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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, June 15, 1917, Image 1

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I j*-vi :y #&%&
E N I N
EDITIONS
rOL. 12, Mo. 143.
is
r\ $
WILL REACH AT
LEAST TWO BILLION
AND 500 THOUSAND
figures Might Go as High
as $3,600,000,000, it
Said.
[ANY BANKS HELD
UP TILL LAST DAYS
'Minneapolis Federal Bank
District Falls Below
Minimum.
Washington, June 15.—The
Liberty Loan has been tremend
ously over-subscribed. When the
books closed at noon, treasury of
ficials estimated that the total
would reach at least $2,500,000,
00Q and might soar to $3,600,000,
000.
Nearly every federal reserve
district appeared to have exceed
ed its minimum, allotment.
Scores of small subscribers
stood in line at hundreds of banks
throughout the country during
the final hour. T,he small sub
scriber apparently has responded
with an enthusiasm that exceed
ed the most confident hopes of
officials.
Swelling the huge total by mil
lions came the belated subscrip
tions of the banks that\ held back
till the last moment. The cleri
cal forces of virtually every re
serve bank were practically buried
under a landslide of eleventh
hour subscriptions.
Because of this situation, the
exact total of subscriptions may
not be known for many hours.
Th- full magnitude of the coun
ts'* response even may not be
inc. wtred for several days. Thou
sands of belated subscriptions, |t
ift--i£4MkF«lr-.inay--nQt .rettciv 'She
serVe
1
4 1 T.
'H*
':T*r
banks until after the dead
line of noon, standard local time,
and these must be included .in
making up the full totals showing
the '.saltan's response.
Millions of dollars, it was esti
mated, were transferred by tele
graph from national and state
banks and trust companies on be
half of their customers to the fed
eral reserve banks. This trans
fer marked the measure of the
last 1'iute response of the small
investor as the banks had for
warded the bulk of earlier sub
scriptions by mail.'
Tast Amount Fours In.
Washington, June 15.—The Liberty
Loan has been over-subscribed by
many hundreds of millions of dollars.
Treasury officials estimated at 11 a.
m., an hour before the books closed,
that the total of subscriptions would
be at least $2,600,000,000. an over
subscription of 25 per cent.
IndicaUons based upon telephone
and telegraph reports from all sec
tions were, at that hour, that every
federal reserve district in the country,
with the possible exception of two,
would subscribe its minimum" quota
and that many of the. districts would
over-subscribe the maximum.
Encouraging reports came from
Minneapolis, where committees were
conducting the final drive to reach
the $80,000,000 minimum set for the
ninth district. The unofficial estimate
of the total up to theclosp of business
yesterday was $67,000,000.
Chicago Passes Quota.
The Chicago district flashed past
its quota of $260,000,000 shortly af
ter the accountants resumed work this
morning. The first figures announced
were $266,000,000, arid it was pre
dicted that the loan in the seventh
district would be over-subscribed by
$40,000,000.
Bushel baskets filled with applica
tions for the loan today greeted tabu
lators for the Kansas City district
with $65,000,000 actually recorded.
Officials were confident the total at
Kansas City would pass $76,000,000.
Cleveland Ahead of Mark,
Cleveland subscriptions reached
$66,000,000 this morning, whloh
mean* the city has exceeded her max
imum total of $46,000,000 by 26 per
cent Officials predicted that the al
lotment of $226,000,000-for the fourth
district would be over-subscribed.
New England Investors made a
spectacular drive today to make up
the $26,400,000 necessary, to All the
minimum (quota of $240,000,000. Ac
countant* were far behind thelrtask
and Boston committee members were
concerned, not so much with whether
New England would' 'come' to' 'the
mark, a* with how heavily It had
ovsr-subscribed
It was announced that the Dallas
district Had raised its quota of $40,
000,000.
New TofkHtn Than Halt Total.
With tabulating clerks .many hours
'behind the subscriptions, the .New
-Tork district had reached an aggre
gate of $t»2.000,000.1t appeared cer
tain that New T^Ms's share In th*
'•loan would exceed more than half of
'.tnja two billion totiU.
