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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, March 13, 1922, Image 17

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1922-03-13/ed-1/seq-17/

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1
EVENING EDITION.
\'-Mvh
1fr&
-i:
|estigator Reports In-1
isln a Deplorable
'. State
%t''-\\.''^.
aiaj
iS*'
?V. X*.V."
f-xlltaaleSM, Okla., March 11.—Four
hundred ^embers of the Choc
Xndtan tribe residing fti the state
Usdafilppi are In a deplorable oon-
d^rn,»
.^T1? opinion of r-eter .1. flud-
«gb-o£ Tuekahoma, member of the
OkJ&homb. Choctaw tribe, who has r«
month's m.'ssir.n among
tne Mlflfiitwlppt Indoans. Mr. Hudson a
8«W:the
late'Monseigneur W. H. Ket-
c&tin ofiOklahoma City were delcgat
®4t*by Indian Commissioner Burke to
n^ke an Investigation of the condl
the tribe in that state. Mon
WgKienr Ketcham died suddenly at
Mfllaaolphia, Miss., wiiiie engaged In
tiyfe work.
-il^issippi Choistaws are
5MS-1.^)t(?,.^laas
and
Srt ^2"
t0
ly
HttrV Vn the SSS w-
Vlt will require many years to bring
hIj -i- education of the youai
Hk
Dr. W. Smith
DENTTST
Phone 983-W
Corner 3rd St. and DeMers
Over Sacotah Phaihiacy
l\.
Offilvie
I
Bl
Sherman
DENTISTS
Widkind Bldg.''
Phone 4C6-W Grand Forks
DRY CLEANING. PRESSING AND
REPAIRING
Reasonable Prices
Send Tour Package Parcel. Post'
Pine Hemstitching on all Materials I
GRAND FORKS DYE HOUSE
317 Kittson Ave. Phone 798-W
DAK0T-\:P.H010 E NG1?AV1NC CO
&
DESIGNERS EN6SAVERS ELECTROTYPES
OUAUTY- SERVICE
PHONE (963 FARGO,NA
ELECTRICITY-
Man's Mbst Dependable
Servant
Bring all the pleasures and conveniences
of the electrically equipped home to the
farm with .''r"v
It wQI supply illumination, 'tis clean and safe for every,
place where a fight is desired, 'twill save labor, ptnpp water,
operate washing machines, etc
Spme. territory open yet for dealers.
Write for our propo«ttion.
FARGO fRf
MamtfKtuad fqr
General Gas-Elaetric Co.
Haoover, Pi
Oag
S.
if. 4
DROPS CAREER TO
AID ZIONIST DRIVE
Jndgti Henry J. Dannenbanm.
they are! That ho may direct the Zionists')BAtiaTAMC
nCC°XdirB
driv«
,n
their an-, tine foundation fuhd. ,Ti.d*e Hftdi-y
1
a",Tor"
HO" years. Mr. Hudson "says. ..,
declares their greatest need is educa-i]
tidn Their bMc oeoupat'on is farm-«
iniSf find as sjich they are tenant farm-,'
erfr of whites.
'ft't am firmly con\incpd that by edu
oatioV alone can the customs and bar
riers of a hundred years' standing
bo broken, says Mr. Hudson, "to Im
press the Ohoetaws with the respon*'
stbuitiCK of q'tlzenship. Today they
exercise no rtRht of franchise and
are, not on terms of social cqpBjity
wiili tbo while citizens of Misslssippi'."
iln
Texas
ct^
riipry in tne early 30 s. They have his enteftBrtans m» wm ittLtm- fnnd
the pa.t S ad.^aKivS VM' "J
and he dfiputy under Attorney
a^hg^lMlCkereharn for the- cn
f6rc^S^WoJ j.he Mann act. He will
•p£?~&,gwf§0$te)fi*r man in -his new-
nf MississionL tboritieB joined police tod&? in seek
iing the'solution to the myaterldua
AM1TP TD AIM bombing of the suburhan home of
nUrlllEi 1KA1N Willis P. DickinBon, president of the
CTAOC AT AM AII A Security TrtM .and pepokt company
1
Ui Al URIAH
A
Omaha, March 18.—A train load of1 V.^T' ..aZ?Bins
Meanonites from Haskett, Man.,
stopped briefly in Omaha last night
oni.. their journey from their former
colony near the Canadian border to
Torren, Mexico. Members of the par
tygave a number of reasons for mov
ing among them being- an objection
to' *k.law requiring them to each .Eog
liafi- jto the growing-generation.
_'^We are Germans and want our I vaults.
children to be Germans." Benjamin
Fahr, one of them was quoted as say- DlTPMItlPa^n WagL
Isa
7X majority of the colonists are of
German nativity, although some RUB
eistas are included.- Of the 17$ per
so'&r.'ih'' tho party, '""flfty-three are I
adults.
I BOMB BELIEVED
THROWN AT U. S.
