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Grand Forks herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1916-1955, September 20, 1922, Image 6

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042414/1922-09-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE COMMISSION
To Consider Election On
Street Railway Paving
Relief Question.
The question of passing or' submit
ting to the voters an ordinance .sub
mitted some time ago with petitions,
I
elieving the Grand Forks Street Rail
way company from all paving costs
for a period of ten years from Janu
ary 1, 1921. came before the city com
mission today, when City Auditor
Charles Evanson certified the peti
tions to the commissioners. The
question was referred to the commit
tee of the whole, which will meet be
fore the next commission meeting to
determine upon a course of action.
Indications, are that the ordinance
will be submitted to the voters. In
that event election Judges apd clerks
probably will be asked to serve ..with
out pay to do away with the greater
part of the election expenses.
The commission also decidcd to ad
vertise for bids for supplying lignite
coal for use in all city plants.
The contract for the construction
of watermain on Strong avenue was
awarded to J. M. Carroll. The work
will cost approximately $6,000.
Secretary Of Health
Association In City
Miss Carrie Haugen, secretary of
the North Dnkota State Tuberculosis
association, stopped off in Grand
Forks this morning on her way to the
state tubercular hospital at Uunseith
with ft patient.
Miss Haugen, who makes her head
quarters at Bismarck, has charge of
all the office work, literature, nurses'
work and modern health crusade of
the state association.
Comparatively recently the crusade
work was made compulsory as a part
of the regular curriculum in all the
public schools of the state. i'nder Miss
Haugen's supervision health princi
ples are taught in the schools by ac
tual practice of methods advocated
rather than in theory.
LOCAL BAPTISTS ON
STATE COMMITTEE
of the church in this state.
Mr. Spaulding and Mr. and Mrs. R.
B. Griffith returned from Fargo last
evening by automobile.
M'INTYRE AND
VOWLES ADDRESS
KIWANIANS TODAY
Wbolemle and Retail
Attorney W. A. Mclntyre and Guy ported to be at work the early part
Vowles, recently elected secretary to of this week. The number was based
President Thomas F. Kane of the unl-lon reports received by Samuel Felton,
versity, were the speakers at the Ki- president of the Chicago Great West
wanis club meeting today. Mr. Mc- ern and chairman of the Western
Intyre spoke, on Y. M. C. A. week,
and Mr. Vowles addrdssed new mem
bers o, nthe purposes and ideals of KI
wanis.
The St. Paul Klwans club presented
the local club with a Kiwanis shield.
With the shield came a letter ex
pressing the gratitude of the St. Paul
club for the entertainment received
during the recent district convention.
The attendance prizes, awarded by
Randy McDonald, were won by A. G.
ftorlie and Bob Benner.
SQUIRES TELLS
LIONS OF TRIP
Returned Home
Night Appeal Made For
H. S. Football
Dean Vernon P. Squires of the state
.university, who arrived in Grand
Forks Tuesday night after a trip of .,
several months in Europe, spoke in- V,,
formally at the Lions' club luncheon R1®,t,e,lPre8®1"~7.IV,e
today on his European experiences. *re
He discussed what he saw in Eng- 1.5
land. France and Germany, laying es- I
ROOMS AT Y. M. C. A.
Grand Forks citizens who hive
rooms available for use by students
,at the University of North" Dakot'a
during the coming school year are
urgently requested to list them at
the local Y. M. C. A., announced Ar
thur Tweet, business «&nd boys' sec
retary, today-
Students, who are arriving in the
city daily for the .opening of the uni
versity Friday, almost invariably seek
lodging'at the Y. M. C. A. first, stated
the secretary. The association build- bridge probably will be about *127
ing is filled to capacity at present, 000.
making it Impossible to abcommodate
any of. the newcomers.
A list of rooms In 'the city which I
tn
.tnHontc. would be a
are open to the students would De a considerably alarmed at the
very material aid in assisting them to
get located, declared trie secretary,
and it is for this reason that the re
quest is being made.
