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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, March 25, 1921, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1921-03-25/ed-1/seq-8/

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PAGE EIGHT
LEGION WILL
HAVECONTROL
OF BALL CLUB
Citizens of Hatton
to Support Semi-Profes
sional Team.
Hatton. N. D.. March 25.—At
joint meeting of the Hatton Commer
cial Hub and the Carrol O. Flesche post
of the American Legion held recently,
it was decided to turn the summer
baseball proposition over to the IjC
gion and let them handle it exclusive
ly.
A Committee of three men were ap
pointed from the local legion post
and the matter of obtaining funds to
finance the team was taken up. A can
vass of about half of the city was made
and over $600 was raised.
S S S S S a
is expected that Hatton will be repre
sented by one of the best semi-pro
fessional teams in the northwest. Hat
ton has long held the reputation of
being a first class baseball town and
its citizens are 100 per rent loyal to
their team. The activities of the team
for the coming season will be handled
by the American Legion but. will have
the complete, moral and financial sup-
port of the citizens of Hatton and
surrounding community.
May 16.—Chicago at Evanston.
May 21—Wisconsin at Madison.
May 25—Notre Dame at Evanston.
May 27—Ames at Ames.
1
May 28—Iowa at Mason City.
TO BID FOR CHAMPIONSHIPS.
Mansas City, Ma., March 25.—The
Kansas City Athletic club, which
staged the national A. A. U. basket
ball tournament, will make a bid for
the 1922 championships.
Dr. J. A.sReiIly. director of athletics
at the club, said the success of the
recent tournament proved the popu
larity of the sport. The tournament
drew $13,142, which means that about
20.000 persons witnessed the games.
TesfoSeed Wheat for
Germination
1
\c
-I
th(
NORTHWESTERN "U"
TO HAVE BASEBALL
TEAM THIS SEASON
Evanston, Til.. March 24.— For the
first time in five years Northwestern
university is to have a baseball team
been developed by Coach Jack Saw
telle, and the schedule has been com
pleted.
Seventeen games ave.to br played,
starting with Armour institute April
9 at Evanatdn. Twelve conference
games are on the program. There
are eight home games and nine trips.
The schedule follows:
April 9—Armour at Kvanston.
April 13—Illinois at. Urbana.
April 16—Purdue at Lafayette.
April 18—Beloit at Evanston.
April 21—Iowa at Evanston.
April 23—Ohio at. Columbus.
April 26—Chicago at Chicago.
April 29—Wisconsin at Evanston.
May 4—Purdue at Evanston.
May 7—Indiana at Bloomington.
May 11—Waseda Japs at Evanston.
May 14—Notre Dame at South
Bend.
ii«k to any grain with
it for germination in wet blot-
SPORT JABS
HOT FBOM THE WIRE.
The American Legion Boxing asso
c.iation has been formed in California
to provide central control of boxing
matches conducted under the &us
pices of the veterans' organization.
I The Detroit .Americans
Pledged!to
brcak camp at
are te
tonight
^momo
begin a round of exhibition games
in the south and west en route homo.
Manager Ty Cobb is elated by the
I pre-season showing of his squad.
"Cotton" Tierney, second baseman
I of the Pittsburgh Nationals put his
a home run total up to nine yesterday
at Hot Springs when he smashed out
two circuit hits in a game betwocn
the first and second divisions. He
registered three runs with three
times at hat.
Babe Adams, veteran Pirate twirl
er. demonstrated mid-season form
when he held the regulars to a single
hit in three innings.
The St. Louis Americans will meet
the Xew York Giants at New Orleans
Sunday, substituting for the New Or
leans Southern association team,
Pitcher Frank Graham, purchased
by Memphis Southern association,
from the Louisville Colonels, will go
back to the Kentucky club. Memphis
will not meet his salary demands.
.imont. Texas league. 6 to 0.
Hamilton. Ont., hockey players in
vade Cleveland tonight, to open a.
