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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, August 23, 1916, Image 1

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EVENING
EDITION
VOL. 11, NO. 200.
CAPITULATION
Of TURKEY IS
SBNMPIAN
General Offensive Against
Bulgaria Imminent,
Says Journal.
AIMED AT FALL
OF OTTOMANS
The Muscovite Forces Gain
"Brilliant Success*' De
clare Reports.
London, Aug. 28.—Developments in
ithe Balkans take first place In both
the news and editorial columns of
newspapers today. The papers dis
play keen interest, not only in the
landing of Italian and Russian troops
at Saloniki, but also in the possible
actions of the Greek and Rumanian
governments and in the new Russian
offensive developing in the Bukowlna
region. According to official dis
patches, the Russians are pushing
ahead with the greatest energy In
Bukowlna, close to the Rumanian
frontier and already gained a "bril
liant success." Summing up the Bal
kan situation, the Dally News says:
"There is imminent a general of
tensive against Bulgaria of great lm
portance. One of the first result* pf
a successful offensive by General Sar
rail woul$ b^ the .complete rupture of
the German communications with the
east and the isolation and capitulation
of Turkey. This is a plain geographi
cal fact."
Political situation Watched.
Political developments in the Bal
kans overshadowed the Interest for the
moment even in the important mili
tary operations in progress there, but
today's dispatches throw little new
light on the situation from either the
political or military standpoint.
In connection with the attitude of
Rumania, who may soon enter the
war on the side of the Entente Allies,
the course of the Russian campaign in
Bukowlna close to the Rumanian
frontier, is being closely watched.
Two hea^y assaults on a position
newly won by the British south of
Thlepval on the Somme front were
made last night by the Germans.
They gained a footing In British
trenches, but were driven out again,
the war office announced today.
Germans Gain Footing.
Paris, Aug. 28.—German troops,
attacking the French lines south of
Estrees on the Somme front, gained
a footing at some points in trenches
that had been captured by the French
on August 21, It was officially an
nounced today. The attacks in the
Sstrees region south of the Somme
was launched after *a period of In
tense artillery preparation. North of
the Somme, the Germans violently
bombarded the French first line.
Indians Move Forward.
Rome, Aug. 28.—The Italians are
making a strong and successful thrust
at the Austrian lines into the Alpine
region on the extreme north of the
front, It Is officially announced. The
Italians carried a strong Austrian po
sition to the Tofana area.
Turkidh Attack Halts.
Petrograd, Aug. 23.—The Turkish
offensive along the Armenian Black
Sea coast has halted, the Russians
driving the Turks back with the aid
of the Russian fleet, it was officially
announced.
DODGE AUTO BANDITS
THOUGH CAR UPSETS
Clear Lake, 8. D., Aug. 28.—After
successfully racing a quartet of auto
bandits for miles in a desperate ef
fort to fight off robbery, Mr. and Mrs.
George Artus of this city upset their
own oar In taking a sharp curve and
were seriously injured. The robbers
were forced to withdraw at the ap
proach of another automobile as they
overtook their intended victims at the
scene of the accident.
NOOVERTURES
Of PtACE HAW
Lord Robert Cecil Makes
Statement
Jn
Answer
to Question.
London, Aug. 28.—Lord Robert
Cecil, minister of ward trade, and
parliamentary under secretary for
foreign affairs, declared in the house
of commons today that no'peace ov
ertures had been made to Great
lie statement was made in re
sponse to a question by Sir James
Hsnry Dalslel. the liberal member
from Kirkcaldy Durghs, regarding
"peace rumors" and the situation in
Btlktoi
-y /, -1.
BUKOWINA MOVEMENTS OF GREECE
SUSPECTED HEAD Of
AUTO-THEFT GANG
IS ARRESTED TODAY
Owatonna, Minn., Aug. 28.—A
man suspected of being the head of
a nation-wide automobile theft
syndicate, was arrested here on his
appearance at a garage where the
supposedly stolen cars were deliv
ered from Chicago. He will be
taken to the Minneapolis county
jail, pending an investigation.
