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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, September 29, 1920, Image 6

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Other Crops Will Also Show
Big Increase Over Last
Year, Report Says
Sr
Ottawa, Ont., Sept. 29.—Canada's
1!)20 wheat crop will break all record
of yields. and other cereal crops will1 «g ,«
also show a great increase according ^Q||f|P|j||§
to lho report on yield and condition
compiled by the. Dominion Govern
ment Hureau of Statistics, just is
sued.
Thp estimate for the whole
Canada is
Wheat. 2S9.498.000 bushels, as
against 193,260,400 bushels last year,
Oats. 556,719,000 bushels, as
•.gainst 394,387,000 bushels last year?
Barley, 64,257.000 bushels, as
against 56,389,400 bushels last year.
Rye, 12,915,000 bushels, as against
10,207,400 bushels last year.
I
Flaxseed, 11,090,000 bushels, as
against 5,472,800 bushels last year.
The estimate of the total produc
tion in the three prairie provinces,
(Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Al
berta) one of the greatest grain pro
ducing areas in the world, with the
corresponding totals for 1919 is
follows:
Wheat, 260,157,000 bushels
544,300.)
Oats. 359.289,000 bushels
580,000.)
(36,-
Barley, 43,762,000 bushels
(82,000.)
Rye, S.S20.000 bushels (7,262,000.)
Flaxseed, 10,817,000 bushels (5,
232.000.)
The estimated yields by provinces,
in the three prairie provinces are:
Manitoba—Wheat 40.305,000' bush
els (40,975,300) oats, 61.328,000
bushels (57,698.000) barley, 19,895.
000 bushels (17.149,400) rvo, 4,349.
000 bushels (4.089,400) flaxseed*
605.000 bushels 520,300.)
Saskatchewan—Wheat. 136,880.000
bushels (89,994.000) oats. 173,008.
000 bushels (112,157,000) barley,
1 1.640.000 hushels (8,971,000) rye,
3.535,000 bushels (2.000.000) flax
seed. 9,283.060 bushels (4,490,000.)
Alberta—Wh^at, S2.972,000 bush
els (34,575,000) oats, 124.958,000
bushels (65,725.000) barley, 12,227,
000 bushels (10,562,000) rye, 1,
936,000 bushels (1,173,000) flaxseed,
S24.000 bushels (222,000.)
KOSKI FOUND GtTTLTY.
Virginia, Minn., Sept. 29.—Andrew
Koski, charged with murder in the
first degree, was found guilty by a
jury in district court here last night.
He Is convicted of having, had a part
in the murder of Jacob Carlson, a
storekeeper at Markham, Minn., Juno
15. 1919.
His conviction was due to the testi»
rnony of his accomplice, William
Kumpolainen, who is now serving a
life sentence at Stillwater for partic
ipation in the same crime. The jui-y
was out 45 minutes.
tyKO
O N I
L^O ia told In original priin» only,
.••hapictursabeve.Refuee til aubatilutN
sf
A'
it ii _4 r, I
Tinker Bob, King of the Forest,
Was anxious to see if Young Swamp
Rabbit would do as he was taught by
as his mother, so he lingered a while
I among the tall grass of the swamp.
(165,- This young fellow wandered away
I from his home and made one or two
(235,-! squats in the bunches of grass, and
then became tired and went to sleep.
*f«Wf
Willie's long nose sniffed the air.
He cp.n always tell when Red Fox
is around because Mr. Fox is always
tryirg to catch him, and that has
made "Willie very wise. He scented
Red Fox. and looked about and saw
YouDg Swamp Rabbit sound asleep,
and he knew that -Red Fox was com
ing right toward this bunch of grass.
Willie remembered the old law of
the Forest, so he went, to young Rab
bit and nipped his ear. Young Rab
bit nearly jumped' out of the bunch
of grass.
"Listen," whispered Willie, "Young
Red Fox is coming right toward this
bunch of grass and you'd better get
out of here quick."
ADVERTISEMENT. ADVERTISEMENT.
Worn Out In Mind and Body
Your child is quick to observe disturbances in your mental attitude or
physical condition. And when heasks: "What'3 the matter, Daddy?"
there'3 a tone of solemn anxiety in his little voice. The depression
stamped upon you reflects intensely upon him because of his profound solic
itude. He at once drops his playthings and rushes to your side, but his
happy smile has disappeared and his buoyant spirits are gone—replaced
by a countenance of worry and a bearing of hopelessness.
