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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, June 22, 1917, Image 7

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1917-06-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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President Wilson to Select
Delegation of Most Prom
inent Citizens..
S
Washington, June 22.—president
Wilson will send to Japan an Ameri
can mlaaton headed by one of the na.
tloji's moat prominent cltlsens. De
tails are under consideration now
and It is likely that the Americans
will be in Tokio at about the same
time that the Japanese mission, which
is to leave Japan July 2 or 3, reaches
here early in August A closer mu
tual understanding of each nation's
war aims and how co-operation may
be,.best effected also will be consider
ed.
Boston, June 22.—T. p. O'Connor
and Mr. Hazelton, members of parlia
ment, are now on the way to this
country aa a mission in behalf of the
,Iriah nationalist party, according to a
cablegram from John Redmond, lead
er'pf the party.
The object of their mission is be
lieved to be connected with the con
vention to be held in Dublin at which
the. form of government for Ireland Is
to be discussed.
2,000 PLANE MOTORS
MONTHLY, U. S. AIM
^Washington, June 22.—Within four
I months the United States will be able
to turn out engines for 2,000 battle
planes a month with which to over
whelm the air forces of the German
[army. Every month thereafter It will
|be .possible to increase this production
gby approximately 1,000 machines un
gtll the maximum is reached.
This was the information given out
gpfllcially today to do away with the
Impression this country would be sat
isfied to engage only In the manufac
ture of machines for the training of
iviatora.
On the. contrary, it. is the intention
|ro build the heavy battleplanes for
jimmediate oervice at the front. With
the motors which have been perfected
6
for them they will be able to do from
110 to 120 miles an hour.
factories in this country will take
pv^jr the manufacture of engines and
part* for training planes and the
he^vy battleplanes, leaving for the
present to the plants in England and
France the construction of the high
Fpowered and speedy light fighting
{planes.
[WILSON PROCLAIMS
RECRUITING WEEK
Washington, June 22.—-President
Wilson has issued a proclamation des
I recruiting week for the regular army
and called upon unmarried men with
out dependents to enroll for war serv-
Ice that the ranks of the regular army
might be filled promptly.
The proclamation follows:
"I hereby designate the period' of
IJ line 23 to June 80 next, as recruiting
week for the regular army, and call
upon unmarried men between the
ages of 18 and 40 yeare, who have no
dependents and who are not engaged
in -pursuits vitally necessary to the
prosecution of the war, to present
[.themselves for enlistment during the
week herein designated, to the num
ber of 70,000.—Woodrow Wilson."
This president's action was taken at
the,..request of army official* who have
beea seriously concerned over the
tslow. rate of recruiting for the reg
lular^army
Since April 1, 121,868 meq have
been enrolled as war volunteers of
|h£ 188,898 necessary to bring the
fervlce to war strength.
COMPANY WILL"
HAVE RECRUITING
CAMPAIGN IN JULY
As a means of recruiting Company
fcM.. N. D. N. G. up to its .full war
(Strength of about 150. a recruiting
{campaign will be carried on for a pe-.
rlod of ten days, commencing July 1.
There Is room for about B0 more en
listments in order to reach the full
pva* strength of the guard, and it la
likely that these fifty places will be
Ifilled by men who would rather vol
lunteer for service than wait to be
|forced into enlisting, when the selec
tive draft measures are put into ac
jition.
1ST. MARY'S PARSONAGE
IS DAMAGED BY FIRE
Fire, starting from an over-heated
pjii'mney in the attlce of St. Mary's
hJatholIc parsonage,. Belmont avenue,
ishqrtly before 7 o'clock' last night re
isulted in damage to the residence of
[approximately 1800. Rev. J. O'Dris
I coll, pastor of St. Mary's church, was
not at home when the blase started,
land before he returned Chief John
Fitzgerald and his firemen had the
[blaze well under control.
The kitchcn, dining room and attic
were damaged by the flames, but oth
er Motions of the house suffered llt
tie except from smoke. A collection,
(of books In Father O'Driscoll's lib
Irarjt valued at $8,000 were unharm
led.
l.*£..
