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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, January 18, 1889, Image 5

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PRAISING PROTECTION.
The American Protective
Tariff League Dinner.
MORROW ON CALIFORNIA.
Speeches by Several Leading Ad
vocates of the Policy of
High Tariff.
[Associated Press Dispatches to the Herald.l
New York, January 17.—The Ameri
can Protective Tariff League dined at
Delrronico's this evening. There were
present 325 members and guests. Hon.
William McKinley, of Ohio, and Hon.
Thomas B. Reed, of Maine, sent their re
grets. President Ammidown welcomed
the guests and stated that there aro now
900 members of the League, who have
contributed over $75,000 to further its
purposes, and that $150,000,000 pages of
tariff statements and arguments had
been sent out to the Statas and Terri
tories. Congressman Morrow, of Cali
fornia, spoke of the Pacific Coast and
its developments under a protective tar
iff. He said the forces of nature had
provided in a rough way for California,
about all she could wish, except, per
haps, a place in the cabinet under the
new administration, which last, how
ever, he wished to say in confidence
they expected to receive. He spoke
of the growth of California's wealth as
her gold output has delcined, and cited
it as tbe result of a home market under
protection. Having touched upon the
increase of production in wool, raisins,
fruits, minerals and sugar, Morrow said:
"Even the Bourbornism of free trade
hesitated at this point and ad
mits that the spirit of the de
mocracy requires American sugar.
Will Maine or Ohio let me ask, be l6ss
ardent to their devotion o the principal
of protection because if this fact? I
hope not. Let us maintain this state of
facts and in a few years every pound of
sugar consumed in the United States
will be the product of our own soil and
the reward of our o<vn labor. I desire to
be understood as being emphatically in
earnest on this point, for I think
I know what the Pacific Coast will do
with fair encouragement in this new and
promising field of industry. I want to
impress upon you the important and ',
growing interests of the Pacific Coast and
its increasing power as a factor in the
policy of the whole country, a power that
insists distinctly upon the principle of
protection for the benefit of her people
and for the development of her indus
trial wealth."
Hon. J. F. Hanson, of Georgia, speak
ing to the toast of "The Two Souths,"
and having referred to the recent cam
paign, said: "If the results of that cam
paign, aB they indicate the public judg
ment and the public will amount, to any
thing, tiie Republican party is under a
mandate from the people to cut up the
internal revenue system by the roots and
Becure the permanency of the
American policy of protection. That
the political South proposes to
destroy the protective system no
man of candor and intelligence will
deny. In view of this purpose, the man
or party who will save the political
South from itself and save the country
from the political South will best pro
mote the interests of the South and the
country. If the cause of protection fails
in this country it will fail at the hands
of the Solid South."
When Hon. Warner Miller was intro
duced, and allusions were made to a
Cabinet position for the New York
statesman, there was a volley of cheers
and applause. Miller spoke on the in
fluence oi the tariff on commerce and
shipping and set forth, by facts and
figures, that the prosperity of the coun
try was solely due to the high tariff.
A telegram of congratulations to Gen
eral Harrison was read and followed by
great applause.
John Jarrett, of Pittsburg, spoke in
behaif of the workingmen's interest hi
the tariff, hinging his remarks upon
comparisons instituted by him to the
advantage of protection as between the
English and American workman.
Dtstaonciit Officers.
Chicago, January 17. —The Times to
morrow will say that within the past
week it has been promised, on behalf of
Mayor Roche, that he would dismiss
from office, for corruption and dishon
esty, Inspector Bonfield and Captain
Schaack, the two police officers so widely
known through their connection with the
Haymarket riot and the hanging of the
Anarchists. This announcement is made
in reply to a proposition sent to-day from
Mayor Roche to the Times, asking that
all the evidence be submitted to three
well known citizens to determine
wheHier the Times' demand for the im
mediate suspension of the accused should
be acceded to, pending the court trial.
The Times will allege that sufficient
sworn proof was some days ago submit
ted to the Mayor's intimate associates,
and that the Times will not now be in
veigled into prematurely exposing cer
tain proof necessary to the proper de
fense of the suits brought against it. The
paper claims it is not yet through with
its extraordinary disclosures, and prom
ises to present to the public additional
evidence reflecting not only on Bonfield
and Schaack, but also on others.
Tne Field Trials.
