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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, March 06, 1922, Image 1

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E E N I N
E I 1 0 N
VOLUME 17.
OPINIONS OF EXPERTS DIFFER
AS TO HOW CRISIS IN ENGLAND
STANDS AFTER WEEK END DEBATE
Some Declare Retirement Of
Premier Is Certain, While
Others Believe Outlook
For Continuance Of Coali
tion Is Improved.
London, March 6.-—(By the Asso
ciated Press.,—Within 24 or tt most
4S hours, the world will know
definitely whether Prime Minister
Lloyd George has decided to resign' or
continue as chief of the coalition gov
ernment. This is the only substantial
conviction emerging from a tangle of
contradictory rumors in the crisis
which engrossed political observers
over Saturday and Sunday.
Contradictory Opinions.
Experts today were diametrically
opposed in their opinion as to how the
crisis stood as a result of week end
conferences, some declaring that the
outlook for a continuance of the
coalition' was improved and encour
aged "belief that he would not resign,
others declared all signs pointed to
his retirement and that liberal col
leagues In his ministry would go with
film. Some were content to refrain
from committing themselves to any
opinion whether the result would be a
encash up or a patch up. Even if the
premier stays, nobody believes that
the coalition can last much longer
th6ugh It may be prolonged until
Irish foreign and the Genoa confer
ence are out of the way. It is gen
erally credited in certain quarters
that nothing .will be definitely an
nounced until the speech of Sir Ar
thur Balfour oh Tuesday. It is de
clared that the pre-eminent interest in
'.8ir Arthur's utterances will be a pos
gtble declaration as to the prime min
1 Jeter's decision. If this expression is
tor resignation of Mr. Lloyd George,
fltr Arthur will not in any event as
•Otoe' premiership according to re
peated statements made today but
be willing to take office under
Austen Chamberlain as premier. (Mr.
Chjunberlain is government leader in
t)ie
house of Commons.)
Premier Ready to Quit.
friends of Lloyd George assert he
is exceedingly tired- arid will gladly
quit responsibilities of hie office. If he
holds on, it will only bn because
recognition .that'chaos is liij? to ftJ54
1
*w his retirewteitt 4ft the £f%sent 1)6-
W £is retirawmitt- 4n the^jfjSfeseht
ciiliar circumstance. Whether he
goes or stays he has decided to take-
orJ5?y? aecl^
an immediate holiday which he wil**
probably go to his country home in
Criccieth, a small watering place in
Wales situated in the county, of Car
narvon on Carigan Bay. If he does
not resign his vacation will probably
follow the entire period until the
^enoa conference.
Premier Returns,
London, March 6.— (By. The. Asso
ciated Press.)—David Lloyd George,
•the prime minister, returned to Lon
don yesterday afternoon from Cheq
uers Court, where he spent the week
iend. His only political guest over the
period was Charles A. McCurdy, chief
coalition-liberal whip.
Mr. Lloyd George's offer to resign
has been held in abeyance, but not
Withdrawn. He still is awaiting assur
ances of the continued loyalty of the
unionist party to the coalition govern
ment.
The premier points out that candi
dates are being chosen in varipus con
etituencies for the approaching gener
al elections who openly disclaim Mr.
Lloyd George's leadership, yet receive
the approval of unionist headquar
ters and he considers it impossible
allocation of seats between the union
ists and liberals in. the coalition,
whereas the unionists claim the pre
ponderance of the seats.
Further Complications.
The situation is complicated by the
fact that while the unionist members
of the cabinct are earnestly urging the
premier not to resign, the coalition
members of the government are al
most as anxious that he should re
sign.
They see little prospect ^of success
for the coalition In the general elec
tions, and many of them are anxious
to seek a reunion with the Asquith
liberals under Mr. Lloyd George's
leadership, they admit this.solution
of (he situation present difficulties,
but they express the belief that it
might be accomplished in time.
