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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, June 13, 1922, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1922-06-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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WJr« ••''Pi'- yy:
One hundred aind' forty students ire-
\., S? L®d degrees, from the University of
North Dakota at the annual coni^
rmencement
™on
givcn
.'.
B®8
7
exerciser "of the inst'itu-
thls
mofnlng. President Thomas
f'f ^ane conferred the. degrees.
•". v-^*p!ff The commencement addreia 4ra»
by
Uf.^Charles P. Aked, of Itan-
City, Mo. Dr. Aked told the stu
4ents that,they must kno.w the occa-
Blon of death, the occaaio'ng when thtj
::.,i tfving of life was called for, th^t they
./ must know the difference between
working for work's sake and wording
''f Tay, that a thing worth doing/was
worth doing badly .rather tlian-tobe
put oft until another time,' and that
they must go forth to do' a. work for
humanity as the supreme aiiA of their
lives.
The program opened »t'9:16 a. rts
with the academic^ procession^ w^iich
began from, the' law- school, 'proceed
ing around the dam pus pan the pres
ident's house, the Commons, Science,
Merrifleld and Bytdge halls to the
armory^/ The services in tUe armory
began at 9:45 o'clock with muBic by
the band. Dr. S3. P. Robertson of Wes
ley college gpve the' Invocation. A
chorus selectl|n was given by the
women's glee club' .of the university.
Following the commencementad
dress by Dr. Aked, announcements
were made of awards given at the in^
stitution during the yea^. Among
those not already announced #as that
of the GanshW:holarahip honor, which
goes to Miss Marion Hyilder *s the
member of the graduating clua hav
ing the highest schpiuttic standlrtg
during the four years of the college
course.
Diploawe Pnwoatod.
r^he deans of the various colleges
presented the candidates for -degreed,
President Kane conferring the taon
ora. Ip his charge to the class at thte
close of the ceremonies, he told theak
that they woiild "meet now the- nfccesV
pity of asauming responsiblllty fthdi
that the fact which !w6uld dlstingtilah
them college trained yMith£ was
.: that they:
c^U a(^e%«ip^UUt^
,?i that they c'ouId uWderti»k«
without som«*ne ^Orfltajtt' hs,la,iia:^«
directions, that they could work1 on
their own' initi&tiVe. Thn pledge' thtCt
the class as a Ttthole tbok follows:
"As I* go ou^ .r pledge njyself to live)
up to the ideals if my iiviversity'-.ajid
to ,take my stand on tHijr'sldfe of right
with the best light thi^t I J»«ive."
Ctiultor Honored.
At this occasion the degree of Doc
tor of Laws was conferred upon Pres
ident John Lee Coulter, of the state
agricultural college, a former studept
iv it
Alumni Loncbeon
Following'the exercises a business
iqceting of thfl alumni association
was held in the armory. At 1'o'clock
members of the association, members
.. of the graduating class and friehds of
the graduates and the university as
sembled at the annual "alumni lunch
eon and commencenflent cUpner. Talks
were given, at the affair by RiChsM
K. Wenzel, president of: the alumni
association, and Miss Beatrice Olson
on behalf of. the body of ^alumni.
Francis
spoke as
uatea.
"...
if"
Class Day Exercises. S
Class day closed Monday evening
vHth talks by the varioufc- class com
mencement Hpi»*.ers. Harpli D. Sha^t
give the valedictory address, stating
that ^he university had given each
member of the class training that
would enable him to go out and take
part as leaders in the communities of
the state and in matters of state im
portance. Randolph F. Olmsted, as
salutatorian, told of the worth of an
education and its meaning in'the .life
of
,-ve
the young man or woman.
Miss Marlon Wilder gave the class
poem, Miss Alice May Austin the
class history, Miss Helen O'Connor
the testament^ and Miss Edith Mptt
the class pfophecy. Vocal solos wej
y%w*$
1£$?V- 4 %r-(*'•
,.* v.