I two-game series with the Cleveland
team.
this season. A promising squad has against the regulars yesterday at Hot
Springs,
seven.
Superior, 13 Madison 8.
Waukesha. 23 Monticello, 12.
Menominee. 30 Elmwood, 10.
LaCrosse, 13 Rhinelander, 8.
Appleton. 23 Neillsville, 2.
TO ENTER BIG MEET.
Duluth, Minn.. March 25.—Duluth
Central high school swimming team,
holders of the national interscholastic
swimming championship, have quali
fied for entrance in the 1921 interna
tional scholastic meet to be held at
Evanston, 111.. April 2. The local
swimmers gained the interscholastic
title in 1919.
The Treatment for
Cleaning and Grading
After yon are sure that yon hare the very
bent wed wheat available, it will pay you to
clean it and grade it two or more times by
running it through a good fanning mill. Uni
formity of seed is of great importance. Extra
large or giant kernels are not always the best,
especially when mixed with ordinary kernels.
Yon can tell by the general appearance of the
seed whether or not it has been attacked by
rait, aoab, smut or .other disease.
Be careful to fan oat all shriveled kernel*
and kernels with discolored tips. Examine
to aee that yon have no great amount of yel
low berry bot dark colored kernels. A little
afternoon, will' give wonderful results in the intelligent use of the
hminaB. y» can- liilih ,iuji -your gu engine and do the worj easily.
Treat Your Seed for Smut
from saat iaen(iielpipreventable by the formaldehyde treatment.
An owrlwir bsubels per acre has been found in spring wheat in which
ailOfr urn ok.idI one-half bosbels were actually destroyed by smut. The
ocan, i«{K«bebly chiefly due to the fact that the grain i* affected
by s*hrr, seed-borne parasites than smut and which are as effectually checked as
"Too-can get full direction* where yon buy your formaldehyde.
AR o#tbe pupils in oar nnl1 schools know
how to do thu. Coant one hsndred seed*
ttey eome, into a blotting paper which
has been moistened. Fold over like a book,
wmp in oil paper or doth, insert a strip of
n( about one inch wide by ten inches loqg
exactly like a lamp wick. Wet tbe whole test
and the* place so that the wick hangs in a
giw of water, keeping the whole thing damp
for several day*. Open after the fifth or sixth
«nd ewmt the strong, weak and dead kernels. This will give yon the perant-
J00 to see how strong the grain is, tarn the test inside
ont wit hoot disturbing it and the kernels mil grow into green rfioota. They ought
to 0fow three or four inches tall before beginning to bend over. It is very impor
tant that yon should know the vitality of youMwd. Sowing mora seed when poor
is not the. way to do it.
If jrowr test is below 99 or per cent, yon had better change seed.
Good Marquis seed wheat is available in any quality.
If You Need Seed, Advise Us
Spring wheat varieties an becoming badly
mixed. If you have any donbta abeat yoor
seed, yon ted better send a sample to yamr
agricultural eeUafs for judging, or and for
Hat of seedsmen or growers who have fine
Marquis seed of supeiioc quality. Hat, clean,
heavy wheat always brings a yroataa.
Qoabty is always most pnfltable.
Spring Wheat Crop
Improvertient Association
881 8*ur*» fMUkig. Mlwmilb, Mhm.
SAINTS HAVE
PROSPECTSFOR
Goopoumr
Many Veterans and Young
sters in Good Shape Who
Reported to Kelley.
The St. Louis Cardinals scored Cincinnati as part pavment for Pitch
ilieir first shutout of the training sea- er Coumbe and Catcher Hargrave,
son yesterday by defeating Beau- has not reported.