Bakersnield, January 17.—The field
trials to-day were most satisfactory. The
average work was good. The incom
plete heat of yesterday, between Old
Black Joe and Galatea, was won by the
former. Tbe next was a heat between
Royal Duke and Sirocco—also an uncom
pleted heat from yesterday. Duke won.
The third was between the pointer Point
and Solano B. Point won. The race
between Royal Duke II and Sunlit was
won by the latter. Old Black Joe beat
Sirius; Point beat Sunlit; and in the
final Old Black Joe beat Sunlit and won
first money. At the club meeting last
night J. G. Edwards was chosen Presi
dent.
Tne "Charleston's" Trial Trip.
San Francisco, January 17. — The
cruiser Charleston is being rapidly put
in shape at the Union Iron Works for her
trial trip, which is to take place in a few
days. Commodore Belknap and a num
ber of naval officers from Mare Island
will accompany the vessel and superin
tend the tests. A number of invited
guests will also be present and the trip
will extend outside the heads and as far
south alone the coast as Santa Barbara.
Harrison's Visitors.
Indianapolis, January 17.—General
Harrison had an unusually large num
ber of callers to day, both from out of
town and at home. A prominent South
ern visitor was Captain E. L. Ward, of (
THB LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 18. 1889
North Carolina, son of General W. T.
Ward, who for a time commanded the
division to which General Harrison's bri
gade was attached. Captain Ward is
anti-Mahone and comes as the represent
ative of North Carolina Republicans to
tell the President-elect that his people
preferred ex-Congressman Dockery to
General Mahone.
Colonel R. D. Locke, of Marion, Ga.,
arrived this evening, and will be joined
to-night by Colonel A. E. Buck, of
Savannah, and Dr. C. W. Arnold, of Al
bany, Ga. They will confer with Gen
eral Harrison to-morrow on Southern
politics.
The Indian Commissioners.
Washington, January 17. —The Board
of Indian Commissioners held its annual
meeting to-day. Resolutions were adopted
deprecating the changes of Indian offi
cials for partisan reasons; urging an ex
tension of the civil service system to the
Indian service, and opposing the removal
of tribes from reservations where they
are settled and are making progress to
ward civilization ; urging the passage of
bills for the relief of the Mission and
Round Valley Indians in California, and
for the payment of expenses of Indian
courts; asking for liberal appropriations
for carrying out the land-in-severalty act,
and that immediate steps be taken for
the industrial education of all Indian
children, and demanding that the satred
obligations of treaties be regarded in all
negotiations with Indians.
Bribery and. Corruption.
Philadelphia, Pa., January 17 —The
special committee of the Select Council
appointed to investigate the charges of
bribery in connection with the passage
of the northern elevated railroad ordi
nance in 1884, to-day repsrted that Noblit
sought to bribe a member of the Council
in the interest of the bill mentioned, and
recommend that evidence as to Noblit's
conduct be sent to the District Attorney
of Albany, N. Y.
Marriage in High Life.
Philadelphia, January 17. —The mar
riage of Edward Devaux Morrell and
Miss Louise Bovier Drexel, daughter of
the late Francis A. Drexel, took place
this morning at the Roman Catholic
Cathedral in this city. Part of the honey
moon season will be spent in Europe.
The gifts of the bride were numerous
and costly, and aggregated in value
nearly a quarter of a million dollars.
A Uroundless Story.
Indianapolis, January 17. —A story
has been going the rounds of the press
purporting to give an account of Mrs.
Harrison's being snubbed by Mrs.
Blame on a special occasion at the
White House, during President Garfield's
administration. It is reliably learned
to-day that there is no truth in this story
which consequently does Mrs. Blame
cruel injustice.
A Provisional Depot.
San Francisco, January 17. —A freight
car, fitted up as a telegragh office, etc.,
has been sent to Santa Margarita, the
new terminus of the Northern Division
of the Southern Pacific. This car will
serve aB a depot until one can be built.
Trains will begin running on the new
section of eighteen miles from Templeton
to Santa Margarita next week.
O'Connor on tue Way.
! Toronto, Ont., January 17. —This
afternoon William O'Connor, the cham
pion oarsman, started for California,
where he will try conclusions with
Gaudaur. His new Ruddick boat was
strapped to the top of the Pullman car
by broad belts of webbiug.
AMUSEMENTS.
The Variety Show at the Opera
House.