MlnnnapoiHs District Befcind
':r-*ii»n«®oU(k June 5.—Liberty
Loan subscriptions in the ninthieder^
preserve district will total between
$#1,400,000, and $66,000,000, accord'
ingto estimates by officials ofthere
i3£tank here, at nbon today, Th*
dilljmt's mlnimtim qyota ^ras $10^
E?':
rural districts afs just awak-
.-anlBpfrk Ib another ttptk, MgM
MORE EXEMPTIONS
IN INCOME TAXES
ARE MADE TODAY
Washington, June 15.—'An income
tax exemption t&llowance of 1200 for
each dependent child of a taxable
parent, and reduction of the two cent
stamp on bank checks to one cent,
were decisions reported today by the
senate finance committee revising the
war tax bill.
Following his attendance at the
chamber of deputies, the general and
his staff motored to an aviation field
to watch aerial evolutions of French
experts. The French airmen outdid
themselves In performing, spirals, loop
thtfW|Wra'iid uihei'trtcke ihafwnk*
ly astonished, the Americans, who ad
mitted afterward thsit they' had, never
£e'en" such feats in aviation. After an
hour with the aviators, General
Pershing returned to Paris and con
ferred with the minister of marines.
He, then, rested briefly, while the
ever-enthusiastic crowd waited pa
tiently outside his hotel. After his
rest, he went to keep a dinner en
gagement with Minister of War Pain
leve.
While the meetings with the minis
ters were largely, of a social order. It
is understood that they afforded the
American commander to at last
broach the work into which he and
his following are so eager to plunge.
General Pershing consented to be
sketched from life by a young
Parisian woman artist.
General Pershing spoke almost
Joyously at the prospect of being able
to take up his work'immediately. It
'was characteristic that during his talk
he never used the first personal pro
nous, but always referred to "us."
Engagements of a social character
will largely take up tomorrow, but
the Americans are looking forward to
settling down to work in earnest by
Monday at the latest.
ST. PAUL MINISTER'S
WIFE AND ANOTHER
MAN ARE ARRESTED
Sacramento, Cal., June 15.—Mrs.
Elsie Cornlls, wife of Rev. J. Cornils,
a professor in Phalen Lutheran sem
inary, St. Paul, and Clayton E. Walker
were- arrested here yesterday on a
charge of contributing to the de
pendency of the, two minor children
of Mrs. Cornils!
The couple arrived in Sacramento
about three or four months ago. Prior
to coming to this city, they went to
Los Angelee. where they resided for
some time. Leaving Los Angeles, tfiey
went to Reno, .where.
Washington, June 15.—President
Wilson today- renewed his effort* for
early' passage of the- food control leg
islation. He conferred with Senator
Martin, majority leader, and Senator
Gore, chairman of the agriculture
committee^
FIVE NORWEGIAN
Considerable Lota of Life as
Result is Re
ported.
London, June IB.-1—The sinking of
Ave more Norwegian vessel* with .conV
*ld«rabl*-lo**' of life is-reported .by
the' Norwegian^orelgn office quot
ed In at diapatchifromCopenhagen.
The-Cavmet, a aaillng vesael, load
ed with -plt prop* wa* driven aground
and seriously-damaged by gun Are.
All th* crew 1* miwrthf with the «x-
v,, is i? ,i\*
*r
N
tERTV LOAN TREMENDOUSLY OVER-SUBSCRIBED
WITH ELEVENTH-HOUR RUSH UNCOMPLETED MAY
EVEN GO OVER THREE-BILLION DOLLAR MARK
have exceeded our quota," said one
of the campaign managers.
Liberty Bonds on Wall Street.
New York, June 16.—The initial
stock exchange transcatlons ig Liberty
Loan bonds, trading in which began
on the New Tork exchange at qoon
today, waa above par. A lot of 910,
000 sold at par and one-fifty. The lot,
$250,000, sold at par.
a
PERSHING IS
ANXIOUS TO
GET TO WAR
Extended Trip Along West
ern Front Will be Made
Immediately.
IS ENTERTAINED
ROYALLY IN PARIS
Visits Aviation Field—To
Begin Work in Earnest
Monday.
Paris, June 16.—Although General
Pershing's first day in Paris was na
turally filled to overflowing with so
cial affairs, he managed nevertheless
to utilize odd moments for business.
It is understood that he will soon
leave for an extended trip to the
•front.
.4%
-Hi*
4m:*
NORTH DAKOTA
WELL IN LIBERTY
LOAN, SAYS .HANNA
Pleased with Work of Vari
ous County Organiza
tions.