IN PRISON CAMPS
Hundreds of Thousands still
in Danger from Turks,
Official Says.
London, Aug. 28-—The Rev. Harold
Buxton, secretary of the Armenian
refugees fund, has Just returned to
England after devoting three months
to relief work In the devastated vil
lages. In an Interview the Rev. Mr.
Buxton gave details which entirely
confirm the grave statements made
by Lord Bryce some months ago In
the house of lords. Asked whether
he had any proof that the deporta
tion of Armenians last summer was
due to German Instigation, he said:
"All I can say is that the German
government did nothing to stop the
massacres. During the whole business
German influence was supreme at
Constantinople, and German consuls
were at their posts in all the chief
centers through ABla Minor. Besides,
the people were swept away with a
methodioal thoroughness which one
does not expect from the Turk, who,
when left to himself, acts rather-with
sudden simakis of -fury.
"I have'evldence from an American
missionary that certain of the German
consuls did their best on behalf of the
Armenian people. For instance, the
German consul at Erzerum wired to
his ambassador In Constantinople vig
orously protesting at the order of de
portation. He received a reply In
these words: "We cannot interfere
In the internal affairs of Turkey.'
"I don't think there has been any
exaggeration as to losses as published
In. England. The Armenian race num
bered over 4,000,000, of whom 2,000,
000 were Turkish Armenians, and of
these perhaps 1,000,000 have been de
ported and 500,000 massacred. Only
200.000 escaped into the mountains,
and so across to Russian soil. There
are some hundreds of thousands In
concentration camps between Aleppo
and Mosul and in the neighboring
regions of Mesopotamia,, where Tur
key continues to be supreme over
their fate.
"To this considerable population we
have no access, and it Is still in dan
ger. According to reports which
come through. It Is being ravaged by
sickness, famine, privations of all
kinds, outrages, and murder, all of
which means high mortality among
the victims."
NORWAY CAPTAIN
SEES DEUTSCHLAND
Newport News, Va., Aug. 28.—Cap
tain Olsen of the Norwegian steamer
Alf, which arrived here, says that on
August 6 he passed the German mer
chant submarine Deutschlaiid pro
ceeding at a moderate speed in an
east and southeasterly direction in the
regular steamer track south of Cape
Race, longitude 61, west latitude
41.40.
SON OF CAPITALIST IS STTICIDK.
Hood River, Ore., Aug. 28 A cer
tificate of suicide was signed today
by the coroner in the case of Barent
Coll, son of John T. Coil, New York
capitalist, and resident of South Or
ange, N. J. Young Coil killed himself
near Parkdale In the upper Hood
River valley, by shooting himself. He
left a letter to his parents stating
that his suicide had been fully plan*
ned, but he assigned no motive.
NAVAUttKES
ARE DESCRIBED
Germans Declare British
and French Navies Lost
72 Big Vessels.
Berlin, Aag. 28.—The German ad
miralty issued a statement today as
serting that the losses of the British
and French navies In the line of bat
tleships and cruisers to August 1,
comprise 72 vessels, with a total dis
placement of 486,060 tons. The Ger
man losses in the same classes for the
same period, are 26 warships, with a
total of 42,67 tons.
WOMAN'S SLAYER KENTISH CEP.
Robert
J,
Williams, Young Iowan,
Most Perm Life Term.
Marshalltown, Iowa. Aug. 28.—
Robert J. Williams, 28, who eenfessed
to the murder. of Mrs. Matilda C.
Steward on the night of July 20, near
Dillon in this oountjr, was today sen
tenced to life Imprisonment by Judge
Cummings. Sentence of $0 years' im
prisonment tor assault with intent to
commit murder was passed on Wen
deU K. ro«te,:
lJ*
t'
44
li* I
(RES HOURLY
fORJIER SON
Woman Sees Boy Fall and is
Hysterical Continually—
Death Expected.
Danville, 111., Aug. 28.—The 10
year-old son of Mrs. F. E. Coleman
of Georgetown, 111., made a "slide for
life" on a tight wire stretched be
tween two trees last Friday. The
mother thought the boy was killed as
she saw him knocked unconscious.