Sfte tapcEitesoFiA
.^ojia,-Bulgaria, March' 13.—-(By tKe
'v.A^ooiated Press.)—The explosion ita
•'the American legation Saturday night
is believed to have been caused bv a
bomb thrown from the street into. the
1
legation conservatory., Passersby pur
sued a man who may have been re
sponsible for the outrage.
Both the police and the American
Wnister. Charles Swltson,, belieyed Jt
the act of a mad 'man or that of radi
cal neeking reyenge for the, American
policy- in- regard.to soviet. Russia,
fi-»
nf^sSED IN
CASE OF HOWAT
Washington, March 13.—The su
preme court today dismissed the writs
error by which Alexander Howat
and other labor leaders sought to have
reviewed the decision of the Kansas
courts holding them guilty of con
tempt of court for their refusal to
appear before the court of Industrial
relations.
I S
v"'
DIST.
MGR.
D.
'•'•i
a.
it
1
K*r
V* im\
$ ifi*
conhacUon *ith the ,l%K*v K^tAKI^
Dannenbaum, for years a leader
affairs, baa given up-
^.••5*^W®w»lirtar man in -his new- 'S^K'^n the ofeeas
tdi*.^^spwnce.'bf'
the
To Solye Mysterious
BombingNear Cbica^o
aJl*
ft Chicago. A heavy charge of dyna-
mite'placfed under tne front porch ex-
crtn"
slderable damage but injuring no one.
Mrs.. Dickinson, a housekeeper and',
her tWo daughters were in the house.
Authorities rtuggest that the bomb
ing may have been done by a dis
gruntled investor In one of Dickinson's
enterprises or -may have been wi At
tempt at blackmail or the aftefmath
of the robbery last August of $100,000
from the Security company's deposit
Was Quiet One At A. C.
I Ffcrgo, N. O.v March 13.—Qu'.« has
prevui«d^tbr the jiast wectk about the
sgrlcultural coltefee here. Manv r,t
the toaehecs and Other members of
the school staffs were out through the
slate addressing diversification farm
work meetings and the extension di»
vision department of the school, es
pecially was almost deserted, only
such instructors being present as
were absolutely necessary to com
plete the imperative work ot the de
partment.
mm
tho HtnM gi
tdtuiMioh, was
tomutl record
toon, there
blotter oonUliilAg
Ar'xona graduate, school irtn- 'f
ol|«ar and stndont cf edncauonal^f
r^aholonr was brought tnto
court, but tlio mibjoct of tlie cA
trj- *a» not. ]n accoManoel with"
the ftrtuitlce In' tlb'ls town, the.
prt*ionnr \vaa rcltiaead vHthout 'ij
•v. -arraliRiin^nu as a Hi*t oftender.
Xf l\Voa#©,' 4t attracted national
ktt«fl)tion reotnt!^, when he was
to the Harrarjl gtradu-
,'*.i?/-uus school, a manof lett/ors who..
,^iad footfht h's up from Uie'^j
weofHidary pHdo Debts.* He was j,
in. a lunch. room Herd onrly thlsj^,
morning, the center of a dta*-
MgjteKM, when a pliccnuin was|'^
At'. Harvard onlveratty inday,
it *as sa|d,.an inquiry would be
madc inio thn tH&tiu
TURNED LOOSE IN
DULUTH THIS WEEK
,/totitSth, Minn.. March 13.—The cijty*
^.^uluth Mil 'be tdrnbd over to Ho^
Thiirsday and Kriflay of thlS
Hyeelk 6n the occasion of -the annual,
9r the Fifteenth Rotar^
WStlrftill. Whidh Includes MinnesotUii
^rthVKakotu. Wi.
VmCltfls AttCll&l '^^O viBiting delega
Wisconsin and Mlchji
is 'v^ngfuard of tiie 1,H
delegntes arrive Wedne$-j
Minneapolis, 126 8t. Paul, 12Sji
Fargo, 100 Milwaukee, 40 Grartd
Forks 40 Devils' LakA, 20 MadlsoKv
50 Marquette, 25 Houghton and
Hancock, 22.
The, following cities have ilroady
reservations, as follows: !}.
Fohd du Ia.c. Wis.. 33^ Evoleth, 21
Tractor Plow Outfit^
rt'
forks asMm auMRfry,
SB
.•C^K
at
it6rti4bob) Of
a 'MMtti# Of-
*4 in jjjfe" district:
loday. The policei-j
Irilng the latent cn-j,tf
"J
field, Wis. Menominee. 'Mich. Mef- fooned pair, were t«eeived with all
MInn^ Oshkosh°' \Vis ^"W^teW^ngs^
Rhln^nder, AViS. Point ti^°
Wis. -Sturgeon Bay. Wis. Superior ,t
Wi- Vniiev rttv li woktwinn The
S
aidered typlco.l of the localities in the
northwest st3tcs where land has been
cut over, are receiving material aid in
preparing their fields' for, cultivation
through the promotion *sf tractor..
,-^®hi*:-^a^jhent i.3 gfving-- a-, tjew
tinjtiid cMiarin^jndustiy.
asserted Ejw Biiehlcr. pr^in4ent! of
the McGrath .State bank »teadlng!
townsman and community ehiijf!.whon
believes the new scheme has helped"
the community increase its farming
acreage rapidly.