Tiller and Marquard will pitch fori
the Cincinnati Reds against the Dal- CDCA^CD CTD/lAf/*
las. Texas leaguers, at Cisco today, iJf JuAflClt ul flVrlfU
The Reds brcak camp tonight. I
Krncst Neitzke. a recruit of Iht. I
Boston Red Sox. pitched nine innings!
defeating them eight to
FIVE TEAMS STILL
IN CHAMPIONSHIP
MEET IN WISCONSIN
Madison, Wis., March 25.—Wau
kesha., Menominee. Superior, LaCrosse
and Appleton high school basketball
teams are still in the running at the
sVUe tournament here. Scores on
Thursday were:
St. Paul, Minn., March 26.—A11 the
regulars of last year's championship
American Association baseball club,
who are to report this season, are in
uniform at Dawson Springs, Ky..
where Manager Mike Kelley is put-,
ting thf veterans and recruits
through their paces.
Dressen. Berghammer and Boone,
the three remaining players of last
year's Infield combination, with Rig
gert. Miller. Duncan and Haas, out
fielders, Hall. Williams, Foster and
Merritt. pitchers, and McMenemy,
catcher, have all reported and ,ire
in good shape for the beginning of
the spring training.
Manager Kelley, through the club
secretary here, has announced that
many recruits seem to be above the
average and the prospects for a com
bination which will win a third con
secutive Vpg for St. I'aul are blight.
Nick Allen, catcher, turned over by
At least two first class pitchers are
necessary, according to Manager Kel
ley to insure a winning combination.
Pitcher Kelley obtained from
York in p,art payment for
Baseman Rapp is showing
promise.
FOR COLLEGE MEN
HAS MANY SIGNED
In addition, Manager Speaker has
Shortstop Joe Sewell and Second
Baseman Riggs Stephenson of the
University of Alabama, and may sijfn
Catcher Luke Sewell and Third B.ise
man Hall of the same school before
the year is over.
"My reason for showing more con
sideration to college pla.yers and par
ticularly pitchers." Speaker said, "is
that practically all the colleges have
good coaches, former big or minor
le,aguers. As a result college pitch
ers come to you with a pretty good
pitching knowledge."
Several of the stars who were
members of the championship team
in 1!)'19 will compete again this year.
By popular subscription students of
Duluth Central high raised a fund of
$500. which will' be used to finance I
the trip of the basketball team to the from college
middle west high school basketball and Henderson and Edwards are still
tournament to be held at Madison.
Wis., beginning April 1.
Hamilton Ellison and Kime jumped
to the Cleveland team.
in school. Mails and Clark had minor
league experience.
Constantinople—An advance of
about 20 miles was made by the Greek
forces in the first day of their cam
paign against the Turks.
NOTE the new
Diamond Crown
in this late style
McKibbin now
shown in all
the late colors
—at tbe best stores.
A
0
GRAND FORKS HERALD, FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1021.
S0U1HDAKOTA
LEAGUE WILL
OPENMAY20
Many Promising Youngsters
Report But Few Old-Tim
ers Considered.
Minneapolis. Minn.. March 25.—
The season's play in the Dakota Base
ball league will begin May 20, ac
cording to a schedule of games an
nounced by M. E. Cantillon, president
of the leagiie. A 100-game schedule
will be played.
Redfleld, Mitchell, Huron and
Sioux Kails draw the opening en
gagements with Aberdeen, Water
town. Wahpeton-Breckenridge, and'
Madison, respectively.
A large number of the players on
the several clubs of the circuit are
Only a few old time players are
listed in the league and nearly all of
them are playing managers.
Dave Altizer, former White Sox aind
member of the Minneapolis team in
the American association, is manager
of the Madison club: Roy Patterson,
now in the south with the Minne
apolis club, developing pitchers will
manage the Wahpeton-Breckenridge
New outfit Ed Karger. who pitched for
Third
much
Cleveland. Ohio, March 25.—Man
ager Tris Speaker of the Cleveland
Indians is going in strong for cpllege few of the castoffs of the big leagues
players. He already has ten on his [will find a place to land in the Dako
squad including eight pitchers, andjta league.
indications .are he will add severalj
more before the season is over. T1APRY fVUDIVN Tft
Of the pitchers Walter Mails, who !1/A1VI1 ®IUSn lU
joined the tribe shortly before last
season ended, is a graduate of Rt.