Mr. M. B. Leavitt's European Varie
ties continues to hold its own at the
Grand Opera House. There is variety
enough about it to suit all tastes. Mr.
Duncan is the first accomplished ventril
oquist to give an exhibition of his powers
in this city for a long time. He is one
of the trump cards in Mr. Leavitt's full
hand.
Tbe Cotton*.
Ben Cotton and charming Miss Idalene
are doing well at the Los Angeles. Last
night Wild Flower was the attraction, to
night Jessica will be presented for tbe
first time. It is claimed to be the strong
est piece in the reportoire of the Cottons.
The fire scene and the railroad ficene are
very fine.
Coming; Events.
There is no little interest taken
in the appearance of the Gris
mers at the Grand next week. Of
the opening play the Call says:
"Forgiven, Clay Greene's latest dramatic
production, which was produced at the
Alcazar last night, was not disappoint
ing to those familiar with his work, for
in the handling of the plot and in literary
merit it is superior to his other plays,
even the Golden Giant. It has sufficient
of dramatic interest and variety of in
cident to thoroughly please an audience
and send down the last curtain, leaving
the spectators in a satisfied frame of
mind. Forgiven drew a packed houEe
last night."
They Illd Not Know Rein.
F. L. Reis, of the Royal Saloon, was
very angry yesterday afternoon over the
difficulty he had encountered in getting
identified at the postoffice on applying
for a registered letter, of the arrival of
which he had been apprised.
"Good Heavens," said he, "is is not
enough that I have to go out into the
country to hunt the postoffice, but I
have to go back to the eettled part of the
city to get a man to testify to my
identity? Civil service reform is
needed—rather.''
Mr. Reis has been a resident of the
city for six years, has rented a box in
the postoffice during that period, and re
sents being mistaken for a "Johnny
come-lately."
A Chinaman's Oame.
Detective Glass yesterday arrested a
Chinaman who had stolen a fine gold
watch of Daniel Eyrand, the French
cogk at the Elite. He confessed the
theft when it was shown that the proof
was unquestionable against him, and
gave up a quantity of valuable articles
which he had managed to get through
his peculiar method of work. He would
serve in a place long enough to learn
what valuables there were to be had
there and then would pretend to leave
town. Instead of leaving, however, he
would be constantly on the watch for a
chance to make off with some valuable
article which he had located.
A New Engine House.
The new engine house on Ihe corner
of Hope and Pine streets is now open for
usefulness. There is a new steamer in
it, with a full compliment of fire laddie?
anx ous to respond to tbe summons of
the dread alarm bell. The whole de
8' artment under the management of
hief Moriarty is exceedingly effective.
THE PARNELL CASE.
Damaging Evidence Against
the Home Rulers.
MICHAEL DAVITT ON ROSSA.
He Characterizes the New York
Agitator as a Low, Cowardly
Ruffian.
! Associated Press Dispatches to the Hrbaldl
London, January 17. —The cross-ex
amination of Patrick Delaney was re
sumed before the Parnell Commission
to-day. The witness persisted in declar
ing that he saw Bayton point out to
"Invincible" Brady the chairman of
the prison board, Bourke, for assassina
tion. On cross-examination by Michael
Davitt, Delaney said he was positive ho
had often seen Davitt in company with
Dan Curley, although be could not fix
dates. Attorney Webster showed the
correspondence between Matt. Harris
and Michael Davitt with reference to
the land agitation. The only letter that
attracted interest was one from Davitt
to Harris, written in New York,
in which Davitt said: "Perhaps
you are not aware that John
O'Leary is here. He came from
Paris to upset my Land League en
deavors. He will go back a wiser, though
a sadder, man. He is supported by no
body saving the bosthoons following that
blatant ass, Rossa. The Nationalists on
this side are common sense men. Rossa
will achieve more success upon your
side than upon this. He is a cowardly,
low ruffian, who has not the courage to
resent an insult I offered him in tbe
Herald. He has not sufficient courage
to set fire to a British haystack. Do
your utmost to keep the people within
bounds."
Justice Hannen asked if the letters of
Parnell would be shown to the Parnellite
counsel, as the court seemed to be within
reasonable distance of getting at them.
Attorney-General Webster refused to be
pinned to a definite time for the produc
tion of the letters.
STANLEY'S SAFETY.
Sir Francis De Wln ton Receives a
Reassuring Letter.