There is a growing advocacy here
of a postponement of the Genoa eco
nomic conference nntil after general
elections ate held in England, unless
the present crisis is solved in such a
manner as to leave the premier, with
undiminished authority.
MINING OPERATIONS
AT RAMSEY, MKH.,\
ARE RESUMED TODAY
Ironwood, Mich,, March 6.—Mining
operations at the Eureka mine iat
lUtmaay, -Mich. were resumed today
iriflii the employment of three hun
dred miners on two shifts.
The order to resume work was con
tailed in telegram from the Oglebay
Norton company, Cleveland office. No
reference Was made to. 'the wage
/schedule. ..
No reason was given for the rer
sumption of Operations, but the Goge
betf Range Mining company expressed
.opinion thai the opening iras the
step to Vlleviate the uneniploy
jjnerit
situation .fen the Lake Superior
iron* mining fluids..
«nte Tale mine at Bessemer, ^tich.,
recently resumed operations on
mal basis announced' at tho op
of the mine that the work was
ted to give employment to the
property's crew, to relleve unemploy
•jrt.
^..'^r v?1 v#%.
Chicago! Pin
Smashet Breaks
Record Today
Toledo, Wis., March ft.—Lun
gren of Chicago, rolling on the
third shift in the singles event
today, broke the American
Bowling congress tournament
record and rcOed into first place
with a score of 729. Lungren
had games of 234, 282 and 2OS.
NO BONDS CAN
BE ISSUED BY
HOMEBUHDERS
Amendment to Law Makes
Such Action Illegal at
Present Time.
Bismarck, N. t., March 8.—No
bonds of the Home Building series
can be issued for several yearn under
the terms of the laws governing the
Homebuilders' association, in the
opinion of F. E. Diehl, manager of the
association. There appears to be no
legal manner in which operations
could be resumed in the. Homebuild
ers' association until the legislature
has revised the laws, he bellevea.
The legislature also probably wMl
have to wrestle with the problem of
making up the huge deficit which the
Homebuilding association now faces.
There are only three ways provided
by the Home Builders law of 1919 for
raising money, Mr. Diehl points out in
a report to the Industrial Commission
on the operation of the association.
These are: (1) By sale of bonds.
(2) By appropriation. (3) By pay
ments of home purchasers or derived
from deposit:*'raadfe by them.
An amendment to the law, enacted
by the spetila) Session in 191J, how
ever, provides "that no mortgage may
pttymepts arr.^mt to.
un
vt
tion plan of payment, after the pur-
1° chaser has paid 20 per cent of the
vjU)1£k nf tl£
amortization begins, it would require
124 months, or 10 .years and 3 months
before one-half of the amount would
a
The Original Law.
Section. 6, Chapter 150, of the laws
of 1919 provided:
|. "Whenever funds shall be available,
derived from the sale of bonds issued
iby the state and* delivered to the In
dustrial Commission for negotiation to
carry on the business of the associa
tion or derived from appropriations
made by the legislative assembly for
such purpose or derived from de
pos'.ts received by the association as
Shortly after arriving at his offi- hereinafter provided or derived from
cial residence in Downing street, the payments made for homes by pur
premier was visited by Lord Birken- chase as thereof such funds shall be
head, the lord high chancellor and used, under proper regulations of the
Winston Spencer Churchill, secretary Industrial Commission, for investment
for the colonies. The conference be- in building or purchasing homes with
tween the trio lasted an hour. Lord in the state for members of the Home
Birkenhead gave a political dinner at, Buyers' league, as such leagues are
bis town residence. hereinafter provided
The above section, in the opinion of
Mr. Diehl, "provides only three meth
ods of procuring funds for operating
this department and that there is ab
solutely no provision of law, which
authorizes the officers of this depart
ment to execute-notes in the name of
the department or procure loans in
the name of. the department."
The association, however, owes the
Bank of North Dakota about $413,000,
As the association is unable to issue
bonds for several years the only way
to go on under such conditions. It is in which the loan can be repaid is
further understood) that the premier from payments by the home pur
insists in thy event of a general elec- 'chasers or by legislative appropria
tion that there shall be a more equal tion..