She went into hysterics and ever since
has been screaming for her boy, de
spite the attempts of physicians to re
store her normal condition. Her
death Is expected momentarily.
CHARLES E. HUGHES
ARRIVES AT RENO
Reno, Nev., Aug. 28.—Charles E.
Hughes reached Reno today for a day
of parades, barbecues, receptions and
speech-making. He leaves tonight
for Ogden, Utah. He was given a big
reception here on his arrival at the
station-
DYNAMITE BLAST INVESTIGATED.
Outside Agents Absolved by Powder
Company Officials.
Ashland, Wis., Aug. 28—Dupont
Powder oompany officials emphatical
ly deny that outside agents were re
sponsible for the dynamite eploslon
that killed two men and did $2,000
damage late yesterday. The explosion
occurred on the Trlvelone plant
David Macaud of Hayward, Wis., and
Harry Edner of Ishpemlng, Mich
were killed. This is the plant's first
explosion in eight years and the
fourth In the 12 years of its opera
tion.
NORMAL BOARD AT BEMDMI.
Plans Considered for Beginning Work
on Mew Normal School.
Bemldji, jjRnn., Aug. 28—rPlans for
the commencement of work on Bfe
midjl's normal school, for which an
appropriation of $26,000 was made by
the last legislature, were considered
here today by members of the state
normal school board, the presidents
of the five state normals, and C. G.
Schuls, state superintendent of edu
cation. Aside from the business ses
sion, which was the quarterly meeting
of the board, several entertainment
features had been arranged for the
visitors.
RETURNS FROM
CROCKER LAND
U. S. Naval Officer in Cop
enhagen—No Report on
McMillan Expedition.
Washington, Aug. 28.—Ensign Fitz
hugh Green, the American naval offi
cer assigned to the McMillan Crocker
Land arctlo expedition reported his I
arrival at Copenhagen on August 10 I
to the navy department, but has made
no report as to whether the expedi
tion found Crocker Land or of the
whereabouts of McMillan, and other
scientists in the party. Green an
nounced his arrival from three yeats
of exploration in a brief cable saying
that he would proceed to Washington
unless otherwise instructed.
BOY IS ACCUSED.
Wisconsin Lad Suspected of Attempt
ing to Wreck Train. I
Delavan, Wis., Aug. 28.—George
Oleson, a 12-year-old boy, is being
held here today on a charge of hav
ing attempted to wreck a passenger
train on the Milwaukee road between
Delavan and Elkhorn by placing a
railroad tie on the track. The train
hit the tie, which was fastened to the
rails, but aside from smashing the
cowcatoher, no damage was done. Ac
cording to detectives, the boy has
made a confession, saying he placed
the tie on the track as a prank.
CS&ranb ZFotk# Meralb.
NORTH DAKOTlfS W WitTEST W NEWSPAPER
NEW NAVAtATTACHE
GOES TO LONDON
Gapfe. W. D. McDougall.
Capt. W. D. McDougall, formerly
of the president'yacht Mayflower, but
recently on duty at the naval observa
tory, has been.. assigned to duty in
London as naval attache of the United
States embassy, succeeding Comman
der Powers Symington. Captain Mc
Dougall's. father, the late Gen. Clin
ton McDougall', was several years ago
a member of congress from New York.
SLIGHT GAM IN
WEANTPIAGUE
Number of Deaths and New
Cases Little Greater
Than Yesterday.
New York Aug. 23.—During the 24
hours ending at 10 a. m., infantile
paralysis killed 42 children and 131
were stricken, against 39 deaths and
118 cases during the same period yes
terday.
This 1b but a slight gain, despite a
record-breaking heat wave-
•-mm
Is Expected This Time to
Meet With Approval
of President.
Washington, Aug. 23.—The army
appropriation bill with the revised ar
ticles of war approved by the war de
partmeht, passed the senate today.
It now goes to the house where the
amendment Is expected to be accept
ed. President Wilson vetoed the bill
because the bill on its previous pass
age gave exemptions to retired offi
cers of which the war department
disapproved.
