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Grand Forks herald. [volume] (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, September 08, 1922, Image 1

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VOLUME 17.
Greek- Cabinet Resigns
Army Of 150,000 Men
Turned Into Virtual Band
Of Refugees British) Ship,
Ordered To Smyrna.
Washington, Sept. 8.—All
Americans in the interior of An
atolia were reported safe in ad
vices received today at the state
department from an American
vice consul, unofficially station
ed at Angora, .Turkey.
/.Paris, Sept. 8.—(By The Also*
elated Press.)—Rumors that
King Constantino of Greece in
tends to abdicate are current in
several European capitals. They
are considered here to have been
given some color by the sadden
recall of the Greek heir apparent,
.Prince George, to Athens from
Bucharest..
Athens, Sept. 8.—(By The As
sociated Press.) —Succumbing to
the pressure of public opinion, as
a result of the severe reverses to
the Greek armies In Asia Minor,
the cabinet of Premier Protopa
padakis yesterday resigned.
Klkolas Kalogeropoulos, for
mer premier, has been charged by
King ConstantIne with the task
of forming a npw ministry.
Continue Advance.
London, Sept. 8.—(By The Asso
ciated Press.)—Official dispatches
from Constantinople indicate the
Turkish Nationalist forces have ad
vanced to within 25 miles of Smyrna
and are advancing rapidly.
Athens, Sept. 8.—(By The Assoclat-!
ed. Press.)—The evacuation of'Asia
Minor by the Greeks as a result of
the' successful offensive against their
arrny by the Turkish Nationalists, is
accepted here as foregone conclusion,
although it has not been announced
officially:
Actual.orders for1 the evacuation of
^Aala Mirioirhive not. yejt^lMfsn given,
it la said, but General Doustnanoa, the
'chief of staff, is studying the prob
lems of how to carry out-tta maneuv
er uhdfr the best conditf$»s possible.
A' telephone message from the
Gr#ek comman4er ln the field sayi
^StWt General' J?a!
:r been ^POlat«dft«- tl»i» &nwiufflF&
Oeij^t:JMege|^i'were^.fettu|^,KFv5
Turkish davalrjftvwhlle ^IlK'Jrere p^
©ending to join the Greek.1corps «it.
Alasbehr, east of Sipyrna.,
Constantinople, .Sept. 8.—(gytThe
Associated Press ):—Unable to extri
cate their army from the Kemalists
hold, the Greek military- leaders, it .is
believed here, will be obllged'to*accept
•any armistice terms the victors may
ulctate,
The allied commissioners have rec
ommended to Hamid Bey, representa
tive of the Kemalists here, that the
Angora government propose an armis
tice to Athens.
A Greek communique states that
General Tricoupis the commander in
chief, was captured while attending
I an important military council at
Ushak Sunday night at which it was
decided to withdraw to the* Alasher
Nne.
Complete Disaster.
Smyrna, Sept. 8.—(By The Asso
ciated Press.)—Only an eye witness
can realize the extent of the disaster
to the Greek, army.
An army of 150,000 men, well or
ganized and equipped, has been trans
formed in
less
7*1
than ,two (weeks into a
virtual band of refugees.
A" official Turkish statement says
400 Greek officers and 10,000 men
Have been captured since the toffense
•V was launched, together w.lth 500 mo
tor trucks, 350 guns and a million
-.rounds/of artillery ammunition.
The Greek loss of morale Is illus
trated by the reported refusal of a
nt
reserves rushed Were
to disembark. A con-
battalion of
^Irom Athens,
tingent of Senegalese which arrived
yesterday on a French transport also
dUTnot land, owing to some disagree
ment. The whole of Smyrna hinter
.. And has been ravaged, by the Turks,
S and refugees continue to pour into
the city by the thousands. A Turkish
airplane yesterday flew over the town
and dropped pamphlets Announcing
ihe "complete liberation or: Asia Mi-
P°J
number
of American destroyers
are anchored in the harbor which
with its concentration of warships or
all the powers, resembles the scene of
a huge naval pageant. The G»«k
troops have taken up positions on the
outskirts of the city. ,,,
British Ships to Smyrna.
