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The Dalles daily chronicle. (The Dalles, Or.) 1890-1948, March 03, 1891, Image 1

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THE DALLES, OREGON, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 1891.
NO. 68.
VOL. I.
Clt
the Dalles Daily Chronicle.
Published Daily, Sunday Excepted.
THE CHRONICLE PUBLISHING CO.
Corner Second and Washington Streets,
Dalle, Oregon.
The
Terms of Subscription.
Per Year
Per month, by carrier. .
ingle copy
. 00
TIME TABLES.
Uail roads.
BAST BOCKB.
No. 2, Arrives U.I. Departs 1:10 A. M.
WEST BOUND. "
No. 1, Arrives 4:50 A. M. Departs 5:05 A. M.
STAGES.
For Prineville, via. Bake Oven, leave daily
(except Sunday) at ft a. m.
For Antelope.
Mitchell. Canyon City, leave
Mondays, Wednesdays
hjImvh And Pridavs. at b A. M.
Kor Dufur. Kiiureley and Tygh Valley, leave
daily (except Sunday) at 6 A. M.
For Goldendale, Wash., leave every day ol the
week except Sunday at A. M. -Offices
for all lines at the Umatilla House.
THE CHURCHES.
IMRST BAPTIST CHURCH Rev. O. D. -Tay-'
lob, Pastor. Services every Sabbath at 11
A M. and 7 r. M. Sabbath School at 12 X.
Prayer meeting every Thursday evening 1
clock.
.-.rMOfiniPfiATinx AI. :HTiRCH Rev. W. C.
I 1'nvnn. Viwtnr. Horvices everv Sunday at 11
a. M. and 7 p. h. Bunday School after morning I
Mrvine. Stranitera cordially invited, beats tree.
m r v.. CH U RCH Rev. H. Brown, Pastor.
1 ' Services every Sunday morning and even
ing. Bunday ecnool at rift o cioca m.
nlt tjU o'clock M. A cordial
Invitation is extended by both pastor and people
to all.
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH Union Street, opposite
Fifth. Rev. Eli D. SutcliB'e Rector. Services
very Sunday at 11 a. m. and 7,30 P. m. Sunday
School 12:ao r. u. Evening Prayer on Friday at
7:30
ST. PETER'8 CHURCH Rev. Father Bbokr
6EE8T Pastor. Low Mass every Sunday at
7 a. u. High Mass at 10:30 a. M. Vespers at
7 P. M.
SOCIETIES.
A
BSEMBLY NO. 2H70, K. OF L. Meets iu K. I
of P. hall Tuesdays at v :au r. m.
W
AB.ro Tnnr.K. NO. 15. A. F. & A. M. Meets
first and third Monaay oi eacu uiouvu at
P. M
COLUMBIA LODGE, NO. 5, T. O. O. F. Meets
every Friday evening at 7:30 o'clock, in Odd
Fellows hall, Second street, between Federal and
Washington. Sojourning brothers are welcome.
H. A. Bills, Seo'y R. G. Clobteb, N. G. ,
FRIENDSHIP LODGE, NO. 9., K. of P. Meets
every Monday evening at 7:30 o'clock, in
ehanno's building, corner of Court and Second
street. Sojourning memDers are coraiaiiy in
vited. Geo. T. thohpsom,
D. W. Vaosb, Sec'y. 0. C.
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERENCE I
UNION will meet every Friday afternoon
at 8 o clock at the reading room. Aiiare invireu.
mRMPLE LODGE NO. 3. A. O. U. W. Meets
J. at K. of P. Hall, Corner Second and Court
Streets, Thursday evenings at :.iu.
Johh Fillook.
W. 8. Mtbhs. Financier. M. W.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
VV R O. I. DOANK PHYSICIAN AND 8UR-
IJ geon. Office; rooms 5 and 6 Chapman
Block.
Residence over McFarland & French's
Office hours 9 to 12 A. M., 2 to 5 and 7 to
tore.
P.M.
A. flee in Bchanuo's building, up stairs. The
. a UffBHVTT ITTftU VirV.I'l'.l .tW i IT '
" I
tM o. C. ESHELMAN Homoiopathic Phy-
Lf sician and Surgeon. Office Hours: 9
to 12 A. H' ; 1 to 4, and 7 to 8 V M. Calls answered
promptly duy or night' Office; upstairs In Cbap-
man J
L iioca
TTb 8IDDALL Dentist. Gas given for the
17. nainless extraction ot teem, aiso teem
set on flowed aluminum plate. Rooms: Sign of
the Golden Tooth, Second street.
