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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, November 09, 1921, Image 11

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1921-11-09/ed-1/seq-11/

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1 EVENING
1
1
t- ,M
nf
glrl*
•«K
Vw
-v*
Jury
Sam
Cnrrm«*»*e T, ii A'.. storekeeper, was notified, Who in
roner
i^CCi(|CS
An-
na Story Was -killed by
Cavalier, N. !., Nov. 9.—The body,'cavaiier?
of Anna Story, the 16-yea.r-oId girl
murdered near Leyden, Monday morn­
mg, wi'.i' be buried after-
"L
2™r
h"T"
8rirljils.'unaer
nxi Story, mother of the. He stoutly maintains his innocence.
S
the
And is suffering from a fractured jaw,
leged that ahe was shot by
nands of Sam ^alii.
i^
ured
Kaiu following the shooting of the according to Harold Thompson, state's
1
Inquest Held?
A post mortem examination, and
coroner's inquest1 were held over the!
body of the girl Monday evening, with
\V. Hodgson acting as /.coroner iand
Tr. j. l. Miller having charge of the
•post mortem. I
Tt was discovered that the girl had "T:
been shot in the breast with a 38-cal- I Minot, N D., Nov. 8.—P. C. Upton
ibre revolver, the bullet passing di-j?nl^i
''y through -the heart «id 4ed^
ding itself near the spinal co'timn.
The bullet was removed was *P- ^S SmT™ ^f.nhpt
parently from the revolver field by'
•v.o „„a ,,
tr,
Kalir ^t vpwiw ^f th^ ^n^?n«r'« rderst0O(J ^that
b? 38-^r,6 revolver
t-
^alil
ycrsioniofjCrimc,
Acqprding "to the
1
statement' of the
'1 l-yefu-.pld brSthpV'of fho dead glH,
hvyas awakened from sleep earlv 4n
the niprnlhg by the sound of.,twoeBots
and. springing vtit of .bed. he-ligpted'(^
lamp and* saw Sfifo/ Kalii: the -Syrian
peddler who had. been sleeping down
stairs standing with a revolver in his.
hand in the room near the bed where
.his mother, sister and younger, broth
er were sleeping. He heard his
mother cry^ "Is that you. Sam?" a^»d
then spring from the bed bleeding
from the iaco and .'wrench the-revol-
HLourkjMr
BREAD
ISA
WINTER FOOD
With Caldries of Warmth' In
Every Bite,:,
Barker System Bakery
Sam- Papcrtnaater,' Mgr.
404.''.y: Phone ..Grand
DeMcra 1*70 Forks
CUT FLOWERS
Fan* Any Occasion
UNERAL
ESIGNS
on' Short Notice
alive night and day
tr sight Caii 5S9-B
Grand Forks Floral Co.
heading ndrlsts
12 DaVers Ave. Grand Fork«
J. E. MCDONALD
», Landscape Gardened
and Florist
Cut Flowers
Potted Plants
We specialize in planting. tulip
beds, rote beds, trees, hedges, etc.
9 N. Fourth St.
jraxt to Bitot* AMXO CO.
Phones: .Store 134 Kes. 8864
Wholesale and Retail-
JAM
THE LEADING
PorkSansage
gweet Cflofer,
sage,
Ptr pound.
best breakfast San-
ISJC 35c
ji:
JL
•m
LTI:
«,
ver frtrin ths'mM'i hand.The mas
thenrkn downstairs, according to the
boy, apd evidently got a butchSr knife'
te attack the, mother, but she succeed
ed in' retting it away from him.
The older boy then fainted'. accord
In* to the younger boy, who4 testified
tMfct Kalil again g&t hold ofithe knife
,, and c^t his own throat.: Growing
l| weak, .Kalll lay''down on a mattress
downstairs and the inother,' seizing
the smaller boy by the hand,' ran with
him toLeyden where Charles
.turn notified the county authorities,
wh0 arrived at the scnno the
Jcaloasy Thought to Be Mathe.