Malta, Sept. 8.—6y ThA Associat
ed Press )—The British cruisers Con
I and Cardiff under comrtjand of
Admiral Sir Reginald T^rwhitt,
IwTunder orders to sail today for
Smyrna. The entire British ^Medlter
ranean fleet now is concentrated in
near eastern waters,
ifOWjL*
7—A eotamn of
4 MO Kemalist cavaliynien oc
"/'•iBSt'S'a'StfSS
ffSltonorth^.ot
iDoodin^ lowftfd
cohumi feacfc tfee
SfeflSie ftlxyre
"A &s sr
^7JZ.
•~m.
TB® .WKMClBK*..
toalcht
r?i
THREE KILLED IN
HEAD-ON COLLISION
NEAR SPOKANE, WASH.
Spokane* Wash., Sept. 8.—
Three railroad men, Including
two members of the drew of Nor
them PMiild passenger train No.
41, were killed, and fourth, a
flreman on a switch engine, was
fatally Injured when the passen
ger-train collided head-on With
the' switch Engine last night at
wpter, four miles east of
dead are O. W. Southern,
engineer of No. 41, Ed. Hodous,
engineer of the switch engine,
and the electrician on the pas
senger train, whose name Is be
llevcdx to be Nowe.
None of the passengers were
injured seriously.
M1LLERAND AT
Egyptian Student Fired.Shot
at -Automobile Millerand
Out of City.
Paris, Sept 8.—(By*The Asso
ciated Press.)—Georges Halem,
an Egyptian student, fired a shot
at an automobile in front of the
Palace of the. Elysee today, be
lieving the car to be President
Millerand's. The shot went wild.
President Millerand.. was_^at his
country residence'at Rambouillet
at the tufne.
Mlllerand
S.
Await Outcome.
Washington, Sept. 8.—Labor lead
ers here were1 awaiting today the out
come of their first legal move against
the injunction obtained by the gov
ernment in Chicago last Friday
against the' striking railway shop
crafts—the suit of the International
Brotherhood of Electrical, Workers,
one of the striking organizations, to
prevent the federal authorities from
enforcing locally the provisions of tjje
Chicago order.
The suit, filed in the District of
Columbia supreme court yesterday
and set for hearing tomorrow,, as
sailed.the legality of the Chickgo in
junction, questioned the jurisdiction
of the Chicago court, and denied that
the plaintiffs had been guilty of any
illegal act "before or since" July 1.
The electrical workers were said to
have acted without Reference to the
other six organizations on strike in
filing the petition, but officials of the
union said they expected both .the
temporary order, which they hoped
would issue tomorrow and the per
manent writ also sought would have a
nation-^flde scope.
Department of justice officials while
declining to comment for publication
on the suit qf the union, expressed
the opinion unofficially that if the
district supreme court should grant
the temporary restraining order, it
would lead to wide possibilities of
injunctions and restraining orders
granted By that court under the Sher
man and Clayton acts being upset by
courts of other jurisdictions.
No Interference.
Washington, Sept. 8.—Assurances
hiave been given by Attorney General
Daugherty, according to Information
today from administration leaders,
that the meeting next Monday at Chi
cago of the striking railroad shop
men's cottimittee would not be inter
fered with by the government undei
the federal court's restraining order.
DUtNOnON CAIIiED
HAftDlVG'6 "BIG STICK." ?v(s
(By The Assoylatetf Press)
Atlantic City, N. J., Sept. 8—Assert
ing that President Harding, "instead
of using the big stick on the railroad
executives, through his attorney gen
eral.: has .swung it in the form of an
Injunction akalnst the shop crafta,"
Samuel Gompers, president of the
American Federation of Labor, last
night issued a statement wherein
said: "Oh, for one hour of'normal
thinking by our government. officials!'
.'- An amendment to-the constitution
of the United, States aimed "to curb
the despotic powers'' which labor
leaders nee wielded in Attorney G^n
eral Datygherty's injunction against
the shop crafts will be submittal for
the approval of the executive council,
of the American Federation of I«abor
when ^lt ^convenes Saturday, members
of the 'council disclosed Thursday.
As, tentatively drawn, the- aakend
menr would prohibit the eiiaetmento
any iaw or the making of any itriteUl
determination which would deny the
rikht of the' workers ot the country
'"to organise, for the betterment of
their- conditions Jo deal collectively
With thetr amployers, ol- to collectively
Withhold tfcdr Ubm Aitd patrflftatfe
and. induce others to do so."