Yon owe it to the happiness and welfare of your family to keep trim in body and keen in
intellect. Yon are the sun and the inspiration of their lives. Dark, threatening clouds hover
orer their heads the instant you show signs of being: "out of sorts" or "under the weather."
Don't imperil their future by neglecting your health.
Young Swamp Rabbit was so
The Great General Tonic
will banish that "tired feeling" and dispel that warn-oat
look. It will renew your strength and visor, overcome
the ravishing effects of overwork and worry, revive your
spirits and increase your bold on life. Being a refresh
ins appetizer, a valuable aid to digestion and a worthy
pnmoterof tit* general health, because of itspoeitive re
vitalizing and reconstructive value, its use i. especially
desirable in cases of subnormal conditions. If you suffer
from nervous exhaustion, muscular or mental fatigue
or deficiency of vital force due to general weakness or
wasting illness, you'll find "LYKO" particularly bene
ficial. It tones up the entire system and keeps yoa
feeling fit. Ask your druggist for a bottla today.
Sola Manufacturer*
LYKO MEDICINE COMPANY
New York Kansas City. Ilk
•Woman Traveler
Wants Comfort, Conveni
ence and. Protection at her
Hotel.
All three are found at your
Jj^ll "Away From Home^'Homew
if you stop at the
5
I
a a
JERRY D. BACON, PROP.
Gmpd Forks
iVfiiTr-i
Tinker Bob'
itorie'
by Carlysle H. Ho) comb
A CLOSE CALL FOR YOCN6 RABBIT.
Now his mother told him that he
should not go to sleep away from
homo till he had learned the lesson
of how to awake quickly, so if an
enemy came upon him he could get
away. But he was, too sleepy to
listen to what his mother said. And
while he was asleep, there came'wan
dering through the swamp young Red
Fox.
Red Fox knew the hiding place
of these swamp creatures so he was
thrusting his nose into every bunch
of grass as he came along. Poor
Young Swamp Rabbit would be sorry
if Red Fox ever found where he was
hiding. .But in this bunch of grass
there, happened to be a door to a
small tunnel, and out of this door
there came the tiny little fellow that
we met a few weeks ago. His name
is Willie Shrew.
I
lie Soontcd Red Fox, And l'jookcd
About And Saw Young Rabbit
Sound Asleep.
frightened he didn't know what to do.
"Oh, Mr. Shrew, what shall I do
what, shall I do?" he cried.
"You'd better run for your life, for
that Fox would like a fellow like you
for his dinner. I'm going back in my
tunnel and you'd better run." And
that is just the thing that Young
Rabbit did—he ran!
Such running you never saw. This
young Swamp Rabbit didn't know
which .way to run, for he didn't know
where Red Fox was. He had never
seen this Mr. Fox and didn't know
what he looked like. But run he
must. and. run he did. And what
did he do but run right into Red
Fox, who had his nose in a bunch of
grass.
It frightened Red Fox so that at
first he didn't know what to do, but
when he spied this Young Swamp
Rabbit he knew just what to do, and
after him he went. It would have
been a sad thing for Young Rabbit
if he hadn't chanced to run right by
Tinker Bob just as Red Fox was
about to catch him. But the King
saved his lfie.
Tomorrow—OTossnm is Hurt.
LIVES OF PUBLIC
MEN IN ENGLAND
ARE JEOPARDIZED
London,. Sept. 29.—Rumors of
widespread plots, which have ranged
from conspiracies to assassinate King
George to blowing up public buildings
have been current in London (luring
the past few days. These reports
have been caused by the fears that
the lives of public men in Great Brit
ain might be jeopardized, should any
of the Irish hunger strikers die, par
ticularly now that the "black and
tan" police have made reprisals in
several Irish towns.
Police authorities have investigated
some of the more plausible si-ories
and newspapers have run down many
more, and always with the same neg
ative result.. Some of ths more timid
profess to see the frustration of a plot
in the arrest of a man giving an lri3h
name who had in his room four serv
ice rifles and a quantity of Irish Self
Determination League literature. Ha
is awaiting trial on a charge of un
lawful possession of firearms.