Mary's college, Ca.l.: Bob Clark came
from Eusquehanna: O. R. Ellison
from the University of California, H.
L. Kime from Ohio State, J. C. Ed
wards from Mississippi college. C. C.
Hamilton from the University of
low^., and B. Henderson from Texas
A. & M. Wayne Middleton, a recruit
southpaw attending Simmons college,
Abilene, Texas, will report here
June 1.
St. Paul a half dozen years ago. is
manager for Aberdeen: Matty Mtf
Grath Is rttanager of Watertown: H.
J. Halstead is in charge of the Red
Held club H. G. Schwarnwebber is
again manager of the Mitchell club,
which won the championship last
year and Fred Charrish is manager
of Sioux Falls.
According to President Cantlllon,
it. is the purpose of the league to de
velop playing material for the faster
circuits. For that reason only a very
MANAGE CHISHOLM
RANGE LEAGUE TEAM
Chisholm. Minn., March 25.—-Local
baseball fans have expressed satisfac
tion at the selection of Darby O'Brien,
known in these parts as one of the
most, successful amateur baseball
managers, as pilot of the 1921 Chis
holm team in the Mesaba Range
league.
O'Brien, for several years managed
a Duluth independent nine. While with
Duluth, O'Brien landed several north
eastern Minnesota championships. He
alsoc developed many young players
who have since seen service in the
majors. Among these are Woodburn,
Dauss. Marion, Cunningham, Schmirl
er, Cummings, Miller, McCrone,
Schreiber, Wolfe, Kole. Breen, Menos
ky and Smith Miller. O'Brien an
nounced he had scoured the Twin
Cities and other points in Minnesota
and the northwest for material for his
Chisholm club. He contemplates mak
ing a trip to Chicago and Cleveland to
round Jut his 1921 roster. It was in
Cleveland that O'Brien in past years
signed many players for his cham
pionship Duluth club. The new Chis
holm manager is said to have signed
Lcverett, veteran major league pitch
er. for many years a member of the
Pittsburgh Nationals.
WOMEN BOWLERS TO
OPEN THEIR ANNUAL
TOURNAMENT APR. 30
Cleveland, Ohio. March 25.—The
second annual tournament of the Na
tional Women's Bowling association
will open here April 30. Women
bowlers from all parts of the eountry
have already signified their intention
of entering.
Last year's tournament was held
in Chicago with an entry list of 84
teams and Cleveland women bowlers
say the Cleveland tourney will exceed
this number by a. score or more.
The prize list will total at. least $2,
500. more th^.n $800 in excess of last
year's stakes.
START PRACTICE APRIL 1.
lOvanston, Til., March 25.— Spring
football practice at Northwestern uni
versity will be started April 1.
Assistant Coach .Tack Sawtelle and
Captain-elect Jack Hathaway will
have charge of the spring drills,
Buddy Lane is to watch the punters,
Inability of the Purple eleven to
meet earlier is a. handicap, but North
western's men have been busy In
other sports.
Mid-semester examinations dealt
several blows at football prospects.
Magnuson (guard) and Carney (end)
went cn the ineligible^list. Dahl, reg
u'ar guard la*t year,**has left school.
However. Bud Turner, crack end.
whose injured knee kept him out of
many games last year, has returned:
Plan to Eat Your
EASTER
DINNER
—a/ the—
Hotel Dacotah
COLLEGE COACHES
TURN ATTENTION
TO BASEBALL TEAMS
.?
St. Poul,. -Minn,, March 26.—With
the advent of spring weather, and
the concluding games in basketball
schedule* played, coaches of the vari
ous colleges in the northwest turned
their attention to training,'the .base
ball squads for the coming season.