*"4*t~'
'I'll
PfMHrat TbsiMs F.. Kane U- S. EXPORTS
•!^ltt^i^'eseilt# Charge ToSenior *kM04
Class Alnmni Luncheon
And Business Meeting
Bring The Commencement.
Season To A Close Class
Day Exercise^. Held Mon-
'•V'."
ire
^ven by Dean Lelck, tenor, and WJ1
bert Llebeler, baritone. Francis -J,
Webb, class president, presided.
The annual pilgrimage of farewell
to, the various buildings. took place
Monday afternoon, the buildings-vis
ited being Merrifleld hall. the. law
-school, president's bouse,' Science h^n,
Woodworth hall. School bf Mines,
University librair »«d thd- armory.
Russell McClellan subsOtuted for. Miss
Ethel Bvingson at Merrifleld hall, the
Remainder of the prpipmm. being car
ried out', according to. •cnedule. A
concert by the University band ana
(Continued on Page^l)
fFor
NORTH
-y*j- '.
SUFFERDECREASE
Washington, June ll^—America's
export trade
rsufferi»d
another decline
during May, dropping from the/total
Of $318,000,000 reported for April to
|S08,000,000. Imports, however, in
creased in .May- to $2,54.000 as'com
pared with $217,00,000'.'for April.
Attacked Train in Mexico
Attempted to Get Bullion
Worth $29,000.
Nogales.i'' Aria.,- June
bandits were killed and
13.—rFlve_,
T_
three are
known to' have been wounded in an
attempt to\'hold up .a combination
freight,-and passenger train' of tbe
Southernv.Paciftc de Mexico, near
Jldsares( between Mbsatlan,1 Sonora,
and T^pic, Slnaloa, Mexico, late/ Sat
urday Afternoon, according to a con
ductor who arrived here yesterday
en route to his home in Los Angelea.
The dead apd wounded were mem
berri of band of 2S Mexican bandits
who attiicked the train which was
carrying',a shipment of 29. bars of
bullion valued at $29,000. The other
bandit floA. without any loot.
.: The.' Ave were killed and three
.others wounded 'by General Axelardo
RodrigUes, hl6 aide and chauffeur!
who were passengera on the. train.
General Rbdrigruez is military gov
ernor rof the state of. Nayarit.
N. D.
""^"''at "State. A.\ C. ''Dis-1^
D„ June tS.~Ge6rg».
tofLtKOr- H- ^D..
Ma:
trnil
tur^,r staticftied at the state 'agricul
tural college here, today announced
that black rust in the. red 6r early
stage had been'discovered hear Ken
sal,1. Stutsman county, oi* winter
wheat. H. L. Solley, plant patholo
gist of tie college, also announced
that it Mid, been found on winter
wheat at the college.
you, assistant p4thologist... of the
itfd States department of agricul
Kxperts «t the college, discounted
the importance of the finding of \he
rust af It makes its appearance each,
spring.' Only complete eradlcatiOp of
the "barberry bush which harbor^! the
-spores in early spring wilt change this,
they said.. Tlie amount of damage
"that the disease will do th,e. crop is
WhcUy dependent', on the wea,ther,
they added—coot and dry weather
Acting as an enemy qt rust'.
In makliig his statement Mr. Bolley
itressed the importance of the anti
j. Webb. mis.
nf thA md« wPbepry cAmpugttS in MinnewU ana
representative or tne. graa-
to be
tarted 1b North Dakota, July 1.
Rust had been discovered on the
barberry earlier in the year and the
finding of it on wheat was altogether
ekpected. Mr. Bolley and Mr. Mayon
agreed
4
ii.
PRESIDENTTAKES
NO POSITION ON 1HE
MUSOE SHOALS ISSUE
Washington, June 18.—rpresident
Harding has taken no posiUon with
respect to the question of Muscl
•Shoals, and feels tha.t congress, shouli
have a free hand in the matter, it was
authoritatively said today' at ,'j. tJ»j»
White Hoiiae.
