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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, November 22, 1888, Image 2

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COLD STORAGE.
A Tisit to the Hendrick
Establishment.
HOW ICE IS MANUFACTURED.
Green Grapes That Have Been a
Month Off the Vines.
Eastern Butter.
About the Ist of last July the Hendrick
Cold Storage Company commenced
operations in this city in a large estab
lishment on Seventh street and the
river. Understanding that everything
was now in full working order a Herald
man yesterday visited the place in ques
tion and on announcing his mission was
confided to the care of Mr. Keller, one of
the officials in charge. The investigation
was an interesting one. The scribe was
-first conducted to the large rooms which
are situated on both sides of wide paesages
constructed at right angles throughout
the building. As the door of the first
chamber was opened a chilly air wave
came out, and on stepping into the room
the feeling was similar to that experi
enced in frosty regions when leaving the
fireside for the cold world without. A
glance at a thermometer attached to one
of the posts showed that the mercury
stood at 35 degrees, this cold being in
duced by the circulation of icy brine
through six layers of pipes passing all
round the room. The department in winch
the scribe was standing was devoted to
the storage of meat, some of which had
been there two weeks, and yet looked
and smelt as fresh as the day when it left
the slaughter-house. The room was
illuminated by incandescent lights, and
everything about it looked clean and
seat.
The next apartment visited contained
butter; then came one filled with cheese;
a chamber filled with fruit, including
green grapes that had been picked a
month and tasted and looked as sweet as
if they were still on the vine;
and so on, until the scribe
had seen the twenty-one rooms
which the company has fitted up. The
storage rooms range fron 26x30 feet to
50x60 feet, and are rendered air tight by
packings of sawdust between the thick
frame walls. Mr. Keller said that the
concern is doing a big business, which
was increasing daily as the residents be
came acquainted with its workings.
Hams in brine are shipped in by the
thousand from the East, and are kept in
the cold-storage rooms until wanted,
when they are smoked and prepared and
Bent out in the same condition that they
would be in if they had just come
out of one of Phil Armour's packing-'
houses. A good many of the prominent
merchants of the city have taken advan
tage of the establishment and have
rented sections in which they keep their
perishable provisions until they are re
quired. By this means Los Angeles is
enabled to have a continual market sup
ply of fresh Eastern butter and other
provisions, and months after the last
grapes has disappeared from the vines,
the merchants can call on their cold stor
age stores and furnish tbe fruit at reason
able figures, for the charges of the Hen
drick establishment is not very high.
HOW ICE 18 MADE.
After all of the rooms, including a few
additional ones now in course of con
struction bad been visited, the reporter
was escorted to the machine rooms and
ice making works in the basement,
which are in charge of Mr. C. E. Rich
ards. A number of dials, known as tele
meters, first attracted attention and
■how the temperature in the rooms,
which is taken every three hours and is
kept between 35 and 45 degrees. As some
people do not know how artificial ice is
manufactured, a few words of explana
tion may prove interesting. A quantity
of aqua ammonia is put in a retort and
heated. A gas is thus driven off, and
this passes into a condenser, and from
there to a cooler, consisting of a large vat
containing coiled pipe, in which brine is
kept circulating by means of an engine.
Here it expands and this freezes the
brine, which passes into a large section
containing 2,000 cans filled with water
and this water is gradually frozen. The
process takes about four days, and at the
end of that time each can contains 170
pounds of ice which is then ready for
consumption. This same brine is what
passes through the cold storage room
and keeps them at their low tempera
tare. The water used for the ice is ob
tained from a well one hundred feet
deep and is boiled and filtered before it
is placed in the cans so as to ensure that
the ice will be perfectly pure. An idea
of the manner in which it is appreciated
may be obtained from the fact that the
company makes about twenty tons of ice
a day, most of which goes to meet the
city's consumption of that article, as
very little is needed about the building.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
Several Important movements Dis
cussed at 1 enrlb.
The regular semi-monthly meeting of
the Chamber of Commerce took place
yesterday afternoon at the Board ot
Trade rooms. The attendance was very
small, barely a quorum being present.
After the reading of tbe minutes the
report of the Committee on Immigration
which was made at the last regular meet
ing and ordered to be a special order
the next time the Chamber came to
gether was taken up. The Secretary
read the report which advocated the
advertising excursion ti am to go through
the East next winter.