GRAND FORKS DOES
HER BIT SPLENDIDLY
County and City Respond
Readily to Call For
Subscriptions.
In' a long distance telephone inter
view,' former Governor L. B. Hanna,
chairman of the North Dakota Lib
erty Loan committee, said that the
amount subscribed in this state would
amount to something between two
and a half and three million dollars,
and he thought this was a remarkable
showing In view of the fact that the
crops of last year proved a failure,
and also considering the dry weather
of the spring and. early summer this
year. Mr. Hanna said that he was
exceedingly gratified at the splenedld
results, on behalf of the executive
committee of the state, he wished to
extend his sincere thanks to chair
men anA..members of all the county
and city committees who have been
consistently at work throughout the
state ever since the campaign start
ed.
Following is a. report of subscrip
tions to Liberty Loan bonds maide by
the banks in Grand Forks county
outside the city of Grand Forks:
Arvilla—Arvllla State Bank $2,500,
paid in full.
Emerado—The Farmers Bank $2,
600, paid-in full.
Gilby—Bank of Gilby $2,000, paid
20 per cent, $200 paid in full.
Inkster—Bank of Inkster $8,160,
paid in full. Farmers and Merchants
State bank $2,400, paid in full.
Kempton—First State Bank $2,000,
paid in full.
Larimore—First State Bank $2,000,
paid in full.
Larimore—Elk Valley Bank $10.
200, paid In full. The National Bank
$6,000, paid in full.
McCanna—Bank of McCanna $1,
200, paid In full.
Manvel—First State Bank $1,200,
paid in full.
Meklnock—Mekinock State Bank
$1,600, paid in full.
ParreVBank
of
S*»w
*Lrf
Af
NlaBMU"®
I
Mrs. Cornils in­
stituted a divorce suit, but later drop*
ped the suit.
Rev. Mr.' Cornils,' husband of the
woman, has made every effort to lo
cate -his wife since she left his home
in March, 1916, but never succeeded
until the couple arrived here.
EARLY PASSAGE OF
FOOD CONTROL BILLS
URGED BY PRESIDENT
*2000
North wood—First National Bank
$3,500.' Cltlcens' National Bank $2,
000, paid in full.
,,Orr—Bank of Orr $2,000, paid 2 per
cent.
Reynolds—State Bank of Reynolds
$8,000, paid in full.
Thompson—Farmers State Bank
$4,000, paid in full.
Total amount $61,350.
E. J. Lander, chairman of the Lib
erty Loan county committee, said this
afternoon that the committee was en
tirely satisfied with the result. He
thought that if more time had been
granted, it would have been possible
to present the issue to many more
farmers than was the case now, and,
given that opportunity, he felt certain
that the1amount would have been
trebled, notwithstanding the fact that
certain people had been trying to dis
suade the farmers from investing in
the government bonds. Mr. Lander
said that the committee had reached
the conclusion that meetltngs in
school houses, town halls and other
(Continued on Page 10.)
1
OUR GOVEffNOP'
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NORTH DAKOTA'S' GREATEST -W" .'• NEWSPAPER
GfcAND FORKS, N. D., FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 1817.:
From an Editorial In—
Normanden
Thursday, June 14, 1917.
When Ike (Mice
SeekitheMan
"8ome of our political greenhorn
leader*' are just now stalking around
In the district emitting vast volumes
of nonsense to the effect that .the time
when the voters allowed the man to
seek the ofllc*, 1* a thing of the past.
Now. they aay, It is the office which
must look for the man if things are
to go aright. I
"It sounds quite nice, this talk
about the office seeking the man. And,
yet, it is perhaps the most foolish poli
tical nonsense that, ha* been heard
of late, that Is:' Nonsense when con
sidered in the light of practical ma
terialisation.
''Can you,
.dear
reader, imagine to
yourself the picture of "The O.flce''
walking around looking for a proper
man? We .have Town ley's words to
the effect that this is actually what
happened when candidate for con
gress from 'the First- -North Dakota
district had to be found this year.
''The Office" started out on a still
hunt for the man.' Whence It started
has not been definitely determined,
but it made its choice in Fargo. A
quiet young fellow who had no knowl
edge whatever of the needs of the dis
trict was the best material "The Of
fice" was able to find.