The Amendment.
Chapter 39 of the amendments to
the Home Building law, enacted by
the special session of 1919, has the
following limitation regarding bond
issues:
"Provided, however, that no such
mortgage, note or obligation shall be
so assigned (to the state treasurer) as
security for bonds so to be issued if
the total amount remaining unpaid
and payable ,upon suclv. mortgage shall
exceed one-naif the value of the real
estate by which such mortgage, note
or obligation is secured, nor unless it
shall be a first mortgage upon such
real estate."
The loan of the Bank of North Da
kota is for S per cent, the interest
amounting to approximately '$25,380
a year.
Under the Viaw prohibiting the. as
sociation from loaning.more than |4,
000 to an individual home purchaser,
the amortization payment on a $4,000
loan would be $28.65 per month.
There are 54 houses built by the as
sociation. This would' make this
amount paid $1,547.10 a month, or
$19,725.20 a year which, the home
purchasers would pay the association.,
This limit, however, was not observed
by tl^e former administration.
Boy And Girl Avert
Wreck In Wisconsin
Waldb, Wl*.. March 6.—Thought
fulness and quick action of Bruno
Dahlman, 14, and his sister, Ella, 11,
children of a' farmer, tbday averted
a wreck of a C. M. j9t. P. road train
and probably saved scorep of lives.
Bruno and Ella' were on their way
to school whev, they noticed that
heavy rains hadfwashed a section of
track on the railnoad just north of
the town. They ran back to their
homes and .'told .their father.
Knowing, that the train from Green
Bay to 'Milwaukee was due in a few
minutes, Mr. Dahlman raced for the
track. He reached it as the flyer was
whKtling for t^ve right' of way a mile
north.' He whipped off his eoit, stood
in-the middle of,the track uid waved
his coat until the engineer saw it and
•topped the train.
•»., St
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NORTH DAKOTA'S
F%
INTERNATIONALE
CONFERENCE IN
RUSSIAPLANNED
Formation of United Front
On World Problems Will
Be Discussed.
Moscow, March 6.—(By the Asso
c'ated Press.)—A conference of all
the Socialist Internationales to discuss
the formation of a united front on
world Problems affecting capital and
labor was recommended by the ex
ecutive leaders 'of the Third Inter
nationale of Moscow after a.t.wo
weeks' discussion here. The vote'was
46 to 10. The resolutions adopted
mentioned the various Internationales,
with which a conference is favored—
the second or "pre-war organization—
the second and a half as the organi
zation formed at Vienna last year and
which recently held a meeting' in
Paris, is termed, and the fourth Inter
nationale.
Leon Trotzky and other Russian
chiefs who were instrumental in
hastening this decision explained that
the move simply was in keeping with
new tactics having as their purpose a
flank attack oh capitalism instead of
the old open battle for an immediate
world revolution.
1
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1
VI"
i-'S ,-'i '-V&'
Throughout the conference, both
the, Russian leaders and the newspa
pers dwelt upon the idea that the di
rect attack for a world revolution had
failed.
"The victory we expected seems fur
ther away/' says the Izvestia. "The
bourgeoisie have held on and the sec
ond Internationale, which we consid
ered dead is again on its feet. The
Communistic Internationale has not
become a decisive force to change his
torical developments."
According to some of the speakers
at the conference, the Internationale
should concentrate now on "revolu
tionary minimalism," Instead of mak
ing the old, broad demands for a dic
tatorship of the proletariat.
The principal objects of the united
front which is desired, according to
Carl Radek, are to gain recognition of
Soviet Russia, the abandonment of
teparation from Germany, the,' eight
hour day and the solution of the un
employment problem.
Belfast Quiet After
Week End Disturbance
(B .- The Associated Prese.)