The chairman suggested that the en
terprise was of a nature to demand im
mediate and careful attention and before
action was taken there should be a
thorough discussion of the question.
It was moved and seconded that the
report as read be adopted and its recom
mendations be carried out.
Mr. D. Gilbert Dexter said that it has
been evident to all people during this
dull season that the waste land through
out this district should be cultivated and
that the work which this Committee has
in hand looks to that end. If the fact
could only be placed before the people
of the East that this was a region where
a livelihood could be obtained more
easily than elsewhere. They could be in
duced to come here in large numbers and
develope the farming possibilities of the
country. He said that while he did not
want to question the value of newspapers
and other forms of pnblication, be be
lieved tbat an exhibit of actual products
would be more effective than any other
species of advertising. The money, he
thought, could easily be raised for such
a good purpose.
Mr. Smith told of the work of the
same sort which has been done by the
South, especially by Alabama. Their
cars, now in progress through the North,
were crowded with people anxious to
to learn about that country.
Mr. Duncan said that he thought thai
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: THURSDAY NOVEMBER 22, 1888.
the matter was too important to decide
by such a small number of members of
tl c Council, and he proposed an amend
ment to the effect that action be post
poned until a special meeting next
Wednesday evening at 7:30. The amend
ment was accepted and the motion
carried.
The Committee onLaudß Irrigation re
ported that they were in communication
with the proper organizations in neigh
boring counties with the purpose of as
certaining whether they were desirous of
taking part in a permanent exhibit of the
products of all Southern California to be
maintained in some sort of a suitable
building here in Los Angeles. The ques
tion had also been put to these organiza
tions aa to whether they wished to be in
cluded in the publications .of the Cham
ber. A circular letter had been drawn
up to be used in this work.
By a vote of the Chamber on the re
quest of the Committee on Lands and
Irrigation, Henry T. Hazard was asked
to serve as a member of the committee.
The report of the committee was received
and filed.
An amendment to the constitution was
proposed reducing the number of mem
bets necessary to transact business. Col.
H. G. Otis moved that a committee of
three be appointed to revise the constitu
tion, to whom all amendments should be
referred until tbe Ist of January. The
motion was carried.
The following resolution was offered by
Dr. Widney; "Whereas the collecting
of city as well as State and county taxes
within a period of two months of each
other causes a stringency in the money
market by withdrawing large sums of
money, and thus checks the natural
course of business and trade, therefore
be it resolved as the sense of
the Chamber of Commerce that it would
1 be advisable to change tbe time of col
lection of city taxes to January of each
year instead of October.
A communication from the Philhar
i monic Society calling the attention of
the Chamber to the value of musical
. culture to the community and asking
their support in the work of the society
. by attendance to the concerte, was read
I and placed on file and tbe invitation ac
: cepted.
A communication from Dr. Bryant
i concerning tbe matter of absence and
tardiness at tbe meetings of tbe Chamber
i was referred to the committee on the
i revision of the constitution. As mcm
i bers of this latter committee the Chair
■ appointed H. G. Otis, AV<. K. Fitzgerald
and J. C. Flournoy.
Mr. Duncan asked permission to call
1 the attention of the Chamber to a very
important matter which should be
brought before Congress at the earliest
possible time, viz.: The re-arrangement
of this customs district and the establish
ment of a bonded warehouse at San
Pedro. He was advised to present the
matter to the Committee on Commerce.
The meeting then adjourned.
NOT GUILTY.
The lnd of the Alles murder
Trial.
The trial of the Indian, Antonio Alles,
for murder, was continued yesterday in
the United States Court, the first witness
called being Mary Alles, the daughter of
the defendant. Her testimony as to the
occurrences which led up to the shooting
did not differ materially from that of the
previous witnesses.
Francisca Alles, the wife of the defen
dant, war then called and as she couid
not speak Spanish or English, Miss Mary
Noble, a teacher in the Indian school of
Sabobo, acted as interpreter. Nothing
new was told by this witness.
Miss Noble, followed by Francisco Es
tudillo and Constable R. M. McKim,
testified to the good character of the de
fendant and the bad character of the
deceased.
The last witness called was Precentia
De La Rosa, but his testimony was un
important.
Attorney Latham opened the afternoon
session for the prosecution and was fol
lowed by Mr. Preston, the Indian agent,
and Mr. Middlecopft for the defense;
United States District Attorney Denis
closing for the prosecution. Judge Ross
finished his charge to the jury shortly
after 4 p. m. and upon the first ballot the
jurymen were unanimous in finding the
defendant "not guilty."