Physical Committee
Meets Friday Night
The meeting of the physical com
mittee of the local Y. M. C. A. will be
Friday evening at 7 o'clock at the
association building, announced Ray
W. Edwards, physical director, today.
The meeting, which was originally
scheduled for Thursday, evening, was
postponed a day owing to the expect
ed absence of several members of
the committee on the Commercial
club booster trip.
SHOPlORCES
TO INCREASE
Indications Are That All R.
R. Shops Will Have Nor
rrtal Force Soon.
Chicago, Sept. 20\—Shop forces of
the nation's railways will gradually
increase to their normal size, accord
ing to indications today.
While ome lines are restoring job*
to erstwhile strikers under,.terms of
the Baltimore peace plan for ending
the shopmen's strike, other roads,
holding aioof from the arrangement
with strike leaders, continued to re
cruit shop workers independent of
all negotiations with the six shop
craft unions which went on strike
July 1.
Twenty thousand strikers are due
to return to the New York Central
M. W. Spaulding ana Mrs. J. N. Nel
son of Grand Forks and Rev. R. W.
Hobbs and Miss Ruth Plnwell of Far
go compose a committee Appointed at! shops under the terms of the Balti,
the'concluding session Tuesday of the more agreement as a result of yes
North Dakota Promotion conference terday settlement between A. H
of the Baptist church to co-operate Smith, president of the system, and
with the district association and local I ®erj- Jewell, head of the shop
pastorates in carrying out the work
era,?S-
erall'
According to the most Sen-
accepted estimates about 50,-
000 erstwhile strikers had returned
to work on other roads which entered
the Baltimore truce.
Forces Near Normal.
Roads remaining out, of the Balti
more agreement reported shop forces
at work ranging.from 75 to 100 per
cent of normal.'
On western roads alone, 122,415
shopmen, or 77.5 per cent of the
forces employed last June, were re-
Executives committee on public rela
tions, who mad.e, the announqement.
On the heels Ojf tVie New York Cen
tral settlement came news of the first
collective agreement, with striking
shopmen in the southwest,. The
agreement was signed by the San,
Antonio and Arkansas Pass railroad
and provides for the restoration of
jobs to 450 shopmen who walked out
July 1.
To Meet October 2.
Officials of roads west! of the Mis
sissippi river, are due to meet here
October 2 for conferences with W.
W. T^ee, president of the BrotherlTood
of Railway Trainmen, and L. E.
Sheppard. head of the Order of Rail
way Conductors, to negotiate for new
agreements, according to an an
nouncement by Mr. Lee.
These brotherhoods, within the last
few days signed agreements with the
'New York Central lines, the Pennsyl-
1 UcSUay vania system and the Lehigh Valley
railroad.
BOLIVIA AND CHILE
RELATIONS ARE
NOT AS DESIRED
Tkh
pecial emphasis on the poor economic 1 arbitration of the League or Na
conditions in Germany due to the de-u! -c^n ?ecure'3- This declara
cline of the vaJue of German money ^Lon
W. G. Bland, secretary of the Y.
C. A., appeared before the club to
explain the work being done by the
T. M. C. A. and to ask the support of
the club in connection with the mem
bership and financial drive now being
carried on.
W. W. Blain of the Grand Forks
Commercial club, Paul Pritchard.
coach of the Grand Forks h^gh school
football team, and two of the team
members urged the support, of the
club.-for the high school team during
the present football season.
18
THE LEASING GROCERS.
m'mk
for..
Asso"
re,ations
suoh
1
rtlade
that
®rulti{es ,t,hre?
ten'
,?" °f
UMleSS
A
'rIe1ndly
pow,er
"1 fu
from Alfredo Gutierrez,
delegate to the assembly.
"r
le"er recelvflJ
,_by
Bolivian
Borings Being Made
Preparatory For New
Bridge At Pembina
Bismarck, N. D., Sept. 20.—Borings
are being made in the Red river at
Pembina preparatory to the building
of a state-aid bridge ^.cross the Red
1X1-114
'PEACH DAY'
W
10 baskets of fancy rosy cheeked Elberta
Sooth Third
at
A
raw Faper. a^tOO sheet, tn.
.Uaaae, S n41s for. MB
Mlct Aiper,
titer
1
Q4|,
Grape. rolls tot/..