Belfas 'Mar'-.ii «.•—Belfast Was quiet
today afiw. -recK-cnrl -.disorders in
jybid* "•k«led' and
twenty-one wounded. A missile was
thrown, today at a group of early
morning workers without injury to
any one., Otherwise the city showed
little evidences: of yesterday's disturb
ances., The killing of Owen Hughes,
who was shot while riding in a street
car in York street on .Saturday night,
is discredited by. the authorities as
premeditated. According to witnesses
four men saw Hughes seated with his
brother and questioned about his re
ligious convictions. They then shot
him dead and escaped without inter
ference by panic-stricken passengers.
INDIANS TO GET
MONEY BY PLANE
Winnipeg, Man., March 6.—Indians
living in the northern parts of Mani
toba and Saskatchewan, in the lake
and river districts, will have treaty
money carried to them in airplanes,
state officials of the department, who
have made all preparations for the
trips.
If successful, all moneys coming to
the Indians will be p.aid in that man
ner. It will save many weeks of hard
travel.
—.
~r
&
GRAND FORKS, N. MONDAY,. MARCH 6, 1922.
APRIL 10 APPROVED
BY ITALY AS DATE
F0RGEN0A MEET
Parts,. March S.—(By the As
sociated Press.)—The Italian
government today informed the
French foreign office that April
10, was a satisfactory date for
the opening of the Genoa eco
nomic conference. This informa
tion was in response to the re
quest sent to Italy following the
recent meeting between Premier
Poincare and Prime Minister
Lloyd George at Boulogne.
EMPLOYERS
Compensation Bureau to Re
turn Part of Premium if
Loss is Normal.
(Herald Special Service.)
f°r.t.hAe
REPARATIONS TO
BE DISCUSSED BY
MINISTERS MARCH 8
Paris, M^rch 6.—(By the As
sociated Press.)-—The finance
RAILROAD WAGE
BATTLE OPENED
BYCRAFTSMEN
Employers Demand 10 Per
Cent Cut Workers Want
13 Per Cent Increase.
Chicago, March 6.—The six rail
road shop crafts union, representing
500,000 employes, were the first group
of railroad workers on the program
today at the opening of the fight over
the present scale of wages between
railroad labor and the nation's largest
transportation lines before the United
States Railroad Labor board.
Petitions asking for a 10 per cent
wage reduction have been placed be
fore the board of 114 roads while the
shop men have asked increases of IS
cents an hour over the present scale
on eighty-five of these roads.
Bismarck, N. D., March 6- A- reso- More than 175 roads have placed
lution has been adopted by the work-
nC^nHSanf tn^ntrr^rrnZnfn„r
»ho nromf™ ill tn I
loss experience above normal,'
announced today.
It was stated by Commissioner El
liott that the bureau felt that the sur
plus to be refunded should be refund
ed to employers who have paid rates
rathetr than that the benefit should
inure through a reduction of rates in
the future, wherein firms which had
not been insured would benefit.
A refund of 15 per cent was made
last year, in addition, it was stated
the bureau has adopted a resolution
instructing the rating department to
co-operate with H. D. Bangert, of Co
lumbus, Ohio, actuary of the bureau,
in giving experience in North Dakota
compensation. Great weight in fixing
the rates for the year beginning July
1, 1922, and "to make as substantial
a cut in the rates for the coming year
as safe actuarial science-will allow."
It was said by Commissioner Elliott
that rates has been based hitherto
chiefly on general actuarial experi
ence that the bureau has been in op
eration in North Dakota long enough
ts justify giving great consideration
to North Dakota experience in fixing
rates.
FIRE DESTROYS SCHOOL. .V
Wausau, Wis.. March 6.—Fire' be
lieved to have started from a defec
ttvji- obimneir.-'de«tr©y.eA„-Uie:_Nprth
fleld, Wis., public school causing a
loss of $20,000, $17,500 of which is
covered by insurance,
Failure to ask increases on more
than eighty-flve roads was due. it was
8aJ^
to
petit
ion8
for
1 board
have
the premium shall be made to era- the shopmen by making counter
P'°fqe™
1
ministers of Great Britain.