CHURCH WORK.
Tbe Final Session of tne Congress
ol Churches.
The congress of the churches which
has been in session for two days closed
its work last night. Yesterday morning
Rev. S. H. Weller, of the Presbyterian
Church, presided and announced that
the subject of discussion would be
"Evangelical Methods." Prof. H. E.
Storrs spoke of the many different kinds
of evangelistic work, and delivered a
very interesting discourse. In the after
noon the subject discussed was "Our
Young Men." Rev. A. Rider read a
well prepared paper on the subject,
which was followed by brief talks by
Meesere. E. S. Field, W. H. Meade and
others. The subject for the evening
was "Interdenominational Co-opera
tion," which was discussed by Rev.
Thos. W. Har kins, who pointed out the
value of the combined work of the
churches. A special paper on "The
Evangelists We Need" was read by Rev.
E. P. Abbott, of the Sierra Madre Con
gregational Church. Prof. J. M. Mc-
Pherson and a number of others joined
in the discussion of the topics presented.
Fine Pears.
Mr. W. Denby yesterday exhibited at
the Herald office three pears, the com
bined weight of which was six pounds;
the largest of the three weighed sep
arately two pounds five ounces, and was
fifteen inches in girth and seven inches
in length. The fruit was of the Vicar of
Wakefield variety, and was grown on
moist land without irrigation, on Mr.
Denby's farm, four miles west of tbe
city limits. The same tree last year bore
600 pounds of this fruit, and the aggre
gate yield this year is probably 800
pounds. Mr. Denby says all the fruit
trees on his place were productive in
proportion, and this is only one of the
many instances of the wonderful adapt
ability of Los Angeles county to fruit
growing.
marriage Licenses.
The following persons applied yester
day for licenses to wed:
Jose Vejarg Pcmona and Vicente
Yorba of Santa Ana.
Lester G. Brewer of San Bernardino
and Grace G. Campbell of Los Angeles.
William W. Dyer of Los Angeles and
Jessie McConnell of Artesia.
Come to Stay
With an entire new stock, at the old plane. C.
F. Heinzeman, Druggist and Chemist, 122
North Main street, Lanfranco Building.
Finnan haddies, at H. Jevne's, 38 and 40
North Spring street.
Unequalled. Sperry's Family Flour.
Wanted, aecond hand furniture at 202 8.
Spring St.
HIEOICAE.
DR. STEINHART'S
Essence of Life.
Sold in Europe for 17 years 13 yeirg on
the Pacific 'joest
[ttf~ Tliis gre'„ t strengthening remedy and
nerve tonic without fall Nervous and Phys
ical Debility, Exhausted Vitality, Involuntary
Weakening Drains npon the System, no matter
in what manner they may occur; Weakness,
Lost Manhood In all its complications, and all
the evil effects of youthful follies and ex
cesses. Also Impure conditions of the blood,
pimples and eruptions
Price—s2.so per bottle. In Uquld or pills, or 5
for $10.
DR. STEIN HART,
108 N. W. Cor. First and Spring «.s.,
Room 13, opposite Nadean House.
Office Hours—9 a.m. to 3 p.m : 6to 7:3. i\ m.
Sunday—lo to 1 o'clock.
N. B.—For the convenience of patients, and In
order to insure perfect secrecy, I have adopted
a private address, under which all packages are
forwarded.
DR. STEINHART'S
Great Vegetable
KIDNEY, BE ADDER
AND
LIVER REMEDY
A positive cure and relief for all forms of
Kidney, Bladder and Liver diseases: Diabetes,
Gravel, etc,; Acute inflammation of the Kid
neys, from cold or injury, pain or heaviness in
the Back or Loins; Irritation at the Neck of tbe
Bladder, causing a frequent desire to puss
water; Smarting or Burning after mi duration;
Incontinence of Urine; Calculi: Lack of Force
or Power to evacuate the Bladder; Stoppage,
etc.
FOB THE LIVER
This remedy is a purely vegetable compound,
free from mineral substances, and prepared
with great care; this remedy is the best ever
put up to relieve Immediate sufferings such at
Constipated Bowels, Sick Headache, pains in
the right side running through the shoulder
blades, sickness of the stomach, Giddiness,
Double Vision, Had Taste in the Mouth, Foul
Breath, Sour Bt>.,nacb, Water Brash, Heartburn,
and all tbe hi rrlble diseases implied in the
word
DYSPEPSIA.