"We have found that the develop
ment of Idle acres is very largely de
pendent upon two things,'*! said Mr.
Buehler. "First, the advancement, of
credit to the settler must. b$' ar
ranged, and secjond, the fostering of
the propers-morale in your settler In
order/ to? Ke«^- ftim in fighting trim
m.Usf'npt• be.^overlooked. As a banker,.1
our dut.v is fo find out two things. I
Firs'., how we can advance this credit
safely, and second, how it can be
extended so that it does the mpst
amount of- good." .'
The, club first placed one tractor
and a twenty-inch- bottom breaker in
the field, but the demand was so
great that now even a. second outfit
rpables it to accommodate only a part
of the business.
"Encouraged by the headway the
tractors are making, our settlers are
takihg a «iew hold and the results are
beginning to crop out everywhere,"
said Mr. Buehler.
_.
Indians mAke up two-thirds of the
pbgulatiOnjofJjSuBatemaJa*^^^^^^^
HBISKVllfc-ft..
BLACK'S
8.
PHONE I
Northwestsm Nat'l Bldg.
Fourth Hoar Rooms 41t to 4»»
nS FURS
mad* and repaired at
RI E MAN
*l*
Af
6 vs
*•*:,-5* *''.,i'-"r- -3 ••vO-.l-w •*^r^5v5'3Swt?S*vV,^{lii^.,^:StfA^^Lvi'* r- '/-Vi v?*
WJUikmyS.-frlelding, minister of fi
,. natice of "Canada is now in Washing-
day night the keys tit* city WHl be- ton ursrlng- reciprocal' tradp relations
tile-II.
formally tu. ned over to them. ThWi betwefih tfie-Ii:,s: awd:his--'fcountry and
is being groomed for/the 'Rot&rian irylhg :to discourage: unfavorable ac
inv^sl'on- and the local club serving.its i—•«..!
first apprehticbship as host to (he dis
trict Cdhfthrdi'ide lius' outlt
proiratn o(.entertainment
two days.
(Sessions will be held in the lo
Orpheum theater, which has. be|n
closed to.' vaudeville for the seasoiv'
Cities have indicated what'their al-j
tendance will be, as follows:
Robinon^
it
Wisconsin Rapids Wis!, 43 .,Gtoqu^
80 Fergus Fills. 7: Austin. 15" Ker:
nosha. Wis... Appleton, IWis.» 25
Stillwater. 29: Kly. 25 Sheboygan.
Wis., 6 Hibbing, Minn.. 21 Glad
stone, Mich.. 11 Waukesha, .Wis., 6i
Urainerd. 28. and Virginia 8. -is
Other cities in the dlstrlot to be rep»i
resented are: Ashland, Wis
rcsenica arc: A8ii|ann, Wia. u-uu wuanns joiift
iinarek, N, /D.: Crystal Falls,
Mk4«tPush^
iBelpitt, .Wts. Keeanab: Mi^h ^m-Ythey' had Sighted the "rrtscud
•B&ult, Green Bay, Wis. Iron MOuhV'A" WkrrM and a goat Wer¥' thel
tiin. Mich.: Ironwood,'Mich. Jam'fe's
town, N. D.: JanoSv.ilie. Wis. l.o
Crosse, Wis. Mandan. N: Mani
towoc, Wis. Marinette, Wis. Marsh-
,S'
Crii^ Talc
IsvVividiy: Pictured
Valparaiso Ch%e.—-The rescue froni
an Island in the south Pacific of
Alexander- Selkirk, the British mar
in,er, ii.rouad whom Daniel De.foe is
said to have woven the tale of Robin
son. Crusoe^ was vivfd-ly pictured to
several hlihdi*ed. tourtsts, including
prominent British and American resi
dents Of Valparaiso, On their arrival
recently, a^ Jun.n Fernande7^-the
Origlhal ,CKwoe .island—250 miles off
the Chilean i^.oasf.
Two'"natives of .Yuan Fernandez, ono
Boarding the vessel, v'he "ma-'
vtourist.fl
spent three days at
wr' th«. Jtiari .Ferna,hdez. island group
W13.. and,.^ Ul.ston, vistt-ing'-'tliO'-wlMi. coui^trt': of high
mountain iieaks ttnd luxuriant vege
i'tation. Tlj-ev saw the monument
.'i erected ..by. Brit'islri: a^atpen to the
PERENJ
ICE
CREAM
TIB A FOOD
NOV A FAD
Dr. Gilbert Moskau
DENTIST
PHON*4
191
Fcrrler.
is aovn-FMntk st.