"There is, of course, no one who
seriously believes this even though Mr.
Townley says it, and even though the
Courier-New*" in Fargo obediently
repeats it But, alas, there Is noth
ing new in the assertion that the office
seeks the man, in that sense. It was
ever thus. n.' this country since the
days when the Union was established
The Office" Is an aristocratic fellow
who does not condescend to perform
his own tasks but leaves them to
others. As errand boy "The Office'
has always' made use of, and still
makes use of, the nearest political
boss within reaching distance. And
as a rule, the boss choses a modest,
humblis and coy fellow who, although
he knows very little about the move
ments of the age or about the will of
the people and the voters, still has so
much sense left that he realizes that
his election is due solely to the efforts
of the political boss. For this reason
he also knows whom he must obey in
the Interest of the office.
"Does onyone actually believe, for
instance, that' the members of the
Nonpartisan league in the First dis
trict would have nominated John M.
Baer as its candidate to fill the vacan
cy after the excellent Norwegian
American Henry T. Helgesen—if it
had been left to tnem? Not by a long
shot! No one would have been think
ing of the cartoonist in connection
with this office.
"But the office seeks the man, say
Townley and the "Courier-News"—
unanimously, they add. For the sev
enty delegate*, prevent at the conven
tion nominated hlo^ir. the league's
candidate without ^protests.
"There is -no doubt about this.
They are very "unanimous," these
league "representatives." They also
sent a "unanimous" vote of thanks to
Governor Frailer because he vetoed
the very same terminal elevator bill
which they "unanimously" adopted in
the closing days of the legislature.
"If "The Office" goes on to seek the
man in this manner, we ought to be
consistent and abolish the privilege
of ypting. For, when "The Office"
at first has had so great trouble in
finding its man, the voters should hot
be given an opportunity for doing
foolish things on election day. Who
knows but that they might make an
other selection than the one already
made by "The Office!"
ABANDON MEETING
New Tork, June 14.—Announce
ment was made here tonight that the
American Institute of Banking had de
cided, because of war conditions, to
abandon its annual convention which
was to have been held in September
at Denver.
In the Same Bed Now
«.<p></p>Jfrrmfc
The heaviest increases were in flour,
18 per cent bacon, 15 per cent, and
potatoes, 14 per cent. Every article
of food except coffee showed an ad
vance.
Relative price Increases for some
of the principal food follows:
Sirloin steaks, 8 per cent round
In the year ending April 16, aver
age food prices advanced 82 per cent.
Onions, during the 12 months, went
up 179, per cent potatoes, 146 per
cent beans, 79 per cent, and flour, 72
per cent.
GREAT LAKES NAVAL
STATION IS IN FINE
CONDITION, ADMIRAL
BENSON SAYS TODAY
Washington, June IB.—Admiral
Benson, chief of naval operations, aft
er a personal Investigation of the
Great Lakes training station at Chi
cago, has reported to Secretary Dan-,
lels that conditions are very good and
the morale excellent. Complaints had
been made that men were badly cared
for.
^,*VSH
Bismarck, N. D., June 15.—Fargo and Grand Forks are to lose
much of the prestige which they have attained as jobbing centers
through favorable rates obtained after years of endeavor, while
the Twin Cities are to reap a corresponding benefit through the
operations of the distance tariff act, as enacted in North Dakota
by the fifteenth general assembly on the lines of the Cashman
act in Minnes6ta, and forced through by Townley's secret caucus.
This fact was made clear at a hearing of North Dakota rail
ways before the state railway commission yesterday. Fourth
class rates and a number of special commodity rates which the
Red river valley cities have enjoyed will be abolished by the dis
tance tariff law. On the other hand, neither Bismarck nor Minot,
inland jobbing centers, will profit from the operations of the act,
as the Twin Cities will still enjoy the advantage of a long haul at
interstate rates, which formerly was partly overcome by special
class and commodity rates granted these points.
RETAIL FOOD
PRICES SHOW
BIG ADVANCE
Increased Nine Per Cent Be
tween March 12 and
April 15.