FORESEE SUCCESSFUIi SEASON.
Los Angeles. CaJn Sept. 29.—Uni
versity of Southern California students
and officials are looking forward to a
successful footfball season, for eight
members of the institution's successful
1920 football gridiron machine are ex
pected book to try for places on this
year's eleven.
"Gloomy" Gus Henderson, coa«h at
the University of Southern California
recently said prospects were brighter
this year than at a corresponding time
last season. First practice was held
recently.
The veterans expected are Captain
Roy Evans, tackle, who is on his way
back from the Antwerp games Beale,
tackle Lockett and Leadingham, full
backs Smith and Toolen, ends Cox,
center, and Byrd, a substitute on the
varsity last season, guard.
Besides these, the Trojans will have
Eddy Leahy and Paul Greene, half
backs, and James Woodward:, quarter
back, members of the freshman squad
laflt se&son*
Bill Hunter will assist Henderson
with the coaching.
NOT SUCH A JOKE.
Bordeaux, Sept. 11.—(Mail.)—Tves
Berthon sauntered off the good ship
Laverdiere where he presides over
the destinies of the galley, with 1,900
francs in his pocket and a great
longing in his heart for a "sailor's
good time."
"Hands up," was the shout of a
feminine voice that greeted him as
he turned into a water front street
from the. docks.
"This is a. good Joke," said Tves,
as he wheeled about to look into-the
muzzle of a business-like revolver,
held by a steady feminine hand. "This
ia indeed a good joke, let me kiss
you
"Bingt" spat the business-like re
volver and Yves felt a stinging pain
in. the left shoulder.
When he awoke the 1,900 francs
had gone and so had the business-like
woman. It was just getting dusk.
\ves went to the police station first,
then returned to the good ship Laver
diere.
INVESTIGATION ORDERED.
Washington, Sept. 29.—-Investiga
tion of the Minnesota state railroad
and warehouse commission in refus
ing to permit railroads in the state to
conform with the new interstate rates
was ordered today by the interstate
commerce commission, A hearing
was set for October 4 before Bxamln
I er Klynn at St. Paul, Minn.
An article in a Twin City paper is
thug: "Cork ls Shaken bjr f5z
plosioit.". We did not f'ead the article
read the aftiele,
"w,
1 ^tpT^',VV'\ ,,- f»
-f»
GRAND #ORKS HEJRALD! WEDliESDAY! SE
MA66C 1% R»5HT I
SHOULD BE ORfiSEO
UP ALL "THE. "TIME.
TRAVELING IS
COMPLICATED
Trip 'From Constantinople
To Paris Requires End
less Controversies.
Constantinople, Sept. 6.—(Mail.)—
Nine visa.es are required to carry a
traveler from Constantinople to Parts
on the Oriental Express, ahd the
task- is so great that most travelers
take steamers to Marseilles or Venice
in preference to the jumbled rail trip
across the Balkans which necessitates
endless controversies with border con
trol officials at various frontiers.
An American who desires to go to
Paris by rail must start with the visa
of the United States consulate on his
passport. Then the tourist must go
to the Swedish legation to get the Bul
garian vise. The Serbian stamp is
next in order. It must be followed
by three Greek stamps, that of the
•Greek high commissioner, of the
Greek military control and of the
Greek consul. Then visaes* must be
had of the Italian and the French
military controls.
Many passports are not large
enough to carry a.11 the stamps. An
Ti S-fj.
•q.V,
Englishman who recently attempted
to. get the collection on an old pass
port, exhausted all the blank space
in four calls. His embassy would not
permit him to attach a blank sheet to
his passport. Consequently he had
to have a new one issued and started
over again on the round of vexatious
queues
Since the Polish disaster,. Bolshevik
agitation has become so acute in
Turkey that travelers are watched
more carefully than ever before by
the Allied officials. On a recent pas
senger ship from- Batum a so-called
Russian colonel, whose conversation
with British officials showed a decided
ignorance of military xUfalrs, was ar
rested. He had Ave passports, in his
trunks, together with great Quantities
of soviet literature in many languages.
The bogus colonel was sent to General
Wrangel in the Crimea.
VICTIM OF MURDER.
