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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, January 10, 1889, Image 5

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GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE
Sent to the State Legislature
Yesterday.
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS.
State Debt amu the Debts of the
Comities of the State, with Other
Matters, Discussed.
Yesterday Governor Waterman sent
to the State Legislature now in session
his first biennial message. It is a very
voluminous document of one hundred
ottavo pages and containing about 30,000
words. The following is a brief synopsis
of the points covered.
The death of Governor Bartlstt is
touchingly referred to, and an appropria
tion of $3,300.02 to defray the expenses
of his funeral is asked; also one of $1,000
to pay for a portrait of the late Governor
to be placed in theatate Capitol building.
The necessity of an amendment to the
Constitution prohibiting the Legislature
from incurring any debt in the name of
the State beyond clearly defined limits
is set forth. The history of previous
legislation, and of the State debt is gone
ever in order to show why come
such action is necessary. It ib
further urged that a limit should
be put to the power of the several coun
ties in this matter of incurring indebted
ness. The aggregate debts now hanging
over the fifty-two counties is estimated
at $9,260,876. This sum is rapidly in
creasing.
The State funded debt is $2,703,500, of
which $2,698,000 bears interest. This
consists of State bonds held in private
hands, $334,000; bonds held in tiustfor
the State school fund, $1,546,500; bonds
held in trust for the university fund,
$817,000. Of this amount $60,000 has
been called in and the interest on that
has ceased. These bonds mature July 1,
1893.
State school land fund is loaned as
folio wb since the last session of the Legis
lature :
Los Angeles county, \\i per cent.
bonds #165,000
Lake county, 5 per cent, bonds 47,800
Sacramento county, 4 per cent, bonds 84,000
Ban Diego county, 5 per cent , bonds... 100,000
Santa Clara county, 5 per cent, bonds. 24,500
Vomerey connty, 5 per cent, bonds. . 110,000
Total #531,300
The State Treasurer now holds in
trust for the State School Fund, State
Funded Debt bonds of 1873, six per cent.
$1,546,500, and County bonds the sum of
$1,446,900, total $2,993,400. The Btate
Treasurer also holds in trust for the use
of the State University, bonds to the
value of $1,120,000.
The total receipts of the State for the
thirty-Bixth and thirty-seventh fiscal
years, amounted to $10,839,465.99. The
expenditures for the two years amounted
to $11,213,603.36. For the thirty-eigth
and thirty-ninth fißcal years the receipt*
were, $12,498,249 76; and the expendi
tures were $11,839,445.27.
Some small elements of confusion in
the managing of the State finances
are reviewed, and a remedy asked
for. The expenses of the last year,
the tbirtv-ninth of the State, were
1arge—57,049,868.99. This is mostly
above the average.
Hitches are claimed to exist in the
working of the machinery of the State
Board of Examiners' office, and remedial
measures are called for in this branch oi
the public business. The present Board
is an ej-officio one, and a specially ap
pointed Board is demanded.
The action of legislatures in creating
offices without making proper provision
for their expenses is scored with a good
deal of freedom. The pruning knife of
economy is called for to trim away many
unnecessary offices.
The history of the State University is
reviewed with a good deal of eulogistic
comment. The conveyance of the Lick
Observatory to the University Regents is
recommended.
The State school books are discussed.
For this purpose, in 1885, the Legislature
appropriated $170,000. The compilation of
the books cost $20,000, and $150,000 was
expended in the publication of the books,
but the cost of the plant, $57,917.39 fig
ures in this sum. In 1887 an additional
sum of $180,000 was appropriated to en
large the series of books. Of this $15,000
was paid for compilation of text books,
and $165,000 for publishing them. There
is still in the treasury $17,539.58 avail
able for the compilation of other text
books, and $72,786.16 for publication.