'f SEARCH iWl
'Pes Moines, Iowa, June IS.—Police
today continued Search for the sister
of GeOrge "Chief Johnson, 'former
bitseMl player who Jwaiv found shot
to death in Southwtilt Oas. Moinea
early y^rterday. ,..'
Tom. Fairwea(h«rt owner of the
Des Moines Western league baseball
club,
saya
FACTS FOR THE FARMERS,
Under the Nonparti«»n League Adminiatration the Fi
Lota department of the Bank ol NfKlh Dpkotm hwidtod 754 fi
'loans in 87 «Dqotfas, an
Under the Nestoa ad^niatratiMi Ae Fann Loin dfRartnwfet^
of tbe Bank of North Dakota
WHch AdminiitiWioh is Best
thje Former?
Johnaoa formerly playad
baseball with teanw at Tufca, Okla.
Kansas Ctty. St. Joaepb/ Mo. Lin
coln, Neb., and Dei Moinss.- BUs home
is aald to l^ave been Winnebagcu
Minn.
hiui fendM 0T lotaf
5.
[hV -TVancisco,' June l3i-r-The
U||•+#'?$$!$ S^ndardOll.company which a year
v*#&V5,
5 A N O N S A N E 1 8
&" 3 S _v -i'v •••:/«. *«i:' v£ i:' .•':•••: .1 'V-, rt- •?:*•.
•,u''4ftm'-'. •'f'ranojfc'o, June' 13.—The
Standard Oil.,company which a pear
agpseht .an expedition to, the Philip
piriephas diecoveredgaB on-the island
pf Luzon possibly Indicating the' pres
voiiee QtvOlU according: to -a Cable re
ceived yesterday from the local eit
flces o£ the, company.
SMys He Will Support Men
Eindorfsed by Republicans
at Jamestown.
Denies Responsibility For
Putting Other Candi
:-^:dates-in ^ield.
Flfe*o, N. lj., June 13.—-Senator
Porter J, McCuinber, chairman of
the senate finance committee, in a
telegram .to his campaign headquar
ters ..here today denied any connec
tion with "certain candidates for
state offices who have entered the
field since the Republican convention
at Jamestown." He is a candidate
foif the .Republican senatorial nomi
natkntv
He declared himkelf unqnalifiedly
in favor of the re-election of Gov
ernor R, Av Nestos and declared the
whole Republican ticket chosen at
Jamestown liad hU'mpport.
Many DemoanMft
Another factor that enteral the
political situation at the. beginning of
the last two weeks, of, the pre-primary
campaign, is the reported large in
crease in Democratic voters regis
•ftet. It is receiving^ attention at
political headquarters here. Ac-
»v
1B
Pit #'j-5
Advertising and
perts From Foiu' States
On Program
Study
Araising
1
WH.WIIMWU SbV
,uie political headquarters here. Ac- Wheels in n^otion, and «arly this aft
cording to some reports, it is already ernoon-committee appdintments were
triple that of the last election and,
according to others, it is 34,000, as
Compared with 14,000 Democrats
registered last timet ^Re^stration of
women voters who voted Tut did not
register at the last election, and the
contests within Democratic ranks are
^ven' as reasons.
McOmnber's 'Ielccra^
Mr. McCnmber's telegram follows:
"It hail been brought to my atten
tion that reports are being circulated
that I' am responsible for bringing
out -certain .candidates, for state of
iices who have'entered the,"field since
.the. Republican convention at James
town. I am ^not directly pip/ indirectly
ible f«r. the -candidacy of any
mft n^lf jrt^ have not been
.adufey a.njr or the Qther. oandl-
When the manager of my
Hughes, moved cte ttaei
•Of the cifhvention that. no en-'
.dorsement for .aenatpr bff made, he
•aked my' friends to suppCvt, the state
ticket nominate there
1
He did this
with my. approval, and I. have 4ot
to get. into the
campaign because oJ^
work here on the tariff bill and for
that reason will be unable to make
any statement, from the platform. 1
Am entirely satisfiedj with the ticket
nominated at the Jamestown »cen
vention and unqualifiedly in/favor of
the re-elecuon of-Mr. NestoA^and the
otheni nominated there."
made, and the reports of Mr. Mann
as president, W. A. Donnelly as sec
retary and W. W. Ruff as treasurer,
were, heard.