DR. JOHN G. BRUNDIN
DENTIST
Northwestern Natlowl.Attk
N. yr.
Cut Flowers
CLORAL DESIGNS
». CORSAGES m~
LOVELL'S
t4- -v
Iwa.1 Rob-
1
Sul^ra^ Institution
ok
:ii«£&lr®«\»'.•tphie.lv "jiV Is saifl to have'
To Appoint Big Board
Iyfiipcfty at Sulgrave Manor, the birth
place .of George Washington, in a joint
British and American body of trus
tees consisting of 18 members.
l'rosident. Handing has promised to
give to Sulgrave Manor n.n_ elm tree
from Mount Vernon. Washington's
home in Virginia, and Mrs. Harding
his promised a cutting from, Martha
Washington's rose tree at Mount Ver
non.
3
I
With about 30 species of perennials
and over 150 varieties. Grand Forks
is certainly, not without a goodly sup
ply of hardy outdoor flowers. With#
proper. care there is no reason why
any one of the following kinds should
not do well in the gardens^here.
Pink yarrow, hollyhock, columbine
larkspur or delphinium, aster, giant
or fall daisy, moonpenny daisy, lily of
the valley, coreopsis, sweet william,
bleeding heart. ds|y lily, lemon Illy,
tiger lily, galllardla, baby's breath,
German Iris, Black Hill's Iris, peonies,
poppy, phlox, ballon flower or platy
codpn, golden glow, meadow sweet,
yucca, lychnis.
Tot condensed Information on sel
ection, planting and culture of flowers
read page 46 ot the March number
of House and Garden.
Perennials live from year to year as
opposed to annuals which die root and
branch after flowering. Annuals live
only one year, biennials two years.
Perennials Include trees, shrubs and
berths. Generally "perennial" is used
by gardeners instead of the phrase
"hardy herbaceous perennial."
Some perennials live three or four
years and then die, others like peonies
live about'as long as shrubbery. Near
ly all perennials should be lifted now
and then, because the crown that
gives the flowers die's after a few
years but the new plant spreads and
gives off new shoots and new growth
which furnishes the future bowers.
This wifl save your soil from depletion
and give your newly set out offshoots
an unused and perhaps undepleted
doll.'
Seeds can be collected from most
perennials.1 This should b.e done as
soon as they are ripe. The Colum
bine, Larkspur, Aster, Coreopsis, Gall
lardla, Baby's Breath and Lychnis
arp easy to grow from seed and Often
seed the ground they grow on and if'
this condition is encouraged many
'rew plants can he had.
"Vy
It ip usually best not to try to tnake
formal designs with annu&ls. Such de
signs are.special things, anyway,-and
should'' be used Sparingly and should
be made only'.by persons skilled in
such work. A poor or unsuccessful
design Is the sorriest failure a garden
can havo.
li This brtngf u(K a discussion of the
proper place? to put annuals. Do not
put them irt the lawn—you want grass
there: Supposing that you grow the
annuals for (garden effects there are
them—to
t?f
?4f%
1
Duluth, At
arch 13—Closing 'ca#h:
prices: Wheat, No. 1 dark north«rn»
1.45 [email protected] 1-4 No.
1-53 1-4 No. ,3,.,do, ,i.27i.i-41© 1.45
1-4 No. 1. a.mber dvrurt, .1.27' 1-40
1.37 i-4
AX4o
amber durlim 1.25 l-4ig)l.i5 1-4 do.
arrl\-e, 1,241'4 No. 1 durum Ul* 1-4
No. 2 do, l.i8'l-4 No. 1 mixed diirueh
1.20 1 -4di S2 1-4 do arrlyo 1,20 1-4
N
Oats, .Ift^i '3 "white track and arrive',
32 7-«®3* 7,-». ':ri
No
1
I
GRAIN
WUUant 8 .Molding, photographed In! No, 1 'and 2 number durum and No. "l
^-V ^Mntogton roeently. .. |and durum 24 No. 8 amber durum
and- No. 3 durum 13: other durum 29
tlbii OjTrtiirpsirt 6f jtJbngif^ss In.dealing
host to the dis- with tariff 1-eldtUon^ between the t^
•outlined lively countries.'
iment fftr the'fa|^' •'. "iV,*'.
two
Bli%goat *kl«jj and^ w«A«ne long boards, mostly steatly to Weak relatively few
Taft after fad cattle here common to medium'
ship." beef steers [email protected]_ bulk 6.25tg)
their only -.00: butcher c.ows and heifers mostly
4.00©5.75 few [email protected] largely
handywelght heifers: canners and
cutters 2.25®3.50: bologna bulls 3.00
@4.00: stockers and feeders dull
good and choice grades steady to
weak: common and medium grades
weak to 35c lower: bulk [email protected]
calves receipts 8.00: best light veal
calves steady, few at 8.00: bulk 7.00:
seconds weak to lower, 4.00 @5.00.
sh6re on a Tafl
paPSPtifrers and: as In Defoe's story.
the -yaft. was laden with fish, -fruits I
nn/i other lefiand-products.
*1^
V"
t*i -to
4r^
A.
4 ,«*
I^A*
V/"
^3uL
msm w.im-
'^wmM
-*:"y
Hog receipts 7.300: market slow
early sales mostly [email protected] loweru
range 8.00 810.00: bulk 9.60(4 9.75:
hulk of desirable pigs 9.85 about 2.
000 pigs here.