This money will be expended in the is
suing of the Elementary Grammar, Geo
fraphy, and Physiology and Hygiene,
he books now issued are First, Second
and Third Readers, Speller, Number
Lessons, Arithmetic, Grammar and
United Stateß History. From the sale
of these $152,092 87 has been received
back into the Treasury. This goes into
the School Book Fund to be used
in tho manufacture of the same books
whose sale it came from 'after the first
edition is exhausted. The publication of
text books by the State is strongly re
•ommended.
The normal schools are said to be in
a flourishing condition.
The State prisons are passed undtr re
view. The jute mill at San Quentin is
now operated day and night, and thus
the output is doubled. The grounds
about the prison are being much im
proved. At Folsom a big dam is being
built, by which a tine water power will
be utilized and the labor of the inmates
turned to profit for the State.
The pardoning power is discussed. The
Governor complains of the great strain
laid upon the executive shoulders in deal
ing with applications for clemency. Still
he" thinks the present system better than
any other likely to be devised.
The overcrowded condition of the in
sane asylums is referred to, and it is
urged that two additional asylums,
one in the northern part of the
State and another in the southern
be erected. At Stockton the cost per
capita for taking care of the insane is
36 9 cents per day.
The asviums for the deaf and dumb
and the blind, and that for the care of
feeble minded children are passed in re-
Tl The State Mining Bureau is com
mended as a useful institution. The
preservation of tho big trees at Mariposa
and of the Yosemite valley is emphati
cally recommended. An appropriation
of $25,000 for this purpose is asked for.
Harbor matters at San Francisco are
discussed in connection with the report
of the Board of Harbor Commissioners.
Reports of various other commissioners
are briefly referred to. The general
question of these Commissioners is dis
cussed in reference to their abolishment.
It costs the State $100,000 to maintain
theßevarions' commissions. . .-
The health of the State is retorted as
in admirable condition at all points.
Amendments to the laws by which
statistics of births, marriages and deaths
THE LOS ANGELES DAII,Y HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 10. 1689
may be better obtained than at present
is advised.
The State officers, the Governor claims,
are all underpaid. The State Treasurer
is responsible for $25,000,000, and is paid
a salary of $250 a month. All other offi
cers are as poorly paid. The remarks
are extended to the judiciary.
The Governor asks for a continuance
of the Supreme Conrt Commission.
The several State officers' reports are
then reviewed.
The message estimates the productive
area of the State at 79 000,000 acres; and
that there are 20,000 OOJ acres of heavily
timbered rough lands. The schools of
the State have a large interest
in the public lands. These have
been selling at $1.25 per acre. In
the Western States school lands are
selling at $4, $5 and even $7 per acre.
The Governor wants the law amended
raising the price of the school lands of
the State.
The building of a Governor's Mansion
is urged.
The work of the State Engineer is com
mended as being important, and as being
well done.
The passages of laws intended to aid
in the forming of districts for irrigation
purposes is urged. Some changes in the
laws are asked for to enable the disiricts
to float bonds to build their ditches, etc.
Agriculture and Horticulture in their
history and importance, are reviewed.
The establishment of a State weather
service for the collection of data npon the
crops and climate is commended.
The Governor urges that the National
Guard be placed upon a plane of the
greatest possible efficiency.
He recommends that the Soldifrs'
Home at Yountville be transferred to
the State, and that the Legislature
take steps for the establishment of a
State Soldiers' Home at that point.
The agency of Captain John Mullen,
at Washington, to take charge of the
act for the refunding to the States of a
special war tax, is the next thing the
message takes up. It handles Captain
John Mullen and his methods in a very
positive way. If tbe Governor has his
way the Captain will not get his fat com
mission.
His Excellency asks for the passage of
a stringent law empowering the local au
thorities to deal with the tramp nui
sance, with the view of stamping the
able-bodied roustabout out of existence,
or at least out of the State.
The division of tbe State is referred to,
and tbe Governor takes it for granted, or
says he does, that tbe people are op
posed to what he calls "a desecration of
the kind mentioned."
He asks for amendments to the regis
tration and election laws which will tend
to make frauds less easy of perpetration.
WEST VIRGINIA ELECTION.