Senator George M. Peterson of Du
luth, secretary of the Minnesota Re
tail Merchants' association, was
scheduled to conduct a question box.
this afternoon, and. F. W. Peglow wa«K
on the program for an address,
Wednesday Program.
E. U. Berdahl, secretary of the
South Dakota. Retail Merchants' as
sociation, will give the opening ad
dress oh Wednesday morning,' dis
cussing ''Protection of the Merchant."
John S. Taylor will "speak on "Sales
Auuiship." Speakers for-: the -Wednes
day afternoeni'. aeasiOh Swill include
John: T. Sujliy&n. C. B'.sLawrence, ad
vertising manager ., fo^- iFlrihh, Van
$yck McConvllle. St. Paul, and C.
I. Bvenson, president of the Minne
sota Retail Merchants and Growers
association.
Members ^o{ the women's commit
tee-have arranged an auto tour, with
entertainment following, at the home
of Mrs. H. H. Wilson, and. on. Wed
nesday evening there will .be a smokpi
rnd ,linch at the Commercial club
roons. with F. X. Grayelle of Duluth,
presiding.
A
»'l
5
Oltiom Here.
With- President F. P. Mann, officers
of the North Dakota Retail Mer-
h'
ENEMIES ONCE—ALLIES SOMETIMES!
(Continued on page 2.)
•TOURIST
SWt1
v.
kal
,"-••
off
Merchandising is
Main Theme of the
.Convention.
According toPresident.F.' P.,Mann,
a study of merchandising Witl^ the ob
ject of
the standard of mer­
chandising'within the state, will 'form
the theme of the programs °for the
North Dakota Retail Merchants' con
vention which opened In Grand Forks
this morning.'
.¥bis.. is the twenty-fourth annual
convention of tl\e body. A -number
of delegates registered this morning,
•ad a larger number is expected in
during the day to attend the remain
ing two days ot the convention, which
will' close, on Thursday afternoon.
Advertising and sales experts from
four states have places oh the pro
cram. In ^addition to the talks which
they will give during the session.
Governor R. A. Nestos and J. F. T.
O'Connor have been invited to speak,
and/will appear on the Thursday pro
gram. Governor Nestos will speak
Thuk-sday morning oii ''North Dako
ta," and in the afternoon Mr. O'Con
nor, will speak, on "Our Government."
GUy L. Ireland, president of the
Grand Forks Merchants'' association,
called the convention to' order this
morning and extended a welcome on
behalf ot the association which he
represents. A formal welcome to the
city was extended -by Mayor Henrys
O'Kee'fe, and President Mann gave a
response.
'The-morning was.devoted chiefly to
the business of getting the convention
$ Ti
(J
i^v^C '*$
«Sfe v^
::V^/hi'v.-', -r.^Jfi
cs Ex- Gains Nothing as Result of
Armistice Ruse Troqps
:c Again Retreating.
(By The Associated Press)
Tientsin, June 13.—If Chang Tso
Un'a suit for an,armistice last week
was a ruse, asia believed here, to give
his defeated and retreating Manchur
lan.army a chance to reorganize for a
successful offensive, it missed its pur
pose'.'
Whetr Chang's troops attacked early
in the morning they found a firm
Cmhli line strongly supported by ma
chine guns «nd artillery. After an all
day battle Sunday the Manchurlans
are agaia headed homewara.
Reports lost night said the Man
chrurians! were withdrawing northward
toward Shanhaikwan with Wu's army
pressing closely behind them. Two
carloads of wounded were being sent
to Tientsin.