Sulgrave cereda, member of the supreme
primarily con-1 council, w-ho is charged with the task
ndly rela-j0f raising 1,000,000,000 gold rubles, or
and Amer- $500,000,000. for agricultural and road
,i&£t.has d^eidpd to appoint a national improvements, announced the-plan in tjard
•Vti^rd of 50 British and 50 American in interview with the official Russian May
':nffe,rpl\ors. press bureau. July
'-.j VJt'hks also been decided to vest the M. Cereda said the leases will be. Ribs
Home Gronnds and Their Care
B. KAITOOWSKI. of Parka.
-yT"
nr/tclirfir? ."V,-. *rs-
JfiiTX!TlSt DW*MWffofe.^v
arrive,. 1.2$ 1-4 No. 2
1
lo. 2 mixed durum 1.18 .1-4 @1.8'0
-4 do, .arrive. 1.18 1*4 .^o.• 1 red
durum 1.16 1*4.. i.
Flajt se«d 'jrv tra6k, 2.56 1-4 @2.60
1-4: arrive 2.Sl l-4^2.0*9 l-4 -May
2.56 t-4 iek©d) July 2.«4 1-4 asked.'
track and arrive' 9 9,Cv
Barley, choice to fancy 5(S'{^84
:'n\af.
dlum to' good 51 @55 lower grades I
*[email protected] -.
•-Cotyi.-NO.-2 mixed 52 [email protected] Nb.
2 yellow, 52 7-8 ©63 1-8.
mCCEIPTS.
Duluth, Minn., March 1
S'.-^Eilevar
tor receipts, domestic 'grain: Wheat,
65,100 bushels*, corn 38,700 ry«i. 25,?
100 flax. 1.40^
Shipments—Wheat: 2,#00
1 and 2 dark northern and No. 1 and
2 northern 5 No. 3 dark northern
and No. 3 northern 4 other spring 3?
No. 1
and 2 dark hard winter and No.
1 and 2 hard winter 1 mixed 47
smutty mixed 1 all Wheat 127 llax
1 corn 67 oats 4: rye 76 barley 2.
All grains 277 on track 322.
GRAIN.
Duluth. March 13.—The wheat
market was weak during today's ses
sion as a result of a combination of
conditions." The movement of grain
from the west to the terminals here
continued on a substantial scale, there
being. 322 cars of all grains on track
today.:
In view of the liberal offerings'the
cash market was easier but all tho
grain on the tables was taken, the
elevators cleaning up any residue.
May durum stood 1 3-4 ofT at the
noon hour at 11.21 1-8 bid and July
2 cents off at $1.14.
SOUTH OT. PAUli.
MV13STOCK.
South St. Paul, March 12.—(U. S,
'representing Crusoe and the other his Bureau of Markets.)—Cattle receipts ,.^J!^usa,'nr
man Friday, clothed in the tradtitiofial 2/T00, market slow killing Classes
Sheep receipts .*1.4 00 about 800 on Poultry alive-unchanged fowls
sale: balance billed through market springs 28: "roosters IS.'
ago. the mostly steady, no good or choice fed
after stock here. CHICAG'O G'li.VIX TAIiliE.
TO I,EASE ESTATES.
.... May
designed to put much of the most May
valuable grain land in Russia tern- jufy
porarily in the hands of foreign
capitalists.
Up steps Amos Strunk and says he
never has met the man he works for
in the one and one-half years he lint
been With the White Sox. Strunk
avers he never has had a squint at
Comlskey.
grow in beds or in bordc-rs..Sometimes
One method is better and sometimes
the other. Tho border method is more
informal, and therefore the simpler
and easier.
Its pictorial effect, is usually great
er. But in some cases there are no
boundary lines that can be usen for
borders. Then beds may be used but
make the beds so large and fill them
so full that they will not appear to be
mere play-patches. Ixng beds are us
ually best. Four or five feet wide is
about the limit of ease in working in
them. The moro elaborate the shape
of the bed the more time you will con
sume in keeping tho geometry straight
and the less on. having fun with the
plants. Dong points that run into the
grass—as the points of a Star—arc
particularly worrisome, for the grass
roots lock hands underneath and grab
the food and moisture.
It is surprising how many things
one can grow in any old fence. The
Four-o'clocks illustrate this point. Not
all annuals will thrive under condi
tions of partial neglect. The large seed
ed. quick-germinating, rapid-growing
kinds will do best Sunflower, sweet
pea, morning glory, Japanese hop.