A Decision that Hakes Goff the
Governor.
Charleston, W. Va., January 9. —In
the Circuit Court this morning Judge
Guthrie quashed the case against the
County Court to show cause why it
should not ne fined and attached for con
tempt in forwarding certificates of elec
tion in this county for Governor and
Congressmen, in violation of the injunc
tion granted by Judge McGinnis, of the
Cabell Circuit Court. It also dismissed
the injunction and certiorari heretofore
awarded at tho instance of Judge Flem
ing and Mr. Alderson. This is a victory
for the Republicans, and gives Goff and
McGinnis a clear plurality on the face of
the returns, for Governor and Congress,
both Republicans.
AMUSEMENTS.
A New Rnrlesqne at the Grand
To-Might.
The house at the Grand last night was
not so large as on the previous evenings
since the opening of the Lydia Thomp
son seasou. It is hard to keep the (irand
packed for three successive days with
one play.
To-night no doubt a big bouse will
greet the new burlesque which is to bo
put on. It is to have its initial per
formance here to-night, and it is said to
be very much superior to Penelope,
which has amused so many for the past
three nights.
"Tbe Woman Scorned."
The Woman Scorned, by the Azalea
Dramatic Company of San Diego, at the
Los Angeles Theater, last night, did not
draw a very large attendance, but those
who were there seemed to enjoy the per
formance very much. The play, which
is by Mr. Geo. S. Wheatly, possesses
considerable merit, and tbe players in
terpreted it very fairly, and will do it
better after another rehearsal, which
will be had to-night. The next perform
ance will be given to-morrow night.
The Cotton Company.
The Ben and Idalene Cotton company
will give four changes of programme
during their engagement at the Los An
geles Theater, commencing Sunday
night, January 13th, opening in the
beautiful domestic drama entitled The
Old Home. Ben Cotton plays the char
acter of a faithful darkey, and does it in
such a manner that he never fails to
please.
"Hoodooed" Engines.
Engine No. 640 oa the California
Southern Road has certainly been
hoodooed. It is the locomotive that was
wrecked at Encinitas about two weeks
ago, a few days later it killed four people
at Santa Ana and on Saturday it further
distinguished itself by wrecking the San
Diego passenger train three miles out
from this city. It will soon get as bad a
reputation as No. 248 had on the Gal
veston, Houston and San Antonio, a road
in Texas. At different times it had
killed twelve people, and wa< finally put
up iv the shops as no engineer cared
about taking it out. A newly appointed
knight of the throttle, however, an
nounced oneday that he would try "Ca
lamity," as the engine had been named,
and it was accordingly fired up and
headed on a freight train. When about
a mile out of Schulenberg, twenty-three
miles from the end of the division at Glid
den, the fireman went out on the running
board to oil up, and losing his hold, fell
from the locomotive, hie head striking
with terrific force against a large rock,
death being instantaneous. "Calamity"
was put back in its old quarters immedi
ately, and it was doutless many a day
before the water was again heated in its
boilers.
A New Church.
The Trustees of the First Congrega
tional Church met last evening in the
lecture room of the First Presbyterian
Church for the purpose of selecting plans
for a new church building. It will be
remembered that this congregation sold
its building on the corner of Hill and
Third streets a short time since to the
Central Baptist Church for $43,000. A
number of designs were presented last
night and those adopted are for a hand
some building that will cost $13,000.
The contract w ill be let shortly and the
work commenced as early as possible.
Ehe building will be located on the
corner of Sixth and Hill streets.
SACRAMENTO GOSSIP.
I A Lance Launched at the
Governor.
CHARGED WITH INGRATITUDE.
George A. Knight Kicks Up a
Great Row — Legislative
Proceedings.
Special to the Hkbald.
Sacramento, January 9. —Almost the
sole topic of conversation at tbe Capitol
to night is the big row which took place
this afternoon between Governor Water
man and George A. Knight, a well known
Republican leader. It will be remem
bered that when the Republican State
Convention was held at Los Angeles two
years ago, Knight made Waterman's
fight for his nomination as Lieutenant-
Governor in opposition to Senator Wil
liam JehnstoD, of Sacramento county.
