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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, August 22, 1916, Image 1

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I'
EVENING
I
EDITION
VOL. 11, NO. 199.
RAILWAY HEADS
PREPAREANSWER
TOPRESDENT
Every Utterance of Execu
tives Displays Objection
to Wilson's Plan.
EMPLOYES HOLD
MEETING TODAY
[Presidents-of Roads Prepar
ing Counter-proposal of
Unknown Nature.
Washington, Aug. 22.—The answer
of lnore than sixty railway presidents,
Including those of the western roads
newly arrived, to President Wilson's
proposed plan for averting the threat
ened strike is being formulated to
day,
Bvery utteranoe of the railway
heads displayed opposition to Wilson's
suggestion, but it Is considered that
a possible oounter-proposal acceptable
to the employes will be made the
[basis for further negotiations.
A committee had in charge the
framing of a reply and it appeared
{doubtful that it could be finished to
day.
Tills morning the railway employes
[held another conference.
The men went Into the meeting at
tended by leaders of all four brother
1 hoods.
The leaders said the meeting was
"just to keep the men together-'
A statement replying to the argu
Intents of the railroad executives re
[gardlng arbitration probably will be
.'published tomorrow.
Railroad executives announced that
consideration of the situation was
turned over to a committee of eight
.and that no conclusions had been
reached.
While the sub-committee was work
lng the executives communicated
with their board of directors. It is
understood a reply might be ready
•for Wilson tomorrow.
In administration circles, it was
'Said there was hope for a settlement.
The exact nature of the proposal
1
to be submitted to Wilson was not
revealed, but from the fact that the
executives were In communication
.with their boards, the conclusion is
drawn that It concerned the conces
sion of an eight-hour day.
One suggestion, understood to be
under consideration, was the submis
jsion of collateral Issued to the inter
I state commerce, commission or- pror.
vision for making a permanent com-
brotherhood meeting adjourned
'•until late today. Brotherhood oft*
described the situation am un
changed.
IRON ORE DEPOSITS
FOUND IN WISCONSIN
St Paul, Minn., Aug. S2.—Reports
of the discovery of paying deposits
of Iron ore along the linfe of the
Omaha railroad between Spooner and
Hayward, Wis., have come to St. Paul,
although it is said that every effort
has been made on the part of the
prospectors to keep the discoveries
quiet.
Have Held to Soltcg.
So secretive have they been that it
is said that they yet have the field
almost to themselves.
That there is promise of the devel
opment of some paying prospects In
the region la Indicated by the report
that the M. A. Hann& com
pany of Cleveland, which Is interested
In the Minnesota iron range, has pur
chased large tracts of the land and
have been prospecting there for sev
era! days.
25 Mica by 70.
Tha region under Investigation Is
said to cover a territory about twenty
five miles wide by seventy miles long,
'lying east of the line of the Omaha
road between St. Paul and Duluth and
Is about mJdwagr between the two ctt-
FRENCH SHOOT
A WOMAN SPY
Axis* It—The execution of a
wotaan spy is reported In a Havas
dispatch from Marseilles, says the
:3Mlee Pfaat She was executed at
(the lighthouse shooting rum today
or
asipl
PAXBOKB BE8UUK BUK&
Shut llulr (Doon TTase
Esctttng Time.
Chicago, An*. 23.—While the police
"seatern states are searching for
SOver, accused of looting the two
Chicago private banks of Adolph Sil
ver ft, Co.. bto brother Adolph. founder
of the Institutions, Is hurrying back
.from California to tut the deporf
'toro.
of
Max
Chlop
Prom* Setter written bp MhxBltver
I to hM tkltimr the police are convinced
ths^fttgttivB hanker Is flstlng weat-
"W depoaltors
bsdfsd the bank doors and the for
mer lume of Sliver, of the
bank* natrons are Huaslaaa. who
know'lHile of American lawa
0hW
Wnwry
12,1111.
nineteen
private bsnlm have failed in
AUFGED AUTO
•Minneapolis DetecthresCap
ture Suspected Mem
ber of Ring.
