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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, September 29, 1920, Image 12

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PAGE7FWELVE
HERE TONIGHT
I"
Sj,
Landing of Pilgrims Will Be
Celebrated at Congrega
tional Church.
TSie tercentenary of the landing of
the Pilgrims will be observed this
evening at the Congregational church
as a part of the conference now in
session. The program will open at 7:30
o'clock with a musical and devotional
service which will be followed by an
address on "The Pilgrim Tercentenary
in the Light of the International Coun
cil," by Rev. R. A. Beard of Fargo.
Prof. Ambrose W. Vernon of Carleton
college, Northfleld, Minn., will close
the observance with an address on
"Bradford and Winthrop After 300
Years."
An address iby Dr. Ozora Davis, pres
ident of the Chicago Theological col
lege, on "How Shall We Provide Ade
quate Leadership For Our Churches."
was the feature of the morning session
of the thirty-ninth annual conference
of the Congregational churches of
North Dakota. A business session and
a devotional period occupied the re
mainder of the morning meeting.
The meeting this afternoon was op
ened by an address on "The Continu
ous Relation of Ministers to the Pil
grim Memorial Fund," by Rev." Fran
cis L. Hayes, ot Chicago. Immediately
after the opening address Rev. Robert
F. Kelly of New York gave an address
on "The Educational Outlook" which
was. followed by an address by !tev.
Joseph Clare of Cando, who was in
charge of a parish in Petersburg, Rus
sia, at the time of the revolution, on
"The Bolsheviks' Red Terror."
Opening Service.
The conference was formally open
ed last ndght at the St. Mark's English
Lutheran church by a conference ser
mon by Rev. J. G. Duling of Dickin
son. The sermon was preceded by a
song and devotional period.
A communion service closed the op
ening meeting.
ANNUAL CONTESTS
BETWEEN STUDENTS
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
The annual athletic carnival to be
staged next Friday afternoon be-
tween the freshmen and
sophomores'the
Three boxing matches between
of the best pugs discovered to
NEW RECRUIT WAS
RECEIVED HERE
NEED ONE TYPIST
A notice was received this morning
at the recruiting office that onp typist
is needed to do clerical work for the!
318th engineers.
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A meeting of the Engineering so-j
ciety at the university will be heldj
this evening in the Mines building.!
The important question as to whetherl
or not corduroy breeches \®I11 be!
worn by engineers this year will be'
brought before the meeting.
An election of officers and other
matters of business importance will
also be discussed at the meeting.
RELIEF WORK
ISPLANNED
Grand Forks County to Care
For 90 Needy Armenian
Children.
The committee in charge of the
local Near East relief campaign met
at the Commercial club rooms this
morning and completed arrangements
for the drive. No individual will be
asked to make donations, this being
left to such organizations as churches,
lodges and business societies.
The committee in charge of secur
ing the local donations is: Rev. W.
E. Stephenson, chairman R. B. Grif
fith, secretary and treasurer J. B.
Wineman, Rev. Thos. H. Gallagher,
Rev. S. Talackson, C. E. Garvin, Mrs.
A. A. Westeen, Mrs. C. M. Cooley,
Mrs. W. A. Mclntyre and Mrs. F. F.
Stokes.
At last night's meeting Mrs. Jean
nette W. Emerich of New York gave
an intensely interesting address on re
lief work in the Near East. She said
that every country now officially con
nected with Armenia is using that
connection for selfish motives. The
United States has no official connec
tion, yet it has agreed to adopt a
number of Armenian children and
care for them. North Dakota is to
care for 1,500 of these children, and
Grand Forks county must care for 90
of them.
Five dollars will support one child
for one month. All the money raised
for this purpose is to go direct to the
needy children in the shape of food,
clothing, etc., the overhead expenses
to be paid for by one of the country's
financial leaders.
of the university promises to be more paign for funds, October 4 to 11,
than interesting. The fun is sched- were outlined at a meeting held here
uled to start at 3 o'clock in the aft- last night by Herbert N. Jeffrey, ter
ernoon but no closing hour has been jritory manager of the cairjpaign.
named and the exercises usually last] Mr. Jeffrey explained that the state
until "along towards morning." I budget has been placed at $85,000
six
date, i^hat
and three wrestling matchcs promise
to be among the big attractions. The
fights: and wrestling matches have
been divided into heavyweight, mid
dleweight and bantamweight classes.
across the English coulee promise to
be the feature attractions of the day.
McLain Johnson of Grandin has been,
chosen as marshal of the day, and
George Soule of Minot and Allen
Gray of Grafton as assistants.
Salvation Army Was
Discussed Committee
For Campaign Named
Plans for the home service work of
The cane "rush" and the tug-of-wari in this city and county were an
nounced. E. R. Montgomery, chair
man of the county committee, Don
Salvation Army and for the cam-
and Grand Forks county's share of
is $11,000. of which $5,500 is to
go. towards paying for the citadel in
this city.
