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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, November 30, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1921-11-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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8 New York. Mo v. 30.—For the second
time within thrv« years, American en
glneering skill has triumphed over
obstacles tendinff to prevent the £iant
steamship lJeviatHcm, the former pride
of Ciei niahy's mer^iiant fleet from go
ing to sea.
The first time was jn 1917, when the
Kreat 54,000 ton liner interred here at
the beginning of the var, was wilfully
damaged by her own engineers to pre
vent her fronr being used -j« a trans
port for American and allied soldiers.
M'. 4^Vg£*H'' -t
&
^v
E TwO r?Hp **j ,s j* "t,v"'
PAGE TwO.
LEVIATHAN
TO BEREBUILT
Changes Necessary to Make
'Her Useful Trade Ship
t" PWd.
STRAND
New
|£V
,v
WW
bidders she will be entirely restored
as befitting her size. Tho grandeur
of her Original great' dining saloons,
lounges, smoke rooms and libraries
will be retained and improved upon.
An immense tiled and marbled plunge
bath wtyh accompanying, rooms for
turkish, electric and other baths will
be one of her attractions. Suites once
designed as personal quarters for his
former imperial majesty^the Emperor
of Germany will be retalried—but sug
gestions of royalty will be replaced by
luxurious fittings desired by modern
democracy.
Who will operate the Leviathan
when rftstored to service and under
which houseflag she will sail is yet to
be determined by the Shipping Board.
HERMIT KILLS SELF
RATHER THAN GO TO
JAIL FOR ROBBERY
American engineers repaired the at Liodge.
damage and made her ready for ,a trip Since he was accuse^ of the mur
within a few weeks. Her record for der of Henry Howe, 19 years ago,
the war was 19 voyages on \rhich she. Davis roamed up and down the banka
carried going and coming 1&4,253 of the Sangamon river getting food
American soldiers. Signing of thoi when he could find it and taking shel
armistice laid her up. ter wherever nature provided it.
Restoration Began. I B. C. Chapman, an attorney, his on
Then the United States Shippiugi
board, her custodian for the United throughout the chase. Davis attempt
States: government. began to plan to to dodge pursuers by wading
restore her to the trans-Atlantic trade nnH nil hnnl.
as the premier American passenger 'ake Patrolled and all hope of escape
liner. Fitting her for- troops had
stripped her of her former palatial ,walar
cabins, saloons and dining halls. These
had to be restored. I ,=vlng.
Her German builders were cabled
Mahomet, 111. Nov. 30.—Choosing
death rather than give up the life of a
hermit to spend his last days in pri
son, Harry Davis, 50, shot himself
through the heart yesterday when
driven into' a small lake by a sheriff's
posse.
and asked for a set of blue print plans Farmers had been complainittg
giving details of her construction, was stealing- from them. Thre«
They consented to provide the plans jjve chickens and a stock of canned
for $7,000,000, goods were found stored in his eight
With an estimated cost of between by ten home which he had just com
$7,000,000 and $10,000,000 facing pleted.
them for restoration, the Shipping A large log "about 18 inches in di
Board declined the offer and decided ameter and two and one-half feet
to make its own plans. A pma.ll army high used as a chair, a pile of leaves
of engineers and draftsmen wwp put for a bed. a brick campers fireplace
to work to ascertain the details of her near the door and a few old, but well
construction. ''cleaned, kettles, made up the furniture
Partitions n^ere removed in part. 'n h's home.
floors ripped up in certain sections.
miles of telephone, electric light and
signal wires were traced, equal miles ...
of pipe lines controlling heating and £opu
plumbing systems were followed.!
,7i,—i
were bored into and measured. The
Leviathan was at last "put on paper"
Urider plans now prepared for the
O E S
Your I«st Chance Today To See a Great Picture
He was suspected of robbing a store
st0re.