France, Italy and Bdgtnm will
meet in Paris, March 8 to discuss
the distribution among 'the allies
of reparations payments already
made by Germany.. It was an
nounced.
THE WEATHER.
Minnesota: Snow and colder
tonight Tuesday generally fair,
rising temperature by afternoon
in northwest portion strong
northwest winds tonight, dimin
ishing by Tuesday morning.
North Dakota: Vnsettled and
colder tonight possibly snow in
east portions Tuesday generally
fair with rising temperature.
CAN THE STORK DELIVER THE GOODS? By MORRIS
ANEPJCAfl
SOLDIER
Li
Manitoba Is Drilling For
Oil Now Down 1,075 Feet
Winnipeg, Man., March 6.—The
well drilled by the Manitoba govern
ment near Winnipegosis, northwest of
Dauphia, exploring for oil or gas, is
now down 1,075 feet. It was started
in limestone and continued for over
900 feet in the same material. It is
now in sandstone and if ho indications
of oil or gas are discovered in the
near future it will likely be abandoned
as a dry hole.
Many farmers claim to have dis
covered signs of oil and gas in the
district and there has been a big rush
to secure leases.
fj#ess
LR0OR
T"
I'.',*. v.?v
4£v- ..*.v
UUMhUrtUiXi
J'
failure to get the employe's
petitions in on time.
reductions before the
many e™ups of employes
adopted a method similar to that
proposals for wage advanced
it^ I
w%s
said that B. M. Jew,
Jewell, presi­
dent of the railway employes depart
ment, American Federation of Labor
representing the shopmen, would be
prepared to ask postponement of the
hearing on technical grounds and at
tempts to block the hearings were re
garded as likely.
$34,978,033 Provided
For Agricultural Dept
In Bill Reported Today
Washington, March 6.—An appro
priation of $34,978,033 to meet ex
penses of the agricultural department
during the coming year is recom
mended in a bill reported today by
the house appropriations committee.
The total is $3,710,026 less than the
amount appropriated for the current
fiscal year and $1,554,835 less- than
budget estimate.
FISH HATCHERY TO
BE DISCONTINUED
£!smarck, N. D., March 8.—The
Fish lake fish hatchery, operated .by
the state game and fish commission,
-will not be. maintained this year as a
result of the decision' of the state
game and fish commission. Likewise
plans for enlarging the pheasant
propagation reserve near Grafton, N.
D.j will not be carried out this "year.
'President C. E. Manning of the
board opposed plans for enlarging the
Work this year, and' he came into
sharp conflict with John Bloom of
Devils Lake, whose place on the com
mission has been challenged by Gov
ernor Nestos because of failure to
qualify under the law.
rV'if
A*
300 Precincts
Report 2 Favor
Toumley's Plan
Fargo, March •.—Only two ont
of MO precincts that have report
ed the remits of their caucuses
have supported A. C. Townley's
"balance of power" plan, accord
ing to O. A. Kaldor, treasurer of
the Nonpartisan league state ex
ecutive committee.
Mr. Kaldor announced today
that the state Nonpartisan con
vention will be held in Fargo on
Thursday, March 88.
SMALL ASKS
POSTPONEMENT
OFJSTRIAL
Panel of Fifty Talesmen on
Hand For Jury
Selection.*
V.
Waukegan, 111., March 6.—Governor
Small today asked a' sixty day post
ponement of his trial on charges of
conspiracy to embezzle state funds.
(By The Associated Press.)
Waukegan, 111., March 6.—Gover
nor I^n Small's trial on charges of
conspiracy to embezzle state funds
was delayed today while Judge Claire
C. Edwards heard a divorce case, im
paneled a grand jury and called the
docket of the March term' of court.
Fifty prospective jurymen were on
hand for the first day's examination,
and an additional venire of fifty will
report tomorrow.
Judge Edwards announced state
and defense would each have ten per
emptory. challenges.