Canton, Ohio, has painted th« tower
[of t|ie eourthouse red, whit* and blue
"tilkthe war is over." Now we know
what Cantonment.
V£lll the world aver settle doWn so
that: croquet will become a diversion
again?
Katherine Stinson, Intrepid
Aviatrix, To Fly at the State
Fair Made Orient Enthusiastic
Although daring and diminutive,
little Miss Katherine Stinson the 19
year-old wonder-girl of cloudland,
who has Just returned from a six
month's tour of the orient—every
step of her tour'through China, Japan
and the Hawaiian islands being just
one series of ovations, triumphs and
conquests—asseverates smilingly that
she la not superstitious, the slip of a
slim and shy girl admits that she does
not like to fly over cemeteries.
Japan was a bit Incredulous, re
luctant to believe the stirring stories
of her mastery of the air printed by
its own. newspapers, when she arrived
in the land of the lotus. She quickly,
however, brushed aside any fears any
might have had' as to her prowess in
the heavens, and then, having seen
with, its own eyes the many things it
had been promised, it fell down and
worshiped its little and girlish visitor.
The same series of sensational and
ctipftaotilar feats that made the Jap
anese sit up and take notice and ap
piauii will be presented by this in
trepid aviatrix when she apears at
the Grand Forks state fair.
"Do you know that if there is a
cemetery near where I am to fly, I
do everything I can to avoid it—I
just simply will not fly over one. I
will circle about .or go pquare around
it. I will certainly be carried to one
some day—that is inevitable—al
though I may not be killed flying and
BUSY PERIOD
FOR BURTNESS
The Headquarters Receives
Many Requests For
Speeches.
Headquarters for Olger B. Burt
ness, Republican congressional can
didate for the First district, will open
tomorrow morning In' the Security
building and a vigorous campaign will
be Instituted, the details of which
will be published in an official state
ment to be Issued In a day or two.
Already, Mr.- Burtness has received
many requests for speeches and the
campaign headquarters will do Its
best to accommodate all the parts of
the district which desire to hear the
candidate. It will, of course, be* dif
ficult to meet the demand.- but head
quarters will make the very best ar
rangements possible:
Meanwhile, Ur. Burtness has the
rest of this week and practically all of
next week taken up. He went to Far
go this afternoon and will return to
morrow. Then, he will go to the nor
thern part of the district, and spend
some time in Cavalier county until
he returns Monday evening. Part of
Tuesday, Mr. Burtness will spend
around the campaign headquarters,
and late in the day he will go to the
southern part of the district, spending
practically all of the week In Rich
land, Sargent and. Ransom counties
and alsp in the rural parts of Cass
county, On Tuesday next, Mr. Burt
ness Is scheduled to address the an
nual meeting of the Hallinglag in
Fargo,' and he will not speak here
again until the final day of the cam
paign, that is, July 9.
A week from tomorrow the candi
date will be In Kindred where the
oldest Norwegian congregation In the
state celebrates Its 4Kth anniversary.
The campaign headquarters will map
out the further Itinerary and divide
the district as reasonable as possible
so as to give the voters of most of the
counties of the district an opportunity
to hear Mr. Burtness.
P. O. Thorson, chairman of the
campaign committee, has today writ
ten to all the county chairman with
Ih the district urging them to do
everything within their power to or
ganise a strenuous campaign In co
operation with the Grand Forks head
quarters. The list of speakers la not
yet complete, but it include* Henry G.
Viek, of Pembina, Senator C. W.
Plain, Cavalier, Fred' T. Cuthbert,
Cool and Comfortable
Our assortment of
\w
4trap effects is large in
!X T-
Jariety of pattern^ and
leathers, also a wide
Variation of ^izes „and
gridths.* J* -.
I $2.50 to $4.50
H. $
and Bros. Shoe Co
4ifc
may live to a good ripe old age, but
If I know it, I am hot going to fly to
one."