London, Jauuary 17.—Sir Francis De
Winton ia of opinion that Stanley
reached Lenin in November, and that
his journey from Emm's headquarters to
the east coast would occupy from six to
ten months. Sir Francis has received a
letter from Major Harminter, dated
Kinchassa, on Stanley Pool, No
vember 30, reporting the arrival
there of Lieutenant Baert, Tippoo Tib's
Secretary, on beard the steamer "Stan
ley," en route to Leopoldville. Baert
wijs Buffering from dysentery. He said
that Stanley returned at the end of
August to the camp where Bartelot was
murdered, and found the remainder of
Jameson's detachment in charge of Bon
ney. Stanley wrote to Tippo to come
and see him, the distance being being
twelve days' hard marching. Tippo did
not arrive, and Stanley proceeded to
Wadelai with the Bonney detachment.
Baert confirms the news contained in
Stanley's letter, adding that Stanley said
that Tippoo would not see him again, so
Stanley evidently did not intend to re
turn the same way. Baert further says
that Stanley wrote to nobody excepting
Tippoo Tib, and sent no letters home.
Stanley had not heard of the death of
Jameson.
Baert positively denies the rumors
spread by the Assyrian interpreter with
reference to Jameson.
A < 111 <UffiHED CAREER.
Joel Heury Wells Is Found Dead In
Ells Bed.
Chicaoo, January 17. —Henri De Tra
visse, better known as Joel Henry Wells,
an old resident of this city, was found
dead in bed this morning, presumably as
the result of heart trouble. Accounts of
the singular experience of Mr. Wells are
familiar to nearly all the newspaper read
ers of the country. About ten years ago
he brought suit against his wife for
divcree. Sho caused his arrest and
subsequent committment to the Elgin
asylum for the insane. Ho escaped and
was after some months recaptured, but
got away again. Some of the most
noted experts in the country pronounced
him sane, and he traveled about lectur
ing on his experiences. Last year, when
he attempted to regain control of his
property, he found he had no standing in
law, and the Superintendent of the Elgin
asylum, for some unknown reason, re
fused to either formally discharge or re
ceive him back as a patient, and the
matter was settled only after tedious liti
gation by a friend of his, who managed
to secure bis return to legal standing.
The Urent 1 ens-linker.
San Francisco, January 17. —Professor
A. G. Clark, manufacturer of the Lick
telescope lens, who arrived here a few
days i ago from Cambridge, Mass.,
left to-night for Los Angeles. "I am going
down there," he said, "to confer with the
regents of the new Southern California
University about the lens that it is to go
in the telescope used in connection with
the University. This lensisto be thirty
nine and one-half inches in diameter
and have come from Cambridge
to consult with them about it."
Mr. Clark said it was doubtful if he
would visit the Lick Observatory. His
intention was to ntay in Southern Cali
fornia a week and then go home, prob
ably via San Francisco.
To De Lesseps' Mescue.
Paris, January 17.—The Banque Par
ißienne has assumed the entire cost of
the issue and constitution of the new
Panama Canal Company ; but it stipu
lated that, after the opening of the canal
it shall receive annually one per cent, of
the net profits. No doubt is entertained
that the meeting to be held on the 26th
instant will approve the scheme. If 300,
--000 proxies are not obtained tte com
pany will be judicially wound up.
Bonds Successfully Floated.
San Dikoo, January 17. —Dispatches
received hero state that Wm. H. Carlson,
who has been ia New York for several
weeks negotiating bonds for $500,000 for
the equipment of the Ocean Beach Bail
road, has been successful, and that the
j rolling stock, complete to operate the
road, has been forwarded.
All Quiet ln Mlmoil.
Sydney, N. S. W., January 17.—The
German steamer Lubeck from Samoa,
which arrived here to-day, repcrts all
quiet in Samoa on the Bth instant.
tiring the titncbmen.
I Berlin, January 17. —The Emperor
has ordered the dismissal of all French
cooks employed in the palaej. They
will be replaced with Germans.
mi»(!ELLANEOI's.
WOOLEN SALE
SPECIAL. SALiE
—OF THE—
California Hosiery Co.'s
All - Wool Underwear
FOR LADIES AHI» GENTLEMEN.
GENTLEMEN'S DEPARTMENT.