9CQ
!b.
f,
ji
been assigned to head the crew to de
termine the necessary depth of piers
in "the[ river. It is probable, the engi
neer said, that the piers
imim4i?i
ot
the ,brldg6
may be built during the coming win
ter when the river is frozen over.
The legislature, at the time It made
an appropratlon to aid In the. con
struction -of the felsmarck-Mandan
Missouri river .bridge, appropriated
Jatt
$35,000 to be used in constructing the
Peir.blna bridge It Is expected tnat
the bridge will be financed /.rough
this grant, through state-ah) to Kitt
son county, Minnesota, federal aid and
possibly appropriations by Pembina
and Kittson counties. The cost of the
MOISTURE: PROVES MASSIVE.
T0k'0-~«*apanese
match producers
re.-
port that moisture-proof matches in
vented by a French engineer have
been introduced in the French-Indian
market. The Japanese safety matches
which enjoy the practical monopoly
of the markets in the South Sea
Islands and in some parts of India are
subject to spontaneous combustion in
places which^hre subject to continu
ous rainy weather. Representatives
of the match producers in this coun
try will meet in Osaka to consider
means of improving their products in
the hope of favorably competing with
the newly invented matches.
Silk
Stockings
That Wear
If
.)
morrow's Day Bed Sale.,
www a mv o»»i
NESTOS ANNOUNCED
Governor R. A. Nestos will ..open
his campaign for re-election with an.
address at Wilton, McLean county, on
We'dnesday, Sept. 27. •_
He will put in the balance of the
week In McLean, Sheridan, and
Wells counties. His Itinerary for the
week is' as follows:'
Wednesday'., Sept.. 27—Wilton,,-Mc
Lean county,'8 p. m..
Thursday. Sept. 28—Underwood.
McLean county, 8 p. m. Tuftle Lake,
McLean county, 8 p. m.
Friday, Sept. 29—Goodrich, Sheri
dan county 3 p. m. Bowdon, Wells
county, 8 p. m.
Saturday, Sept. 30—Points In Wells
county.
O'Connor's Program.
J. F. T. O'Connor, candidate for
United States senator, begins his in*
tensive campaign next Monday with
an Itinerary that calls for three ad
dresses each day for his flast week
out. He opens at Milnor in Sargent
county, next Mojiday.
His itinerary for next week fol
lows:
Monday—Milnor, 11 a. m. Oa^es,
3 p. m. EUendale. 8 p. m.
Tuesday—Mortango, 11- a, m. Edge
ley, 3 p. m. LaMoure. 8 p. m.
Wednesday—Litchville. 2 p. m.
Ft. Ransom, 4 p. m. Lisbon, ,8 p. m.
ENNER & BEG
The
choice of about 200 ladies' all wool sweater?, in Tuxedo styles owly, at a
price that is less than halt the original retail price.
On Sale
Thursday Morning
At 9 A.M.
The Price is: Each
SEE WINDOW DISPLAY
Watch Thursday's paper for, announcement of Art Goods Sale for Friday
andCSilurdatf.
1
Store Accommodating
A fortunate purchase by our New York buyer enables us to
?•/.
BENNER & BEGG
&
means an "extra bedroom"in emergencies
Picture the convenience of mn "extftii"
bedroom"'in your home in time of need, nifeht, there is a piece in your I)pa4 fot
and you'll 'realize the importance of to- V-ik one of then Day Beda which no (RHjiti}''
mmmm
T^e need of additionalli#^pl»m- \1 o*r fcgti Bay:Bedtv^
modatiofts, when ncknew visit* the home,
or when unexpectedgu'«it«arrive, is not
the only advantage .ffcicn Sifnmons Day
SatUrady^-rSutton, p.. A». Grace
pity, 4 pi Carrlngtori. 8
ARREST SOON IN
DOUBLE MURDER,
•lM ,t$E:is ExjEcna
ft.,
Prosecuting officers of Somerset
and Middlesex counties,,, who beg in
a formal .Inquiry Into the double kill
ing, were expected also to cause the
arreBt of one person on a short.war
rant charging suspicion of murder.
No intimation was given as to the
identity of the person to be arrested.