Jealousy is thought to have been
the motive for the killing of the girl,
nt»Qp at Leyderi, providing two broth-,, as two letters were found in Kalil's
era who live in Saskatchewan and who.**® users pocket written to M:ss Story
in time, otherwise thev body will. be! the nature love letters. The-moth
Jj held until their arrival. er, who can apeak but a few words,
Sam Kalll. the*ttll&ed murderer of K-KnAwn that Ka"U was aJso
tho rw^i ,. .. •, Jealou» of. other young men of the
the girl, is held at the county jail and community ,Who paid some attentions
is expected- to recover from a wound to. her daughter. J*
on the throat believed to hive been Kalil, according to the boys' story,
doctor's care .The accused will have his preliml-
liary
hearing as soon 4s he has recov-
sufficiently to stand the ordeal,
attornvy for Cavalier county. ..'
MANY OF WATKINS
HELPERS DROPPED
I FROM STATE PAYROLL
JTard y,^tkln| ®f.siata?ts#i?
were released from the state's pay-
state inspector at Bismarck. It is un-
8,11
'j..u verdIct of. Jhe ®rn21tbent officers and their assistants in
uL State have also been released with
hi„d
in
Mlnot,'N. D., Nov. 8.—The j«iry in
the case of Lewis Barton, charged
with illegal transportation of liquor,
disagreed and were dismissed by
Judge Geo. H. Moellring late Satur
day evening, after they had been out
over 13 hours. States Attorney O. B.
Herigstad says the case will likely be
retired at the next term of district
court in December.
The case of. the State of North Da
kota versus G. S. Shank, charged with
illegal. transportation of liquor has
gone to the Jury.
In both cases an interesting con
stitutional question has been brought
up by the defense, which alleges that
at the time the officers searched the"
automobiles of the two defendants
they had no search warrants, and that
it was therefore an illegal search.
Judge Moellfing overruled the argu
ment in the case against Barton. In
the Shank case the defense. brought
out an additional feature, in that the
officers who seized the car were .'spec
ial investigators and not peace officers.
O. C. Redlin and F. C. Upton'. were
the officers who made the arrest in
the Shank case.
RED LAKE FALLS
TESTS
SWsssih*.
8h00t*
ing in a short time. The county off!
cials found thfe girl &ead on the bed
upstairs, the man nearly dead from
the loss of b'ood apd still lying on the
mattress, and- the older boystiir faint
in the house. All were brought to
the "other' enforce^
the exception of F. L. Watkins and
two othfer men whose .names are not
liknowri. _•
Shortrjeas of funds in the .treasury
for thei'l#.^ enforcement department
jelieyed*
is believed' to. be the reason for de
pleting the state, forces, as it is said
that-expenpe money for the men has
n,ot. §een ^recejyed yet for the jnontha
of Sept and Oct ,"although their wages
have been paid.
It is said that there was about $.15,
000 in' the treasury «^.rly this fall,
and the only revenue that the de
partment has been existing on, it is'
said, is from the sale of license tags.
By releasing the two men here law
enforcement work in the northwestern
section Of the state will' be seriously
hampered, it' is said, although Mr.
Watkins will now work in conjunction
with looal officials whenever their
assistance .is needed, it i£ said.
Jury Disagrees In
Case OfjBootlpgger
NEW SIREN
Red Lake Falls, Minn., Nov.- 8.—
The city council is testing oqt the-new
electric siren that has been secured on
trial. The siren is driven by a 3 h.
p. motor and makes a penetrating
noise that has been heard for dis
tance of five miles from the city. It
is planned to have the siren operated
by a push-button in the telephone ex
change office in case of fire, and .in
order to keep the machinery in con
stant working order it is probable
that it will be blown at 7 a. m., jioon.
1 p. m'., 6 p. m. and a curfew sounded
at 9 p. m.
Red Lake Aggie Society
Will Meet November 15
Bed Lake Falls, Minn., Nov.* 8.—
The annual meeting of the Red Lake
Countj/ Agricultural society will be
held Tuesday evening, Nov. 15, at the
Riverside club rooms, and three di
rectors
wiir'
toe chosen to fill the va­
cancies caused by the expiration of
the terms of J. E. Draeger. president
J. 'H. Wagner, 'vice-president, and
Ferment Derosier.
GROCERS ...
122-124-126 South Third Bt.
