range 63.
01
Sinclair, School. hou3e on Section 21.
Township l:38,~Range 67.
SpirJtwood, ..Town Hall, Town oil Splr- v
itwooa.'- .'Chri$Schgner,. h|8 eon Jacob, John
St. Haul, -School house on aectionr.^6, taockfti^n and 'Conrad JTickfer nar
Townshjp 138i Bange-69.
Stlfctoni Flaherty's Hall,. Village of
CleVeland, Tov/nshlp 139. Rangre 67.
•Streeter, School house,\ Village aj.
v t-'j
Opera house, »Village Ql
Wbodworth. .,
14
^Sydney, -School hoySu .on Section
1$S# Han|e,p,
it VfilJpV
SDrine, SchiKlhpiise on Sec-,
tion li, ToVnWln^li5 li*nge\6J5
wadsn'orth, ^cnoofVf
'rownship 148, 'Hi!
iy«lter*. School jfWi
Btock a,
BriftS
between
Eld^idge and Qswf go' black travel-.
hWWinte,
tion toYJljfe«e of.OU?i?el»mi\ -J
Pohooj .^pu8e,(^n fl^wn
-/^n'^iik »«&<#
isJOsi*
Behoof houceln T9W11 of
Ypsilanti.,
patpd at stoWn, J^orth Dakota,
thfs 2*6th diy 1922.. y?
Xalr*w Blewett.
County- Auditor.
(itw.)
Three Times as
Under Independeiit Ad
ntinistt-atioii -ft* Wfere Made
Under Nonpartisan
ContrdL
Bismarck, N. D., "May 29r—(Spec
ial)—If there is belief Upon the part
of any one that political ioans are
being made by the farm loan de
partment of the Bank of North Da
kota, the records of,the department
inspection W. B.
DeN«ult, manager of the department
said today. The department had on
Slay 26, completed 297 loans and no
trace of partisansttip or favoritism
can be found in these -loans, the de
partment manager said.
Records of the department show
that the volume of farm loans now
being handled by the present admin
istration far exeeed in volume the
amount of loans handled by the bank
under the management of the Non
partisan league administration. A
bout ftiOOO.WpO of farm loans will
have been closed by the end this
month, according to the department
records.
A comparison shows that the for
mer administration handled loans at
the rate of- 2:S per month whila the
present department jiuring the per
iod of actual loaning lias made
loans at the rate of 85 per month.
The former administration made
a total of 754 loans. The present ad
ministration had, on May 25, made
297 loans, or about half of the a
moui\t of the ^former administra
tion djurinn ito entire pes'.od of op
eration, and is now making loans at
the rate of 250 per. month.
The law authorizing the Bank of
North Dakota to make farm loans
went into effect February 15, 1919.
The bank was stiairtefl in July. The
first loan was /not made until some
two months later. During the per
iod of 33 months in which the league
adminisiraHion had authority to
make loans it closed them at the av
erage of "23 a month, and between
September 2, 1919, the date of thie
making of the first ^toan by the for
mer administration and November
23, 1921, it made (loans at the rate of
28 per month.
The new administration came into
control of the farm loan department
on December 5, 1921. There was
practically no organization in the de
partment at that time. The organ
ization was rebuilt from the bottom
and althp some loans were made it
was about February 4, that opera
tions started in full blast. The 297
loans made represents an average of
88 loans per month between Febr
uary 4, and May 20. The compari
son taken gives the league adminis
tration the benefit by taking the per
iod of actual operation while this com
parison of the present, administra
tion covers also the period of organ
ization.
CANDIDATE
FOR SUPREME JUDGE
Fargth May 26—Announcement is
made in theCourier-News that Wil
liam Lemjce is not a candidate for the
supreme judgeship, altho petitions
had been circulated for his candid
acy in Bismarck, Jamestown and oth
er points inIthe state. It is cl^ftped.
that these petitions were prepared
by friendsf of "Le'mke, but that, they
were done so without the consent of
Mr. Lemke.
The. Nonpartisan comniitteo. has
caused to be circulated petitions for
the nomination of 'Attorney Seth
Rf'.chUrdson, of this city, to fill the
vacancy caused by the withdrawal of
George E. Wallace.
KOSITZKY-PRATER
CASE SET FOR JUNE
B'smajpfc ,N-. D., May 27-(Spec
ial)_.The^unreme court has Bet the
Kositzky-Prater ease for hearing on
.tune 6. the first day of the June
tqrm, it was announced today. In
this case William J. .Prater appeal
ed from the district court ruling
which held Carl R./KotJ'tzky entitl
ed to the offices of land commission
er.
1
•.
The case of the Workmen's Com
pensation Bureau against the State
Auditing Boartt In which ths bureau
seeks to reverse a ruling to the ef-,
feet "thiit••'ity must submit salary
vouchers to the auditing board, will
be heard at the same term. Dates
Tor the June'term are June ,6—9, In
clusive, and "June 12*
JAiMEStflWtl AHt(HSI1S
HAVENARROWESCAPE
IN IWUSUAi. ACCIDENT
rowjy e
(ped sejlrihs injury whejiv
wtod to 0p#jtv/i6od «hbi|t! fdur mile?1
hom Thafsdiy
I
Jflew
The fly
noon
lato
Buiek is selling today.
gUisli the flames which literally cov
ered Mr. Shauer.
Tbe flames spread so rapidly that
the men were unable to recover
their coats or the cafpenter tools in
the rear seat of the car. The larg
est piece, of the fly wheel found, a
bout six inches. l,ong, was picked
up nearly fifty feet from the car. The
driver had just- started the car after
fixing a tire when the explosion oc
curred.
Schiicter Brothers motor company
sent out for the what remained of lie
car and brought the engiilfe. into, the
city. The.only .wooden part of the
car remainiing is a part of the spokes
on one rear wheel.
ALERT ADS BRING RESULTS
v,
Model
It is not the Price but the Value built into a car that
counts. Or, it is not what you pay^ but what you get
tor what you pay. Valiie is of paramount importance
with Buick. Price is based entirely oft what it costs to
produce the car designed to carry the Buick name
That the value is in Buick is evidenced by the way
H. W.
Phone 103 BUICK DEALER Jamestown
When bettor cars arc built, Buick will build them
OF KINDS
JOHNSON BROS., JAMESTOWN, N, DAK.
.H' -t -a- -g. -8' -t' I'
i Bxtra Ply of Fabric-1—Ifeavy Tread
|||^§efl7.S$
'& a
CAMP CORLISS MINNESOTA
When you plan your vacations
don't forget Camp Corliss. Good
meals, cottages, boats and bait.
Good fishing. Rates reasonable. Mrs.
Emmd Marheine, manager, 'Battle
Lake,* Minnesota.
CARD Of THANKS
We wish to take this opportunity
to thank all our friends foY the as
sistance and sympathy Bhown us
during ^hg .plckiiesB^nd %t the time
of-.' therdeatfi' of pur husband. a»d
father and for the many beautiful
floral offerings. -x
Mrs. Ferdinand Clemens
and family.
v
... x3J4
poll.boor roads, ior ^e^vy loads, ^r hard utt
A iny^here the Fisk Red-Top cehhotbe
'M A« e*tra ply of fabric atid a l^aVy
red rubbcr nu^»a strong tire .,
exaoting Conditions. ,4.,
M.
n*
•i
(mtwdCfi th»&

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