Price, $1 per bottle. Sold at my office. 109
West First stre t, and by Drnggiats. 027-tf
I H E I. I Ft VT «. O •
DR. A. W. BBINKEBHOFF,
Diseases of Women a Specialty
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
RECTAL ULCERATION, CATARRHAL CON
dltionsof the RECTUM and INTESTINAL
TRACT poison the blood, interfere with diges
tion and assimilation, producing so-called
CONSUMPTION. By removing the cause we
continne to cure this when all others fail.
PILES, FISTULA, FISSURE, RECTAL UL
cers, cured without Cutting, Llgating, Burn
ing or Swallowing Medicine, by DR. A. W.
BRINKERHOFF'S Sure aud Painless System of
operating. No chloroform or ether used.
aVsfT-More than 150,000 operations and not
one death.
sTßV'Shnn the old, painful cabbolic treat
ment—it Is dangerous.
C. EDUAR SMITn, 111. D.
Office— Hotel Hollenbeck, cor. Spring and Sec
ond sts., Los Angeles. Rooms 12 and 13.
030-3 m
Do You Dream.
YOUNG MAN! Are you suffering from any of
the errors or indiscretions of youth, causing
lame back, tired feeling about tne legs, coated
tongue, bad taste in the mouth, wind on stom
ach, or sour stomach, amorous dreams, vertigo
(dizziness), forgetfu'nesß, loss of energy and
pain in the Bide? These are some ol the nu
merous sj mntoms of Spermatorrhaea. Let not a
sense of lalse modesty prevent you from seek
ing relief at once. This trouble will lead to loss
of Manhood, Insanity or death. The under
signed has treated many hundred cases such as
yours with never a failure.
Have you contracted any Private Disease
which \ou do; not wish your friends or family
physician to suspect? If so, DR. BLAKE3LEK
will treat you privately and successfully, and
guarantee a cure in the shortest time possible.
Many cases can be cured in twenty-four hours
if taken in time.
Syphilis (blood taint) whether of recent 01
leng duration can be entire y eradicated from
the system by the use of my vegetable remedies
without mercury In any form. There is no
necessity of going to the Springß when you can
be cured as quickly and permanently at home.
Are you troubled with Strlctuer, or any other
ailment peculiar to the male sex? If so, relief 1b
at hand The Doctor, by his studies ami practice
In this country and abroad, has made himself
familiar with all such cases.
CONSI'EATION FHEE.
Drs. D. &B. are a firm of physicians, one
specialist of which has charge of each depa-t
-ment. Tho above department 1b under the su
pervision of Dr. Blakeslee.
Hours: 10 A. M to 6 p. M., and 7 to 8 p. M.
BRS. ». A B.
Phillips Block, N. Spring st.. Eos
Angeles, Cal.
Ladles Parlors, Nos37 and 38; Gentlemen's
Parlors. Nob. 39 and 40.
sOsT-Btop the elevator at the First office floor.
018 ly
TO THE UNFORI UN ATE.
nesi, Impotency and Lost Manhood permanent
ly cared. The sick and afflicted should not fail
to call upon him. The Doctor has traveled ex
tensively in Europe' and inspected thoroughly
the various hospitals there, obtaining a great
deal of valuable information, which ho is com
petent to impart to those In need of his services.
»• OIBBON will make no charge unless he
fS?£fi a c .lJ e - Fer »°nß ats distance CURED AT
5 , ?;, Ml communications strictly confiden-
Ua L, A lLlf t .J*» ans . wered in P laln envelopes,
Ci[ii^S?.t d . ol A a s!!i ,ora^S ck . R s e °' medicine;
iffiwaSaS: Addre " a , ? B - GIBBON, Box
1957, San Francisco, Cal.
_Meution I-os Angeles Herald. 07-l
COCKLE'S
ANTI-BILIOUS
PILLS
The Great Engrlish Remedy.
F°s- LI Y KE ' BILB - INDIGESTION, ETC.
v«mJl??„ f om mercury; contains only pure
\r^vnl 11 5F a s£?*-. A S«m<*. LANG LEY &
«ie.HAELS. San Francisco. I*wV<yly
BAKER JJON WORKS,
1 542-561 Buena Vista St.,
Los Angeles.