Knight claims that Waterman's success
was mainly due to his woik in the con
vention, lobbies and in his eloquence in
nominating him, and be says after his
nomination the new-formed statesman
was profuse in his thanks, and declared
Knight should have any office within
the gift of the Governor in tbe event of
Governor Bartlett's death. Shortly
after the late Governor's demise,
Knight says he met Waterman at San
Diego, and that the newly-made
Governor then promised him, as a re
ward for his faithful personal services,
the office of State Insurance Commis
sioner, and this afternoon Knight walked
into the Governor's office and asked
when his nomination would be sent to
the Senate, whereupon Waterman ex
pressed great astonishment, and said it
must be some mistake, as be had never
promised Knight anything at all. The
latter then grew angry and administered
a stinging tongue-lashing, both to the
Governor and his Private Secretary
Boruck. The latter named personage
forsook his chief in the heat of the affray
and left him to defend himself against
the wrathful attorney as best he could.
At the close of the interview Knight in
formed Waterman that all was at an
end between them, and that henceforth
he would have to get aong without his
(Knight's) assistance and influence.
Knight is out in a column interview in
to-night's Bee, going over the whole story
and denouncing tbe faithless Governor.
It is reported on the street that he
threatens to thrash Private Secretary
Boruck, whom he holds personally re
sponsible for tbe Governor's action.
LEGISLATIVE PROCEEDINGS.
The Governor's message Received
In Roth Houses.
Sacramento, January 9. —The Senate
met ihis morning for the purpose of com
pleting organization,and immediately 1 ro
ceeded with the ele:tioa jf minor officers
selected in the Democratic Senatorial
caucus yesterday afternoon and even
ing.
When the Enrolling Clerk was reached,
Heacock objected to the proceeding,
on the ground that the law did not pro
vide for such a position and there was no
work for such a Clerk. His motion to,
indefinitely postpone was defeated by a
party vote.
McComas, of Los Angeles, created
some amusement by asking the Senate
to vote for T. C. Thomas for enrolling
clerk because he was the neighbor of
March it on. All tho constitutional offi
cers were elected in the usual way, and
in the case of those not provided for by
law, resolutions creating their places
were adopted by a puity vote.
A committee was appointed to notify
the Governor that the Senate was ready
to receive any communication be might
wish to make. The Committee reported
that the Governor would be ready to
deliver his message at 2:30 this after
noon, and the Senate took a recess un
till that time.
Iv tbe Senate, nothing of interest
transpired during the afternoon, further
than the receipt of the Governor's mes
sage, the reading of which was postponed
until to-morrow.
THE ASSEMBLY.
The session of the Assembly this fore
noon was devoted to the work of voting
into office the Democratic cbucub nomi
nees for the minor places. Tully gave
notice that at an early date he would in
troduce a bill for the prevention of fraud
in elections. Adjourned till 2 o'clock.
When the Assembly reconvened the
Committee on Rules presented its report,
one thousand copies of which were
ordered printed.
Black, of San Francisco, offered a reso
lution authorizing the appointment of a
clerk for the San Francisco delegation.
Black's motion prevailed.
McCarthy offered a resolution author
izing the Secretary of State to furnish to
all accredited members of the prpss $10
worth of stationery each. On motion of
Brierly it was made a special order for
to-morrow afternoon.
Private Secretary Boruck appeared
and announced two messages from the
Governor. One of these called atten
tion to the fact that Mr. Boruck was
the Governor's private secretary,
aud would deliver to the Assembly
whatever meSßages the Governor would
make, the other was the Governor's bi
ennial message. On motion of Matthews
1,000 copies of the latter document were
erdered printed, and at 2:45 the Assem
bly adjourned until 11 a. m. to-morrow.
I'DELL CH.ED.
He say* He Will Hake It Hot tor
mattie.