AR. THOMPSON ATTORNBY-AT-LAW. Office 1
. in Opera House Block, Washington Street,
Tne Danes, Oregon
r. P. HAYS. B. B. HUNTINGTON. H. 8. WILSON.
rAVS. HUNTINGTON & WILSON ATTOB-
nbys-at-law. Offices. French's block over
first national Hank, The Danes, Oregon.
B.B.DCFUB. GEO. W ATKINS. FRANK MENEFEK.
DUFUR, W ATKINS & MENEFEE ATTOR-neys-at-law
RoottiB Nos. 71, 7S, 75 and 77,
Vogt Block, Second Street, The Dalles, Oregon.
WJ H. WILSON Attorney-at-law Rooms
V v . 52 and 53, New Vogt Block, Second Street,
me uaiies, uregon.
W. & T. mocoi
BARBERS
Hot and Cold
BKTH S.
11Q SECOND STREET.
YOU NEED BUT . ASK
The 8. B. Headache and Liver Cure taken
according to directions will keep your Blood,
Liver and Kidneys in good order.
The 8. B. Cough Cube for Colds, Coughs
and Croup, in connection with the Headache
cure, is as near perieci as anything known.
The 8. B. Alpha Pain Cube for internal and
external use, in fteuTalgla, Toothache.
Colic and Cholera Morbus, is unsurpassed. They
J mitwipn . ThfiV
are well liked wherever known. M ami f sutured I
at Dufur, Oregon. For sale by all druggists.
3 T?ilF S
A COMPLETE
JEN'S FINE SHOES
McFarland
CHAS. STUBLING,
-PROPRIETOR
41-
New Vogt Block,
OER7VaIN.
WHOLlESRliH and ETflllx IiIQUOR DHALEt.
Milwaukee Beer on Draught.
D. P. Thompson'
J. s. Schbnck, H. M. Bball,
Vice-President. Cashier.
President.
Hist national Bank.
THE DALLES, -
OREGON
A Genial Banking Business transacted
Deposits received, subject to Sight
Draft or Check.
Collections made and proceeds promptly
reimtteu uii uav ui wntn;uuu
Sight and Telegraphic Exchange sold on
Hew York, Kan rrancisco ana ron
land. DIRECTORS.
P. Thompson. Jno. 8. Schenck.
W. Sparks. Geo. A. Liebe.
H. M. Bball. ,
FSeHch & co.,
BANKERS.
TRANSACT A GENERALBANKING BUSINESS
Letters of Credit issued available in the
Eastern States, -Sieht
Exchange and Telegraphic
Transfers sold on New York, Chicago, St.
Louis, San Francisco, Portland Oregon,
Seattle Wash., and various points in Or
egon and Washington.
Collections made at all points on fav
orable terms.
PIHIER&BEJITOU,
Cor. Third and Union Streets.
We are in thelce Businness.
BULLETIN.
The V.mr market ia almost bare and we
are selline todav at 20 cents, or 3 dozen
for 50 cents.
Lemons 35 cents per dozen.
Walla Walla Flour 1.00 per sack.
We inst received one box of Sweet
Potatoes. Anyone wanting any to plant
can find some at our store.
Choice lot of California Eoll Butter
just received. J"
MAIER & BENTON.
$20 REWARD.
VTTTLL BE PAID FOR ANY INFORMATION
T leading to the conviction of parties cutting
i I I . t 1 1 V. . K,.
w ropes ut in uj "v "' "'"
w.ra, I "
Electric Light
H. GLENN.
Manager.
LINE OF
' t
I
& French.
OF THE-
Second Street.
BUNNELL BROS.,
190 Third Street.
PIPE v WORK.
Pipe Repairs
and Tin Repairs
A SPECIALTY.
Mains Tapped With Pressure On.
Opposite Thompson's Blacksmith Shop.
COLUMBIA
QaQdy :-: paetory,
VY. S. CRAM, Proprietor.
(Successor to Cram & Corson.)
Manufacturer of the finest French and
Home Made
O 1ST .ID. I
East of Portland.
IE S
-DEALER IN-
Tropical Fruits, Nuts, Cigars and Tobacco.
Can furnish any of these goods at Wholesala
or Retail .