Minneapolis. Mln&, Ai
muTflWD(M« name as John Miller,
suspected of being a member of the
extensive ring of dealers In stolen
automobiles, was arrested here today.
I after a —nsatloasl chase through the
a carefully
Automobile Insnrande
sets. The arrest, followed
lUd trap -hr ditectlvesof
in
•St
r«fc
FARMERS WARNED
BY LAND BOARD
Washington, Aug. 22.—The Federal
Fhrm Land board today warned
farmers that solicitors are busy in
several states without authority of
the board attempting to collect
money for organisations in national
farm loan
associations.<p></p>BKWARGAME
IS BEGUN TODAY
"Blue" Fleet Speeds to Sea
to Destroy "Red"
Enemy.
Washington, Aug. 22.—A "red"
enemy fleet of great strength, con
voying 30 transports laden with an
invading army, arrived within 600
miles off the Atlantic coast early this
morning and the greatest war game
undertaken by the navy department
began.
Within an hour, 12 battleships of
the "•blue" defending fleet were
speeding to sea behind a far-flung
line of destroyers and scouts, Intent
upon locating and destroying the
enemy before he approached the
shore.
WISCONSIN NOW HAS
103 PLAGUE CASES
Madison, Wis., Aug. 22.—Eleven
new cases were added to Wisconsin's
infantile paralysis list today, bringing
the state total up to 103. The death
list is nine.
HOTELS CUT SIZE
OF MENU CARDS
New York. Aug. 22.—Because of
-Scarcity and high cost of paper one
of the leading hotels here announced
today it would reduce the sire of its
menu cards beginning September 1.
Other hotels are expected to adopt a
similar course.
The hotel which has taken the first
step will distribute less stationery to
its patrons in the future. Those
wishing to write letters in the writ
ing room will.be required to apply to
the desk for paper and envelopes.
PEACE TERMS NOT
SUITED TO ALLIES
London, Aug. 22.—"The German
government has as yet shown no dis
position to agree to peace, except on
terms that would be intolerable or
humiliating to some of the allies," said
Premier Asquith in the house of com
mons.
"The suggestion of Dr. Zimmerman
.(German under secretary for foreign
affairs) that the, entente is Influenced
by any pressure from Great, grifaih is
thi
quite untrue," added »e premier.
ft ANK ATTACK
This is Object of Russians
Germans Have Strong
Fortifications.
Petrograd, via London, Aug. 22.—
The feature of the Russian campaign
which broke out like a tempest on
the southwestern front over two
months and a half ago, Is the almost
continuous nature of the fighting.
With the exception of brief interludes
for consolidating positions or chang
ing the direction of attack, it has
been like one great sustained battle.
Periods like the present, which are
described as "lulls" usually turn
to have been crowded with intense
fighting, the details of which it has
been the consistent policy of the Rus
sian staff to hold secret the op
erations are ended.
It Is impossible at present to say
whether the Russian attack upon
Kovel, from the Stokhod region con
tinues with its original energy, but
the belief seemn to prevail here that
the discovery of a series of strong
German fortlfioations protecting Ko
vel from the east led the Russian
staff to base its hopes on the
city by strong flank attacks, which
are now developing. This Is consid
ered to account for the desperate
German attacks in the region of Lake
Nobel, where they are trying to pre
vent the Russian occupation of the
marshy land south of the Stokhod,
which would constitute a serious
menace to the left flank of the Ger
man fioroes whose base is Kovel, and
prove a valuable vantage point to Gen.
Kaledines in the pressure he is exert
ing in the. south.
The strengthening of the Austrian
forces in the Oarpathtarns has suc
ceeded momentarily in checking the
Biwian movement in this direction,
hot the Russians are declared to oe
able to hold all the positions recently
won.
GRAFT CHARGES
UPHELD BY BOARD
Begins. Bask., Aug. 22—The Brown
Bhnod commission, which was ap
pointed to inquire Into bribery and
eonsgtracy charges made by J. E.
Bradahaw, conservative member of
the Saskatchewan legislature for
MoM Albert, has submitted Its re
post to the lieutenant governor.