Sacramento, January 9. —Alva Udell,
a well known land lawyer and speculator
of San Francisco, was arrested this
evening on the charge of bigamy,
upon a warrant issued in Les
Angeles and sworn to by Mrs. Mattie
Udell. She alleges that she was
divorced from Udell in San Francisco
last July, but she married him again in
Los Angeles on the 27th of October. She
declares further, that six days later he
was married to Miss Edwards, of Stock
ton. Udell was unable to give
bonds to-night, and was placed in
a cell, where he was seen.
The prisoner denies emphatically
that he was married to Mattie Udell a
second time. He declares that he eajn
prove he was not in Los Angeles on the
date of tbe alleged marriage. He s*ys
further that he proposes prosecuting his
former wife on the charges of forgery aud
perjury, perpetrated in securing a mar
riage license in Los Angeles.
Governess (to little Miss Ethel, who is
making famous progress in mythology) —
"Now, Ethel, what do you know of
Minerva?" Ethel—"Minerva was the
Goddess of Wisdom ; shenevermarried."
[—[Town Topics.
fIII»CELLANEOI S.
WOOLEN SALE
SPECIAL SALE
—OF THE —
California Hosiery Co.'s
All - Wool Underwear
FOR LADIES AND GENTLEHEN.
GENTLEMEN'S DEPARTMENT.
All Wool, double In front and back,
former price $6.00 per suit, now $4 00
Alt Wool, A 1 extra heavy (not double),
former price $4.50 per suit, now 3 00
All Wool, medium weight, former price
$4.00 per suit, now 3 50
All Wool, lightweight, former price $3.00
per salt, now 2 50
Merino, full finish, extra good value,
former price $2.50 per mit, now 2 00
Merino, light and heavy weight, former
price $150 per suit, now 1 00
LADIES' DEPARTMENT.
All Wool, No. 15, formerpr!oesl 00 each,
now 75
All Wool, No. 10, former price $1 25 each,
now 85
All Wool, No. 221, former price $1 50
each,now. LOO
All Wool, No. 1589, former price $1.75
each, now 1 25
All Wool, No. 1G99, former price $2.00
each, now L5O
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT.
All Wool Shirts and Drawers, former price
$1 25, now 90
All Wool Missei,' and Children's Hose, for
mer price 50c, now 25
The 50e. Hose that we will close at 250 are
the best values Los Angeles ever knew.
Think of it! All wool, fast cclois, full regu
lar Hoße for 25c. a pair.
We havo two or three dozen All Wool Chil
dren's Jerseys, worth $1.00; we will close out
at 25c each.
Ladies' Jerseys one half former price.
We have a few Cardigan Jackets left which
we close out at 50c. on the dollar.
A few Combination Suits left which will be
sold at a great reduction.
Our Flannels and Heavy Dress Goods will be
sold this week at a reduction.
We offer extra bargains in Blankets and Com
forts Remember, we manufacture blankets
and flannels, hence we can give you the best
prices.
N. B.—The above gsods will be sold for Cesh
only.
THE COULTER
Dry Goods House
Cor. SECOND and SPRING,
I,OS ANGELES, CAL,.
[BEST FITTING
I FOR SALE BY LEADING I
1 RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS J
SMYRNA RUGS
CAN BK BAD IN ALL SiZES
AT LIOJST & SONS'
Next Popular
EXCURSION
Leaves at lO A. M.,
Saturday, Jan. 12, 1889,
On a special train chartered by tH*e Hotel
del Coronado Company,
PBOH
LOS ANGSLES
»o
HOTEL del CORONADO.
ROUND-TRIP
$3.50.
GRAND BALL
At the hotel Saturday evening.
Round trip tickets, good till Monday
afternoon, for sale by
CHAS. T. PAB3ONP,
?anta Fe office, or at Depot,
ulO-3m
LIOIST & SONS
ARE SELLING CARPETS
CHEAPER THAN ANY HODBK ON THE
COAST.
FRENCH CHA-RJUfiY>»
OCCIDENT STABLES
(100 8. MAIN BT, foot ol Third St.)