TERRIFIC STORM
SWEEPS ISLANDS
St. Thomas, D. W. I., Aug. 28.—A
sudden storm with high winds, and
heavy seas, swept over the island,
causing extensive damage. Several
smnll vessels were lost.
PROMINENT ILLINOIS
POLITICIAN IS DEAD
Jollet, Ills-. Aug. 28.—J. D- Ray,
former lieutenant governor of Il
linois and well known politically,
died early today, aged 88.
SEVERE EARTH SHOCK
ROCKS HUMBOLDT CO.
CALIFORNIA THIS A. M.
Eureka, Cal., Aug. 23.—The most
violent earthquake felt here since
April, 1918, when San Francisco
was destroyed, rocked this city and
northern Humboldt county at 6:55
o'clock this morning arousing deep
era who fled from their homes Into
the^streecs panic stricken.
no material ilimsga
HBMPBBD6 OF RAILROAD UNION REPRESENTATIVES THRONG
WHWi! HOUSE CBQPHP6 IN CONFERENCES WITH WILSON
Part of the line ofMO railroad employes lopresmHim union filing into the entrance of the White House.
President Wilson talked te (lis six hsndred and forty chairmen representing the 400,000 railroad men In
verted in the present dispute about the fight-hoar day for over fifty minutes, telling them that he had decided
to ask that the railroads concede thfe eight-hear day. The White House lawn was thronged with men daily,
earning la In crowds,, oar part eC the Whits Senas being sst aside tor their usrata imnfirmnt
GRAND FORKS, N. D« EVENING, AUGUST 23, 1916. EIGHT PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
PERSHING CAMP
HEALTHREPORT
Only Six Deaths from Dis
ease Since Army Cross
ed the Border.
Field Headquarters, American Pu
nitive Expedition, Aug. 23.—Only six
deaths from disease and the present
sick rate 1.6 per cent for the Ameri
can punitive expedition since it en
tered Mexico over five months ago, is
the record contained in the official fig
ures issued today by* the sanitary de
partment. There has not been a sin
gle case of typhoid, the prevailing ail
ment being dysentery.
STORMUiirM¥HER'S
CHATEAJJ_ON SOMME
Son, In French Army, Knew the Ger
mans Had Driven His Parent
fMm Her Home.
Paris, Aug. 8, (by mail)—The
Chateau La Maisonnette, so often
named in recent bulletins on the
Somme fighting, is the property of
Mme. Fernet, who has lived there for
many years. The property is close to
Blaches and Peronne. The owner was
there in August, 1914, when Von
Kluck's forces passed through during
their rush upon Paris. She remained
in her house and for months after
ward no news was heard of her. One
of her sons, Victor Fernet, son-in-law
of Gen. Boisdeftre, although free from
military obligations, volunteered at
the beginning of the war, and the
hazards of war sent him recently to
the Somme front, where he has shar
ed in all the attacks made.
A letter from Germany had inform
ed -him that his mother, who had re
mained until a short time ago at La
Maisonnette, had been sent away- with
almost all her aged servants, so that
he was able to take part in an attack
which meant the destruction of his
home without the fear that his moth
er was still there.
The Germans made six desperate
efforts to retake La Maisonnette be
tween 11 p. m- Sunday (July 16) and
Monday afternoon. Each was made
iby at least a battalion, but each was
defeated.
CLAPP BOOSTS
FOR lAEOLLETTE
Minnesota Solon Urges Re
election of the Wisconsin
Senator.
Waupaca, Wis., Aug- 23.—"Senator
La Follette's defeat would mean abso
lutely the perpetuation of that reac
tionary spirit which in the last four
years has supplanted largely the al
truism of the preceding few years."
This was the declaration of United
States Senator Moses E. Clapp of Min
nesota, who made a vigorous speech
here in the interest of Senator La
Follette's re-election.
Sees Setback in Defeat.
"If he is defeated," continued Sena
tor Clapp, "it means the end of that
altruistic struggle for many years.