At the meetln* last night the per
sonnel of the committees who will
take charge of the appeal for funds
McDonald, L. K. Hassell, P. S. Peter
son and B. U. Abrahamson.
Members of the city committee, of
which D. C. Hair is chairman, in
clude B. U. Abrahamson, T. J. Smith,
J. A. Dinnie, Dr. R. D. Campbell. Dr.
L. L. Eckman, Harry Randall, Miles
E. Strieker, H. Mayne Stanton, W. P.
'.Davies, M. J. Colton. T. B. Elton,
Cecil Langton of Lawton, N. D.. en- tee. and Tracy R. Bangs and T. B.
listed in the coast artillery of the Elton the committee on speakers.
United States army this morning and General plans for carrying on the
will leave in a, few days for Camp appeal for funds here and through
Lewis. Washington. iout the county, next week, were
Paul B. Griffith. M. C. Bacheller, J.'
B. Wineman and Hans Anderson.
Frank A. Brown and E. R. Mont
gomery form the publicity commit-
made
at the meeting last night.
The only quadruped that is known
that cannot swim is the camel.
The Reduced Cost of Tire
$2150
Do you realize that Goodyear Tires
are priced no higher today than in
1910 and that their mileage actually
costs less than it did a decade ago?
During this period Goodyear has been
able steadily to increase the amount
of mileage built into its tires and,
consequently, the cost of Goodyear
mileage has actually declined*
In no part of the Goodyear line has
this decline been more marked than
in the present 30 3», 30 3V&- and
31 4-inch sizes of Goodyear Tires,
made especially for small cars*
If you own a Ford, Chevrolet, Dort,
Maxwell or other car taking these
sizes, go to your nearest Service Sta
tion for them—get the unusual value
contained in their construction and
delivered in their mileage*
&•>
ENGINEERS WILL S "V" DUVCIfAI
MEET THIS EVENING! I lllIOltAL
Goodyear Heavy Tourist Tube* coat no
more than the price yon are asked to pay
for tube* of leas merit—why rbk cortiy
casings when such sure pnrtee
tion
available? 30x3% she
in wftrfr—f h*t—
COMMITTEE MET
ATTHEY.W.C.A.
Plans For City and Grade
School Basket Ball League
Discussed. .,•
A meeting of the physical depart
ment -committee of the Y. M. C. 'A.
was held this noon at he Y. W. C.-A.
and plans for various winter activi
ties were discussed in full.
Plans for a City Basketball League
were fully discussed and it was de
cided to organize a league of not less
than six teams immediately after
football season comes to a close. The
"Y" will have no. independent team
this year as they did in 1919, but a
team of all-stars will be chosen from
the various teams in the league, and
this aggregation will meet any ama
teur five within a reasonable dis
tance of this city.
j£~~ series of stag nights and enter
tainments will be held under the di
rection of the physical department,
and plans for these will be put ill the
hands of an entertainment committee
to be selected at a later date, C. E.
Zink, chairman of the physical com
mittee said this afternoon.
Grade School Basketball.
Grade school basketball has never
been pushed much in the past) but it
is the intention of the Y. M. C. A. to
encourage the younger boys to start
the game. The subject was discussed
at the meeting held this noon and
the committee thought very favorably
of the plan. A' conference will. be
held with the director of athletics in
the grade schools before definite act
ion is taken.
MANYARElO
MAKEJUNKET
Local Residents to Go to
Red Lake Falls Women
Invited to Make Trip.
The Commercial club committee in
charge of the arrangements for the
excursion to Red Lake Falls Satur
day, will complete its canvass of the
city tomorrow when it is expected
that more than 300 men and women
will have been signed up for the trip.
The women of Grand Forks and
East Grand Forks are invited to make
the trip. A number of them already
have signed up. but there are many
more who .have expressed a desire
to accompany the tourists.
The Grand Forks Municipal band
and the Juvenile band will.accompany
the excursionists.
A large number of local men arc,
going to Red Lake Falls to hear J. A.
O. Preus and Louis Collins, Republi
can candidates for governor and lieu*
tenant governor, respectively. Both
speak there that day.
CHURCH COMMITTEE
TO MEET AT THE
"Y" THIS EVENING
A meeting or the committee in
charge of the games and entertain
ment of the Young People's society of
St. Mark's English Lutheran church
will be held this evening at the Y. M.
C. A., according to an announcement
made this morning by c. E. Zink,
chairman of the committee.
At this time plans for the opening
meeting of the season, which will be
on Friday, Octobcr 8. will be formu
lated. Plans for a Hallow'en party
also will be discu^SS.
IU,
SSI
GRAND FORKS HERALD, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 29. 1990.