It Cost a Man's Life—It Saved a Girl's Happiness
"HELIOTROPE"
It Put a Wicked Woman Behind the Bars
It's a Hit at the Strand Theatre
A, Bays, Starting Thursday. "The Kcntnckians"
BIG POPULATION INCREASE.
Ottawa, Ont., Nov. 30.—Manitoba's
l0n
t0
ALSO "BILL AND BOB" "PATHE NEWS"
GRAND
wow sxownra
Hobart Bosworth and Doris May
"FOOLISH ^MATRONS"
A tele in the eaxoar of a trio of society matrons. A peep into the
dtawiag rooms of aoMn ciimMrg wltb the peacock's of tho smart s«t
la all their glory.
8BHHETT COXKOT—"MADE Of THE KXTCSEW FXTZ OMAI
CLUBHCB
SEATS GOING FA§T
for the
v.
Glorious
America's Greatest Lyric
*Soprano
r-
.". vt%
standinS-hiP deeP
PMt ten years
?eroffen':
ac",D'":?:
official returns the 1921
cen.fus. In 1911 the population was
461.190, while this year's figures arc
1
to the most minute detail.
SJnbmit Plans.
Consequently, when bids were asked
of shipbuilders last month to restore
the ship to her"original grandeur and
with additional facilities and
accom­|10.99
modations. the Shipping Board was
able to submit to cach bidder a" com
plete set of plans and specifications.
These bids will be'opened December
29
placed at 613,008. The same returns
(give Winnipeg a population of 178,
364, against the 1911 figures of 186.
035. an increase of 31.12 per cent,
Brandon, the next largest city, has a
population of 13,839, an increase of
per cent over 1911.
The province of Alberta shows a
{total population of 581,995, against
the 1911 figures of 374,663, an in
crease of 207,332, or 55.34 per cent.
Edmonton city now has a population
of 58.627 and Calgary 63,117, both
being large increases.
IjAST TIMES TODAY
JHOMAS MEIGHAN *e "EA ROAD"
•'f Prom the Well Known'story' "Jc&sy Street," by Blair Hall
(It's a Paramount Picture)
Current Events Comedy, Sea Shore Shapes
Tomorrow, Vaudeville. Mon., "The Great Moment"
3 O
7
Hear the Orpbeum Melody Orchestrq Every Show
3 0 0
5
Matinees, 3:20, 4:00
Nights, .7:30, t:00
Priccs. ...
10 and 25c
ATURDAY, DEC. 3
HOSTS DAKOTA'S
rSXTSST
o'oonroB, mio inoa
ota CoBcert Bureau
"P1^1 'I'M
TBAXBS
Batertainment for the
Discriminating
•.
in
Sheriff Gale searched a newly dug
I cave in which the hermit had been
Herc he found all the
from the
Lodge
ioot
WUKlteiWiW
,!
Ai
'•'VSk-'i
C1^
1
C-?
The co-operative grain marketing
leader defended governmental mar
keting agencies which have been
criticized for aiding farmers in de
veloping the co-operative marketing
of their products. He declared he was
opposed to government aid and sub
sidy of any industry.
THE SHCIK
A GCOftCC MCtTOOO PBODUCTKM
(Paramount Qicture
STRAND
nw **V© *u^ ,»,ii'-.i
GRAND FORKS HER/ U?
Br. ^Solph Ijorenz operating on an in fantile paralysis case in Xew York.
..chief sorgoon of the hospital.
Seeks Protection 01
Farmers Against Fake
Co-operative Schemes
Chicago, Nov. 30.—C. H. Gustafson,
president of the U. S. Grain Growers,
Inc., proposed to the National Asso
ciation of State Marketing Officials
here yesterday that it take steps for
the protection of farmers from fake
co-operative schemes. Mr. Gustafson
heads the largest co-operative grain
marketing corporation of farmers in
the country.
Alili NEXT
WEEK
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
O O
I TODAY
"THE HEART OF
THE NORTH"
Soy sad XrfnlM
•towart
Kovsly
Tlnrt tlms showm la V. B.