Many of the colleges already have
started their spring ttraining and re
port ""wonderful" material on hand.
Others. report that graduations have
not materially changed their lino-ups
from those presented a year ago, and
all pre of the opinion that they will
place a championship winning team
in the field.
Those institutions which are not so
fortunate as to have many letter
men, with which to form the nucleus
of a team, report that with the host
of "green" material upon. which to
work, they are sure that winning ag
gregations will result.
Four colleges in the state report
that the probabilities for discontinu
ance of baseball this season are. very
likely, because of the. Jack of mate
rial, but practically every other col
lege makes optimistic reports regard
ing the baseball outlook for the year.
Those reporting lack of material
are Piilsbury Academy at Owatonn^.
St Cloud normal, St. Cloud normal
school at Mankato, and the normal
school at Winona.
I Piilsbury reports that because of
the lack of veteran material and oth-
er difficulties, the athletic director-
being given a tryout with American ... __in_ _#
association clubs this season and there °aIkfJ *nHn^
Avftn. plans ror a baseball squad this spring,
is everj prospect that the majority of ,, st
players who will be found in action
in the Dakota league this season will
be new players.
Lack of experienced' material at St,
Cloud normal is given as the cause
of making basebp.ll in that Institution
doubtful. Spring football practice
will probably replace baseball here
this year, it is reported.
At Mankato normal the probabili
ties of a team are meagre, unless the
co-eds decide to enter the field. There
are but two male students reported
at the institution this year and these
are not baseball "bugs," according to
the report.
Wlnonsf1 normal reports that the
school never was successful in b/isc
ball, and the chances are no better
this year, consequently the game will
be dropped. However, St. Mary's
college in this city is making prepar
ations to put a winning team in the
ficWl.
JAPAN'S RIGHTS IN
EASTERN SIBERIA" TO
GET CONSIDERATION
Tokio, March 24.—(By the Asso
ciated Press)—Responding to inter
pellations in the house of representa
tives today. Viscount Uchida, the for
eign minister, said the powers fully
recognized th£.t far eastern Siberia
stood in special relationship to Ja
pan, and that therefore Japan's rights
and interests in that territory would
receive their full consideration. Their
protection would form a' condition on
which the Russian government would
be recognized, he added.
A representative ^sked why Japan
was heRltating when it was rumored
the United States was contemplating
opening trade with Russia, as this
doubtless would include the Far East,
where he declared America had long
been ambitious to gain a foothold.
Masano H^anihara, vice foreign
minister, replied that Japan was not
negotiating with Russia for a resump
tion of trade at present. If the Unit
ed States had opened negotiations it
would be important to Japan, but the
reports had not 'been confirmed.
SPECIAL SESSION
OF PANAMA CONGRESS
CALLED FOR MONDAY
Washington. March 25.—President
Porras of Panama has called a spe
cial session of congress for next Monr
day to consider Panama's attitude to
v.ard the demand made b.y the Amer
ican government that Panama accept
a-s final the White award as to thii
boundary between that country and
Costa Rica. This information was
contained in a dispatch received to
day by the state department from the
American legation at Panama City.
CLEVELANDPACKERS'
WAGES NOW ON PAR
WITH THOSE OF EAST
Cleveland. O., March 25.—Wage re
ductions averaging 8 cents an hour
for workers paid by the hour and 15
per cent for piece workers, effective
next Monday, were announced by
meat packing houses here today. This
Is the second cut since the first of the
year, and places lawful wages on a
par with those
tfi\
Chicago and the
west.
The agreement reached between
packers and their employes at Wash
ington. it is siid, will have no. bearing
on the local situation.
During normal times 2,500 men are
employed here, but the plants have
been operating with half that ,nu nber
for several months.
