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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, March 06, 1922, Image 10

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1922-03-06/ed-1/seq-10/

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JEWISH RELIEF
DRIVETOOPEN
HERE TUESDAY
St. Paul Attorney, Speaking
at Mass Meeting, Describ
ed Suffering of Jews.
Teams Will Solicit Business
District Make Plans at
Supper Tonight.
Definite plans for the carrying out
of the Jewish Relief drive in Grand
Forks will be made at a supper-meet
ing to be held in the Dacot&h hotel
this evening at 6:30 o'clock. The so
licitors and friends of the drive will
assemble at the trapper, and under the
leadership of Tracy R. Bangs, city
chairman, will formulate a definite
campaign.
(Fifteen teams will solicit funds, in
the business district of the city. No
personal soliciting will bo done in the
residential portions, but individuals
who are not asked to contribute, may
mai! or take their contributions to
headquarters, at Max Rabinovich's
jewelry store on DeMers avenue.
The drive through the first district,
comprising five counties, will cpen to
morrow, also, Mr. Rabinovich, district
chairman, announces.
In Grand Porks, the Jews of the
c-ity already have raised approximate
ly $4,000. This is an unusuaJly fine
showing, in view of the fact that there
are only about seventy-fivo Jewish
families in Grand Forks. The district
quota is $S,000. and it is believed that
that amount will be oversubscribed.
Mass Meeting Held.
'As a means of stimulating interest
in-the drive here, a mass meeting was
held Sunday afternoon at the New
Grand theater. Gustavus L/oevenger,
an attorney of St. Paal was the chief
speaker. He described clearly the
desperate conditions existing among
the Jews of central and eastern Eur
ope-
Mr. Ixjevenger made an impassion
ed appeal for generous help for the
unfortunate people who are left in a
pitiable condition from starvation,
cold, hunger, filth and disease. These
people he said, are victims of the war,
having lived in that portion of Europe
where contending armies marched
back and forth time after time, leav
ing death and destruction in their
wake.,
lt:
The speaker said that since 1917,
250,000 .Tews in central and eastern
Europe have 'been murdered,
800,000 have been made homeless as
the result of the pogroms or massa-! CTHtfCO AI COD MDC
cres. Conditions in the devastated *»HCRAIj rUlv mAu.
area are such that nothing is pro
duced, there is no work, and money
caanot buy food or clothing. Mr.'
Ixievenger told of an American relief
worker, who went into Russia to
work a«d to investigate conditions and
who could urchase only a small
amount *ck bread, and rat, or
horse meat ugh he had plenty of
money.
--.-•In Russia alone two million Jews
are on the verge of starvation. Mr.
Iioevenger stated. There is a refugee
population of 500,000 Jews in central
Europe, he said.
Appeals for Children.
Mr. Loevenger said he appealed to
Grand Forks people for aid for the
destitute of Russia, Poland. Austria,
Hungary, Rumania and the Ukraine.
The children of those countries,
starving, cold, naked and diseased, are
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reaching out their hands to you for
crust of bread," be said.
"Hundreds of thousands of these
helpless children are appealing to
America for shelter, for food and pro
tection and American people are be
ing asked to help, heal.and save," the
speaker continued.
The sufferers not only must be giv
en the necessary food to keep them
from, starving, he said, but they also
must be given soap and water, or the
means of keeping clean, and thereby
stamping out disease. The Jewish
relief committee Is asking for fourteen
million dollars from the American
people to assist in bettering the con
ditions of the persecuted and suffer
ing Jews. More will be needed, Mr-.
Loevenger said, because there will be
the continued' problem, not only of
keeping them from starvation and
freezing but also of reconstruction,
and of placing the sufferers on a foot
ing where they can help themselves.
Tracy R. Bangs, as city chairman
of the drive, presided. He emphasized
the seriousness of the drive, which
has for its purpose the saving of hu
man lives, he said.
Mayor Henry O'Keefe.. representing
the city of Grand Forks, gave whole
hearted endorsement to the drive, and
J. F. T. O'Connor also spoke feelingly
of the appeal from the Jewish suffer
ers, and voiced the belief that Grand
Forks would respond generously.
The meeting opened with the singing
of America, and Vocal numbers were
given by Prof. E. D. Naff, baritone,
and Theodore B. Elton, tenor.
ELKS HOLD ANNUAL
MEETING-BUDGE IS
NAMED FOR RULER
At the annual meeting of the Elk
Lodge No. 255 held Saturday evening
J. H. Budge was elected exalted ruler.
The other officers for the coming year
follow:
H. H. Gram, esteemed leading
knight.
Phil Bangs, esteemed loyal knight.
J. L. Byrum, esteemed lecturing
knight.
Frank Brown, secretary.
Robert Spriggs, trustee.