This famous and fearless feminine
flyer has not had a single accident
during the six years she has been
flying, explaining their absence thus
ly
"You see I am very, very careful.
I never do anything that I do not
think my machine will do. Some men
do this and that, try one-thing after
another and get hurt or killed. I know
just what my machine will do, and
that is all I try to make It do. My
greatest danger—as leant I think so
is when I am in the air teaching a
thickheaded and clumsy pupil. The
student then controls the machine,
and it is exceedingly difficult to cor
rect in the nick of time a false move
on the part of a novice.
"When the old Grim Reaper gath
ers me into his eager and invisible
graps, It will be from the seat in the
machine of one of my pupils. And his
chances of victory in our game of dice
will be made much brighter, as after
this year I expect to devote myself
almost exclusively to teaching and to
do little exhibition work.
"I conduct two aviation schools—
one at San Antonio, Tex., and the
other at Chicago, 111., and have al
ready taught more than 100 of our
army aviators and four score and
more Canadian fliers, at them."
Devils Lake, A. G. Divet of Wahpe
ton and several others.
The Burtness campaign will aim to
take the people of the district into the
confidence of the candidate. Fair
play will be asked for Mr. Burtness,
and fair play will be given to others.
HEAVY RAIN FALLS
IN WESTERN N. DAK.
Willlston, N. D.. June 21.—Drouth
conditions in western North Dakota
were broken tonight by a soaking
rain, which was general over the en
tire section, so far as could be learn
ed. While crops are now in excellent
condition, this section of the state
faced at least a partial crop failure
had there been no rain within the
week. W'th an all-night downpour
predicted by the local weather bureau,
farmers of this section are in a hap
pier mood than for weeks, and are al
ready looking forward to the biggest
crop ever grown here.
ENTIRE FAMILY KILLED.
Toledo, Iowa, June 21.—The entire
Ludlcek family, consisting of Mrs.
Jos. Ludlcek, her two sons, James and
Albert, and daughter Helen, were
found dead shortly before noon today
at their farm, eight miles northeast
I of Toledo.
A rifle shot had been fired through
the head of each. The weapon, a 22
caliber target rifle, was found beside
I the body -of Albert Ludlcek, the eld
est of the dead sons, 21 years of age,
who it is believed was responsible for
the tragedy.
Organizing Women
in Big Food Army
Hoover, photographed
wfetti laavtac Cb» fnUte How.
Tfca organisation of the houMWivaa
of the nation In a graat food con
servation army ls tha taak whleh .haa
baan undertaken by Herbart C.
Hoover. Actual registration will be
Kin Julr t. Mr. Hoover alao la en
lUjmg' tha aid of th« country's ram*
mar aahoola in the beuaahold aoo-
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GRAND FORKS HBgALD, FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 1917.
Will be Red Letter Day for
Western Polk Co. From
Present Indications.
The third annual Community Pic.
nic of western Polk county will be
staged in the Chaa. L. Ryan grove,
two. miles east of East Grand Forks
on Wednesday, July 4, according to
arrangements completed this morning
by the executive committee in charge
of the annual festival.
To Meet Monday Night.
A meeting of all- of the various com
mittees appointed by the executive
committee, composed of M. A. Foote,
Frank Drosky, C. J. Kelleher, T. A.
Sullivan and E, Arneson, will be held
in the commercial club rooms on
Monday evening at 8 o'clock, to make
preparations for the final arrange
ments.
As yet, no definite plans have been
arranged for the day, but all of the
committees in charge of the celebra
tion are working hard to make it a
red letter day for the western part
of Polk county.
With the East Grand Forks com
mercial club, the Key West Farmers
club and the Mallory Farm club work
ing in co-operation, an enormous at
tendance is ar.tici'pated.
Committees Named.
The following committees have been
placed In charge of the various phases
of the picnic:
Grounds—T. A. Sullivan, M. A.
Footo.
Speeches—T. A. Sullivan, F. C.
Massce, N. J. Nelson.