I a a a an
American Fedenttoa qf &nb»r, declar
ed a nation-Wide -movement was al-
mr er deputised lab*»r^to launch de-
•j*'
ffi
I
l5iS
LAi
NORTH DAKOTA'S
The shot went Wild,
AWAIT RESULTS
OF ATTACK ON
INJUNCTION
A. F. L. Will Discuss Pro
posed Plan to Seek Im
peachiiient of Daugherty
tlahticClty, Sept. 8.—Iaau
iinst
atflirop
•JYadesjtnd Labor Council will be
brought before the executive council
of'the American' Federation of I^abotS
when it convenes .here tomorrtw, it
was announced today' by Mitthew
Woll, vice president of the federation
and a member of the executive coun
cil.
PURCHASE OF COAL
NECESSARY TO GET
SUPPLY FOR WEST
ii.
Northwest Fuel Director
Says Lakfe Michigan and
Canadian Ports Get Bulk
Of Coal Shipped From
Lake'Erfe.
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 8.—Duluth
and Superior docks are not receiving
their just proportions of the coal be
ing shipped from Lake Erie ports, C.
P. White, federal fuel distributor for
the northwest, declared today. Mr.
White charged that the twin ports are
receiving only approximately 20 per
cent of the lake^coal. whereas 75 per
cent is their just share of the ship
ment.
In-one report received from Cleve
land it was shown that out of 28 bot
toms carrying coal from Lake Erie
ports from September 2 to September
4, inclusive, only five were destined
for the head of the lakes. Both the
Lake Michigan ports and the Cana
dian ports received a larger shar^ of
thls~coal than did the northwest.
Reports reaching us within the
paat
few days indicate also a reluct
ance on the part of the larger buyers
in this territory in the matter of their
purchases of coal," Mr. White said.
"Coal reaching Lake Erie ports if
being diverted to .Canadian and Lake
Michigan territory and of the amount
loaded at the mines and 'received at
Lake Erie loading ports within the
last week, the tonnage actually floated
for the head of the lakes, for distri
bution within the northwest territory,
is a way short of the contemplated al
lotment. 1 believe that continued pro
crastination on the part of the buy
ers here is moat likely to accentuate
this condition."
little' Buying.
The coal authorities are agreed
that there exists a virtual buyers'
strike, which is preventing, the dock
operators from going into the market
and competing against Canadian and
Lake Michigan ports for the coal. As
long as this condition exists, it is said,
the proportion of lake coal reaching
l*k« Superior ports will be very
•fvaoto reaaon gi^sn by the dock oper
ators' for falling to -compete for the
ooifls that after contracting *pr large
qUWltttlea, at high -^tiefcs, ptopOfced
lagiiUtloh might prevent 'the sale of
the coal and cause -them to
large losses -jy
Buffer
St. Paul, SOpt. 8.—Complaints t&at
towns Just across the Minnesota
boundary in Canada are .receiving
supplies of hard coal from Duluth and
offering the fuel at extremely high
prices to nearby to^ns in Minnesota
are to be investigated today by the
Northwest Governors' Coal .commit
tee.
Governor Preus last night Informed
Senator Frank B. Kellogg of these
complaints and in his message sug
gested the importance of requiring
that all eoal destined for Lake Su
perior ports must not be diverted.
"Reports indicated that the coal
.loadings at the Lake Erie ports
destined for Lake Superior docks are
being diverted to other lake ports,"
Governor Preus telegraphed Senator
Kellogg. "I understand that you
have proposed an amendment to the
fuel control bill placing lake trans
portation within the regulatory
channels of the bill. I feel it impor-
(Continued on Page 2)
THE WORST IS YET TO COME
/n
r~
GRAND FORKS, N. D.. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8,
K-
RECEIVING JUST SUPPLY OF COAL LEWIS
a CERTAIN Of RAUFKAHONOF PEACEPACT
.v
Fact Finding
BiUPassed
Washington, Sept. 8 —Comple
tion of congressional action on
the emergency, coal legislation
program nearea today as the sen
ate passed the fact finding coal
commission bill. It acted on the
anti-profiteering and ooal distri
buting measure late yesterday.
Both Mils were sent to conference
for adjustment of differences
similar measures passed by the
house. .. .•
Washington, Sept. 8.—Ihe sen
ate decided today to retain pro
visions in the fact finding coal
commission bill, .providing for a
proposed agencyto make, a study
of the "advisability orvrtsdomf' of
nationalization of the dial indus
try. The provisions had provok
ed heated debate bnt ail amend
ment by Senator Dial, Sonth Car
olina, which would have struck
them oat was lost 30 to 19.