GOLTRA WILL RUN
BARGE UflE ON
UPPER MISSISSIPPI
St. Louis, June 13.—Edwin F. Gol-
least, any intenUon to operate on the
lower Mississippi, the four towboats
and 19 barges he has leased from the
government. Hp added however, that
he would operate the barges on the
Upper Mississippi, carrying coal north
to .St. Paul. Minneapolis and iron ore
to St. Louis on the return trips.
WIFE OF MURDERED
CIRCVS OWNER IS
PUT UNDER ARREST
Mount Holly, N. J., June 13.—Mrs.
Doris. Brunen, widow of John T.
Brunen, circus owner, who was shot
and killed on March'10, is under ar
rest, here today on a charge of mur
der. The authorities said that she
was arrested upon information fur
nished by persons already held In
connection with the case, but declin
ed to give further information.
STRAUSS GOES TO CHINA.
Manila, P. I., June. 13.—Admiral
Joseph Straflss, commander of the
^static squadron, departed today for
Chinese waters^ aboard' the flagship
Huron. The destroyer fleet ,4feft for
China last Monday.
\y-^i
I
iUT-:®^
fc1fcK'fc
1
-'r
AVIATOR 1WTH0UT
FOOD TWO DAYS
ATE GRASSHOPPERS
Tampa. Fla.. .Tunc 13.—Cadet
Ai1atot- Raymond White, lost for
three days in the Everp-Inflr* was
out of the hospital aid lack on
dnty at Carlsrom field today little
the worse for his experience.
In his story of the experience
White stated that after going
two days without food he caught.
and ate grasshoppers.
By MORRIS
v?
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•m
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iPf*¥
F* «v,v
Jt^4«S« fti*
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-fe
Subsidy Bill Condemned In
Resolution Adopted Unan
imoutly By American Fed
eration Of Labor As De
structive Of Nation's Hope
For Sea Power.
Cincinnati, Ohio, June 13.—(By
The Associated Press. )-^The ship
subsidy bill now pending in congress
was condemned by a resolution
adopted unanimously today by the
American Federation of Labor as
Inimical Jto public interest and de
structive of. the nation's hope for sea
power.
Andrew Furuseth, president of the
International Seamen's union told the
convention that the bill'probably
would be reported tomorrow^ in both
houses of congress with committee
recommendation that it be enacted
into a law. jn Furuseth's motion, the
convention voted to Wire a protest to
congressional leaders opposing favor
able action.
Cincinnati, Ohio, June 13.—(Byi
The Associated PreSs.)— Although1,
tra. Democratic national committee- confronted with many problems, del-! the merchant marine measure in the
man for Missouri, today announced egates to the animal convention of Jiou today but because of unexDect
he had'abandoned for the present at
1
From the messages of the foreign
leaders, the convention delegates ex
pected to learn policies, practiced
abroad, that might be applied in this
country, and alBO be informed of the
labor movement abrohd.
r.y The Associated Press)
Cincinnati, June 13—Facing a fight
that leaders of organizr-d labor regard'
as one for the existence of unions,,
the American Federation of Labor
here Monday opened its 42nd annual
convention, which was marked by the
presentation of many issues that are
to be considered during the next two
weeks,' and a speech by President
Samuel Gompers -declaring, "We do
not fool'ourselves into any fancied
security.": The issues were .brought
before the delegates' by the report of
the federation's executive council:
While'the executive Council's ^report
centered around many questions that
.will comie before'.the* convention, it
also showed that the total member
ship of th.e''federation is 3,195,635.
Although this in a loss of 710,893 in
the last'year, members of the com
mitte? nointed out that it was a gait.
of more than 1.100 000 over 1916,
which year was followed by big gains
during the witf-. Further, the report
told of labor's accomplishments of the
las! year, which it was said, was
ma Ued by "unusual strife and un
usuul industrial depression."
FIREMEN'S CON\TENTION.