"Senator La Follette fathered the
Progressive cause so dear to the
hearts of millions in this country. If
he should be removed from public life
this great movement would lose
steadfast champion and leader In the
senate.
t,
RAILROAD HEN BECOME UNEASY
BROTHERHOOD LEADERS EXPRESS
FEAR OE ABILITY TO HOLDJEM
The steel interests have their rep- awarded. A government calculation
resentative in the senate the high
tariff barons have their representative I
in the senate so have the mining in
terests, the munition traders, the rail
roads, the employers of children, the
insurance Interests—and there should
be representatives of the people's In
terests," Senator Clapp conoluded.
"Senator La Follette Is the people's
representative. Public interest will
suffer without him-**
HOSTILE FLEET HAS
NOT MET DEFENDING
SQUADRON AS YET
Washington, Aug. 23.—Admiral
Mayo's hostile fleet seeking the land
Invaders of the Atlantic seaboard,
and Rear Admiral Helm's def™iui
ing squadrons had not met in battle
today in the greatest war game oi
the American navy.
MANMPOUCE
(Mf ARRESTED
He and Others are Charged
With Conducting
Blind Pig.
(Herald Special Service.)
Mandan, X. D., Aug. 23.—State's
Attorney Langer today caused the ar
rest of Chief of Police Mike Knoll,
John Ehret, deputy sheriff, Gabe Eck
roth and August Ussellman, charging
them with the conducting of a blind
pig. The chief is further charged
with aiding and abetting in the main
tainance of a common nuisance.
Ehret and Knoll are further alleged
to have sold memberships in the Ger
man Kultur society, at $5 per, and,
then, charged the members with
drinks and split the profits between
them with no return to the society.
Eckroth and Ussellman were orig
inally dlreotor and secretary of the
organisation before Knoll, treasurer
and Ehret, president, seized its con
duct for their perssonal profit. Half
a dozen informants have sworn to
affidavits, charging the above and oth
er items.
STRIKER'S WIFE
AND BABY JAILED-
Virginia. Minn.. Aug. 28.—Mrs. L.
A. Hamlin of St. Paul, a member of
the executive board of the Women's
Welfare league of that city, today is
making an investigation of the strike
conditions for the St. Paul club and
for the charities and correction com
mission of the Minnesota Federation
of Women's clubs, of which Mrs. T. F.
Kinney of Minneapolis is chairman.
Mrs. Hamlin will report on the
manner in which the women of the
range are treated, particularly by the
special deputy sheriffs employed by
the mining companies.
The case of Mrs. Mllka Masonovich
of Blwabik is being investigated es
pecially. The representatives of the
club have asked the governor why the
woman was being held in the county
Jail at Duluth. It was reported that
Mrs. Masonovich used a club on the
body of Deputy Sheriff James Myron
after he'had been killed.
"I went to their home today," said
Mrs. Hamlin. "I found that the
mother and the small children have
been kept in the county jail at Du
luth. She has a nursing baby and
should not be kept there under any
condition. The other children were
left at the house with some board
ers. I shall recommend her immedi
ate release."
MANITOBA OPENS NEW BIDS.
Cost of Parliament Buildings May
Reach Five Millions and a Half.
Winnipeg. Aug. 23.—Tenders for
completion of the new Manitoba par
11ament buildings were opened in pub
lie today. Only one bulk tender was
received, that of J. McDlarmid com
pany, limited, for $3,128,018, a sum
equal to the total original successful
tender for the entire work. All ten
ders were referred to F. W. Simon,
the architect, for report. Govern
its ment officials say the high figures sub
mitted are due to Increased price of
material since the Kelly contract was
put the final cost at 15.500.000.
DEfENDSWORK
Of AIR BOARD
Major Baird Replies to Crit
icisms in House of
Commons.
London, Aug. 28.—Major Baird,
representative of the aerial board in
the house of commons, replying in
the house last night to criticism of
the air defenses during the recent
Zeppelin raids, announced that since
the war began the Entente Allies had
aocounted for thirty-five Zeppelins.
'There have been thirty-four raids
on England." said Major B&ird, "In
ten of which no casualties were suf
fered while in the remainder the
number of killed was S34 civilians
and 60 military men. Nobody can say
that these casualties, deplorable as
they are, will have any influence on
the conduct of the war, provided the
honorable members of the house do
not give utterance to such ill-chosen
statements as have been ma^e in the
house of commons tonight.