An attempt by Senator Harri
son, Democrat, Mississippi, to
eliminate the provision* Instruct
ing the commission to study the
necessity of. government control
of the industry also was defeat
ed. No record vote was had on
that amendment.
BETTER POTATO
PRICK SOUGHT
Spud Growers of North Da
kota and Other States Ask
ed to Meet in Chicago.
Los Angeles, Sept. 8.—Potato grow
ers of the country are invited to meet
at Chicago. Sept. 15 to adopt "some
measures to overcome the present
demoralized markets conditions," ac
cording to Thomas O'Neill, president
of the California Vegetable* Union.
The union has sent Invitations to
similar associations in Maine, New
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania,
Maryland, Virginia. Wisconsin, Wash
ington, West Virginia, North Caro
lina, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michi
gan, Minnesota, .Oregon",' IpV*. Mis
souri, North Dakota, */So*ithf Dakota,
Nebraska Kansas -Kentucky, Ala
bama, .Montana) Wyomirtg, Colorado,
Utah, Idaho and ""California.
."Demoralized potato '^market con
ditions are general throughout the
country," said Mr. O'Neill, "and are
causing enormous losses to growers
as the price obtained is far below
cost of production and, in many in
stances, even below cost of harvest
ing."
Decrease of shipments of 50 per
cent in the next' week was suggested
as a temporary sblution.
FEDERAL JUDGE BILL FINISHED.
Washington, Sept. 8.—The long de
layed administration bill providing
25 additional federal judges, finally
was completed today by the senate
and upon action by the house, plan
ned next week, the measure will go
to ,tPresident Harding.
WILSON RESIGNS.
Fargo, N. D.. Sept. 8.—E. A. WH
soh, county agent for Cass county,
has presented his resignation effective
at once and has accepted the appoint
ment as state supervisor of extension
methods with the North Dakota ex
tension division. He "will succeed
George P. Wtlf. resigned.
o.
LEW1S PREDICTS
ACCEPTANCE OF
PEACE PROPOSAL
Declares Despite Opposition,
Plan Will Be Ratified
Difficulty in Maintaining
Order at Meet Expected.
Wilkesbarre, Sept. 8.—-So vigorous
was the opposition that developed
among the delegates from certain lo
cal unions that Phillip J. Murray, In
ternational vice president of the Union
Mine Workers and floor leader for the
ratification forces today, at the sec
ond day's session of the tri-dlstrict
convention called to ratify the Pep
per-Reed proposal to end the anthra
cite coal suspension," was expected to
have some difficulty on maintaining
order.
John L. Lewis, president of the
Mine Workers, and Mr. Murray both
declared today tha.t the proposition
will be accepted, adding that they
held a sufficient majority of the. 400
votes to insure ratification. An official
survey they declared showed the dele
gates instructed to oppose the peace
pact numbered between 12 and 15 lo
cals, a minority too small to accom
plish anything besides obstruction.
Washington, Sept. 8.—With only
seven negative votes recorded,, the
senate Thursday passed the first of
the emergency coal bills, the house
measure designed to check profiteer
ing and control the distribution of
coal. The vote was 40 to 7 and the
measure as amended was sent to con
ference for adjustment of differences
with the house.
Passage of the profiteering bill, was
followed immediately by consideration
of the fact-finding commission but
final action on it was deferred by a
sudden and at times heated debate
qver provisions which would direct
the cqinmission to study the question
of nationalization of the mines along
with other phases of the industry.
The commission bill- was amended
to direct the agency to make a sep
arate and distinct investigation of the
anthracite ,industry and to inquire into
any "organized relationships" between
miners and operators if they exist.
The change was a direct result* of the
recent settlement of the anthracite tie
up, and Senator Borah, Republican,
Idaho*, sponsor of the~B!tt'~irttf5i sen
ate, had previously withdrawn it from
consideration in order to await de
velopments of the apthra^cite peace
negotiations.
Set lmtee For Reports.
The commission is ordered to make
its report on the anthracite inquiry
riot later than July ,1 next year, which
would be one month in advance of the
expiration of the wage contract for
that industry. A report on the bi
tuminous study is due, undec,the bill,
in five.months from date or passage.
An effort bv Senator Shields, Demo
crat, Tennessee, to amend the bill so
(Continued on Page 2)'
BADLY BURNED.