LETTER WRITER IS
THOUGHT CONNECTED
WITH TAYLOR MURDER
Im Angeles, Maroh 6.—The
confession letter of ten paged,
handwritten stationery of a hotel,
and giving details o(l|e murder 1
of William Desmond Taylor, mo
ttonpictnre director, slain here
February 1, was sent from At
lantic C*ty, N. j., having been
mtdled there February 27, it was
a^NMMfneed here today by Police
Captain David L. Adams.
Los Angelas. March 6.—further
checking on tlje latest confession to
the murder of Wllliairi Desmond Tay
lor, film- director,- a ten page, docu
ment mailed from a email Connecticut
city, was planned for today by of
ficers assigned -to the case.
According to the "confession," as
described -by the police, the confessor
was a husband with whose wife Tay
lor had had an' affair, only to "scorn"
her later. Then the husband and wife
planned and executed the murder, the
document stated. The name of a
Hollywood man, connected with the
motion picture industry, was signed to
the "confession," but the police stated
that they were certain, the man had
no guilty knowledge of the crime.
They said, however, that despite the
fact that a name they believed was
not the writer's was signed, they felt
inclined to (believe the "confessor" had
some definite connection with the
murder.
DEFENSE TESTIMONY
IN 0BENCHA1N TRIAL
MAY START TODAY
Los Angeles, March 6.—The state
was expected to rest today and the
defense to begin its efforts to prove
the innocence of Mrs. Madalynne
Obenchain on trial for the murder of
J. Belton Kennedy, broker, the form
er sweetheart.
One more witness, Mrs. Mary A.
Bailiff, whose illness caused a recess
in the trial last week, was expected to
testify for the prosecution.
At the trial of Arthur C. Burch,
jointly Indicted with Mrs. Obenchain
for the Kennedy murder. Mrs. Bailiff
testified that Mrs. Obenchain told her
several days before the slaying of
Kennedy that "Belton is going to die.
I can almost put my hand on the spot
where it will happen."
Bartlett Nominated
»As First Assistant
Postmaster General
Washington. -March 6.—John H.
Bartlett of New Hampshire, was nom
inated today by President Harding to
be first assistant postmaster general.
Mr. Bartlett who at present is chair
man of the civil service commission
will succeed Hubert Work who on
Saturday succeeded Will Hays as
postmaster general.
BRANDON FAIR
OPENS TONIGHT
Winnipeg, Man., March 6.—Tonight
the greatest winter fair in western
Canada will open, at Brandon, Man.,
in a new building erected at a cost of
$250,000 to replace one destroyed by
Ire several months ago.
Sir James Aikins, governor of Man
itoba, performs the opening cere
monies. The legislature of Manitoba
now in session in Winnipeg, will at
tend the fair in a body on Thursday.
This year's exhibition is the largest
ever staged in the association's his
tory, all entries in the various classes
setting records. Over 3,75tf entries
have been received and the quality is
alfo an outstanding featuYe.
Seventy boys have placed entries in
the calf competition.
HOUSE REFUSES TO
CHANGE RULES TO
VOTE ON SEED BILL
Washington. March I,—By a
titoee vote the house rcfaaed today,
to suspend ita rales and paw a
hill authorising
of $1,009,MM for the
seed grain to be
"»t stricken
of
In
of
the
the
it$}"4$i§&h
1
E E N I N O
'i
s^
E IT10,-K-S
Formal Report will be Made
Tuesday, Chairman
Fordney Says.,
Details of Bill May Be Giv
en President Harding
This Afternoon.
Washington. March 6.—The sol
diers' bonus bill will be introduced in
the house late today and formally re
ported tomorrow. Chairman Fordney
announced this noon after a legisla
tive session. of the majority members
of the ways and means committee. A
second session will be held later in the
day for final completion of details of
measure.
Democrats on the ways and means
committee will be called in tomorrow
morning to vote on the bill before Mr.