Adjoining Southern Pacific Urounds
.022-
Vesicae.
consumpWon
And all the various diseases of the
HEAD, THROAT AND CHEST,
Together with tbe
EYE, EAR AND HEART,
Successfully treated by
M. Hilton Williams.
M. D.. M. C. P. S. 0..
HOEEENBECK BLOCK,
Cor. Second and Spring Sts., Los Angeles. Cal.
sobb throat.
Inflammatory action of any kind In the cose
Bpeedlly extends itself to the tbroat. From
he throat each bieath we draw carries the
irritation onward and tlotcnward through the
bronchial tubes; as these are involved the sup
ply of air to tbe lungs becomes gradually di
minished, tubercules may form and bronchitis
end in consumption. "Sore throat" is the
popular term used in speaking of throat dis
easts, differing widely from each other in
' their nature and treatment.
' Thethroat comprises the whole space from
Ihe posterior uares down to the entrance Into
the windpipe and gullet. The several parts
liable to disease are the mucous membrane
lining the throat, the mucous Io Holes or little
? lands, which in health, secrete the lubricat
ng mucous, the uvula or pedulus part which
hangs down from the curtain ol the palate and
the tonsils.
' acute or simple sobe throat.
The most simple form of throat disease is
inflammation of the mucous membrane, re
sulting from recent cold. It is most prevalent
In cold or damp weather. The symptoms are
a roughness in the throat, with a sight pain
and swelling. The throat looks red aud angry
and the tongue Is slightly coated with white
fur. Within a lew days small whitish spots,
which look like ulcers, form on the back of the
throat and about the root of the tongue. If the
attack be mild, these aphthous points disap
pear at the end of three or four days, but when
more seTere they leave behind them superficial
ulcers. When the acute inflammation 1b not
entirely removed It is likely to degeneate into
a chronic form, and gradually develop what is
called granular disease, or It may end in an
abscess of the tonsil glands, or cause chronic
enlargement of the tonsils and elongation of
the uvula.
CHRONIC SORE THROAT.
This like nearly all affections of the throit
and nose, usually begins with a Bevere oold,
snd is almost always attended wilh a hoarse
ness. It ia more frequently a mere extension
of catarrh or sore throat than an original dis
ease, the irritation escaping down aud fixing
Itself upon the delicate organism of this part,
and thence gradually journeying onward to
the lungs. When it occurs as a coneeqi encc of
catarrh or sore tbroat, the symptoms are com
parat.vely mild. There may be pain but it is
more common to fiud only a sense of tickling
which provokes cough. Many complain of a
sensation as of "something sticking there," to
get rid of which they keep up a rasping effort
to clear tho windpipe. The voice Is always
more or less affected, being rough in the early
state, but more feeble after the disease ia fully
established. Theie is often a slight tenderness
over that prominence of tbe neck known as the
"Apple of Adam" (Pomnm Adam), a heat and
a sense of tightness and frequently some slight
difficulty in swallowing.
The causes which produoe this form of dis
ease are various. It arises in clergymen and
public speakers and others from too violent
use of the voice. The vocal cords become ex
hausted and lose their tone from straining and
overuse. Dust and all irritating matters in the
air are liable to ba drawn into th j windpipe
and produce Irritation. It is more often a
mere sequel to sore throat, the inflammation
extending down to the larnyx by reason of the
continuity of mucous membrane.
But from whatever cause it arises it Is
always a serious malady. The chronic form
threatens the complete destruction of the
voice, and rarely ends until it has involved
the lungs in disease. Every Blight cold, every
change in the weather, every flight of dust,
feeds the Irritation and Increases the inveter
acy of its hold.
On the other hand chronic laryngitis fre
quently occurs as a sequel of consumption,
and is produced, or at least very much aggra
vated, by the Irritation of the expectorated
matter. Occurring as a consequence of tuber
cles. It Is one of the most distressing complica
tions and adds greatly to the patient's distress.
In this form there 1b more or less ulceration of
the vocal chords, beginning on the lower side
and gradually extending upward. These ulcers
often penetrate through the mucous and cellu
lar membranes, involving the muscular tissue
and not infrequently attack the ligaments and
cartilages themselves.
When the laryngeal disease Is secondary to
that of the lungs, and dependent npon it, we
can only hope to effect a cure by those means
which will remove its cause, and these we
have considered, and shall more fully consider,
under the head of "Consumption."