Fargo, N. D., Sept. 8.—C. C. Reyn
olds, a conductor for the Great North
ern railroad, whose home is at
Minot, N. D„ is in a hospital here
suffering from burns received at
Hannaford, N. D., when a tank car
containing gasoline caught fire from
a lantern and he was sprayed with
the burning fluid.
The burns extend from his neck
downward, covering almost his entire
body. Hospital attendants believe his
injuries will prove fatal.
j\»
S'. f'
By MORRIS
,-li?
rr-
V..
TO GREEK ARMY
REBELLION IN
SOUTH RUSSIA
HEAVY FIGHTING
.Odessa Soviets Declare
South Russia and Crimea
Independent.
taadon, Sept. 8.—Rebellion has
broken out in South Russia, ac
cording to a Helsingfors dispatch
to the Central News via Copen
hagen. The Odessa Soviets have
declared South Russia and Cri
mea independent. There is fight
ing in many districts between the
rebels and the* Soviets the dis
patch states. The crews of war
ships stationed at Sebastapol a)so
were reported to be in a state of
mutiny.
MRS. HARDING
ISSER10US
Complications Develop a
Slight Improvement
Noted Today.
Washington, Sept. 8.—Serious
complications developed in the
°J Mrs. Harding, wife of
President Harding, last night but
they were "slightly abated this
morning and tho patient is rest
ing more easily," Brigadier Gen
eral Sawyer, the physician in at
tendance, said today in a state
ment issued at the White House.
Mrs. Harding's condition still
to regarded with much concern.
tt»e statement said, adding that
Cart W- Sawyer of Marion,
Ohio, who was associated with
his father, attended Mrs. Hard
ing during a previous illness of
similar nature, had arrived here
for consultation.
Fears No Entombe
Miners Aihe Living
Jackson, Ca,lif., Sept. 8.—(By The
Associated Press.)—Diminished hope
accompanied today the renewal of ef
forts to rescue the 46 miners entomb
ed deep in the Argonaut gold mine
here eleven days ago. The feeling that
few if any of the men would be found
alive apparently was growing.
In the first official statement since
the disaster E. A. Stent, vice president
of the Argonaut Mining company, last
night expressed the belief all of the
men had perished.
"I sadly fear that all we can do Is
to bring out the forty-six bodies," he
told The Associated Press.
Mr. Stent based his hopeless out
look largely on the report of Dr. L. H:
Duschak of the Industrial Accident
commission that gas fumes observed
issuing from one of the shafts would
kill in two minutes. He explained,
however, that company officials were
"ignoring all beliefs" and rushing the
work of rescue on the theory the men
were alive.
4
vLg^°n' Sfpt-
Barley
Rye
Buckwheat
White potatoes
Hay, tame, tons
Hay, wild, tons
Beans (7 states.)
(x) Preliminary estimate.
Spring wheat
Corti
Oats
Barley
Buckwheat ...
White potatoes
Flax
Rice
Sugar beets ..
Kafirs
13
E^YENIN#
EDITION
818,000,000 Bushels
Of Wheat Forecast
By The Government
September Forecast For Corn Is Below August Figure
FORECAST.
NUMBER 215.
DISCUSS PEACE
PROPOSAL TODAY
Willard Ready For Separate
Peace if* Satisfactory,
Basis is Found.
Shop Crafts to Hold Gxecu^
tive Meet Today Commit
tee Meets Saturday.'
The conference at rail
tives here broke np shortly be
fore S o'clock with no annooAoe
ment of what had been itlnrwiwnil
®*JwheUiar aa'ythlng had been
accomplished.
A«*ori,ln*
Ramors Persistent.
(By The Associated Press.)
Chicago, Sept. 8.—Persistent nunom
of an impending peace or partial set
tlement of the railroad strike con
tin
ued here today wrhout any tangibla
foundation in the way of definite
statements by rail heads or union of
ficials to substantiate the reports.
In fact, most of the railroad exec
utives who commented on the rumors
denied knowledge of new proposals to
end the strike and union leaders de
clined to lift the cloak of secrecy
which appeared to surrotmd the re
ported peace move.
Expressions of hope for separate
agreements with individual roads were
the most positive statements any
union leaders had made at the time]
approached for Monday's meeting of
the shop crafts' policy committee.
Expect to See Jewed.