A large shipment of .-pure fruit jam in (be following as
sortments, Strawberry, 'Raspberry and
Parked 4 ionnd me palla. Special
p£r pail.
pineapple.-
Fancy luscious Blade
Boratlng with juice,
grown. Large she,
Vt S for.....
One lot of fehcy dreeaed geeee, heads off, and drawnl
Average weight 7 to IS pounds.
fecial,^Per Poand 2$t
Soecitl. Per Pound 25c
$1.10
JL
Pare fruit jelly, packed in 4 pound os. pails, in the
following flavors. Strawberry, Raspberry, Apple,
Plum, Blackberry and Grape. Special (1 An
per phil. A.....'. ............. *lill,U
We have the best selection and largest quantity
of apples in the city. Orer 1,000 boxes to select
from parchased by ua direct from the grow
en ana, retailing at Jobbers' prices. See us
V* before yom lmy.
Minced "Ham
Sweet Clover, the finest quality on
the. market, "i •, aa.
Per pound.. .,..... tUC
1
'... '.-'.Tr
Diaiqonda.
The:fine«t
43c
Qne lot 6f fancy farm dressed Do
i. Iwae are fresh
On hX today.
itaeitid Dockft 'nwsse are fresh killed and doe tp
arrive thts 'morning.
jJVs:
7
*Af#6k
The,welcome accorded-the allied
comthander by Clevelanders equalled
the most oord^ai' extended ty other
cities where he has visited.
SLAY ER=OF KENMARE
POLICEMAN MAY YET
BE TRIED IN N. D.
Mlnot, N. D„ Nov. 8.— Charles
Welling, accused of murder in the
first degree in connection with the
shooting of Peter Nielson, Kenmare
policeman, may yet be' tried in Ward
county.
State's Attorney H4rigstad has re
ceived a letter from the attorney gen
eral's office, asking that Wellington be
returned to Minot for trial.
Judge John ,Lowe had signed an or
der releasing Wellington to Iowa au
thorities, where he was serving a life
term for murder and jail breaking.
He was taken to Bismarck from the
Ward county jail, and Iowa authori
ties came there to get him, but the
attorney general's office refused to
give him up.
State's Attorney Herigstad said to
day that if the trial was tried in Ward
county he would have to get in touch
with several of the witnesses in the
case, who were released when Welling
was taken to Bismarck.
is not likely that Welling will be
tried at this term of court, but if re
turned to Minot. his case will per
haps be called on the December cal
endar. If convicted. Welling may be
hanged, authorities say, as under-the
North Dakota law. anyone convicted
of murder a second time can be ex
ecuted.
'Artl* .*&*
This photo, taken from the top of the Arlington Amphitheatre, shows
the tomb where America's unknown soldier will be buried Armistice day.
In the background are seen the electric amplifiers for transmitting Pres
ident' Harding's speech to the thousands oi persons oh the outside of. the
amphitheatre.
GUEST OF OHIO
Given Great Welcome By
Citizens of Cleveland and
Officials.
Cleveland, Ohio, Nov. 9—Refreshed
•after a day of unbroken rest. Marshal
Foch today became the official guefet
of the state of Ohio, the Ohio depart
ment of the American Legion and the
city of Cleveland. His visit at the
home of Parmely Herrick, son of
Myron T.. Herrick, American ambas
sador to France, where he rested yes
terday, was more of a personal visit
on account of the friendship between
the French marshal and the Ameri
can ambassador, than it was to the
state and city.
WALHALLA NOTES
»The firist snow of any consequence
started falling last Friday night.
Rev. J. G. Moore of Grand Forks
filled the vacant pulpit in the M. B.
church on Sunday night. Rev. James,
the' pastor, who has been in England
on a visit since Jilne, has not returned
yet. He was supposed to have loft
England some six weeks ago and his
friends here are anxious as to his
whereabouts, not having had any word
from him in that tijne.
Gerald Webster of Grand Forks
was a week-en(i visitor in town.
Fred Bloomquist and Frank Fi|z
simonds are erecting an auto repair
shop on Tenth streetvand expect to
have it finished for use before the
cold weather sets in.
J. A. Stevens and wife are spending,
a few days'in G. F. this week.'
Rev. John McDonald and wife of
Milton, were weqk-end visitors In
town.