Zinnia, Marigold Amaranths, are some
of the kinds that may be.expected to
hold' their own. If the effort Is made
to grow plants in such places it is im
portant to give them all the advantage
possible early in the season, so that
they will get well ahead of the gratis
and weeds. Spade up the ground all
you can.- Add a little quick-acting fer
tilizer. It. is best to start the plants
in pots or small.-boxes, so that they
will be "in advance ot the weeds when
they are-set out.-'
First and last, I have grown prac
tically every annual offered in the
American trade. It is surprising how
few ot the uncommon or little known
sorts, really have great merit for gen
eral purposes. There is nothing yet,-.to
take the place of the old-time grou$k,
such as Amaranths, Zinnias, Calendu
las, Daturas, 'Balsam, Annual Pinks,
Candytufts. Bachelor's Buttons, Wall
Flowers, .Larkspurs, Petunias, Gaillar
dlas, Snapdragons, Cockscombs, Lo
be lias, Coriopsts, Mignonettes, Scabio
sas, Nasturtiums, Marigolds, China
Asters. Salpiglossis, Nicotianas, Pari
sles, sPortu lacas, Castor Beans, Pop
pies.: 'Sun' Flowert, Runners. Sweet
Peas.- ConVovuluses. (Impomeaa, Bal
lon VWies, Cobaeas. Of the -annual
vines of "recent Introduction, the Jip
anese 'Hop has at once taken, a. place
for thfe ooVerlng of tences and atbors,
although- -It 'has he 'flower beauty to
recommend iu
/-'Vi 4
Tfi
warn
DVJjVTm CHICAGO.
ti—-
„t~--
Z&
•vsf
'St'
T&flSss-w
t^-^Ain
material 'declines In the price, of
wh«at today durlrrg the first part of
tile board of trade' session, further
.gains being reported in Kansas and
Oklahoma, Bes.dea unpromising
Viators Ot tjie ocsonomie outlook tend
ed somewhat to weaken values and
therer. was a setback In Werllnc:
ctc
Oata ittaftecl 1-8c off to a shade up.
May St 3-8 and then underwent
moderate genieral sag.
JjQjvv
grain pulled down, the price of pro
visions.
Wheat: .Subsequently declines ac
companied by selling on the part of
only transient rallies. The close was
heavy. 2 1-4 to 5c net lower with May
1.32 1-4 to 1.32 1-2 and July 1.10 to
1.15 1-8.
Corn: With figures showing stocks
of corn to,be the largest ever known,
the corn market displayed Jjut little
power to rccover. Prices closed weak,
2 to 2 3-8c net lower, Slav tiO 3-4 to
60 7-8.
di#wnturns In prices al| around. ^rong utilities.. Sugars, especiaVly thei:
drain! Com and oats declined i*1'Cuban group, were 1 to 2 1-2- points^
v.a]u6 vcth Wheat. -After opening higher and Lee Rubber was(istro:i6est!
lHym-8 'higher May 03 to 63 1-4. the of the motor accessories, firm mis
c»fn njatka^ receded to Well under
Saturday's finish.
quotations on hogs and
houses with "eastern Connections car
ried the market as low as 1.32 1-4 for! shares American Telephone WM
May. Announcement of a decrease in strojigest. gaining 1 1-4 points In the
Duluth car Inspection: Wheat, No. tho visible supply total brought aboW! first few transactions. American C'ar
LIVK STOCK,
Chicago. March 13.—tU. S. Bureau
of Markets.)-—Cattle receipts 24.000
market slow, early sales beef steer«.
she stock and Blockers and feeder.1' 15
to 2&c lower: top beef steers early
9.35 bulk $7.50®8.50 bulls about
steady calves weak to unevenly low
er.
Hog receipts 57,000, 15 to 25c low
er than Saturday's average fairly ac
tive earlyfslow later top $10.95: bulk'
$10.30010.75 pigs about steady
bulk desirable 100 to 120 pounds
$9.25 9.50.
Sheep receipts 14,000: slow." little
done early sellers generally asking
higher only lamb sales early throe
loads 82 to 88 pound clippers fully
Blc-ady at $13.00 few small lots fut
ewes steady at $9.00 down.
POTATOES.
Chicago/March 13.—Potatoes dull':'!
cars total u. S. ship-i
ments. Wisconsin sackcd round'
Whites, $1.65(91.75 cwtWisconsin'
bulk round whiles. $1.75$ 1.90 cwt.
Minnesota sacked round whites. $.1.60
(ft) 1.70 cwt. Minnesota sacked Ilcd
•Rivers mostly $2.00 cwt. I dahn
sacked Rurajs. $1.75(ft? 1.S0 cwt. Idaho
sacked Russets, $1.75 cwt. Michigan
sacked round whites. $1.80 cwt.
Icce'PlP1,131
1"a
PUODLti:.
Chicago, March 13.— Butter highqg
receipts. 8.688 tubs: creamery e\tvan
37 1-2: firsts. 33(^36 1-"2: seconds. :I0
@32: standards. 36 1-2.
1
Moscow.—The soviet government j
soon will be ready to lease to foreign
concerns large soviet estates in the
Volga, and southeast Russia, ori a
Cheese1' unchanged.
Eggs unsettled receipts. 2:1.4 27
cases firsts. 21 :!-4ffi2'J: -ordinary
firsts, 19®20 miscellaneous.. 2l. 1^4
r«fi 21 1-2.
Wheat— Open. High. low Close.