This month's forecasts of production, with the forecasts made a month,
ago, the final production of last year and the average production for the fire
years, 1916-20, (expressed in millions of bushetls, i. e., 000's omitted) follows:
Crop— Forecast.
Winter wheat (x) 542
Spring wheat 277
All wheat 818
Corn 2,875
Oats
I
12,1
-a.
The whereabouts of B. ML Jewell,.
(Continued on Page 12.)
Spring Wheat Outlook Improved Winter Wheat
Unchanged Condition Of All Important Crops Is
Given.
8-—Reduction
2 ^orn
818,000,000 BUSHELS
September August 1921 1916-20'
Forecast.
542
263
805
8,017
1,251
192
79.6
13.8
440
93.1
17.2
12.8
1,255
hi
Willard was seen leaving
the conference and would not
answer questions except to say
I have nothing to say." Other
executives were equally evasive.
Chicago, Sept. 8.—The
nw "?1
Pi«
of
the Baltimore
and Ohio i^Ulway is said to have
proposed for individual agree
settlement of the shop,
mens strike, so far as outlined.
"J®1 "S* mention seniority right*,
the Chicago Dally News said to-
to this published
„the seniority question
would be compromised although
taU^Mmlority would not bTS-
Washington, Sept. 8 Admin
istrative officials' who have lent
ckwe touch with the Induati lal sit
uation declared today that set
tlenient of the shopmen's strike
on
n»"?Jer
of. railroads waa
•probable" as a result of con
ferences in Chicago.
(By The Associated Pness.)
Chicago, Sept. 8.—Daniel Willardr
president of the Baltimore and Ohio*
railroad, meta few western raU exec-l
utives in conference in the Chicago'
club this afternoon, presumably to(
discuss the proposals for a basis of!
setttement of the shopmen's strike oni
certain roads by individual agree-l
ments. No announcement was made!
thata conference had been arranged
or what was expected to be accomJ
pllshea.
So
far as learned, only a few ofL
the western roads had planned to
send representatives. H. E. Byram,
president of thfe Chicago, Milwaukee
and St. Paul, was known to be at the
meeting. Both he and Mr. Willard
earlier ,had refused to discuss the con
a it a
Mr. ~Byr3WTsaid his company
stm would discuss separate agreement
if ,a satisfactory settlement basis could
be found.
Crop.
587
208
795
8,080
1.061
1S1
67.9
14.1
847
81.6*
15.2
9.1
194
79.6
13.5
438
92.9
15.8
12.5
....... (x)
(X)
Condition of Crops.
The condition of the crops on September 1, with comparative figures
for September 1 last year and the September 1 ten-year-average condition,
together with the condition on August 1 this year follow:
Crop— Sept. 1, 1922. Stept. 1, *21. 8ept.l-10-yr.-av. Aug. 1, *22
80.1
78.6
74.9
81.2
86.7
79.9
82.7
86.5
88.6
(5.5' 84.6
62.5
85.1
61.1
68.4
85.6
63.7
62.8
82.8
'm
•V
1
of 142.000,000 bushels during the lastj
crop was Bhown
at 2,8.5,000,000 bushels by the department of agriculture. The crop waa
leportea to nave deteriorated considerable in the centra] and eastern»Mates
since mid-August and to have had a severe set-back in Missouri, Kansas and
Nebraska from excessive heat and lack of moisture.
today In the forecast
Average.
666
233
799
2.831
1,413
197
67.8
14.4
373
*5.1
17,1
13.3
70.6
76.E
80.1
79.1
86.2
-76.8
70.6
84.6
89.3
7 (.5
ft
84.6
State mwn
The -fcondition on September 1 anil the foreeaat -of production
for important producing states, folio W.
(Production forecast In thonaanda of buahela.)i.™*.
Com—Illinois, 82 and 826,421 Minneaota, 7« and 1IU»:Urtra, *4 waft
(82,009 South Dakota, 79 and 111.217 Kebraaka. and 17i,0f4.
Spring wheat—Minneeota, 80 and 8M29 North Daket#, 87 and 112,944
South Dakota, 86 and 87,166 Vontajia, t9 and WaahlngtM. ^4* Md
Oata—Illinois, «4 and 112,789", WliiAmaHi, a»4 l«^72ft IflaTnal^^
89 and 142,»62 Iowa, 27 and U2*,m.
75.#
82.0 1
89.7
84.71 S
8«^ i-'Ur''
86.9
t».«

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