OfFESH -f OYSTEHStv-
In Every Style.
104 Second Street, The Dalles, Or.
A. A. Brown,
Has opened a choice assortment of
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
Wood and Willow-Ware, Fruit Con
fectionery, etc. , which he offers at
Reasonable v Prices
A Share of the Public Patronage is
teepectfully Solicited.
fliekelseri's Block,
Cor. Third and Washington, The Dalles, Oregon.
FOR SALE.
12
HEAD OF CATTLE CONSISTING OF
Cows. Calves and YearUngs Apply to
Near S. H. Waterman's, Eight-Mile.
HE HUNTED A BUYER.
Hnnt Sells his Entire System to Chas.
B. Wright for $3,000,000 Will the
Northern Parallel the U. P?
Senator Dolph is Doing Good Work, for
the Cascades Right of Way The
Sherman Diamonds to be Sold.
HIM 8ELL8 Ol'T.
Charles B. Wright Bays the "Hunt Sys
tem" A 3,000,000 Transaction.
- Philadelphia -March-v3. -The-Pre
says Charles B. Wright has purchased
from George W. Hunt, of Walla Walla,
Wash., a number of railroads known ae
the "Hunt System", which penetrates
the great wheat fields of Eastern Wash
ington and Oregon. The first payment
on this transaction which involves $3,
000,000 was made today. Wright is a
heavy stock holder in - the Northern
Pacific RaHroad.
FKUM SENATOR DOLPH.
He Will do All He Can for the
Cascade
Right of Way.
Washington, D. C. March 2, 1891.
To the President of The Dalles Board of
Trade:
Havejiad reported from the commit
tee on commerce and passed through the
senate and sent to the house a concur
rent resolution granting state of Oregon
right of way at the Cascades and have
also reported it as amendment to an ap
propriation bill and if the resolution
does not pass the house, will try to pass
it as af'rider on the appropriation bill.
J. N. Dolph.
Congressional , Proceedings.
- Washington, March 3. The president
has signed the direct tax bill.
The Senate has adopted the conference
report on the diplomatic appropriation
bill including the provision for the
Hawaiian cable.
The senate today agreed to the amend
ment to the general deficiency bill reem
bursing California, Oregon and Nevada,
for moneys expended by them in sup
pression of the late rebellion. $225,000 is
given Oregon.
The senate has passed the general
deficiency bill and sent it back to the
house with senate amendments.
Ia Not "Jack. tne Ripper" Mra. O'Shea
Gets Her Fortune.
London, March 3. Firman Sadler,
arrested for the. murder of "Carroty
Nell," has been discharged as the police
could not collect sufficient evidence to
connect him with the crime.
The application of the brother of Mrs.
Wood to break her will, bequeathing her
large fortune to Mrs. O'Shea, was today
refused by the court.
Chief Bushy head Get a Kastralnlng
Order.
Guthrie, I. T., March 3. Ex -chief
Bushyhead, who has a lease upon stone
quarries in the Cherokee Strip, today
obtained a temporary restraining order
from Judge Green enjoining Lieutenant
Golden from moving Bushyhead and his
employes from the Strip, or destroying
his buildings, side-tracks, derricks and
machinery.
Water Higher than Brer Before Known
in Arizona.
San Francisco, March 3. A dispatch
from Clifton, Arizona, dated March 1st,
says that the Graum County Bulletin
states that the water.is higher than the
Aztec ruins, and sev.en feet higher than
the oldest Indian or Mexican remem
bers. It is impossible to ascertain the
damage done to property or life.
Good Sale of California Stock.
New York, March 3. At the opening
three davs sale of California trotting
stock today. Among the important sales
were Hindoo Wilks a black mare 6 years
old by Guy Wilks, 2:15J $5,900; Cog
nag, a black colt 3 years old by Guy
Wilks, and Lottie by Belmont for $3,200,
Sad Death of two Children.
. Chicago, March 3. Hans Peter Jacob-
son, aged twelve years, and his little siS'
ter aged five, were partly burned and
partly suffocated to death shortly after
midnight last night. The house caught
fire in the absence of their parents.
Two of Astoria's Bad Men Fined.
Portland, Or., March 3. Larry Sulli
van and Dick McCarran both of Astoria.
plead guilty in the United States court
today to a charge of boarding vessels
without permission of the captain. They
were fined one hundred dollars each
American Trotting Association In
Session.