Finances—K- Arneson, M. A. Foote,
T. A. Itydal.
Advertising—E. A. Buckley, James
Gorman.
Sports—C. J. Kelleher, Frank Dros
ky. Leslie Sullivan. C. C. Coulter,
Lloyd Gunness, G. A. Noonan, C. 8.
Iverson.
Preparation of Grounds Tom
Stewart, D. Ferguson, H- C. Johnson,
Fred Fogle.
Privileges—Dr. W. G. Courtney, J.
R. Johnson.
Program—Dr. G. P. jKirk, J. Mc
Donald, Ed Zeldlik.
AUSTRIAN PREMIER
GIVES UP TRYING
TO FORM CABINET
Amsterdam, June 22.—Count Henry
Clam'-Martlnlc, premier of the Aus
trian cabinet, which recently resigned,
has failed in his attempt to recon
struct the ministry, according to a dis
patch from Vienna. The count has
asked Emperor Charles to Invite
someone else to form a cabinet.
a
fWrf-
a-v*
East urand horks News
FESTIVAL TO
BE STAGED ON
WEDJULY4
Plans Made for Third An
nual Community Picnic at
C. L. Ryan Grove.
COMMITTEES TO
MEET MON. NIGHT
STEVENS TO
ADDRESS MASS
MEET TONIGHT
Patriotic Meeting to be Held
in Commercial Club Rooms
to Enlist Men for Army.
Final arrangements for the patri
otic mass meeting to be held this eve
ning at 8 o'clbck in the Commercial
club rooms for every male resident of
East Grand Forks between the ages of
18 and 40 have been completed.
Ex-Senator A. D. Stevens of Crook
ston will be the principal speaker at
the meeting tonight. Local speakers
will also deliver short addresses, and
Sergeant M. E. Coomler, recruiting
officer in charge of the East Grand
Forks station for the United States
army, will be on hand to receive en
listments at the close of the session.
Records Compiled.
Records of every male resident of
the tiity of military age have been
compiled, and every person, on whom
no one is wholly dependent, will be in
duced to enlist in either the regular
army or the National Guard.
All who enlist at this time, or be
fore July 4, according to Sergeant
Coomler, who returned last evening
from the Twin Cities, will, in all
probability be sent to Fort Snelling.
Two new regiments, with the Thir
ty-Sixth Infantry, have been already
organized, and on July 1, will begin
to be filled with recruits.
New Regiments Formed.
Tents have been done away with in
the new regiments being formed at
Fort Snelling, and barracks for the use
of the soldiers have been erected, ac
cording to Sergeant Coomler.
A total of 8,700 recruits are needed
from this district to fill the ranks of
the two new regiments.
The patriotic ma^s meeting this
evening is in line with the nation
wide campaign to raise a volunteer
army of 700,000 men before the
Fourth of July, called for by Presi
dent Wilson.
COOMLER IS
BACK IN CITY
Returned from Twin Cities
Last Evening—Recruiting
Offices to Remain Open.
Serg. M. E. Coomler, officer In
charge of the East Grand Forks re
cruiting station for the United States
army, returned last evening from Min
neapolis, where he was called during
the forepart of the week by the war
department.
According to Information he re
ceived ih Minneapolis the recruiting
stations about the country will not be
closed for a considerable time- It is'
expected thftt even after the draft is
begun, a number of the stations will
remain open, according to Serg.
Coomler.
The East Grand Forks office has
made the best, record of any other
«*y 4
v-
?ivf%
-i j,
1 4
army recruitlng_-»ftlce In the entire
state during the past month, accord
ing to. Serg. Caotaler.'
Campbell Hllllard of Walhalla, en
listed in the United States army at
the local station this morning and (jwill
leave tomorrow morning for Duluth,
where he will be given a final phys
ical examination before leaving -for
Jefferson Barracks, Mo., for training.
FIFTY HAVE
ENLISTED IN
HOME GUARD
Company will be Mustered
into Service of the State
Within Two Weeks.