7. A. Sheppaad. member for Moose*
lair odunty and speaker In the legisla
tors, and 0. R. Moore, member for
MlWto Greek, ale found guilty of re
ostvfaff moaey In connection with the
scouring of Mnsnsss. H. C. Pierce,
member for W*4ena, is found guilty
of fitfhcif, and C. H. Oawthorpe,
member tor Blggar, is found guilty of
both bribery and receiving money in
connection with promise to stills pro-
W. F. A: Thurgeon. George Lang
ley, A. V. Totska, J. Nolln, C. Loc
MM and 8. 8. 81mpeon are esoner-
In the ease ot one of. the charges
Ms Inst A. p. McNab, minister of pub
lift works, the commissioners find
separately. Commlsrtonsr Brown says
ttwi In his opinion there is no evi
dence to support the ohsrge "on
Which he would be warranted ln lm
puting frrong-doing to McNab." Com
missioner gfrooTjMilavea tbat "Mo.
-^Menoe li by no mens satis-
J!
s?
,2jr
:v
NORTH DAKOTA'S
'JO/.:
CREEKS ARE
ENGAGED WITH
TFFIBULGARIANS
Have Been in Battle Near
Seres Since Sunday
Morning.
SERBIAN SOLDIERS
CAPTURE TWO FORTS
Italian Contingent is Really
of Important Pro
portions.
Athens, via London, Aug. 22.—An
initial brigade of Russian troops ar
rived at Saloniki to Join the Entente
allies in the fighting in the Balkans
recently. The arrival created a pro
found impression here. Even the roy
allsts, who consistently opposed parti
cipation In the war by Greece on be
half of the Entente allies, seemed
stunned by the arrival of the Russians
to participate in the campaign, which,
under other conditions, might be un
dertaken by the Green army.
It is regarded possible that the
presence of the Russians in Macedon
ia will effeot a change in the attitude
of Bulgaria.
The general feeling here Is that the
bringing of the Russians has dispelled
definitely the dream of a, greater
Greeoe, 'which was ooncelved a year
and a half ago by the then Premier
Venizelos, who carried Greece well on
the way toward an entrance in the
war with the Entente allies.
In some quarters, Irritation has
policy Sf
S^«aW^ek
Which-Is said to hsVe overlooked the
Interests of the nation.
The occupation of Kastorla and
Corytsa by the Bulgarians Is confirm
6d in news from official sources,
which says that the German fleld
marshal, August Von-Mackensen, is
with the Bulgarians. The military
movement of the Entente allies are
hindered by the plight of the civil
population before the Bulgarian ad
vance.
After a conference the French,
British, Serbian and Russian com
manders at Saloniki today decided
that the Russians should take up po
sitions with the Serbians on the
southern frontier of Serbia.
The Russian force was placed un­
Top, left to right: FVank A. Vender* p, J. P.:
Washington, Aug. 12.—There is no
doubt of the fact that it w«uid not be
for the beet Interests of the financial
powers of the country, the powers be
hind the railroads of the country, for
a general strike to be called. Kan like
J. P. Morgan could not afford a strike
at this time because of the vast loss is
it would entail to the munition busi
nses, which if now at Its height and
growing dally. Practically every mu
factory of
of any con
far enough removed frees
hoard to require adequw
consequence Is
to require adequate raMroad
Trains must he kept jnov-
ing in order to aupply even this de
mand, henoe the intense later »ct of
financial poworp in the etrike situa
tion. -t
Theae men, the men whq qoatrftl
.tmnri •ie"iii»e»
"••^0i[...:<p></p>Wr§r
-ika.
GRAND FORKS, N. D„ TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 22. 1916.
der the combined staff, of which
Crown Prince Alexiwder of Serbia is
the nominal commander, but Russian
General Frlederictss is in actual
command.
The Italian contingent of troops
landing at Salohlkl really is of Im
portant proportions. The Temps, in a
military review, -alludes to the pres
ence of the Rus^bn troops along the
Vardar river, pointing to the fact that
five allied contingents are engaged
now in the Entente campaign in the
Balkans. The Kalian movement is
construed as showing that compre
hensive political agreements have
been arranged itr advance, and also
another evidencC-pf the international
spirit prevailing i|1nong the Entente.