In addition to Inflammation, acnte or
chronic, the larynx is liable to abscesses, to
warty growths and to polipi. Under the
action of long continued irritation the vocal
cords become thickened, rendering tbe voice
husky and indistinct. And again, we may
have complete loss of voice from ralsy of the
corda, constituting an affection known to the
physicians by the term of ' Aphonia." Unless
the remedies are applied to the seat of the
disease it is useleßs to try to effect a cure. It is
for this reason that judicious inhala lons are
successful when all other means have been
tried without avail.
TONSILITtS
Is an acute inflammation 01 the tonsils,
which consists of a collection or mass of small
mucous follicles or glands whose office is to
secrete a portion of tbe fluid which keeps tho
throat moist. There are persons who suffer
every winter, sometimes oftener, with an
attack of acute inflammation of these glands.
The trouble begins with a Blight sorenesß aud
swelling, which gradually increases until the
act of swallowing is attended with great suffer
ing.
These glands are sometimes affected by a
chronic Inflammation, and are found enlarged
and very much hardened. In such eases they
secrete a thin, unhealthy, irritstlng fluid,
which Is spread over the throat, perpetuating
the disease. In the throats of many young
persons these glands are permanently so large
as to render respiration exceedingly difficult.
The defective breathing of children thus
affected often occasions contraction of the
chest, and lays the foundation for consump
tion. The eu'tachlan tubes (the months of
which are just above the palate) are often in
flamed, and partial deafness is the result
Many patients buffering from a throat dis
ease are dyspeptic, and Buffer from depression
of spirits So often does this symptom present
itself that it may almost be regarded as one of
the peculiar ties. Persons thus afflicted have
usually the dark and dingy look of the fare
which denotes functional derangement of the
Uver. They are frequently emaciated, nerv
ous, hypochondriacal, irritable and olten ex
hausted from other causes, in combination
with this disease.
GRANL'LVR BORE THROAT
Is the most serious lorm 01 rnroat disease. It is
bo called because on looking into the throat
S mutilations of various sizes are seen, studding
le membrane and causing It to appear rough
aud uneven. Sometimes these granulations
appear iv patc'ics, but generally they are regu
lar and distinct. When allowed to progress the
mucous follicles of the larynx soon become in
volved, and then we have added to the other
symptoms a huskiness of the voice in speaking
or reading aloud, with a frequent effort to clear
the windpipe, by which a thick, sticky, finish
colored mucous Is forced off with considerable
difficulty. The transition from a simple to a
granular sore throat is very easy. The patient
becomes conscious of vexatious tltillutlon, pro
ducing a de ire to clear thethroat several times
during the course of the day. He may no-, no
tice this himself, but it is. nevertheless, ob
served by his friends. Some months later this
disposition is found to have increased, aud to
be attended with an occasional desire to swal
low, the patient—to use bis own words—feeling
something sticking in his throat
CONSULTATION FREE.
Those who desire to consult with me in regard
to their caaea had better call at my office for
consultation and examination, but if impos
sible to do so, can write for a copy of my
Medical Treatise, containing a list of questions
Address
M. HILTON WILLIAMS, M. D.,
HOLLENBECK BLOCK,
Corner Second and Spring sts., Los Angeles.
Office homrs-From 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p. m.
WACJONS, ETC.
RICHARDSON-KIlimLCO7
PINE CARRIAGES,
BUSGIKS,
spring and Farm Wagons
—AMD—
—AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTB,—
18 and 50 N. Loa Angeles St.,
Lob Angeles, Cal. nl-ti
FOR FINE BUGGIES
—AND—
CARRIAGES
—OO TO—
EL. GhIESIG,
The Farm Implement Dealer.
44 to 18 N. Los Angeles St.. Loa Angeles.
bankino houses.
qal:fornia rank,
Cor. Fort and Second Bts., Los Angeles
Subscribed Capital $500,000
Psld up Capital $300,000
Surplus $10,000
dibectobs:
Hervey Llndley, J. C. Kays. K. W. Jones
Juau Bernard, J. Frankenfield.
H. Q. Newball President
H. C. Wltmor Vice-President
T. J.'Weldon, Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. jy4-4m
FARMERS' AND MERCHANTS' BANK
Or LOS AKGELEB, CAL.
Isaiab W. Hellman President
L. C. Goodwin Vice-President
Capital, - $500,000.
Surplus and Undivided Profits 700,000.