The funeral of Elmira Goudrie, who
died on Wednesday morning from
Tuberculosis, was held from the Cath
olic church Friday A. M., Rev. Fr. Xa
Chance conducting the services The
deceased had been an inmate of the
statcf sanitarium at Dunsieth and was
sept home some three weeks ago. She
leaves, besides her mother, two broth
ers.
Mrs. Dean F%tlkier left the f^rst of
the week for South Dakota where she
will spend the winter with her soq
ClmrieiMan^family^^^^^^^^^^
ADVERTISEMENT.
-QUALITY-FOOD'
It's not volume, but quality
in diet that aid* healthful
growth/
Scotfs Emulsion
is a quality-food that
many need.tohelptidfe
over times of weak
ness.'
If* rich in the
pndou* oitamines.
AT ALL DRUO STOWS
PRICE. SlJiO and
f!.*** *.1
tv?
3ITION. 'n GRAND FORKS HERALD, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1921. ?. .'t *M^S
UNKNOWN HERO'S RESTING PLACE
BULL BOG DRIVES
OFF ROBBERS WHO
BLOW BANK VAULT
Bcmidji, Minn., Nov. 8.—Bob,
the foithfiil bulldog belonging to
Agent Thompson' of the Soo Line
at Phiewood. a station 12 miles
west of this city saved several
thousand dollars in cash and se
curities when he battled a band
of bank robbers who attempted to
blow the safe of the Pinewood
bank Sunday night.
The robbers had made every
thing sure by cutting the tele
phone and telegraph lines to tlie
town and about 12:30 o'clock they
broke down the door of the bank
smashed the combination on the
outer door of the vault and pro
ceeded to fill the vault door with
juioc to get to the inner safe,
but Bob, the agent's dog took a
hand in affairs at this time and
drove the robbers from the bank
before they could do further dam
age. The identity of the robbers
is unknown.
Defense In Murder
Trial Is Strengthened
By Doctor's Evidence
Fargo, N. D., Nov. 8.—Dr. T. L.
DePuy of Jamestown, coroner of
Stutsman county, under cross-exam
ination by the defense, threw some
startling statements into the murder
trial of William Wyant and Henry
Kearns, Jamestown railroad police,
charged witrh. the shooting and kill
ing of three men near Jamestown
last .May.
Under the gruelling conducted by
Atty. George W. Thorpe of James
town, chief counsel for the defend
ants. Dr. DePuy testified that he ob
tained the grip of Fred Johnscn, one
of the slain transients in the North
ern Pacific station at Jamestown, and
upon opening it in the presence of
the state's attorney and the North
ern Pacific agent at Oamestown,
learned that it contained a .38 auto
matic Remington revolver, a sack of
.38 cartridges, besides a number of
pieces of 'silk goods, such as silk
shirts and silk scarfs and hose.
The physician testified that the
sum of $1,750 was found in Johnson's
money belt, besides a number of gold
pieces, which had holes perforated in
them and had evidently been used as
chai-.ms or some decoration.
GREAT NUMBER OF
CANTALOUPES RAISED
IK IMPERIAL VALLEY
Bas Francisco, Nov. 9.—More than
153.000.OQO cantaloupes—enough to
furnish every resident of tho United
States for a .melon and a half for
breakfast—were raised in the Im
perial Valley of southern California
this year, according •to the Pacific
Fruit Express company.
Land on which the melons were
raised not so many years ago was a
desert. Now more than 400 miles of
Irrigation canals carry water from the
Colorado river to Imperial Valley
farms. The valley is located not far
from the lowest land depression in the
world.
In all, 13,000 carloads of can
taloupes were shipped from Imperial
valley points this year to Pacific coa^t
and eastern markets. All went out
^refrigerator cars, big ice manufac
turing plants being operated at Braw
ley and El Centre, valley points to
stock the cars.
An. attempt is to be made this win
ter in the Imperial Valley to produce
Chrlbtmas melons, the valley fourteen
years, ago having sent out the first
melons ever, produced in the country'
in the 'holiday season outside pf a hot
house."