Capture Serbian Positions.
Berlin, Aug. ti.—(Via London.)—
All Serbian positions on the Malka
Niereplanina, eaJt of Banica on the
Macedonian front*'.haye been captured
by troops of the central powers, the
war office announced today.
The French, adds the announce
ment, have been driven out of Buth
kova and Tahlmoa.
Bulgarians Advance.
Berlin, Aug. 22.—The official an
nouncement of the Sofia war office
says that on August 18, the Bulgarian
left wing began a general offensive,
advancing in the Struma valley, occu
pying Demi Hissar, and establishing
itself on the left bank of the Struma,
after repulsing the British and French
near Seres.
Saloniki Fighting General.
Paris, Aug. 22.—Fighting on the
Saloniki front is becoming more gen
eral, says a Havas dispatch from Sa
loniki. In the Doiran section, Serbian
troops captured the forts of Kaima
kadar and Cucurlu.
Greek troops have been fighting
the Bulgarian* in the vicinity of
Seres since Sunday morning, says an
Athens dispatch to the Exchange Tel
egraph company. The Greek com
mander at Seres, kn Important city
of about 80,000, has called to arms
all reservists In that locality, says the
dispatch. That the fighting is of a
stubborn character is indicated by the
fact that a large number of Greek
soldiers have been killed.
The heaviest fighting is on the front
northeast of Saloniki on the left bank
of the Struma river from Kaviala to
Barkli. On the western end the line
of hostilities is confined for the most
part to artillery.
,ES TO
RUSSIANS
ESCA
Hancock, Mich., Aug. 22.—Charles
Toivonen arrived (n Hancock from
Finland today, after two attempts to
escape from serving in the Russian
army.
According to Toivonen, all avenues
of escape from Finland of men of
military age are closely guarded, and
although many of his countrymen are
desirous of coming to America, few
care to take the riak.
Toivonen crossed the Gulf of Both
nia, seventy-five miles wide, in a
small boat, to Sweden, where a ticket
to this country, forwarded by friends
here, awaited him.
FINANCIERS ARE ULTIMATE AUTHORITY AND MAY BE CALLED
ON BY WILSON AS LAST RESORT TO SETTLE WAGE DISPUTE
Jacob
the railroads In this country, not the
directing heads, but the moneyed
nlssssB rsjiiseeiittin tl)» VMt pumber
ot stockholders, oould not afford a
strike any mora than
publiq.
Probably the five men
•entattveof
hlndtha ral
J. P. Morgan, who,
made mqn than any
erhap#, cat ot the production end
ehi& Sutler 2
He powe^ul house TnSSjmb
FRONT IS
ENTENTE FORCES
NEWSPAPER
ARRIVAL Of
MUSCOVITES
STIRS GREEG
Venizelo's Dream of Greater
Greece is Gone is
Belief.
MANY OBJECTED TO
GOVERNMENT STAND
Irritation Expressed at the
Recent Foreign
Policy.
London, Aug. 23.—^Further Athens
advices indicate that the Russian
troops have been in the Balkans for
three weeks, the initial contingent
apparently arriving at Saloniki before
July 31, and the news Is Just being
released by the entente oensorshlp.
Reports today also indicate that
Rumania is about ready to enter the
war on the side of the allies.
Great interest centers In unofficial
dispatches reporting that Greek troops
are engaged with the Bulgarians In
the vicinity of Seres.
British troops on the Somme front
advanced along a line half a mile
long in the region of Posleres. They
also advanced near the Leipsic salient,
it is officially announced today.
Paris officially announces that the
French last night on the Somme front
made progress north of the river In
the outskirts of Clery. They oap
tured trenches south of the river.
WORLD'S RECORD IN
PETROLEUM BROKEN
Washington, Aug. 22.—The world's
production of crude petroleum In 1915
—426,892,673 barrels—was the great
est in the history of the industry. Fig
ures of the geological survey today
show that the output was greater by
28,194,307 barrels than the previous
reoord in 1914.
The bulk of the Increase In output
in l&lS came from the United States
and Mexico, though Russia, Argen
tina and Japan recorded significant
gains.