Authorities were reticent to dls&iss
their theories' a"bout tne house, known
for some time a's the "house of mys
tery," and which has been fouffd to
be completely furnished, although
no tenant has occupied it for some
tlm*. It was known that its present
we Pay Post
age On All
Mail Orders
9
offer
vou your
for lotne
As a di^an by day or a full-tize be4 By
article eui^ver fill ao completely
—risit oar $jeqal
display and/Qake selections during this sale.
iipt picture4 above, in/man^.
St W
1
pi/to?,..
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iP.-
New Brunswick, N. J., Sept. 40.-^-'
The inquiry Into the killing last, week
of the ttev. Edward Wheeler, Hal»v
rector of the Church of St. John the
Evangelist, and his choir leader,'Mrs.
Eleanor Reinhardt Mills, wife of the
church sexton, was centered today, in
Investigating a theory that an aban
doned farm house near the spot where,
the bodies we're found Saturday night
have been used "by the Slalh couple
as a tyrsting place.
A-im'
4
od finishes. The price in-*'
rKS
9
ifoH
if E -J sc ,1
•m.
1. VI 'r-
u'"
-7'-
Authbrtttjia have felt all llong that, scrutiny to every clue Ibbklijg tb eo
Mr. JSall ajil, Mfi. Mils, were
'V.--
:'0'" thvrs., sept,
MUSIC BY
EMARD'S
Making
The
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lis'. vv^i®$
EVENING EDITION.
spot UQder an apple trot
|e* wapa fmtnri.' TTnablo
bodies, were found.
A medium-sized kiln's output is
25 barrels a^t hour, and in that
time3,500 pounds of coal must be
blown into it.
You may have seen the great smoke
'•tacks in rows over a cement plant.
There is a stack for every kiln,ana foux
kilns make a medium-sized^ plant, with
3JOOO barrels cai$icity a
1
Unabl
°determine,-the. scene of
they' ,ha*« -.given clpse
not ludon of that phase of the mystery.
v.i.
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FAIR PAVILION
EnUr,#
Pleoe Qrohsatra
STREET CARSV 10c PLAN
fit,'-
i|siy

I
climax in the huge imper
sonal drama of cement making is
the burning pf the taw materials
in great rotary kilns.
A good-sized kiln,set on end, would
be taller than a 20-story building.
A touring car could run through it
The kilns are steel cylinders lined,
with fire brick.They rest at a slight
angle from the horizontal on
heavy rollers, and are driven by
steel gears at half a revolution a
minute. A medium-sized kiln
weighs 275*000 pounds, empty,
and has foundations as heavy asfor
a 10-story building.
Into the upper end of the revolv
ing kilns flow the finely ground ma
terials for cement-Therethey meet
a blast of burning pulverized coal,
blown in at high pressure from an
8-inch jet at the opposite end.
Where the materials enter the
kiln, the temperature is 1,000 de
grees Fahrenheit or more. As they
tumble over and over on their
3-hour journey through the lain
in the face of the flame, they rise
graduallytoatemperature of 2,500
to 3,000degrees—more heat than
is required for almost any other
industrial process.
The workman, watching through
his peephole in the end of the kiln,
must wear smoked glasses. It is
like looking at the sun.
And if you speak to him, you must
shout close to his ear to be heard
above the roar of the flames.
In a big cement plant, there will
be a dozen or more of these kilns,'
(roaring and revolving side by side
in one great room.
or there-
abouta. When you see Iwte of these
•tacks together, you can know that
enough coat or equivalent fuel is being
burned in the kilns beneath to supply
the electricity for the homes, streets,
shops and industries of three ordinary
dties rf
In a certain town of 12£00 inhabitanu ',
4ikiln plant where the heat
bedrnw ol die 'H
(bdpw,wcnild,
,^
if it coilld be captured,'
j*u^ythreltimestheelectricli^tand
.power used by fll the ie«t of the town.
Every ton ofWnt ycwlniy^^f
|«quivalmt ^mthatflMlf atbp^4
|cto^ in Jieat and power to xnake it—
inoro thah 200 ppunda,tluit it, to
:/v.l
wis!
im

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