PISEK BASEBALL
TEAM ORGANIZED
Pisek. N. D., March 25.-—The base
ball fans of Pisek gathered recently
and/perfected an organization for the
season. About twenty former players
were present and have signed up t«.
play with Uje squad: The team will
be comprish, of entirely home talent
players,
All of. We biisitifss men of Pisek
have donated various sums of money
toward the support of the club and
prospects are that Pisek will have
ope of the strongest baseball organi
zations in the history of the town.
The following officers were elected at
the meeting: W. H. Elznie. man
ager H.- H. Dvorak, assistant man
ager Albin Lovoik, secretary-treas
urer, Joseph H. Parek, captain. The
players. Fill commence practice im
mediately.
WOULD AID RIVER MOVEMENT.
Des Moines. Iowa. March 25.—An
^appropriation of $5,000 a year toward
the campaign of Great Lakes-St.
Lawrence Tidewater association for a
wa\erway from the lakes, to the ocean
for large vessels would be made by a
bill introduced in the houso of the
Iowa legislature by the committee on
apnropriations.
The bill was placed on the calen
dar.
MONUMENTS
M«ti wramu WOBM
««X ft OWXTMKTT ATS.
Ib years active expe*ience enables
us to say without doubt that an In
terview with us will help you select
that thdnwrient'.or marker. We har»
employed no agents for several years
having found that custom"® prefer
to deal with ua 4lreo4 which also
savea them a crntmlsalon. We carry
a large stAck and personally erect alt
our work. If unable to call write us
'nr designs.
W. ft. jaaifc none Myrtle Jack
149 .' Mje. *taaa.
DECLARES JAPS
DQ NOT PLAN TO
OUTDO AMERICANS
the Asso
that the
Tokio, March 25.—(By
ciated Press)—Assertions
Japanese naval program was
followed for the purpose of compet
ing with the United States navy, were
denounced as "preposterous and ab
surd" by Vice Admiral Tomasaburo
Kato, Japanese minister of marine,
in an interview with the Associated
Press here today. He declared Ja-
anese naval program had been for­"
mulated only so that the island em
pire could be defended against any
emergencies arising in the Far East.
During the .course of the interview
the minister emphasized the fact that
Japan's project to have a fleet of
eight battleships and eight battle
cruisers not over eight years old, was
not necesarily irreducible. He indi
cated that if all the naval powers
would agree to a "naval holiday" he
would be willing to enter such an en
gagement, and would not Insist upon
the completion of the nav,al program
projected by the government.
NEW YOWTENTERS
FIELD TO DEVELOP
MUSICAL EDUCATION
New York, Maryh 55.—New York
has entered the field to develop
American orchestral and choral work
and conducting, for which. America
has hitherto been dependent on for
eigners.
Plans to develop American talent
became known with the announce
ment that the American Orchestral
society, sponsored by Mrs. E. H. Har
riman, has "been formed and is soon
to be under way. The program pro
vides for the founding of a central
orchestra of fifty or sixty high class
musicians to work, in conjunction
with neighborhood groups of am
ateurs which also are to be formed.
Promising members of these groups
will be given an opportunity to play
in the central orchestra and to study
conducting under its leader. Counsel
and instruction will be given free to
members of the local musical bodies.
Pounders of the society have an
nounced that it is not designed to
enter the concert field or to compete
with existing symphony orchestras or
institutes of music.
They declare their hope that the
society will maintain a supply of
American trained musicians by pro
viding them with a high type ofLen
semble training. They point out 'that
America now is dependent'on foreign
ers for most of the important con
ductorships and for the direction of
many of her greater musical activi
ties.
J. George White To
Be Recommended For
Indian Commissioner
Washington, March 25.—J. George
White of Chicago, it was reported to
day, will be recommended by Secre
tary Fall of the interior department
for appointment as Indian commis
sioner. He has been In the govern
ment service for many years and re
cently has had charge of the Osage
Indians' property.
IMMIGRATION l'UOBLI.MS.