Chicago. March 3. Men of the turf
from Maine to California are in attend
ance upon the second biennial congress
of the American Trotting Association
About seventy delegates are present,
San f ranciseo Afarket.
San Francisco, Cal. March 3. Wheat
buyer '91, 1.48.
CALIFORNIA'S DEAD SENATOR.
A Brief Biography of George Hearst of
That State.
Washington, D. C, March 3 Special
George Hearst -was born in Franklin
county, Mo., Sept. 3, 1820. His father
had gone to that state from North Caro
lina in 1818. The son received only such
a limited education ' as tne . common
schools afforded in that day. He worked
on his father's farm until 1850 when he
caught the gold fever and went to Cali
fornia. For several years he was a
miner and prospector and subsequently
by location and purchase became the
owner of valuable mining interests and a
large -employer, : having at one time as
many as two thousand men at work in
his mines and operating quartz ' mills
that crushed 1000 tons of ore per day,
The increase of his wealth was steady
and rapid and for some years past his in
come has been something like $1000 per
dav. He has been for a long time chief
partner in the extensive mining firm of
Hearst. Hacrgin, Lewis & Co. He owned
about forty thousand acres of land in
San Luis, Obispo county, California, a
ranch of 160,000 acres of grazing land in
Old Mexico, stocked with a very large
herd of cattle and a fine stable of
thoroughbred horses.
He was also interested in a large tract
of land near Vera Cruz and in railroad
building in Mexico. His fortune at the
time of his death was estimated at $20,
000,000. Mr. Hearst's political life began
in 1865 when he was elected to the Cali
fornia legislature and served one term
In 1883 he was a candidate before the
democratic state convention at San Jose,
California, for the nomination for gov
ernor but was defeated by General
George Stoneman. The latter was
elected governor and when, by the death
of United States senator John F. Miller,
in 1885, the power of appointing a sena
tor was given to him he appointed his
former opponent for the gubernational
nomination, Mr. Hearst. The latter
was re-elected in 1887 and his term
would have expired in 1893.
His death givei the republicans in
their turn, the same advantage which
the death of Senator Miller,- gave the
democrats. While in- the senate, Mr.
Hearst was a man of action rather than
of words. He took but little part in the
debates an he suffered from a weak voice
but when he did address the senate, his
speeches, though brief, were always
pointed. Benator Hearst leaves a wife
and but one child, William B. Hearst,
proprietor of the San Francisch Ex
aminer. Mr. Hearst was in person tall
and slender with blue eyes and long
irrav beard. He was a eood type of the
old California pioneer. He was warm
hearted, impulsive and generous, popu
lar with his associates in the senate, and
had many devoted friends.
The following tribute to his memory
is from the pen of a well known Cal
afornian: For thirty years or more
George Hearst has been one of the vital
men of the west, one of the individual
forces which have inspired and given
direction to that quick and vast develop
ment of its resources which is one of the
material miracles of the century.- But
it is not as the mining expert, the or
ganizer of gigantic enterprises . or the
possessor of a great fortune that he will
be nominated, It is not an obituary
commonplace but the simple truth to say
that his death has brought sorrow to
thousands of hearts. Change of fortune
made no change in the man. As a sen
ator of the United States he was the
same simple, unaffected, clear headed.
arm-hearted George Hearst who mined
on the Feather and Yuba in the fifties
and took his share of the rough free life
of the claims and cabins. To the thous
ands of comrades who knew him he re-
mained always as a comrade. Ostenta
tion was abhorrent to the man formed
on his rugged lines and it will never be
known how' many successful men owe
their beginnings to him or how many
broken lives were made easier to live be
cause of his hidden helping hand. To
hundreds upon hundreds of the associates
and even' the acquaintances of pioneer
times he was a good providence, because
he was a thorough Californian. Mr,
Hearst was held in affection by all Cal
ifornians whose experience reached back
to the days when railroads, and the
sharp completion of commercial life were
unknown on the coast. His years of hard
work and intimate mingling with men
of every social and intellectual grade
gave him a knowledge of human nature
and a sympathy with its defects and
weaknesses which kept him free from
that pride of purse and hardness of feel
ing that sometimes go with the riches .of
the self-made man, and while he had
singularly keen perception of character
and a shrewdness that baffled all pre-
tenders, his heart was tender, his charity
great and his capacity for forgiveness
inexhaustible. Neither in business
politics nor in private life would he
cherish enmities but when blows were
necessary he would give as well as take.