The United States was first with
281,104,104 barrels Russia came sec
ond with 68,548,062 barrels, and Mex
ico third with 32,910,508 barrels.
yi iwiuum
8c!r*9ar
when
Tork
and res
W. HDL
of the country Louie W. HOI. son of
the IsAe James J. Hill, corner Of the
Northern Pacific and Great Northern
nUlsoads, the great northwestern
trunk lines, and Frank A. Vands^lip.
prealdetft ibe jargest hank la the
President Wlleoa «oke ot
ofTHrlais and railroad
MtMett*. he
qugaayether greap of nw lathe
ri:uaniag:gSMK
1
compromise: usedt-
San Francisco, Aug. 22.—Riggers
and stevedores here who joined the
general strike of Pacific coast long
shoremen June l, later returning to
work pending arbitration, have ac
cepted a compromise offer made re
cently by the San Francisco Water
Front Employers' union. The
ment gives the men nearly everything
they asked for, including higher
wages and an acceptance of closed
shop
principle.<p></p>ITAU
PLAGUE-INFECTED
INDIANS BANISHED
Billings, Mont,, Aug. 22.—Stray
cats, dogs and Indians are suspected
of spreading infantile paralysis and
Billings is killing the animals and has
ordered the Crow Indians, who flock
to the city from the nearby reserva
tion, to strike their tepees and flit
homeward.
Six cases of the plague have just
been discovered among Indians at
Pryor and the entire Crow reservation
probably will be kept under strict
quarantine for some weeks to come.
Montana reports twenty-one cases of
paralysis and all but two are In this
section.
GIRL CAMP RECRUITS
STUDY THE WIRELESS
Lake Geneva, Wis., Aug. 22.—Tests
in semaphore signaling and wireless
telegraphy were begun today by the
150 women taking military instruction
at the national service school camp
here. In remote spots of the wooded
grounds groups of women sat with
their notebooks and signal flags and
seemed to forget the severe heat In
their seal for study. The women re
ceived instruction in sending and re
ceiving wireless messages to and from
the Great Lakes naval training station
at Lake Bluff, 40 miles
distant.<p></p>GERMMIWAR
SAY
swjs
rf x. xt*
EIGHT PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
NGtheagree­
VISITS GOFFLZIA
Victor Emmanuel Rides into
City—Given Big
Demonstration.
Udine, Italy, Aug. 20, (delayed)—
King Victor Emmanuel entered Gor
zia today under the fire of Austrian
artillery- Unmindful of danger, the
king drove over a bridge being shell
ed by the Austrians, inquired regard
ing measures for restoring civil life
In the city, and was given a tre
mendous demonstration by the
populace.
SUNK:
British Submarine, E-22, Be
lieved to have Destroyed
Battleship.
London, Aug. 23.—The British of
ficial announcement this afternoon
says that it is believed a German bat
tleship of the Nassau class has been
sunk by British submarine E-22.
The Nassau class of battleship com
prises four vessels with displacements
of 18,602 tons each, length
451
beam 88 feet, and draft 26 feet.
feet,
TRAfflCRUlES
ARNGNORED
Only Few Automobile Own
ers Comply with Orders
of City Administration.
Although the baa has been placed
on parking automobiles on the busi
ness streets of the city, oar owners
have neglected to comply with the
ordinance and nearly as many ma
chines are crowded about the curbings
on Third street as before the council
took action on' the matter. During
the buelest periods of the day, when
traffic on the principal business streets
is the heaviest, car owners negligent
ly stop their machines next to the
curb, oftentimes with the rear end
close to the center of the street, and
leave it in this position for several
hours.
As a result, serious accidents are
narrowly averted daily. A few car
owners have recognised the advant
age of leaving their machines in the
parking sections, but theee are In the
minority. When speaking of the con
dition this morning. Mayor Dinnie
said:
"With the many automobile acci
dents that have taken place in and
near Grand Forks during the past few
months, automobile owners must
necessarily recognize the safety first
methods which have been mapped out
by the city officials for the protection
of drivers and pedeetrlans alike. The
leaving of oars near the ourbs on the
main streets Is purely negligence and
must be done away with.