May
July
Corn
May
July
.1.37
.1.17
.37 ?i 1.32
.1 S 1.15
li"
6 6
1
concession basis. I
To arrive
1
1 -il 2
1.15
,«3'4 0
.66%
Oats-
May
July
Pork-
.S9*„
.41
38 W
.41 .1.0 Vk
I 1.20
11.20 10.80
11.40 11.00
11.35
10.55
10.45
10.55 l(».35
10.45 10.10
MINNEAPOLIS.
a
MINNEAPOLIS GRAIN MARKETS.
I
1
Closing Quotations.
Cash,
No. 1 dark nor., fancy
To arrive
I I dark northern
To arrive
northern
To arrive
.*1.5 3k® 1.604
1,45i (ft 1.ti0m
1.44A4I' 1.52i
1.444
1.42* fn/J .461
1.422,
1.-19J tr 1.58*
1.3 9 Sj- 1.481
1.:t74 (ti: 1.431
1.1«i9' 1.561
1.32 J# 1.4 5
1.3l*«l.»9f
1.4 3 (u 1. -16 A
4 dark northern, fancy
2 dark northrn
2 northern
3 dark northern, fancy
3 dark northern
.'! northern
jl dark ,hard (Mont.)..
I To arrive
1 hard Montana
1 amber durum, fancy. 1.334(41.37}
To arrive
1 amber durum
To arrive .,
1 (jurum
To .arrrive
amber durum, fancy. 1.31} 1.351
amber durum
durum
yellow corh
To arrive
yellow corn
To arrive
2 white oats (Mont..
3 white oats
To arrive
PAGE SEVGNt9m
r-rtr.
NEW YORK.
B.^ooUslf,,
GRAIN A^TD I»ROVl$tONJ5.
Chicago. March IS.—^Better crop- New York, March 14.^-Caii'thoney-.
oondltlons in the southwest led to opened at 4 per cent on the stock ex
change today, although1-heavy wlth-J
drawails of fiends to meet income taJtSg
payments are expected between today
and Wednesday. Investment. ratla^'.S
and industrials again were supftla-nted
in the speculative favor by. specialties,'^
Market Street Railway,- common,
points, the preferred 3 T- aftd
United RaflwMA-B^^
JB il.*.i-w.ivT
er comprised
cellaneouii shares were featured- foy 'j
Sears-Roebuck and ReminStb'n Typo
»vriter, common and preferred/ v'
I^ast week's general advance Of
prices was confidently resumed at the
opening of today's stock' market.
Traders evidently wjjre not disturbed
by adverse foreign advices, which
were reflected in the further decline
of British and other international cur
iTenoies. Of the more representative
Apncrlcan Tobacco, Famous Players
and International Paper preferred,«.
averaged 1 point gains. Texas Oil was
the only weak stock, its decline of
points being associated with the -coin
puny's poor annual statement.
Confident buying in particular HVi
sues produced a favorable influence
on sentiment, and many of the recog
nized speculative favorites swept, up
ward in the afternoon. 'Ihn floating
supply of stocks seomcd scarce when
iarge buying ord.'fs appeared. Rpm
Inglon. H?cond ireferred. advanced 5
points Kelsey Wheel 1-2 and a long
llsf of other industrials were, quoted..
1 to points above Saturday's closing.
Ivitcr pronl taking in Htudebak+'Vp
Mexican Pelrolueni and General- Aap-.
halt took the edge off the rises---
MlTTAIi.
PRODUCE.
New York. March 13.— Live poultry
steady: broth rs by exprcsr. 80 to S5
chicl^ens 27 to 10 fowls 33 to 35
roosters 18: turkeys 30 to 40.
Dressed poultry steady western
chickens 26 to 42 fowls? »'J
1
1.41 1.44 4 .!
1.20} 1.26}
Barley, choice ......
Barley, medium
Barley, lower grade..
2 rJre ...
To arrive
No. 1 flaxseed
To arrive
1.13}@1.17',
.50} .505
.50}
.48} .49?
.48}© .49}
.33|@ .335
.328 .33}
.328
.56 .60
1.53 .55
.49 .52
.95|@) .961
95&@ .96i
2.54}@2.S8}
2.54}@2.58i
POTATOES.
Minneapolis, March 13.— fU. S. Bu
reau of Markets.)—Potatoes—Light
wire inquiry demand and movement
slow market steady sand land dis
trict carloads, f. o. b. usual terms, St.'
Paul-Minneapolis pate, sacked cwt.
U. S. No. 1 round whites, [email protected]
faw $1.56.
•"Red River- valley district carloads
f. o. b. .usual terms. Moorhead rate,
sacked cwt'.U. S. No. 1 Red River.
Ohlos, 91.S091.65.
WLOm.'
Minneapolis, March 13.—.Flour un
changed shipments 38,983 barrels.
Bran $26.00.
GRAIN RECEIPTS.
Minneapolis, March 13.—Wheat re
ceipts 329 cars compared with 307
oars a year ago.
MAT ABOLISH CREMATORIES.
Berlin.—Germans are tanking of
abolishing crematories in prder to
save coal. Letter writers have been
carrying on a campaign in the Berlin
newspapers protesting against this
method if disposing of the dead as a
waste of fuel. In the Berlin--district
last year 4,762 bodies .were, cremated.