Supper Will Precede Meet
ing at Y., W. C. A. "U"
Faculty Man to Speak.
The Ad club will meet at the Y. W.
Qjr A. this evening. A supper will be
®rved at 6:15 o'clock and the meet
ilia will follow immediately.
•-Dr. Henry J. Humpstone, successor
to Dr. J. \y. Todd at the University of
,orth Dakota, will be the principal.
speaker of the meeting. Dr. Hump
stone was formerly a member of the
University of Pennsylvania and will
speak this eveAing on psychology,
particularly as it pertains to mer
chandising and. advertising.
Herbert N. Jeffery, Western territory
manager for the Salvation Army
^•'npalgn, will give a brief talk on
Salvation Army work in this section.
DR. DAVIS TO
"U"
Will Address Students
Convocation Exercises
Thursday.
at
One of the best convocation ad
dresses of the year is expected
Thursday, morning, when Dr. Ozora
Davis of Chicago, prominent in edu
cational circles, will speak at the
university. Dr. Davis is known as an
exceptionally good speaker, with a
message of real interest and beneiit
to university students.
A number of books along educa
tional lines have been written and
published by Dr. Davis during the
past ten or fifteen years. While in
college he was elected to Phi Beta
Kappa and Theta Delta Chi and
graduated from several different uni
versities, getting the following de
grees: Master of Arte, Doctor of
Philosophy and Doctor of Divinity.
His appearance in Grand Porks is a
decided advantage for students and
all are requested to attend.
Miss Kathryn Harris of the univer
sity will give a cello solo during the
exercises.
Athlctic Ratty October 7.
Convocation exercises on Thursday,
October 7, will be in the nature of an
athletic rally, in order to give the
new students a taste of the real uni
versity spirit The university band
will be present, talks will be given by
older students concerning the ideals
of the university, and other phases
contributing to a regular "pep" meet
ing will be given.
INGRAM RETURNED
FROM ROAD TOUR
Jos Ingram, county surveyor,- re
turned this morning from a tour of
Fairfield township, Where he has been
inspecting the roads being construct
ed by the state highway commission.
WoyJc on the Emerado road has
been"'resumed since the close of
threshing season and the work of
graVeling probably, will be finished
before the cold weather sets in, Mr.
Ingram said this morning. The work
on this road was discontinued short
ly after the harvest started, so as to
allow the crew to help with the work
in th« fields.
Republican Women To
Meet Thursday Night
The Republican Women's club of
East Grand Forks, will hold a meet
ing on Thursday evening, at 7:30
o'clock, in the Women's Rest Room.
Reports from the various committees
of the club will be read at the meet
ing, and several other important mat
ters will be attended to.
All those who attended the last
meeting and any other women in the
cinty who are interested in the club's
work, have been extended a cordial
invitation to
rthe
meeting Thursday.
NO REDUCTION
IN BUICK CARS
There will be no reduction in the
price of Btjjick auttangjMies, according
to word received h^re today by J. E.
Sandlie, Inc. Following the reduction
in the price of F«.:,1s and Franklins,
it has been rumored that there would
be a reduction^ in all other cars. The
local agency was notified today that
there would.be no factory reduction in
the price of Buick cars.
GRIFFITH AGAIN
S HEADS BAPTISTS
R. 13. Griffith today was re-elected
president of the North Dakota Baptist
conference, according to word re
ceived here from Bismarck. The con
ference now is in session at Bismarck.
A large number of local Baptists are
attending the meeting.
Excavations in Bagdad show the
presence of a great prehistoric city.
Next Week
Is
REAL
ESTATE
WEEK
WATCH FOR'
HOUSE amd LOT
BARGAINS
JM-
ISii
Cm
In Our
,!$| AD
SgfWANT
OLUMN®
«D *co
3100 IS NOW
HERALD CALL
Private Exchange Installed
More Expeditious Service
Assured Patrons.
For the convenience of patrons and
subscribers, The Herald today put in
operation its private telephone ex
change. The exchange will enable
the company to give prompter and
more efficient service to patrons.
The exchange has five incoming
trunk lines, so that if any one of the
lines is busy the call is automatically,
switched to a non-busy trunk, thus not
delaying the patron with the report,
"line's busy."
In order to establish this service it
has been necessary to put in a com
plete private switchboard. It also has
been necessary to change the tele
phone numbers. The old calls—500
and 150—have been done away with
and The Herald telephone number
now is 3100. This number gives the
patron the private exchange, where
connection is made with the Individual
or department wanted:
The private exchange is in opera
tion from 8 a. m. till 6 p. m. After 6
o'clock In the evening the following
calls will be used: Editorial depart
ment, 3100 and 3101 circulation de
partment, 3102 advertising, 3103.