Zddla Bollasd Oomsdy
1BAT CABTOOV
Mat., AdultaT
TSc"
Eve., Adnlts, JOc.
Children ..... lOe
8^0—t:lft—•7:M—0:t5
'SSSMStSS®
WILLIAM RUSBSLL
IN
''r-uProfa the W«rt^
A S O
HELEN GIBSON
W
"Flirting With Terror"-
Gomedjh—"Speed cop"
Thnrs., M, and Sat..
WlMmtiSomnean tn "fk-*l Heart"
Famous "Bloodless &.:£..
Is Now at WorK 0n XJ^S, CHildren
The wonderful hands of Dr. Adolph Lorenz. famous Austrian "bloodless surgeon," are already at work
straightening the crooked spines, bones and joints of American children "to repay Austria's debt to America.'*
The man whose skill at plastic surgery is known*all over the world recently gave his first demonstration before
a clinic in the Hospital for Joint Diseases. Dr. Lorenz attracted nationr-wide attention eighteen years ago when
he cured Lolita Armour, daughter of the meat king, who then was a cripple and whose case had been consid
ered hopeless.
DR. A. LORENZ
COLLAPSES
A number of strictly commercial New York, Nov. 29.—Weakened by
concerns have been floated under the
guise of co-operative enterprises, he
reported. Frequently these have just
enough of the earmarks of co
operative organizations to mislead
and misguide, he said.
"The co-operative movement has at
tained a place and gathered a mo
mentum that was undreamed of a few
years ago," Mr. Gustafson declared.
"Naturally, it has created opportunity
for fraud and misrepresentation by
men and organizations with seliish
and unworthy purposes."
Mr. Gustafson told the .state mar
keting officials that no objection could
be made to tjyeir discouragement of
organizations having for their pur
pose merely the exploitation of co
operative sentiment.
"1 believe that much good might
be done." he said, "through a cam
paign of education that does not di
rectly attack anyone, by name but
which is directed toward driving "home
certain fundamentals of co-oper
ation."
Austrian Surgeon, Doing
Charity Work In New
York, Faints Thrice
Iack of
When the great bone specialist saw
his first patients at 8:80 this morning,
hundreds ofc men, women and chil
dren, were waiting in line, outside the
IT
TO
nourishment due to a malady
of the stomach, Dr. Adolf Uorelaz,
noted Austrian surgeon, fainted three
times today while attending patients
in his charity clinic here.
After recovering from the succes
sion of collapses, the famous special
ist. deaf to the .pleadings of his
American colleagues, insisted upon
going tp another h06pit^l where new
scores of poor people were clamoring
for his ministrations.
I^ater in the day Dr. Lorenz yielded
to arguments of the physician whom
he consulted yesterday, announcing
that next week, unless he .was strong
er, he would hold but one clinic each
day.
November
1
hospital. A milk man and a sand
wich vender had served breakfast to
many.
Scores, hospital attaches declared,,
had waited there in the. rain all
night—mothers and fathers with
crippled children in their arms, un
fortunates on crutches or leaning on
their canes. They had been told the
surgeon could not possibly see them
today. But still they had waited, un
despairing.
The patients selected for the ex
amination are placed in small com
partments. Witnesses expressed tho
opoinion that lack «f air in them
might havf caused the surgeon to be
oversome. He examined about 800
patients.
MILK IS THE
GREATEST FOOD
Marked Improvements Have Been
Made in!Methods of Keeping
it Fresh..
In the preservation of foods, an art
which has reached considerable per
fection in these days, it is interesting
to note how important a part is^Jlayed
by opposite forces of nature.
For instance, after, milk is ob
tained from the cow, it is a great
stride toward keeping it pure, to use
"cold" (in the form of natural ice
generally) to bring the temperature
promptly down until near the freez
ing point
i-atgr, however, an opposite plan is
essential." By prolonged heating of
the milk to a moderately high tem
perature the bacteria' or germs which
are unhealthful are killed and the
milk, unchanged in its digestibility, is
rendered safe for use by the infant
or invalid,
Both of these. methods are used in
their amplest form in the preparation
of Horlick's Malted Milk, so as' to
obtain the highest purity of the food.