Fordney presents the committee re
port to the house. Meantime the
chairman probably will discuss the
new bonus plan with President Hard
ing. He said he had an engagement
with the president for late today to
take up another matter and that he
might present to the executive, the
details of the bonus bill.
Sfc
BIG IMPROVEMENT
IN INDUSTRY IS
FORECAST FOR MARCH)
Out of 65 cities, from which sta
tistics are gathered by the depart
ment, 44 showed small percentage in
creases in employment, while 21. in
cluding Manchaster, N. H., a textile
center with a payroll decrease of 66.3
per cent, reported fewer men on pay
rolls. New York city reported an in
crease in employment of 1.9 per cent,
while Chicago bad a decrease of one
half of one per cent.
M.
Jm
NUMBER 55.
BONUS BILL TO
BE PRESENTED
TO HOUSE TODAYS
1
Chairman Fordney said that at that1
time the majority would pass on the'
suggested provision for adjusted serv
ice pay to the immediate relatives of
men who have died since discharge
from the service or who might die be
fore the legislation came into force.
Washington, March 6.-—A forecast'
of great industrial improvement for
the month of March was made today!
by the U. S. employment service, in
connection with its monthly report of,
employment conditions in the United 1
States.
"Reports from 231 of the principal!
industrial centers, with but few
ceptions, show a general improve-.,
meat in employment conditions," Di^
rector Jones cf the service announced,
"and breathe an enthusiastic spirit of)
hope and confidence in the future.
Weather verigi£jcingv«Atarch will be
gin an era 'of great activity.
Employment conditions snowed
practically no alterations during Feb- I
ruary, however, according to the
bureau's studies, only one-half of
•one per-cent more men being on re- I
ported payrolls at the month's end
than at its beginning. Only the tex
tile and paper industries evidenced
increased unemployment, and this.
was more than made up by additions
to working forces in nearly all other
lines.
SUPREME COURT
DISMISSES CASE
STARTED BY TEXAS!
Washington, March 6.—The en
preme court today dismissed the case
brought by the state of Texas chal
lenging the constitutionality of the
control of the interstate commerce
commission over state rates and other
features of the transportation act of
1920, including the legality of the
railroad labor board.
The opinion delivered .by Justice
van de Vanter declared.all ssits to
set aside a rate should be brought in
a United States district court, making
the interstate commerce commission
and the United States parties to the
action.
EFFECT OF FOUR
POWER TREATY IS
SOUGHT BY SENATE
Washington. March 6.—A resoln
tion asking President Harding what 1
effect ratification of the four power
Pacific treaty will have on the Lans
ing-Ishii agreement "between the
United States and Japan" was adopt
ed today by the senate.
Grassy Butte Hero To Be
Buried On Custer Field
Dickinson, N. D., March 6.—Jerry I
M. Lanphear, killed in action at So
is
sons, France, July 20, 1918, by Ger- I
man machine gun fire, will be buried
-at the Custer battlefield national cem
etery in Montana at the request of hie
parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Lanphear,
Grassy Butte, N. D. Lanphear enlisted
in the Second North Dakota Machine
gun company,in June 1917, was trans
ferred to the First North Dakota when
the two regiments were combined,
and was transferred to the first divi
sion on arrival in France. On the date
of his de«£h he had been promoted to
chief gunner of Company D, Second
machine gun battalion, first division.
The body .has arrived at Brooklyn.
Action On Shooting
Ground Bill Expected
Washington, March 6.—Action
probably will be taken this week by
the house agriculture committee on
the public shooting ground refuge bill
introduced by. Representative Antho
ny, Republican. Kansas, committee
members said today. A similar mess
ure has been introduced by Senator
New, Republican, Indiana.
The bill would afford added protec
tion to migratory game birds, at the
same time increasing the shooting
opportunities of sportsmen.
INCREASES OAPCTAfe
St. Paul, Man* The Dalath
6tate.bank of Duluth inlreaaed its
capital from to' it
was announced today by 8, B. Duea,
state Superintendent of iMnick
V,
1
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