Washington, June 15.—Retail food
prices in the United States jumped
on an average of 9 per cent between
March 15 and April 15. as shown in
statistics compiled by the labor de
partment. It was the largest advance
in one month since the beginning of
the European war.
r^.'Ji\l£*\^-1S
A^-J^WKSfi
\f
BRITISH CAMPAIGN IN BELGIUM EXPECTED TO
DEVELOP INTO ONE OF MOST IMPORTANT OF
WAR GERMANS BEING FORCED BACK RAPIDLY
JOBBING CENTERS OF STATE
HEAVY LOSERS THRU TOWNLEY S
SECRET CAUCUS RATES LAW
BUTTE MINERS
SEEK BETTER
CONDITIONS
?,ru-elto.todayU",tSd
s!ie
Wheeler and ask him to re
quest President Wilson to send a rep
resentative of the department of labor
to Butte to investigate working condi
tions in the mine.
The new union's d.emands Include
recognition of the union, f6 for the
daily wage of underground workers
and that bulkheads be made with
manholes in them, so that men can
I escape through them in time of acci-
steaks and rib roast, 9 per cent pork
chops, 12 per cent ham, 9 per cent Ident.
lard, IS per cent Jiens, 6 per cent I Several mines that were shut down
canned salmon, 7 per cent fresh eggst because of the flre in the North Butte
10 per cent creamery butter, 11 per
cent cheese, 3 per.cent milk, 2 per
cent bread, 6 per cent corn meal, 12
per cent: rice. .4 per cent: onions, 18
per cent beans, 12 per cent sugar, 11
per cent tea, 1 per cent.
Mining company's properties resumed
work today. It is said by mining men
that at least 8,000 miners are not
working, some because of the funer
als being held in connection with the
mine disaster and others because of
the strike.
SINN FEINERS TO
CONTEST SEAT IN
PARLIAMENT NAME
Minneapolis, June 15.—Four men.
two soldiers and two civilians, were
being held in the Minneapolis city jail
today in connection with two robber
ies. The soldiers gave names which
are believed to be fictitious and rip
ped the insignia from their, uniforms
to save the honor of their units.
Robert Palmquist reported to the
police that he had been .robbed of a
watch and tig, and O. M. Anderson
said four dollars and a watch had
been taken from him. Both men said
they thought they saw two soldiers
among the group which robbed them.
After a search of the neighborhood,
the police arrested the soldiers who
gave the names of James Rusetto and
Robert Durall. and their civilian com
panions. The two watches -are said
to have been found in the possession
of the soldiers.
MANY RECRUITS
NEEDED NOW
Over 50 Men are Wanted in
Co. M, First N. D. Infan
try, says Lieut. Holm.
3&
?,r"%
I-'-
E E N I N

ilEDITlGii
PRICE FIVE CENTSV
General Plumer's Forces
Capture Important First
Line Trenches.
FLOOD DEFENSES
HELP BELGIANS
Germans Tried to Inundate
Land Between Them and
Pursuing French.
(Hy Associated Pre**.)
The British campaign in Belgium
gives signs of developing into one
of the most Important of th* war.
The Germans are being forced back
at a comparatively rapid rate.
Today brings the announcement of
another considerable advance by the
British in this area. They attacked
last night south and east of Meaalnea
and on both sides of the Ypres-Co
rn in canal, gaining all their objeo
tives.,
Capture German Front Trenches.
The front line in the British often- I
sire movement extends seven miles
___ Plumer's troops the German front
Vvant Government Agent to trenohes between the Warnave and
the Lys, besides additional ground
more to the north, in the sector be
tween Tpres and Comlne*, the official
statement indicates.
Investigate Mines
Demands Refused.
®J.att^_Atiorn®y the situation seems
A LIFE PRISONER
London, June 15.—The Sinn Fein
ers of East Clare have decided to con
test the seat in parliament vacated by
the death at the front of Major Wm.
Redmond. They have chosen as can
didate Edward DeValera, formerly a
professor in Dublin university, and
sentenced to death for his connection
with the Sinn Fein revolt. His sent
ence was commuted to penal servitude
for life. He is now in jail.
TWO SOLDIERS HELD
WITH TWO CIVILIANS
FOR ALLEGED ROBBERY
Over 50 additional recruits are
needed in Company M, First North
Dakota Infantry, according to First
Lieut. Oscar Holm this morning. At
the present time, a total of 96 have
taken the federal oath. A total of
150 men is to be enrolled.
Those who enlist, in the National
Guard at thla.time will be considered
In apportioning the final allotment for
the city and stat.e, in .the. draft .of the.
new army, according to Lieut. Holm
today.-. ."