A total of fifty East Grand Forks
residents enlisted last evening as
members of Company B, Tenth Bat
talion. Minnesota Home Guard, of
which Dr. W. G. Courtney of this city
has been appointed captain.
Enrollment lists will be mailed to
day to Major Oscar Seehach, of St.
Paul, in charge of the Home Guard,
and, within two weeks, the local or
ganization will be sworn into the serv
ice of the state by Major Seebach.
The date of muster has not been set
as yet but it will be in a short time.
It is expected that the remaining
number required to fill the company
to It's maximum strength of 76 will
be secured in a short time, as over
1(10 have made Application for admit
tance.
To Forward Fqulpment.
As soon as the company has been
mustered Into the service of the state,
arms and equipment will be forward
ed. and drilling will be commenced at
once.
For a time, the hall at the Com
mercial club rooms will be used as a
commissary supply house ,and drill
hall. The local troops will also use
the City Park as a parade ground for
11 rilling.
On his next visit to this city to
muster in the company, Major See
bach will appoint a first and second
lieutenant. Tt is probable that Capt.
Courtney will appoint non commis
sioned officers very soon.
FINANCIAL AGENCY
TO BE ESTABLISHED
IN EL PASO SOON
Mexico City, .Tune 22.—A financial!
agency is to be established In El Paso,
Texas, by the Mexican government,
to facilitate the handling of govern
ment funds from the frontier customs
houses and to aid in payment of troops
and government employes in the
northern Mexican states.
If money talks, that $2,500,000,000
Liberty Loan subscription must be
saying very unpleasant things to the
kaiser.
for YOUR PROTECTION
POST TOASTIES
are wax-sealed
to
keep them good!
IF YOU CAN'T GO
ACROSS WITH A GUN
COME ACROSS
WITH YOUR PART OF THE
RED CROSS WAR FUND
Grand Forks County's Share
$34,860
,r
4
ft Ojj ^,7 Piano Company.
S E A IS E IS W E E
WE ARE INTO WIN
DO YOUR DUTY
FIGHT OR GIVE"
''a.• s^-.J-y- -*1*"
Thia advertisement ii placed and paid for la tins
S
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'saw
PAGE SEVEN.
Special Clean-up
The price of leather goods
mounting higher and higher!.
Ten per cent increases have
been common* In the face of.
this we offer you wonderful
bargains in Bags. Trunks and
Suit Cases. Soon our fall car
load of leather goods will ar
rive. We must clean up our
present stock. Take advantage
of these jjale prices. It will
soon be too late!
Our "Well BUt" Trunk slat
ted, marbelized pattern zinc
covering Japanned iron bind
ing brass plated steel lock and
bolts. Two com
partment tray
28 inches
30 Inches S4.S0
32 IncheB $4.86
34 Inches ..SB.S6
36 Inches $S.6S
$4.15
Our "Battleship" Tronic Just
like a battleship canvas cover
ing black iron binding heavy
brass plated steel locks, bump
ers and bolts. Two good
leather straps
all around
28 Inches ....
30 Inches ....
32 Inches ....
34 Inches ....
36 Inches ....
$
li
'if
$6.75
$7.00
.$7.50
$7.»0
$8.35
Fibre Covered Suit Cases
color brown, made over steel
frames brass plated
Jock and catches.
Price
1.25
Imitation Alligator Water
Proof Keratol Suit Case*, made
over steel frame leather cor
ners brass plated
locks and catches.
Price
icaiuer uyr-
$2.50
Men's Fibre Leather Massive
Suit Cases, extra deep ring
handle 1 1-4 inch straps all
around solid leather corners
high grade brass lock. It is a
very good case. Our regular
price is $6.00 and that's a low
price. Our
Special Cleanup
price Is
$4.50
(Exactly like cut.)
Black Keratol Bag, high cut
brass claw catches fancy linen
lining push-in lock heavy re
inforced corners a strong,
classy looking bag. Special price
$4.50
Joseph Mahowald's
"Largest Leather Store in North
Dakota."
120 DeMers.
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