Rochester, Minn., June 13.—-This
city is filled with firemen from all
parts of Minnesota today who have
come in unprecedented lumbers to
attend the fiftieth annual, convention
of the state association.
This afternoon the annual parade
will be held.
The sessions bf the statft_ associa
tion will continue through tomorrow,
with sightseeing trips, luncheon^,
banquet and other entertainment to
occupy the intermissions.
ORGANIZE WOLF HUNTS.
Calico Rock, Ark.. June 13.—Dep
redations of timber wolves in north
ern Arkansas have become so serious
that the farmers of this section have
organized weekly wolf hunts. During
one hunt last week several' wolves
were killed. In the hilly country near
here the wolves have not only killed
sheep and hogs, but have attacked
nattie.
Dayton, Ohio, June 13.-—(By
the Associated Press.)—Lashed
by a 120-mile an hour gale, more
than four and a half miles above
the earth, on ths verge of suf
focation, caused by loss of his
oxygen tank and compelled to
cling to ropes and straps attached
to a parachute for fear that a
whirling cross current might
weaken and cause them to break,
are several of the "mere" details
related today by, Captain A. W.
Stevens, aerial photographer, Mc
Cook, field, who yesterday broke
the world's parachute jump rec
ord, when he descended 24.20P
•feet.
The fact that it was Captain
'Stevens' first "drofc". tende to
make his fes^t one of the moat
remarkable in the history of avia
tion. He suffered no ill-effects
from hi» hasardous trip.
The pane in which Captain
Steveits ascended, a twin motored
Martin bomber, piloted by lieu
tenant Leigh Wade, .broke the
world's 'attitude record for this
particular type of ship, oarrying
three paseensers, when it attain
ed a height of .14,sac feet.
Sergeant Roy Langham Was the
tided member'of the party.
"4fV)r. a. loni ttaw I .have want
ed jto make a parachute' drop,"
Captain etevifns eaid, i'^inartly
:',|o abtstlQ first hand iafoinhation
as ''to- the aenaatlon. ohe^fcela. -.
''When' plane reached .the
cellhur I naSte re«dy tQ Jum
&
*1*
E E N W
the American Federation of Labor ed lo!a it was announced that' the
turned their attention today to Eu- merchant marine committ»3 would
ropean labor affairs, the program
calling for addresses by. British labor
leaders.
The British delegates are H. H.
Smith, acting president of the Miners the party inline behind~the^presiden?.
Federation of Great Britain, and H. —_
t.v Poulton, an officer of the' Boot and
-'hoe Workers union.
ji 'S?i
E01T||i§
Sis
NUMBER 14^
Urges Present Session To
Act On Bill Letter Sent
The House Committee By
Harding Stating His Stead
And Hinting At Necessity
For Calling Extra Term.
(By The Associated Press) a,
Washington1, June is.—Pr«al.^
dent Harding has notified Chair
man Oampbeil of the house rules
commiuee that unless the aMp'4
snbsldy Mil Is passed-prior to ad-"'
jonrnment, he wonld feel obllgat
ed to call a special session solely'
for Its consideration.
Writing under date of Mar 26,
the president said: "So modi is 'C
involved and such a difficult an*
discouraging situation will follon
If congress fal|s to sanation tWa.,
merchant marine bill that If rA
slould feel myself obligated to
call congress Immediately in cx- 45
traord!nary session to especially 'k
consider it if it went over throujfh,!'
neglect or delay beyond the nrcs
ent term."
-Not Introdnerd. tuipi
Plans luwl been madlo introduce
lw
not be able to present the bill before
tnm AFrnitr T• wrill a. 1
tomorrow. It will, be referred auto
matically to the 'committee, wliich
will report it to the house later in the
week.