If the flew commissioner of immi
gration, W. W. Husband of St. Johns
bury, Vermont, wants to give the
country a pleasant surprise he will try
the unprecedented experiment of en
forcing rigidly the immigration act of
1917, which is now on the books but
has never been put into full oper
ation.
This act is adm-irable in most of its
provisions, and if it should be intel
ligently and impartially enforced its
cffectst\yould havp a valuable educa
tional Influcncc. The American pro
pie would learn for the first time how
sweeping are the provisions congress I
has made to protect us from dis- I
eused, mentally deficient, criminal.
Immoral aliens. They would learn
what high standards have been set up
by congress for strangers seeking ad-i inT«Tni.s
mission. They would be informed as vT .u
to the absolutely unnecessary pro- nicaf?o. March
posals which have been put forward receipts cars
recently.—New York Herald. Michigan and
lilliL SCHAEFEJl RESOLUTION.
Madison. Wis., March 25.
Xo opposition was shown to
SOUP-PLATE PARASOLS.
Parasols as small as soup-plates
are the latest novelty in Paris, made
in snuff-colored gllk and mounted on
diminutive sticks with carved wooden
handles. Having been under a cloud
for the last two seasons, this re
juvenated creation will no doubt be
received with favor. The motorist
will, at all events adopt it in fact, it
wa* made for her.-—London Daily-
Mail.
BAXK ORDEIIED CLOSED.
Des Moines, la.. March 25.—The
Rome Savings bank at Rome, Iowa,
has been ordered closed by the sate I
banking department, it was announced
today.
The deposits wore said to be abou1^ I
$45,000. The state department of bank
ing has taken charge of the institu
tion. it was said.
Grand Forks
WHEAT
MARQUIS
KLBAMvA DURUM
BLACK CHAW DURUM
OATS
SWEDISH SELECT
60 DAY
SILVER MINE
VICTORY
GREEN RUSSIAN
BARLEY
MANPHURKY
pDEIUiRUCKER
FLAX
(Wilt Resistant)
8PEI/TZ
BUCKWHEAT
FIELD PEAS
EVENING EDITION.
Markets
EXCHANGES CLOSED
Today being Good Friday
mpetT| practically all of the ex
changes throughout the
country arc closed for the en
tire day and for that reason
there are few quotations fro
pan was not trying to compete with •i,. IT1,1
the American navy, and th,at the Jap- DC given in tonight S, rlerald.
had
GRAND FORKS GRAIN.
Spring Wheat
No.
No.
No.
No.
No.
dark northern .. 11.45
northern spring, 58 lb
northern spring, 57 lb
northern spring, 55 lb
northern spring, 52 lb
No. 1
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
No. 2,
lbs.
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
1.39
1.36
1.2&
1.15
Durum Wheat.
Red Durum.
No. 1
No. 2
No. 3
No. 4
.$1.20
1.18
,. 1.11
,. 1.01
1
Rye.
.-.$1.28
Flax.
Barley.
NEW YORK.
MONEY.
New York, March 25.—Prime mer
cantile paper 7 1-2 @0 3-4. Exchange
nominal. Sterling 60 day bills 3.86 5-8.
Francs demand 6.91 1-2, cables 6.92.
Lire demand 3.95. Marks demand 1.56
1-2, cables 1.57. Montreal 11 7-8 pel'
cent discount.
PRODUCE.
Now York, March 25.—Butter stea-«
dy receipts 2,691 creamery higher
than extras 46 [email protected] creamery ex
tras, 92 scorc, 47 firsts, 88 to 91 score,
[email protected] 1-2.
Eggs unsettled receipts 32,835
fresh gathered extra firsts 26 [email protected]
27 firsts [email protected]
MINNEAPOLIS. I
GRAIN AND FLOUR.
Minneapolis, March 25.—Flour un
changed to 30 cents higher. In carload
lots, family patents quoted at [email protected]
9.15 a barrel in 98 pound cotton sacks.