The.absence of inoisture is an ef
ficient safeguard against the growth
of bacteria and It also makes the pro
duct capable of being'taken easily to
all parts of the world.
READ PAPERS AND
KEEP YOUNG, SAYS
DR. STEPHEN SMITH
-V
1
New York, Nov. 30—Reading news
papers will help one., to keep, young.,
This is the .opinion of. Dr. Stephen
Smith, founder of the New York
health department vtrbo recently cele
brated his 9&th birthday.
"Read all the. news, in the papers,"
he advised. "Read even the murdersi
I get six papers every day and read
them ajl.through."
Up tp two years ago. Dr. Smith
walked £ight miles every day. He
pyil takes\ His daily constitutional, btyt
has cut. dtfwn th$ distance.
if
Regrets That Spain
At Ajnni Conference
^ladPid^.Nov. SO.—^.leiandro t*r-.
ran. Republican leader th the cham
ber- of deputies todajr, xprewea re
gi^f Spain was not represented at the
Washington armament conference^ He
declared King Alfonso ought immedi
ately to visit America, accompanied by
so,
l^i.
At right is Hear? W. Fraoenthal,
Former Royal Pair
Honored By People
.... vf-
Of Madeira Island
Funchal, Island of Madeira, Nov. 30
—(By The Associated Press.)—For
mer Emperor Charles of Austria
Hungary and former Empress Zita
are Uving quietly in, theh- exile. Their
the., Villa
Only guard at the.,Villa Victoria,
where they reside, is a plain clothes
policoman, who accompanies them on
their journeys about the island to pre
vent beggars from bothering them
and to avert other annoyances.
Charles and Zita are treated as
honored gueets by the new governor,
Major Acacio Correa Pinto, and the
other Portuguese officials. They at
tend mass on Sundays and haye en
gaged Canon Antonio Homem de Gou
veia as their private chaplain. Aiter
mass recently a,few women outside
the church attempted. to kiss Zita's
hands thus showing 'their affection
for a member of the family of Dora.
Miguel-. dc Lfrafcanza, pretender to the
Portuguese, throne.
It 'is considered likely that the" for
mer royal pair will enga.ge the Vic
toria for a permanent residence. The
villa adjoins the grounds of the Pal
ace hotel, at which the British coun
sel is staying, but the exiles do not
mix with the hotel guests. Charles is
taciturn, but Zita is affable and talks
cheerfully to those she meets.
Indiana Boy Wins
Sweepstakes In Junior
Corn Contest At Chicago
Chicago,- Nov. 29.—Frank Lux, 15
year-old Shelbyville, Ind., boy, won
the sweepstakes in the junior corn
contest tonight at tho International
Grain and Hay show. The judges de- 'j
clared his ten-ear sample th best'
ever exhibited here, in a previous
junior state contest in Indiana, thei
boy raised 101.p bushels of corn on a'
single acre.
District winners in the junior corn
contest for which a special premium
list was offered by the Chicago board
of trade in addition to the $10,000 In
prizes, included Theodore eterson of
Pokegama, Minn., vJohn Quiering,
Mountain Lake, Minn., Eugene Troy
er, La Fontaine, Ind., and George
Hoffman, Jr., Cliff, Colo.
American Scientists
To Make Study 01 Life
At High Altitudes
Lima, Peru Nov. 30.—(By the As
sociated Press)—Five American sci
entists, part of an expedition which
plans to undertake the first studies
ever made of the physiological chang
es which enable people to live at high
altitudes, have arrived here to await
the three British scientists who wiH
complete the party.