Total, - $1,200,000.
DIRECTORS.
O. W. Childs, Cameron E. Thorn, Jose Mas
carel, John 8. Griffin, James B. Lankershim,
C. Dncommun, Philip Gamier, L. C. Goodwin,
Isaias W. Hellman.
STOCKHOLDERS.
0. W. Childs, L. L. Bradbury, Philip Gam
ier. Louis Polaski, John S. Griffin, Jose Mas
carel, James B. Lankershim, Chas. Ducommuu,
Cameron E. Thorn, Andrew Glassell, Domingo
Amcstoy, L. C. Goodwin, Prestley C. Baker. L.
J. Rose, Frank Lecouvreur, Oliver H. Bliss,
Sarah J. Lee. Estate D. Solomon, Chris. Henne,
Jacob Kuhrts, Isaiaß W. Hellman. opl
ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
cob. flbst and spring stb.
Capital $500,000 00
surplus and undivided profits. 50,000 00
Total $550,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYBON, Sb Vice-President.
F. C. HOWES Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Db. W. G. Cochban, H. H. Mabkham.
Pebry M. Gbbbn, John Bbybon, Sr.,
Db. H. Sinbabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebbakb.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. JyB
gOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL BANK
NADEAU BLOCK.
JOHN I. BEDICK Preaideut
L. N. BREED Vice-President
WM. F. BOSBYSHELL Cashier
Paid in Capital $200,000
Surplus .' 14,000
Authorized Capital 500,000
Directors—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, H. A
Barclay, Charles E. Day, Ben E. Ward, D. M.
Graham, E. C. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank
Bader, William F. Bosbyshell, John 1. Redlck.
aug24-tf
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block, Los Angeles, CaL
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Reserve Fund, $100,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
R.B. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS:
H. L. Macnell, Jotham Blxby,
John E. Plater, Robert 8. Baker,
John A. Paxton, Geo. W. Prescott,
Geo. H. Stewart
Buy and Bell Exchange on Han Fran
cisco, New York, London, Paris, Berlin and
Frankfort
Buy Exchange on all parts of the United States
and Europe.
Receive Money on open account and cer
tificate of deposit, and do a general banking
and exchange business.
JjIIR3T NATIONAL BANK OF LOB ANGELES
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000.
RESERVE $205,009.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
E. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. BCHAFFEB Assistant Cashier.
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bicknell, B. H
Mott. Wm. Lacy, J. P. Crank, H. Mabury
J. M. Elliott. ol
rjlHB UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOB A NEB GEL
No. 119 New High street
CAPITAL STOCK PAID DP - - - - $100,000
B. M. WIDNEY .... President
GEO. L. ABNOLD .... Cashier
GEO. SINBABAUGH, • ■ Teller
Eight per cent, bonds secured by first mort
gage on real estate, with Interest payable semi
annually, are offered to investors of $250 and
upwards.
dibectobs:
B. M. Widnbt, W. H. Workman,
D O. Miltimori 0. M Wills.
B. W. Little, L. J. P. Mobbill,
D. B. Bislrv. aug9-tf
ANGELES SAVINGS BANK.,
130 NOBTH MAIN STBEET.
CAPITAL $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL. Sbcbetabt
1. W. Hellman, John E. Plater,
Bobebtß. Baker, John A. Paxton,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received In sums of
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums of
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Lob Angeles, July 1. 1884. oltf
For Recreation, for Business, for Fun
Jk&m RIDE WHEELS.
Th " beßt lB the cheapest,
»nd we are prepared to
£ss!vkß enow you that
THE VICTORS
ARE THE BEST
B,c P c,e ** Tricycles
Safety Bicycles
In tbe World. Illustrated catalogue free.
P E. A BEE, 30 S. Spring St.
nf>-4m
GEO.W. 00OKE k CO.,
Book : Binders,
BLANK BOOKS A SPECIALTY
119 Los Angeles Angeles, CaL
WOO» AND I i nRLR YARDS.
Wagon Material. Hardwood,
Iron, Steel,
Blacksmiths' Coal and
Cabinet Woods, etc.
JOHN WMMORE & CO.
13 ana 14 South Los Angeles Street.
nl tl
SCHALLERT-GANAHL
MAIN omen AND TABS—
Garner Flret and Alameda Streets, .
LOS ANOELXB, GAL.
BRANCH TARns—
East Lot Angeles Lnmber Yard, cor. Hoff and
Water street*.