(, The first Christmas melons were
raised during a frostless winter and
predictions have been mafle that the
1921-22 winter will be frostless. Act
ing on the predictions many farmers
•h.ave planted winter melons, hoping to
realise, a golden' harvest.
TVSTTNG ROPES.
Washington, Nov. 9.—How strong
is a rope? Tests made at the Bureau
of Standards here have resulted in
answering the question with a
formufa.
For threerstrang regular manila
rope from one-half to four and one
half inches in diameter, the following
computation, experts at the bureau
st&te, will, give the breaking load of
thajspe:
The average breaking load in
pounds iequals 5,000 multiplied by the
diameter of the rope In inches, multi
plied by the. diameter of the rope in
creased by one.
This, the expats add. "Will give the
average, maximum- weight that the
'rope will h^ld but the forking, load
or the lo?,d that a contractor or. safe
hauler may apply with proper safety
and precaution would be considerably
less than the load given by the for-
-u
II
GERMANY WANTS
GOLD CREDITS/
DR. HUGO SAYS
$200,000,000 Would Ex
tinguish "Paper Flood",
Is Claim
He estimated that the value of Ger
raan property sequestration abroad
amounted to twenty times the amotint
of Germany's excess paper currency
and that therefore one-twentieth of
this last remnant of Germany's
tangible credits, If converted into gold,
would suffice to wipe out her paper
marks.
Dr. Hugo icomplained that the
armies of occupation in the Rhineland
were costing the nation more than
did the imperial army and navy in
tinje of peace.
Want Speculation Stopped.
Berlin, Nov. 8.—The German gov
ernment announced today during a
debate on taxes in the reichstag that
it was planning stringent measures to
curb speculation and traffic in foreign
exchange.
Minister of Economics Schmidt also
disclosed that one billion marks
worth of French liquors were entering
Germany through the import control
station'at Ems, and that French per
fumes, cpsmetics and other "super
fluous articles of luxury," were like
wise pouring into the country.
Figures Do Not Tally.
*The debate revealed strong conflict
between the government figures on
budgets and deficits and the inde
pendent estimates compiled by Dr.
Karl Helferrich, former secretary of
the imperial treasury, who declared
that the spectacle of the food minister
running the finance ministry as a side
issue will he symptomatic of the gov
ernment's helplessness. Dr. Helfer
rich estimated that the deficit woijld
reach 182,000,000,000 marks instead
of 110,000,000,000, the figure sub
mitted by Andreas Hermes, the food
minister.
"Every third man in Germany," Dr.
Helferrich declared, "today either is
an official or civil servant, while the
public payroll contains the names of
at least 100,000 political appointees.
The systematic introduction of the
eight hour day has necessitated the
hiring of 250,000 extra officials.
Quick Work Saves
Life Of Electrician
In Path Of Current
Minot, N*. D., Nov. 8.—Only the
quick action and forethought of men
who saw the accident saved the life
erf Joe Havelena, 22, last Saturday
afternoon when a guy wire which he
was hauling up a pole came in con
tact with a transmission wire carry
ing 13,000 volts of electricity, which
feeds towns and villages to the west
of Minot.
Havelena, who is in the employ of
the Northern State Power Co., was
working on top of a pole east of the
power plant, and hauling the guy wire
up the pole to fasten it at the top.
It became caught on some obstacle,
and he gave it a yank. The top end
swung against the. high p(jwer line,
and 13,000 volts of electricity shot
through the man's body, burning his
right hand and right side severely.
He had one foot against a conduit on
the pole, and this is believed to have
made the charge stronger, affording
a better ground, than the wooden pole
would have done.
G. E. Balch, superintendent for the
company, and Henry Slocum, foreman,
were underneath the pole, and saw
the accident. They rushed into the
power house and turned off the power
which had been traveling through
the man's body for about 15 seconds,
it is said.
Havelena was taken down at once
and medical assistance applied. He
is now in St. Joseph's hospital, and is
said to be resting quite easily today,
although the burns are still painful.
rierald Want Ads Bring Results.
•4
I
lA
7tV
(By The Associated Press. eeed 50 cents.