W. S. Dickinson, treasurer.
I^ee Norman, tyler.
E. A. Braseth, representative to
Grand Lodge meeting.
T. P. O'Connell, representative to
state lodge meeting.
OFFICIALSOF CITY
PLAN SEVERAL JOBS
The city will undertake several re
pair jobs in the near future, according
•to City Auditor C. J. Evanson. The
moving and repairing of the city in
cinerator is one of the improvements1
listed, while it is reported that ice
breaks on thp Red river bridges are
also in need of repair. There has also
been some agitation for pavement in
the south end and this is among the
prospective jobs for the city to un
and dertake during the year.
PRENTICE IS HELD
Funeral services for Mrs. Katherine
Prentice, who died at Hawley, Thurs
day. were held this morning at 9
o'clock from St. Mary's church. Rev.
Father Fletcher officiated.
Mrs. Prentice was 73 years of age.
and had been a resident of Grand
Forks for about 40 years. John Pren
tice. the late husband of the deceased,
died here a number of years ago. and
about a year ago Mrs. Prentice moved
to Hawley. Five children survive.
New Tork, March 6.—The list of.
stock brokerage house casualties
touched the fifty mark today" when in
voluntary bankruptcy petitions were
filed in federal court against Etting
and Wall and I. B. Mullins and com
pany.
Get Headed Right
for Spring
Here
The Stetson Hat
STORM STORIES
ARE BEING TOLD
Recent Blizzard Responsible
For One Death and Much
Suffering.
Man dan, N. D., March 6.—At least
one death was cai&ed indirectly by
the Washington's birthday blizzard,
harrowing tales of narrow escapes
from the storm are received and
scores of cases of frozen hands, feet
or faces are being treated, according
to information coming in from the
rural districts.
Olga, IS, daughter of Jacob
Magstadt, farmer in the Heart river
settlement south of Hebron, died
Thursday night following the storm.
9he jyas striken with acute appendi
citis. The raging storm made it not
only impossible to take the girl to
town, but prevented even sending a
messenger for help. The appendix
bursted. She died 24 hours later.
Ruettell Caps always assure a pleasant change of
headgear in the Spring. Fabrics are mighty smart
and shapes are clever. The quality will please you
more as the weeks pass.
$1.50 to $4.00
A V- •/. .-• Wi -i•"- '-I.- .r ~j."
Stalled at School Homo.
Mr. and Mrs. William Brum^anirti
and two boys left tne Parkin ranch
near Winona, east of the Missouri
river, to drive 90 head of cattle to the
Mike Brown ranch on the reserva
tion. The terrific storm struck while
they were on a ridge south of Solen.
The party took refuge in a school
bouse and drove the stock into the
school yard. There was plenty of
fuel.in the school bins. The men of
the party built a windbreak of saow
eight feet high in the improvised cor
ral and took turns keeping the cattle
"milling" around to prevent them
from freezing to death. After two
days' forced encampment in the
FOR SHERIFF
JOS. Z. BENSON
Candidate For
S E IF
of G. F. County at the
Primaries, June 28.
YOUR VOTE AND SUPPORT
WILL BE APPRECIATED
..v,.
are the new hats foi Spring- at $5.00,
$6.00 and $7.00. Good looking irf their shapes and
colors. They have similar brims this years—and the
colors are different too. Clam, browns, golden
brown, russets, fawn and of course they always good
black.
Gome and See—
The Ruettell Hat
Th'-s is our leader a bang up good hat because it's
perfect in every detail, quality felt,
(tb
smart style and right price ipO* UU
Heres the hat that gets, ahead every season." The
Stetson habit is a good
one to get ... ...$/• UU
New Spring Gaps
O N CO.
Clothing in the !forthwest
'Hum mf
GRAND FORKS Saint Cloud
4
iv ].l-\! •!•.. U-:\\-iv ?i: 5 .0
..
GRAND PORKS HERALD, MONDAY, MARCH 6,1981.
school -the storm abated and they
l'nv« tht'iitntk to the ranch without
losing a single head.
xouls beverson, farmer near Rob
inson, is in the hospital for amputa
tion "of a hand which was frozen the
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night of the storm.
A score of others are being treated
at various points in the%Mlsouri Slops
counties for frozen members.
Herald Want Ads Bring Results.
mm
ry?
Crookston
p. -, vt
man
O-rU -i,-
for^r^*president "of toe^now defunct
The cost is very low too these Hart
-Schaffner & Marx coats wear so lone1
GRAND.FORKS
Copy right/19 Scktffiia&rfctani
ftVENINO EPmON^
pioneer State Bankof°nmh*,
sentenced to serve one
years in rftate prison today by District
judge Leslie before whom he recemtty
pleaded^gullty to a charge of
.miff of the bank's funds.
St.
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