Washington-street Lnmber Yard, cor. Washing
ton street and Grand avenue.
Garvansa Lnmber Yard. Qarvania. o23tf
• J. A. Henderson President.
L B - J M . DBB Vloe-Pres. and Treat.
Wu.P. Marshall Secretary.
, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
: LUMBER COMPANY.
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL.
Office and yard, 180 East First St., Los Angeles.
___ n!9-tf
J. mTcriffith company,
LUMBER DEALERS.
Manufacturers of
Doora, Windows, Rllnds, Stairs,
STAIR-RAILS, BALLUBTERS,
Newell Posts and mill work of every descrip
tion, and dealers In Lime, etc.
538 N. Alameda St., Loa Angeles.
nl-tf
HEBCKBOFF-CI 7A RR
Mill and Lnmber Company,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
LUMBER!
>
Yards at San Pedro (Wharf), Los Angeles
, (Main office), Pomona, Pasadena, Puenta, La
, manda, Monrovia, Ann, Glendora, Lords
burg, Burbank.
Planing Mills at Los Angeles, Pomona, Mon
rovia. 025-tf
CO-OPERATIVE LUMBEK COMPANY
> BT6 N. main St , Loa Angeles.
' This company is now prepared to receive or
; ders lor all descriptions of lumber, railroad
' ties, piles, shingles, laths, etc
Subscriptions for stock, which will be taken
at par for lnmber at COST PRICE, will be re
ceived by
A. C. FISH, 275 N. main St.
W. A. VANDEBCOOK, 275 N. Main.
J. C. MERRILL, 113 W. First.
C. A. SUMMEB A CO., 54 N. Main.
POMEROY A GATES, 16 Court St.
C. B. BIPLEY. Pasadena.
ELLIS A SIMPSON, Pasadena. o2otl
■ Westera Lnrntolsr
yard:
, Cor. Ninth and San Peuro Streets.
! L(J 91BKK of all class can be had at this yard.
n6-tf
D. R. ROZKLL. A. ROfELL.
ROZELL BROS.,
—DEALERS IN—
Lumber and Building Material.
Yard corner Main and Jefferson Sts.,
Telephone No. 745. Los Angeles, Cal,
n!stf
PERRY, MOTT & COS
Lumber Yards
AND PLANING MILLS,
Nn 76 Commercial Street. nl-tf
Storage and Commission.
NATO'S WAREHOUSE,
R. G. Weyse, Proprietor.
GBAI N", WOOL
—AND—
General merchandise Warehouse.
Storage, Commission amd Insurance.
Agents for all kinds of Agricultural Imple
ments. Wholesale and retail dealers in Im
ported and Domestic Wines, Brandies and
Whiskies. 634 to 666 Alameda street,
nlltf
California Warehouse,
COR. SEVENTH AND ALAMEDA.
GRAIN, WOOL
AND
General Merchandise Warehouse
Storage, Commission and Insurance.
n5 3m
Clothing and Furnishing Ooods.
FIRST INSTALIImeISt~
—or-
FALL CLOTHING.
NOBBY SUITS,
LIGHT-WEIGHT OVERCOATS,
SATCHELS, CLUB BAGS,
Everything for All
At 19 South Spring Street.
ABKRNETHY & TAFT.
Furniture and Carpets.
W. S. ALLEN,
DEALEB in
FURNITURE
AND
CARPETS.
38 and 34 South Spring St.
WALTON & WACHTEL,
* Wholesale and Retail Dealers la
FUBNITLTRE
OF ALL KINDS,
At Lowest Possible Rates.
814, 816 and 818 South Spring St.,
n6-tf Bet Third and Fourth Sts.*
Restuuranta.
ILLTOH'S
Restaurant and Oyster Parlors,
41 mad 48 North main Street.
tSttT- PRIVATE ROOMS upstairs for ladles
and families, where meals will be served is. the
best style.
oietf ■PaBBH'Y lI.MflHi Proprietor.
FRENCH CHARLEY'S
OCCIDENT STABLES,
(100 8. MAIN BT, foot of Third St.)
LOS ANGELB3.
Buggies and Carriages, Ladles' Saddle Hones,
etc., always in Readiness tor Careful
easterners.
Horses Bought and Sold, Boarded and Kent at
Seasonable Bates.
| F. A. URBAN, Prop.
Telephone 163. nQU

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