A defender, of c'remation. advocates,i
dolpg away wit^ cemeteries as mtnui
aee to the health or ihe people. He*
suggests that as Qermany is short of
farming land all these plots should be
utilised tor agricultural purposM.
Herald Want Ade Bring/
I
fll
-r
*i
c-v|
:ti)
fji
V,
4
New York. .March J3.—Copper.
steady electrolytic spot ajld hearb
13: Idler 13 to 13 1-8.
Tin easy spot and futures 28.87.
I Iron easier No. 1 northern 18.-5S
19.00 No. 2 northern 38.00 to
|18.-"0 No. 2 southern 15.00 to 15.50.
ly?'ad steady: spot 4.70 to 4,80.
Zinc quiet: East St. l»uis ^lc^ivfflpy-'
'spot 4.65 to 4.70.
Antimony spot 4.25.
pitonco
New York. March 13'.—Butter firm,
j-icripts 6.567 crcamery higher (hartl,.
extras, 89 8-4 to 40 1-2: creamery ex-~
trtis. 92 score. 39 1-2 creamery firsts'
&8 to score. 35 lo 38 l-2f ,*(i
liggs irregular, receipts 80,643
frcsii spociuls 21: do average run 20,:
to 20 1-2 state whole milk fresh
twin* specials 20 1-2 to 21 do iiverag.a,
run 20.
Ml
*v
Wi
i\y
31: old
rrtostors 1 S lo 25 tur«ey*-'«l6 to I. )...
KENTUCKY MAY LEAD
IN CO-OPERATIVE
MARKETING UNITS
y.
Ixtuisvillc. Ky.---Kentucky prpli-"'
ably will lead all other states -.'ast o.Cn
.60-% Ill-' MisFissippi river In orgaluaiivj
.63! operative marketing assoc'-'itions for
the sale of its fa.rm .products l\v (IT-
-.'38% I end of this year, in tho opifliOn' of
40] leaders of the farmers unions in the
jrtitatc. On organization, the Burley
20.90 Tobacco Growers' Co-operative,'Mar
ketlng association, with 53.00.0 mem
lO.Sui'bcrs and controlling Ihe sale of sev
ll.O^j-eral hundred million pounds of bur
lev tobacco, already is in operation.
10.40 A strong movement, led by the forces
lO.lOj that organized the burley growers, is
at work in western Kentucky. Tcn
$ nc-ssee and Indiana, organizing the
I growers of dark tobacco.
At least tour others, and probably
one or two more, co-operative mar
keting associations arc expected to be
organized by the spring of 1923.
These include the blue ajrass seed
growers, orchard grass seed growers.
the grain growers in certain western
Kentucky counties and the sweet po
1 tato growers.
The berry growers of western Ken
tucky already have an organisation ot
their own. but it is said they are con
idering a reorganization of their
sales plan to conform more nearly
with thr' approved methods.
Dairymen and poultry producers
I also are to be organized. An fi-ssocia-
,'rn
r_-
1.22}
1.1 6 4f 1.
1.16}
former now is being or-
[email protected] I ganiscd in northern Kentucky In tbf
1.38J I territory close to Cincinnati, while L.
.. .3i Hi 1.37}
Pierce, poultry' expert for thft
1..29}# 1.36} farmers' I'nion in Kentucky, reports
1.23}tg11.29} 'he sale of several carloads of poultry
1 from western Kentucky. It is the
plan of the union to organize dairy
men and poultrymen throughout the
state within the near future.
leaders could not estimate t.he
value of the several crops that it is
the purpose to organize, although
each is said to run far into the mil
lions of dollars, with tobacco leading..
Grain Growers' Sales
Company Incorporates
Bismarck. N. D.. March
JS.
Fuller of Hargo. secretary of
the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc., is
named as the representative 'in the
BtSle, while the Company 'further
stipulates tha.t. in legal actions,.service,
upon Thomas Hill. secr^tarS1 of state,
will be accepted as legal service. C.
Ji. Gustafson is named as president
and Frank M. Myers as secretary.
The list of states in which the eom-
pany may establish branches is given
as- Colorado. Illinois, Indiana, Iowa.
Kansajs. Minnesota, Missouri^- ^Ne
braska, North Dakota, OkflAhoate. and
South Dakota.
JOHN BIRKHOLZ
•oay
Always sm tM
rtBST TAMM. BOMMU MiM
Grand Forks, N. D.
vr^wili pa
prloesi HIDI
etc-
4*
&
$
-1
a
1**
N
the hjtfilwt luftt
iirer
ior niDEfi, FTIRS and WOOT*
CaU or writa tor prieete..^
Ginsberg Brothers .V?
aev »»t_Ave. •,
1
4
i)
fl
1
13.—
Articles of incorporation of the U. S.
Grain Growers' Sales companv were
filed with Secretary of State Thomas
Hall Saturday. The companv is in
cdrporated under the laws of Dela
ware and the articles were in form eo
it must be possible to file them in a
number of states.
-H.

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