LOS ANGELES.
Baggies and Carriages, Ladles' Saddle Horses,
etc., always in Readiness lor Care/ul
Customers.
Horses|Bought and Sold, Boarded and Kept .11
Reasonable Rates.
F.;A. URBAN, Prop
Telephone 163 jaOt'
THE BEST LINK OF COLORS IN
"Window Shades
CAN BE HAD
AT LION & SON
ittINCKI.I.AKIBOIjft.
CLOSING OUT SALE!
Positively Selling Out Iveryliij.
THE GREATEST BARGAINS
IN
FURNITURE
Ever presented in this or any other market.
selling out ol such a tremendous stock at such a
sacrifice is the GRANDEST MONEY SAVING
OPPORTUNITY OF THE TIMES.
not wait, but take advantage of this rare opportun
ity and select your goods at once.
I3rour entire STOCK MUST BE SOLD. No article
will be spared. All goods delivered free.
Pacific Furniture Co.,
226. 228 AND 230 SOUTH MAIN ST.
CLEARANCE SALE
CARPETS, WALL PAPER, Etc.
AT THE
Philadelphia Carpet and Wall Paper House.
Now Is your time to get cheap
CARPETS, WALL PAPERS, Etc.
Two-ply Ingrain Carpets From 35c. per yard up.
Hand-loom From 65c. " '*
Three-ply " From 90c. " "
Tapestry Brussels " From 65c " "
Body " " From 900. " "
Moquette " From $1.20 " "
White Blank Wall Papers from G\c per roll up.
And all other goods In our line at equally low prices. Our stock is new and bright,
and worthy your inspection.
Price lists to the country on application. Estimates furnished.
BEN COHEN, 240-242 S. Spring bt, Los Angeles.
d 23
ROUSE & CURTIS,
General Commission Merchants,
AND DKALKBB IN
POTATOES, ONIONS, BEANS, BUTTER,
CHEESE, EGGS, POULTRY, ETC.
POTATOES IN CAR LOTS A SPEOIALTV.
110 Upper Main Street and 539 North Main Street,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. TELEPHONE NO. 861.
n2fl-4m
THE BEST
—in—
The Market.
For sale at all first-class coal yards. Ask for no other.
(General Office—6Q9 East Firet Street. p29-gm
COAL. COAL. COAL.
South Field Wellington and Foreign Steam Coal.
____________
I beg to announce to the public that I have entered into the coal business
in this city, and am prepared to supply customers with the best grades of
Domestic and STEAM COAL at lowest market prices. Special rates for carloads
»nd large lots.
HANCOCK BANNING,
COAL. DKALEB,
Office: Room 84, lanfrunco Kulldlnfr, 118 Nortb main Street.
PABADENA TRANSFER CO., AGENT.S, I WHOLESALE YARDS AT
PASADENA. I WTLMTNOTQv. c,28 3m
MONTGOMERY, GRANT & CO.,
833 N. Lou Angeles St. Branch stores at Pomona and San Bernardino.
NORWEGIAN STEEL PLOWS. SYRACUSE CHILLED PLOWS.
BUGGIES AT COST, AND VEHICLES OF ALL HE SAME.
We carry everything required by the Farmer and Orchardist. jal 12m
RECEIVED AND NOW ON SALE AT
HARPER & REYNOLDS [CO.
Carload of those celebrated wronght-iron Home Comfort Ranges; also several car
loads of Cooking and Heating Stoves for Coal, Wood, Coal Oil and Gasoline
on hand. '
A very fine assortment of Geo, Wostenholm's I X L and Humaaon & Buckley's
Pocket Cutlery, American Carvers and Table Knives in fine cases, also those
celebrated brands of Razors, "Progress," "Bengal," aad Wade & Butcher,
Complete stock of all kinds of Builders' Hardware and Mechanics' Tools always
on h_d.
HARPER & REYNOLDS CO.
48 and SO North Main Street. UK**
5

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