There was widespread discussion
among members as to the effect of the
president's letter. Republicans of the
merchant marine committee believed
it would have the effect of getting
ELECTION IS BIG
PROBLEM BEFORE
ADVERTISING CLUfeS
Milwaukee, Wis., June 13.—A defi- I
nite break in the ranks of the Chica
go delegates to the convention of the
Associated Advertising Clubs of the
World was noted .early this morning,
when W. F. McClure, president of the
Chicago Advertising, council, declared
that a defection in the support of
vCharles H. Mackintoeb. Chicago, for
president, Was inevitable.
break in the ranks of the'as
sociation oyer the .'election was -l
broughfuo avhead at a meeting of fhe
vigilance committee on Monday when
Merle Sidener, Indianapolis, was re
ported to have launched an attack on
the record of Mackintosh. Mr. Mack
T'
tosh was present at the meeting at
time.
Both men denied later that any- V'*.":*'
tiding personal had occurred. Sidener V'.'j if the
•i a supporter of Louis Holland of just
Kansas City for president. .* visit.
All night long, and ending well into
prospective candidates were given out.
STEVENS DESCRIBES SENSATION OF
PROPPING FOUR AND HALF MILES IN A
PARACHUTE BREAKS WORLD'S RECORD
DEADBEATS DISAPPEARING. ,,. jfutlve
Cleveland, Ohio. June 13.—Persons who"
who never pay their bills, generally bnuaf
referred to as "deadbeats," are rapid- the'
ly disappearing, according to dele- 'wjS'
gates of the Retail' Credit Men's Na- ia-yine
tional "association, in tenth annual
convention here.
"Neither men nor women overbuy Vv. fsittnil
luxuries as they did during the war g'.:the
and in the after the war flurry,'*
over Springfield. Ohio. Bidding,
my pals goodbye, I jumped.
Lost Oxygen Tank. ."
"The opening of the parachuta
loosened the oxygen tank from
its fastenings on the front of my
clothing. Grasping it with both
hands I endeavored to retaiiy It.
"The wind wes traveling atrat
speed of 120 miles an hour, and
whipped the parachute around
like a jackstraw. I was forced to
use bptb hands -on the ropes and
-the straps which held me on the
'chute, in an effort to check
oscillation, which threatened to
weaken the supports. It was
then I lost the tank. I think it
fell some place near SprinjH»l44
"It was an experience I shiftily*
never forget. Before settling
down to a lower altitude, I
thought my time had come ai l
was nearly. suffocated due to the
rareness of the atmosphere."
Dropping out of the gale into*
calmer atmosphere below I qnlek-^ j,
ly recovered, however.
"I landed at Jamestown, approalr
mately So miles froaa where I left
the plane. The deaoent took lasC
S# minutaa.
"Just before teking off at lfq*
Cook field,
carrying a
sandwiches and coffee in vaow
bottles, We ate the lunch
feet In the a4r and enjoyed
Two hours aind flve.
mtaiNl
paet tin Mrtabfcr
bc^akla* altttitto
mm
S#
ar«»c
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tie at
tad'i
vlo"!''
the
Ftyti
vormata
town
£l'.heran
irith al
utnedf
week's
kston'
oquet,
Mrs.
\audOi
work.'
ork in,
new
beeii
An-
'nship
re.-':Vi
ir, oh
Cal.it
dvan
facil-
have
J,?*wHl
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1
can-.
mass
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t*1i
the morning, various of the delegate .hos
groups canvassed the question of the V.
election. Holland supporters claimed*' i' itnd
700 votes sure on the first ballot on
Thursday. Seven hundred would be
equivalent to election.
Three different groups announced
that they would enter candidates to
day and would seek to secure support
case of a deadlock between Mack
intosh.' and Holland. No names for
*!th«
imond
inga
spital.
being'
farm
She.
with
ja.«e a
v.
:,a-
Aext
:,:v
George A. J^aws of. Memphis. Tenn., gwlng
past president of the association, ad- $ .'fctim.
ded. "It is a combination of eduCa- iukA
tion and co-operation that is eliml- S'
nating the bill-jumper."
pec-
4k4ti,
4?
3
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