for he was a man of intense and strong
character, but the battle over he was for
shaking bands with a good humor that
had in it no mixture of guile. If he has
left enemies he has passed away hating
none without previous experience of
public life. Mr. Hearst the miner
and man of business went to the
senate and although in that body he
spoke seldom' he brought to his duties a
conscientiousness and on industry that
made him highly useful to his people,
in his committee work. The sturdy
good sense of the man, his knowledge of
affairs and particularly of the needs of
the Pacific coast more than compensated
his constituents for deficiencies as a pub
lic speaker. He earned the esteem of
the senate and the best men in it, be
came his friends as good men did every
where. His death is a serious public
loss not alone to California but to the
entire Pacific coast and peculiarly to the
mines whose special friend and a advo
cate he was. In the death of George
Hearst a strong man; an able man, a
good man, and a very humble man has
been taken away. He had a manly, a
gentle and a loving heart. There will
be moist eyes in thousands of western
homes, grand and humble, at the news
of his death, and the sorrow will not be
least in the cabins, dotting the canyons
and streams of the Sierras. -
THE SHERMAN DIAMONDS.
The Latest Story is That They are to be
Sold.
Pittsburg, March ' 3. The famous "
Khedive diamonds valued at $135,000,
which were presented to Miss Minnie
Sherman bv the chief ruler of Egypt in
honor of her illustrious father when she
married Lieutenant Thomas W. Fitch in
1875, are to be sold. . Although given
absolutely to Mrs. Fitch, the proceeds .
will be divided equally among the four
children.
Deleware
Loses 58,1C0
Securities.
Worth
of
Wilmington, Del., March 3. It ha
just leaked out that $589,150 in securi
ties owned by the state of Deleware,
have been lost and no one knows how or
when they disappeared. The securities
are not negotiable. The legislature has
appointed a committee to investigate
he unsettled condition .in which the
state's treasury has been left by ex
Treasurer Herbert and upon the pre
liminary report from that committee
it has decided the secretary of state shall
enter judgment upon Mr. Herbert's
official bonds.
Mormons Leaving- Utah.
Salt Lake. March 1. A regular exo
dus of Mormons from Utah to Mexico is
taking place. The Mormons have a tract
of land in Chihuahua, which they are
settling up. All over the territory they
are preparing to go south to "live their
region' The head of the church is
said to ue encouraging ciuigmuuu, ouu
putting up funds. It is estimated that
at least 2000 will leave this summer.
Vandals at Work.
Moscow. March 1. Great excitement
has been caused here bv the discovery
that four pictures by French artists
which have been on exhibition here,
have been cut from their frames and
carried off. The general belief is that
the outrage was committed by bermans,
as an act of revenge. Upon this theory
the police are making a careful search
of the houses ol all Germans tnrougnout
the Moscow government.
A Visit From Lady Churchill.
London. March 1. Lady Randolph
Churchill has signified her intention to
visit New York during 'the absence of
i Randolph Churchill m Africa.
Lord Randolph intends to be gone eight
months, and it is likely that Lady Ran
dolph will spend the gi-eatei1 part of that
time among her old friends in New York.
Conspicuous by His Absence.
London, March 1. Sir William Gor-
don-Cumming, whose peculiarities as a
nlaver of baccarat have rendered nis
presence offensive at most of his former
.... , a i tt : . l
resorts, win suoruy ean lor me uimcu
States, where he will make a long visit
to his brother, who owns a stock farm in
Dakota.
Couldn't Kill the Tramp.
Eugene, March 1. A tramp met with
a serious accident oy trying 10 augiii.
from a moving train near the depot yes
tprrlav pveniiic His scalp was laid
open for about six inches, making a hor-
noie Bpectacie. tit; wd tcwv u y
will probably recover.
Imnriumment for Life.
Chicago, March 3. George Hathwan,
who shot and killed Ex-Alderman Wm.
Whelan in a saloon brawl some weeks
ago, was today found guilty. The punish
ment fixed was imprisonment for life.
Travel to be Resumed.
San Dikgo, March 3. Agent Keller, of
the Santa Fe, reports that travel will be
resumed between here and Los Angeles,
Thursday, the first train leaving that
day. .
Chicago Wheat Market.
Chicago, 111., March. 3. Wheat,
steady; cash, 949478; May, 97
97M; July, 94.
Retailers generally find Februrry a
fchort month.

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