The commission -will remain two
months in Peruvian mining towns in
the Andes mountains. They will spend
some time 'in Cerro de Pasco, Ticleo
and Oroya, 12,000 and 14,000 feet
above sea level,-
These towns, are the enter# of ex
tensive ,Am«rlQjUi mining»operations,
and 4tre said "to be the highest com
munities in the world inhabited by
whites.
reguIar
Many Outrages Are Report
ed in Larger Towns, Re
ports Declare. s*:
London, Nov. 30.—(By The Asso
ciated Press.)—Bolshevism is spread
ing through the large towns of Portu
gal, tho Times declares this mornipg
and there have been many outrages,
especially in the province of Alemtejo.
As a result the powers are consider-
ing intervention' in Portugal and the
Dispatches from Portugal to The
Associated Press have reported two
BODY OF AMERICAN
SOLDIER IS-BURIED
FOR THE THIRD TIME
Cleveland. Nov. 30.—The body of
Wi'.liam H. Campbell. 26, who was
killed in the battle of the Argonne
forest in September, 1918, was bjiried
for the third time here today. The
bodjr was first interred overseas. Up
on Us arrival in this country three
I weeks ago. it was claimed by a Chi-
I cago woman as that of her husband
and taken to that city, where burial
was made. The woman then made
application for war risk insurance.
Up to that time, Mrs. Mabel Heckel
•f Cleveland. Campbell's sister, had
been drawing the insurance.
Congressman John C. Speaks of
Columbus, who was a brigadier gen-
eral in
VJ1 maucir* IIIWIU.
wj,ich
Thirty-seventh division, of
Campbell was a member, inter­
ceded. It was found that the first
name of the Chicago man .was not
William.
The body was disinterred again
Identified as that of the Cleveland
where it was
buried with military honors.
and
"®nt
here
IMPORTATION OF
UQUOR TO CANADA
TO BE PREVENTED
Toronto, Nov. 30.—Importation of
liquor into Ontario from the United
States will be prevented In tho future,
it |s .believed, as a result of arrange
ments just completed between Ameri
can authorities and James Hale, On
tario license commissioner.
Under the American regulations a
permit must be secured before' liquor
may be exported-. United States offi
cials, undeir the new agreement, will
consult the Ontario license board be
fore issuing permits for exportation
into the province.
The Ontario board however,, has no
power to prevent bona fide shipments.
Appropriations Will
Provide For Increase
In The Spanish Navy
Sjadrid', Notf.- SO.—The chamber Of
deputies today passed a bill appropri
ating thirteen million pesastas for
naval construction. This will provide
for an increase in the Spanish navy.
J. E. MCDONALD
Landscape Gardener
and Florist
Cut Flowers
•i, Potted Plants
All- flowers in season for all oc
casions. Reasonable prices.
Phone or call.
9 N. Fourth St.
»t
to Dakota Auto Oo.
Phones Store 134 Ses. 1861
ADVERTISEMENT.
YOUR REASON!
assures you that there is
no substitute for
I Scott's Emulsion
An old saying, but nonethe
less true: A bottle of
Scoff'i Emulsion
taken in time, helps
I-
prices-1#
keep the doctor away.
111 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I I I 1 1
12000 Pairs of Rubber Heels
Men's Half Soles $1.50
v¥ Rubber Heels FW»lrtJK3
irt' Half Soles. .$U5
Rubber Heels (Free)
ne early and take advantage while the oppo^
tunity is good.
907 IteMera Ave. Orand Fo^kitb l,
Mall Orders Oiven Prompt Attention 'y^r
ScottftBnwtie^BlaowiBfM. K.J 10-16
Beginning Monday, Nov 28, until our stock gives
out, we will put on one pair of rubber heels with I
every pair of half soles, men's or ladies' at our
tii-
,/* V%
*W- ,\i.
EVENING EDITION.