"Unless the car owners co-operate
with the officials, little can be done to
relieve the congested condition that
has proven so detrimental in the past.
I sinoerely hope that further cataatro
phlea will not be necessary to awaken
the machine owners %o the urgency of
parking their cars In the prater
placea"
Accordtiy to thq city ordinance
governing the regulation of traffic, no
oaf owner la given privileges and au
must chef. It is prdbaMe that if the
jWMtfoe continues that police officials
will take action.
f*
T*
EVENING
EDITION
SENATE DROPS
IMMIGRATION
BILL TODAY
President's Veto Announce
ment Has Affect on
Solons.
SCORES DEMOCRATS
WHO MADE REVOLTi
Number Refused to t*
Bound by Caucus—Stone
Upbraids Them.
Washington, Aug. 22.—President
Wilson today told callers that he
will veto the Immigration Mil again
if it is passed by congress with the
literacy test. Tlww have been iw»
ports that he might sign the bill.
After Wilson let it be known that
he would veto the immigration bill if
it contained the literacy test, the sen
ate defeated a motion to take up the
measure, returning to consideraion of
the revenue bill.
Washington, Aug. 22.—Aa the rail
road executives were not ready for
another conferences this morning.
Preddent Wilson called hla cabinet
to dispose of business which had ac
cumulated while the strike Situation'
was under consideration^-,.
The cabinet went over the Strike
•"Situation fully.. confidence waa ex
pressed by members that the rail*
roads in the end would accept Wll
Bon's plans.
What assurances the cabinet had
for such conclusions were not disclos
ed. Cabinet members agreed that it
was not feasible to hurry the railroad
executives into decisions aa they had
many things to consider.
PAPER SCARCITY
IS EXPLAINED
Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 22.—Louis
Wiley, business manager of the New
Tork Times, declared in Minneapolis
yesterday the print paper situation is
very serious.
'fPhe raw supply seems to be suf
ficient, but the inadequate manufac
turing facilities have made the time
critical," he said. "Some factories
that formerly made print paper have
gone to making book paper imports
of paper from Europe have been cut
off the newspapers all over the coun
try are being more widely read, and
becoming more and more an essential:
part of a person's daily life, and hence
their circulation and size steadily
have Increased.
"These three factors probably are
mostly responsible for the high cost
and scarcity of paper.
"The situation is bound to remain
serious for some «ime."
BUENOS AIRES IN
GRIP OF COLD WAVE
New Tork, Aug. 22.—While the
United States' climate borders on the
tropical, Buenos Aires, usually con
sidered a city of balmy airs, has ben
g-'ipped by a frigid spell, acoording
to passengers on the liner Varsai,
which arrived yesterday.
Theodore Rickscher, in Argentine:
several years, said Buenos .Aires has
experienced the coldest winter ot the
last half century.
Coal haa risen |40 a. ton and al
most all the landlords have ceased
heating their houses. "The seonle." I
he said, "sit. in blankets and shiver.*"
PEACH TREE AVENUE.
When you drive to Seneca, says
The Sabetha Herald, observe the row
of Peach trees extending two miles to
the city limits. The trees wwe plant
ed from stones by the primaiy pu
pils In Mrs. Emily Collins^ school
r?om- Every spring for ten years
Mrs. Collins has taken her pupils on
a tree-planting walk. Eventually all
roads to Seneca will be lined with
peach trees. Talk about Apple Seed
Johnny! There la as much religion
in planting a tree as there Is ih plant
ing a prayer any day.—Kfcuaa cw
Star.<p></p>ARMY
4p
11K
Revised Articles of War arc
Missing, How-
Washington. Aug. Without
vtai article* of war, to
which President Wilson a
departtaant objected, the
repaaaad the army approi
the bill
fev
K?
1'
1
1'
&
1
The president's announcement,
which settled the question, arrived
just when the democrats were con-1,
tinuing their party row over the ac
tion of nine revolting democrats, who
refused to be bound by the caucus,
which decided to let the bill go over
and the leaders of the revolt making!
caustic replies to the reproaches of
Senator stone.
CABINET TODAY
Not to Hurry Railroad Pres
idents into De
cisions.

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