"Members of the house of com
mons ought to be leaders of the peo
ple they should encourage the people
—not create panic. Lord French has
a very complete system of air defense,
and It is being improved dally, while
the British flying corps has a record
superior to any other nation,"
ti slsM
tf
EVENING
EDITION
DEMAND ACTION
AT ONCE UNLESS
PLAN IS ADOPTED
Some Employes Declare the
Railroad Heads are Play
ing for Time.
AVERT VOTE ON
PROPOSALS TODAY
Discontent Spreading Rap*
idly—Possible Legisla
tion Considered.
Washington, Aug. 23.—"Hie rail
road employes' committee showed
such marked signs of unrest today
at the delay in the negotiations
between President Wilson and the
railway executives, that the leaders
of the men became alarmed and
openly expressed fears of their abil
ity to hold the men much longer.
The employes' meeting was thrown
into an uproar by speeches of the
minority demanding immediate ac
tion unless the roads accept Wil
son's plan, but tbe leaders suc
ceeded in adjourning the meeting
before any vote was taken on the
various proposals. Some of the
men urged that most of them go
home, leaving the brotherhood
heads with authority to imii the
strike if the railroads do not accept
Wilson's plan.
The meeting adjourned to
morrow morning. Frequently Jwmi..'
and applaose were heard a block
from the hall.
"It is our belief," said
mltteenoMt 'dot the ruliroad* SXW
playing for time with Wilson just
as they have done with us for
months. There is no rranfm why
they should not give Wilson an
swer immediately.
"Discontent among the men Is
spreading rapidly."
Washington, Aug. 23.—President
Wilson summoned Senator Kewlandi
and Representative Adamson, chair
men of the senate and house com
merce commissions, to the White
House today. It is understood that
he planned to discuss with them legis
lation on the railroad strike situation.
The president plans for a settlement
of the dispute, which would create a
commission to Investigate the working
of an eight-hour day and collateral
issues.
Men Are Impatient.
Meantime, the men, tired of the de
lay due to the railroad representa
tives' prolonged discussion of Wilson's
plan, gave free expression to their
opinions of today's meeting.
The men felt the railroads show a
disposition to disregard their sacrifice
of the demand for time and a half
overtime.
A. B. Garretson advised patience,
predicting action soon.
"The situation is in the hands of
President Wilson and until he acts
there is nothing for us to do," said
Garretson.
Other leaders said plans were mads
for instant action in case the railroad
managers decline Wilson's proposal.
Reedy to Act.
Xewlands and Adamson, after the
conference with Wilson, declared that
they approved the president's pro
posal and that they were ready to
push any needed legislation-
Further, they would not discuss
the conference. it is understood,
however, that the creation of a per
manent commission to investigate fu
ture controversies was one of the sub
jects discussed.
The bill adding two members to the
Interstate Commerce commission,
which already passed the house and
comes before the senate Friday, also
was discussed at the conference. It
Is understood definitely today that the
railroad executives decided to act as
a unit in handling the present situa
tion.
The program of the railroad execu
tives today was to deal first with the
principle of arbitration and afterward
with the eight-hour day.
If means can be found for guaran
teeing arbitration in future disputes,
at least some of the railroad execu
tives favor acqulescense with the
eight-hour demand.
It was declared in administration
circles today that both Wilson and the
railroad executives seemed on a way
to an agreement.
President Wilson expects another
eall from the committee of railroad
executives some time before tomor
row.
Men Are Restless.
Restlessness on the part of the men.
who openly declare the railroads are
"playing Wilson for more time," be
came more and more Impatient late
today. One leader said, "We ean prob
ably hold the men here another day
or two."
CUMMINS INDORSES HARDIN.
Sioux City, Iowa, Aug. St.—J. A.
Johnson, clerk of courts, made public
a letter today from Senator A. B.
Cummins, in which the senator tn
dorsss the candidacy of Lieutenant
Governor Hardin for governor.
THE WEATMKR.
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