Foreign' Ministfer Says^a
tTon Has Already Started
to Reduce Navlr.'-^
.• sr.-: .-
Washington, Nov. 30.—-fBy The As
sociated Presa)—Because of her vital
interest in tho far east, Holland iside
slrous "of aaaisting in every way in the
settlement of problems relating to
that part of the world, Jonkheer H.
A. Van Karnetoeek, minister of Cor­
ejg'n
assumption of a mandate there tp delente from
quell the ugly wave of Bolshevism,
according to the Times, Italy and
Spain favor such a move.
distinct revolutionary movements in with China as other powers have, and,
(h« past six woeks. In the first, several [although we are not interested in
raNnh«n of the Portuguese cabinet,
including Premier Granjo, were as
sassinated following their resigna
tions A few days later it was reported
tti&t Rwyalists were plotting for the
re^establishment of a monarchy. On Jjon jj,
24 dispatches from the
Portuguese frontier of Spain reported
another revolution browing, Carvalho
t««Qulet heading the movement. The
troops in Lisbon were, said to have
b«»B confined to their, barracks in
preparation for eventualities. No ad
vices have been received since that
time as to conditions in Portugal.
affairs to The Netherlands and
that country to tho
Washington conference, told Tho As
sociated Press today in an ^interview.
"We have been very glad to come
to the Washington conference," he
said, "because, although we have no
special engagements in connection
quite the same way as other powers
are in the far eastern problems, still
everything Athat affects the situation
there may be of great importance to
us. As a matter of fact, any modifica-
the
far eastern situation might
affect our most v^tal interests.*
Plans No Capital Ship*.
Asked about' the prospective reor
ganization of Holland's navy, the
Dutch foreign minister said:
"This program is the remit of an
inquiry of a state comiftisaion and
provides mentis for the defence of the
colonial Empire.and the fulfillment of
international obligations in cam
might be necessary to maintain the
neutrality of the state. As a result of
this inquiry, Holland have given op
the idea of building capita] ships and
consequenlly has already .been mov
ing in the direction! the Washington
conference is following now. Holland
is satisfied with a sufficient1 defensive
navy composed of small Craft, and ia
limiting her expenditure)* on arma
ments as far as oircuihstancea justify."
Expressing' a strong hope that the
conference would result in a. lessening
of world tension, Hie Netherlands for
eign minister declared that to achieve
this it mhst consider the "great eco-,
nomic problem which Hes behind I po
litieal problems is already a menace
to the world's welfare.''
Dyeing and Gleaning
at "ALWAYS BETTER" PUSHES'and
SERVICE
1
Send Tour Garments by Parocf Foat.to
THE
407 DeMors Ave.~Smad FNrks. K. D.
will charm you
ADV&flTIStMBpT-
Gargle with wararMK: water
—then apply over thro^—
a
VAPO RUB
Oetr 17 Million Jan U*JY«uiv
TOUR FURS
made and repaired at
S. FRIEDMAN
-This'.'"
Furrier.
IS Soutn Fourth 8L^
McElroy's Floi^pop
408
BaKers
Ave,
Vboae
A
1M1—nsy
ox anght
Satisfaction or No Charge
WRIM FOC
Moe
Usi.
Ogilvie & Sherman
'-.«(£•is'
Widlund Bldg.
Ptenct4€6W
Grand Vorki
Or. GHb vt Moskau
OENTIST
PBONB 191 raONB
^orthwsatsrn Mat*
1.
fourth Slow
RBPjummo
Reasonable
Send Tour
Fine Hemstitchlnjt
.'.v.'
j. A- •'.*
2i-.\
N ^T)L
Intimii
GRAND FORKS DYE HOUSE
illmttm An. Phone 7tlW
Howard De Londi1
COMMERCIAL ARTIST
DESIGNER
DECORATOR
«0» •eonttty
PHOOTB lM
OR. JOHN G. BRyMblN
North-western National Bank
BnlMtai
T18 OMttd^rorkai N.
'.ap.HV.Vf-~
tja A POOD
NOV
FAD
1
'•Xi
Mi,
fi
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