.Virginia, Minn., Sept. 29.-^X1111 the
man whose body was found last nigh',
on the Itasca county road near Clear
water Lake was a victim of murder
is the theory advanced by county au
thorities now investigating.
Authorities believe that the hole
in which the skeleton was found was
dug by the murderer. The face was
covered wth a mackinaw coat an 4 the
body with two tree tops which were
cut from their base.
The body was found by a man mak
ine a road over which to move a saw
mill.
A young man named Koski disap
peared from this, section five years
a?o and another named David Uill
about two years ago.
This season's style is quite differ*
ent and many men will be glad,
because it is more comfortable and
easy looking than the soldier*like
models of past seasons.
The new coats have a free swing
from the shoulders—the waist line
is lower and not shaped in—the
vent is shorter and behaves better.
And remember there is art in
v.s
$
BER 29, 1920.
FOR. "YOUNG MEN AND MEN WHO STAYYOUNO
Men Will Look Better
This Season
WITH THE VARIED GRADES OF CLOTHING BLOODING THE MARKET, LOCK FOR THE LABEL AS YOUR GUIDE
Al.FRED DECKER COHN, Makers
Chicago
New York
^fh^TPFCW^^^
EFFORTS RESULT
IN SAVING LIVES
OF MANY CHILDREN
Milwaukee Wis., Sept. 29.-—Greater
safety of children's lives throughout
the nation resultant from the na
tional safety council's campaign of
instruction in public and private
schools of the country after over half
a year's activities was brought out to
day in the report of C. W. Price, gen
eral manager of the national safety
council, before the ninth annual safety
congress.
The school safety instruction was
formulated by Dr. E. George- Payne,
principal of the Harris teachers' col
lege of St. Louis, the report stated,
and added that 29 cities and towns
have adopted his plan.
Milton C. Potter, superintendent of
schools of Milwaukee, said intra
school accidents in. Milwaukee, prior
to the war, had been reduced forty
per cent, but that during and after
the war a reaction was felt which
swelled the number of mishaps ma
terially.
"In 1917-1918 Tire had' only 86 such
such Accidents," he said. "In 1918
1919 we had 85. and in 1919-1920
there were 131 lntra-school accidents."
FIGURES' DUE IN MONTH.
Washington, Sept. 29.—The 1920
population of the United States will
be announced late in October, ac
cording to a belief expressed by the
census bureau officials. The popula­
the cut of a full coat. It must
hang right when you sit or stand
when itfc buttoned or unbuttoned
—when your, arms are up or
down* Art in design is what has
made the Style reputation of
Society Brand Clothes. And all
wool fabrics along with fine hand*
tailoring hold these clothes to the
lines of the design*
SOCIETY &RAND CLOTH2S.
E HEADQUARTERS
IMalafbaton of High Grade Oothlac In the Wortlmeet
CROOKSTOir GUARS fORKS ®t. OLOfrl
V" -*9*
fw*T.C'r
EVENING EDITION.
tion -July '1, 1919, was estimated at
106,871,294 and it is believed there
has bedn 'a gain since then.
HOFFMAN ATTENDS MEETING.
Berlin, Sept. 29.—"I am General)
Hoffman, whom you probably remem-l
ber from Brest-Litov&k," said a tall,
man of military bearing as he Intro-1
duced himself to a meeting of Major
ity Socialists called here to discuss 7
eastern European problems.
The Socialists were in the midst
of a discussion on Soviet principles
and the Russo-Polish situation, when
General LudendorfCa former aide-de
camp arose and without more -ado'
took the floor.
He charged the Versailles peace
with the responsibility for the pres-l
'ent state of Europe in thait it failtd*
to take Russia into account, and de
clared that Russia must be' reinstated
imto her former position. Germany,
he said, needed Russia's foodstuffs
and Russia needed German industrial
products.
General Hoffman went on declaring
that German working men alone ware
able to Rebuild the nation. 'It is not
true," he said, "that we have already
reached the bottom of the abyss. We
are, however, standing on the brink
In danger of slipping down into
Despite his unexpected interruption,
the meeting treated the general with
courtesy although some reproaches
were addressed to him for concluding'
the Brest-Litovsk peace.
Herald Want Ads Bring Remits.-.
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fee Canada
Montreal
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a a* fit*
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