Both old men and new recruit* In
the guard will alio be allowed to
leave the service if they wish to do
so at tit* termination of the- war Ac
cording to information which tiaa
been reoeived from Washington. Aft
er the guard ha* been called into fed
eral service next month, the recruit
ing will be done .through the regular
army and through the draft.
Any wishing to enllat now in' the
local company may do so by com
.munlc*ting with Lieut Holm, Flat J.
Stratford apartment*, with Meut- Karl
Hanson at the Northern Produce Co.,
or #lth the guard at tha Armafy 9*
North Fltth street.
lllll
K#^ v£f
?i»,
V,
ENGLISH MAKE BIG
ISli
ADVANCE, GAINING
ALL OBJECTIVES
1
from the village of Klein Zillebeke
south to the river Warnave. Last
night's attack, the culmination of
constant pressure, yielded General
Further Retreat.
Signs of probable further retreat
Butte. Mont. June IB—A commit
tee from the Metal Mine Workers' fit®
wases MdTmn^d1"working SKd? ^u?h*2i? of Sines^the E
treme limit of their range.
Th«
BrlUsh artillery command
to be
Floods Help I
on
almost
wholly responsible for this and other
yielding tendencies of th* German*.
The British big gun* secured their ad
vantage when Messine* ridge, the only
commanding, eminence In the region,
was stormed at the opening of the of
fensive.
Expect Big Development*.
General Haig** dispatches have In
dicated that Important development*
might be expected to grow out of
the offensive In Belgium and hi* pre
diction appear* to be in the wajr of
being made good.
The French Front, June 1.—(Cor
respondence of the Asaoclated Praw)
—Th® Germans have not had *o muoh
success as the Belgians farther nortb
in using floods a* a barrier of defense
along the line of Olse. The river
when it passed northward of th* de
vastated town of Chaune, now in th*
hands of the French, take* a sinuous
course through marshy low-lying
lands, and the Germans after their
forced retreat endeavored by dam
ming various places to place a wide
stretch of water between themaslve*
and the pursuing French troops. Ex
tending north from the foreat of &t.
Gobain almost to St. Quentin, they
succeeded for a time in covering th*
intervening country with water and
several cities stood out like island*.
The nature of the soil and the dry
weather of the spring disappointed
their hopee of creating a permanent
moat in front of their new position*
and a tour of the French front line*
in this vicinity today showed that
scarcely a trace of the inundations re
mains.
The roar of thousand* of cannon
comin- from farther south and east
told of the tense struggle in progree*
for the possession of the Chemln-des
Dames which the French have held
firmly ever since it fell into their
hands during the fighting of April,
and where they have fought back ev
ery desperate attempt of the Germans
to recapture it in counter-attacks de
livered day after day and night after
night. The German commander-in
chief evidently set great value on this
position, for he has sacrificed thou
sands of men from his best formation
in order to' regain possession of it—,
all in vain.
MERCHANTS TO BE
WELL ENTERTAINED
AT NEW ROCKFORD
New Rockford, N. D-. June 18.—
Plans are being worked out here by
every merchant to make the annual
convention of the North Dakota Re
tail Merchants' association the best
from the point of entertainment aver
held by the association. The datae for
the convention are June 19. SO and
21. One of the chief addreases will
be given by Dr. E. F- Ladd, president
of the North Dakota Agricultural ool- {Wi'
lege and pure food commi**ioinr «f
the state, who will addre** tha -con- fc 4'
vention -on Thursday morning, June
21, on the subject of "Th* Merchant mi
and Pure Food Work in North Dako
it#
ta.v
SWOBODA IS HELD
IN MUNICH ON AN 4
ESPIONAGE CHARGE
Paris. June 16.—Raymond Ruff
Swoboda, who waa held for some time J:
by the' FaHs' police in the spring
6t
1916. oh suspicion of caualng a fir*!
on board the French liner Toujf
alne, has been arreeted by tha Euriqh
police, according to the Zurich corre
spondent of the Patlt Parislsn. 8w^»
boda i* accused of recruiting *pli* $4
work against France and 1* alUgadi
to be in cloee relatieaa with a.O^b
bualnea* man who was raMatty -.s**
tenced to life imprlsnsmswt to'.gwjgj
fhresplonac*.

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