Brehien, Nov. 8. Two hundred "That reduction has no significance
million dollars would suffice to ex- to Illinois or Iowa," Mr. Thorne ar
tinguish Germany's "paper flood" said gued. "It has very little significance
Dr. Otto Hugo, leader of the German to Kansas and Nebraska. Here you
Volkspartei, during an address here haVe the great heart of the livestock
today on the German economic' and industry almost wholly unaffected by
political situation. the reduction. Our appeal to the
at large and' he predicted the toss of
the Westphalian industrial section un
less Germany were given a "breath
ing spell" in the shape of gold credits,
abroad to enable her to meet the
reparations 'payments due next
January.
Dr. Hugo estimated 75,000,000,000 commission and to 1)\e railroads has
marks were floating about the world not been for relief just on the fringe
Short-Haul::
Reductions
Are Asked.
Washington, Nov. 8.—kolding tha.t
the reduction in livestock rates recent
ly ordered by the inferstate commerce
eommlsion left the heart of the live
stock producing region almost wholly
unaffected, the American' Farm Bu
reau: Federation through its counsel,
Clifford Thorne of Chicago, today
asked the commission to extend »the
reduction to short hauls. The reduc
tions recently ordered amount to 20
per cent on hauls where the fates ex-
of our territory. The plea of organ
ized agriculture comes from the entire
agricultural section aiid not from the
edge of it."
Further Reduction Opposed.
•Extension of the reduction was op
posed by' the carriers through Ken
neth F. Burgess of Chicago, general
solicitor for the Chicago, Burlington
& Quincy railroad, who to{d the com
mission that the livestock Industry
was suffering from "curtailment of
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 11 I I 11 11
1 1 I I I I I I 1 1 I
1
"Were our situation not So tragic,"
declared Herr Schmidt, "this con
ception on the part of the Entente of
our internal needs would have a
humorous aspect. But the situation
is simply that either we are to con
sume these French wines and snap
ofir fingers at the reparations obliga
tions, or that we are to resolve to ful
fill our obligations in which case we
shall be compelled to decline the
French libations.''
a a
The new sugar coated
chewing gum
uriitch everybody
"likes—you will,
too.
1
tM
iii
Malleable Gas
Coal Ranges are
made by the
Malleable Iron
Range Co. who
for 22 years have
manufactured the
well
known
Monarch
Malleable
Iron
Ranges.
135 S. Third St.
-v
j&jmm
w,-
Combination Range
DEMONSTRATION
Wed., Thurs., Fri.f Sat.
9th
WRIGLEYS
PAGE ELEVEN.
foreign credits and decrease of mMt
eating ih the United State*," factors &
which & rate reduction would: not af- «#$$••,
feet.
The additional reduction requested
would amount to lem than three one
hundredths of a cent per pound and
would be of little benefit to the ahlp-
pers, Mr. Burgess said,, adding that it
would, on the other hand, further cur
tail the buying power of the railroads
and vitally effect such basic indus
tries as steel, lumber and coal.
—Burn—
ZENITH
COKE
THE IDEAL FUEL
$16 Per Ton
S IN S O N
ncn. as twu oo.
18—Agents
Exclusive—mom
111111 iii ii 111 mi ii mi
YOUR MIRROR WILL
TELL YOU
that our eye glasses improve
your appearance instead of de
tracting from it as you may have
feared. It is part of our eye
glass service to mount the lenses
in frames that will best harmon
ize with the featuree. With
their use eye strain and head
aches cease and wrinkles dis
appear.
We Make Complete Examina
/tions of the Eyes
I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 11 I I I I I I I I II I I I I I I I 1 I I I I 11
PARAMOUNT
10th 11th 12th
The Paramount
TWO OVEN RANGE
Distinctly Different From the Ordinary Combination
Come in and let us demonstrate this wonderful range
REDWING HDWE. CO.
HOFFMAN & HANSEN, Props.
Opposite Bruce Ave.
A delicious peppermint
flavored sugar jacket aroaod
peppermint flavored cbewintf soQ
tbat will aid your appetite anddteee*
tion. polish your teetii aod moistea
yoor throat,
THE FLAVOR LASTS
i?
'AFTER
EUERY
MEAL"
10FOR 5$
W
JU. 1
I
5M.
P:
&
I*
b.
SB.
iffi
*A
*3
firl
I
4
SiilkS.

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