Bran [email protected]
CHICAGO. I
LIVESTOCK.
Chicago, March 25.—Cattle receipts
4,000 beef steers dull, weak to unev
enly lo\v«fr Quality plain, bulk beef
steers [email protected] butcher she stock
and bulls, slow, weak bulk fat'cows
and heifers [email protected] canners and.
cutters mostly 3.00 @4.50 bulk built?"'
[email protected] calves steady bulk stocker
and feeder steers 7.25S® 8.25 choice
selected meaty feeder steers 9.35.
Hog receipts 15,000 slow, very un
even, mostly steady with yesterday's,
average top early 11.10 bulk 200
pounds down 10.50® 11.00 bulk p20
pounds up [email protected] pigs mostly
steady.
Sheep receipts 7,000 killing classes
steady to 25 cents higher heavies up
most wonled lambs top 10.75 shorn
9.35 101 pound shorn lambs bulk
fat wooled lambs 9.75
(ft-10.507.50
Cliei se unchanged.
Wisconsin assembly today killed the
Schaefer resolution urging congress
to pass legislation conscripting wealth
for payment of debts contracted
through past and present wars and
making war impossible except after'23 ordinary firsfs [email protected] at mark,
referendum of the people. The vote leases included, 21®22.
on the measure which had been roc- Poultry alive lower fowls 30
ommended for p/tssage by the judic- springs 34.
iary committee, stood 43 to 39.
I
the
Prescott vice bill, when it came up ft
.'or engrossment, and it was advanced
by a 77 to 3 vote. The measure I
would give Wisconsin stringent regu
lator.v powers over uitcomniercialized Cattle receipts 1,800, extremely dull:y
vice by localizing provisions ol' the killing classes mostly steady good\i
federal Mann act. beef steers quotable to $9.50 none
It was voted to give the highway here today bulk of common and
commission authority to make general jniediuni beef steers j^[email protected] few
purchases, of materials to be used in up to 8.75 butcher cows and heifers
highway construction. [email protected] choice heifers quotable
top cwea
6.50 bulk fat ewes [email protected]
PRODUCE.
Chicago. March 25.—Butter lower
receiyts 4,004 tubs creamery extras
44 lirs'.s :[email protected] seconds [email protected]
standards 41.
—Potatoes.
Minnesota,
Wisconsin sacked
round white 9" cents at $1.05 cwt
bulk round whiles $ I -00 (BP 1.10 cwt
The Minnesota sacked early Uhios mostly
$ 1
PUOTHCK.
Chicago. March 25.—Egf», lower
receipts 20.40ti cases tirsts'22 l-2ff/
S A I I
LIVE STOCK.
South St. Paul, Minn.. March 25.—
to $8.25 cinners and cutters $2.00(ii)
4.00 bologna bulls mostly $3.75
4.50 veal calves steady top $10.50
stockers and feeders very little doing,
tendency lower.
Hog receipts 4.500 market steday:
range $7.50^10.60 bulk $5,00®
10.25 pigs strong to 25 cents higher
top $11.75.
Sheep receipts 100 market nom-
inJiVv"steadv
ly
I
JOHN BIRKHOLZ
Honey Always on Hand Tor
rXBST F1BX KOBCOAOE liOAX
Grand Forks, N. D.
Seed
Wliolcsulc and Retail Seeds.
Onr stocks arc complrtc nntl of the very best quality procurable.^
Send fot| catalog and price list.
if
Co.
MEDIUM-RED CLOVER
ALFALFA
SWEET CLOVER
TIMOTHY
BLUE GRASS
RED TOP
RYE GRASS
BROMUS
SUDAN GRASS
MILLETS
FIELD CORN
FODDER CORN
KAFFIR CORN
AMBER CANE
RAPE
POULTRY SUPPLIES
CHICK FEED
CHICK STARTER
BULK GARDEN SEEDS
A-

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