The switchboard Installed in The
Herald office is one of the most up
to-date in the northwest. The five In
coming trunk Uaec iuwure patrons of
immediate and efficient service,' and
the interior exchange assures the
patron of no delay In getting the in
dividual or department wanted,
POCKET SIZED STILL.
AsheviUe, N. C.. Sept. 29.—A pocket
still is the latest device captured by
federal prohibition officers. Agents
.working out of the local office recently
captured such a miniature still near
Saluda. The Whole outfit was so small
the officers put it in their pockets and
brought it tp the city for exhibition
purposes. The officers called it a
parlor still. It Is of about one table
glass capacity and manufactured an
article for home consumption. It was
said by officers that, the still waa com
pletn id smallest total).
ITCtO^ STARTS DUCKS SOUTH.
TMiluttV Minn.. Sept.
At a Saving of $2.50 to $5.00
DRESS SHOES
Laced or Buttoned
One hundred and twenty-five
pairs of women's shoes, either lac
ed or buttoned and with either
French or military heels. They are
made of high grade calf in brown,
lcid in brown or black, a combina
tion of black and gray, and kid in.
beaver.
These are some of our most pop
ular shoes and are selling regular
ly at $12.50, $13.50 and $15.00.
selling THURSDAY, FRIDAY and
SATURDAY,
MAIN FLOOR.
Delightfully Individual
TOP COATS
For Fall
The beautiful soft fabrics such as
Bolivia, Suedene, Velour and Kitten's
Ear lend themselves gracefully to the
styles of the Autumn coats.
The Russian blouse effects are
decidedly new and popular, but there
are also many other handsome gar
ments in,the fuller cut, belted styles.
The deep cape and shavvl collars, eith
er of fur or otherwise, is essential,
with novelty cuffs to correspond to
the collars. One of the pleasing fea
tures of our display is the fact that
cach garment is an exclusive style.
GARMENT SECTION
SECOND FLOOR.
29.—Heavy
frosts various parts of Canada. ip
c.MiSlnx.thc districts where water fowl
ha?4. their breeding grounds,''have
started the ducks on .their major
southern flight, according to telegram*
PUMPS and OXFORDS
For three days you may choose from our entire line
of pumps and Oxfords selling regularly at $10.85 and.
$11.85. They are of either brown or black calf, with
French or military heels. Selling specially
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
$9.95
FUR TRIMMED. HI-CUT SPATS IN BEAVER
AND FAWN SHADES. SOMETHING NEW.
MAIN FLOOR.
and long distance calls from trappers
and hunters to Duluth sportsmen to
day. This meanB that northern lakes,
which have rice beds, will be swarm
ing with ducks from now until snow
begins to fly.
TO SPEND 92,310,000.
Minneapolis, Sept. 29.—Expendi
ture of $2,310,000 is called for in the
Carleton college program, which will
be outlined tonight at a meeting of
alumni and former students of Min
neapolis. The plans for the immedi
ate future will be presented by trus
tees of the college.
STEAL HUMAN ASHES.
Berne, Switzerland, Sept. 10.—(By
Mail.)—Thieves broke into a' crema
tory situated in Blenne, near Berne,
a few nights ago and stole a few
sepulchral urns containing the ashes
of members, of wealthy families.
Prominent families of Berne and
Phone 994
FOR DRIVER Oft SEND TOUR
CLEANING PARCEL POST TO—
THE
0-
WWW1W
EVENING EDITION
t^*r-o»co
^•.•1 •£-*.
-j:
Zurich are receiving letters, offering
to return the urns for a consideration
varying- between 2,000 and 4,000
francs, according to the financial
standing of the owners.
The police hope to lay a trap for the
ghouls. i.
PLANE TO LEAVE SASKATOON.
Edmonton. Alta., Sept 29.—Plane
No. 4 of the United States: army
Alaska aerial expedition was to hop
off from Saskatoon, Sask., this morn
ing on the return flight from Nome,
Alaska, to New York, Lieut. Ross
Kirkpatrick, in command, announced.
BIG RACE PLANNED.
Los Angeles, Sept. 29.—An automo
bile race of 260 miles is in prospect.
for Thanksigiving Day on the L04 An
geles Speedway at Beverly Hills. Prize'
money has been tentatively fixed at
9&6.000 and a number of special fea
tures are being planned.
407 DEMER8 AVE. GRAND PORKS, N. D.
Warner's Safe Remedies
Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver -Remedy.
Warner'i Safe Rheumatic Remedy.
Warner's Safe Asthma Remedy.
Warner's Safe Nervine.
Biliousnesi)
The Reliable Family Medlclnei
I cKjid leading dracctat* racMvt
of ten cents.
WARNER'S SAFE REMEDIES CO.. D*pt.
t.
•V? .V |'.V-ii,' fir. •••/.:•• ,.v
v'
"v"
GLEANERS
S. J. Bergman, Proprietor
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