All Wool, double ln front and back,
former price $6.00 per suit, now $4 00
Al' Wool, A 1 extra heavy (not double),
former price $4.50 per suit, now 3 00
All Wool, medium weight, former price
if 4.00 per suit, now 3 50
All Wool, lightweight, former price $3.00
per suit, |iow - 50
Merino, full finish, extra good value,
former price $2.50 per Buit, now 2 00
Merino, light and heavy weight, former
price $1.50 per suit, now 1 00
LADIES' DEPARTMENT.
All Wool, No. 15, former price $1.00 each,
now
All Wool, No. 16, former price $1.25 each,
now 85
All Wool, No. 221, former price $1.50
each, now 1.00
All Wool, No. 1589, former price $1.75
each, now 1-25
All Wool, No. 1699, former price $2.00
each, now 1.50
CHILDREN'S DEPARTMENT.
All Wool Bhirts and Drawers, former price
$1 25, now 90
All Wool Misses' and Children's Hose, for
mer price 50c, now 25
The 50c. Hose that we will close at 25c are
the best values Los Angeles ever knew.
Think of it! All wool, fast colors, full regu
lar Hose for 25c. a pair.
We have two or three dozen Ail Wool Chil
dren's Jerseys, worth $1.00; we will close out
at 25c. each.
Ladies' Jerseys one half former price.
We have a few Cardigan Jackets left which
we close out at 50c. on the dollar.
A few Combination Suits left which will be
sold at a great reduction.
Our Flannels and Heavy Dress Goods will be
sold this week at a reduction.
We offer extra bargains in Blankets and Com
forts. Remember, we manufacture blankets
aud Hansels, hence we can give you the best
prices.
X. B.—The above goods will be sold for Cash
only.
THE COULTER
Dry Goods House
Cor. SECOND and SPRING,
LOS AN«JKLES, CAL.
THE
HOTEL del CORONADO.
SAN DIEGO COUNTY,
18 THE MOST
Remarkable and Magnificent
On the continent of America.
The climate of the peninsula whereon
this gorgeous stiucture stands
is both
Preservative _M_ Restorative.
There is NO MUD and LESS FOG 3
than prevail back in the country. The
temperature during the winter is 8°
warmer at Coronado than that of the
most favored of the five world-renown
ed Mediterranean resortß.
Rates, from $2 per day by the month;
transients, $3 per day and up accord
ing to room.
E. S. BABCOCK, Jr., Manager.
Maps showing floor plans, also rates,
can be ascertained and printed matter
to be bad at the
HOTEL del CORONADO
Excursion and Information
Agency,
Cor. Spring and Franklin Sts.,
Near the Santa Fe Office,
LOS ANGELES : : CALIFORNIA.
ffBEST FITTING CORSETt'JeWORLDI
I FOR SALE BY LEADING I
_ RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS J
Hotel Keepers, Attention!
THE HOTEL Del CAMPO AT ANAHEIM,
is being furnished by the owners and is offered
lor rent on very reasonable terms to a live and
experienced hotel keeper. The house is new,
well situated, and a large patronage is arsured.
Fall particulars will be given by calling upon
the
ANAHEIM IMPROVEMENT COMPANY.
TBIIO. REISEB, President.
d 30-tf
NOTICE.
For Sale, Cheap, For Cash,
—ONE OP THE LARGEST—
HOTEL RANGES
Made by Baker Iron Works; cost $105: and two
of a medium size,sloo each; also one St. Louh
Stand Range.
W. H. LEVY.
I SECOND-HAND DEALER,
112 to 118 Upper Tlaln Street.
j6-lm
miSCELLANEOUS.
GREAT CLOSING 01T SALE.
Positively Gif Out of Business.
Selling Out Everything.
Goods Positively Sold at Eastern Manufacturers' Prices.
GREATEST SACRIFICE SALE IN
FURNITURE
EVER PRESENTED TO YOU.
Stockholders of this Company have decided that
everything must be sold before the FIRST OF FEB
RUARY, 1889.
NO ARTICLE WILL BE SPARED.
Grandest Money Saving Opportunity of the Times
ALL GOODS DELIVERED FREE.
Pacific Furniture Co.,
226. 228 AND 230 SOUTH MAIN ST. »_
CLEARANCE SALE
CARPETS, WALL PAPER, Etc.
AT THE
Philadelphia Carpet and Wall Paper Honse.
Now is your time to get cheap
CARPETS, WALL PAPERS, Etc.
Two-ply Ingrain Carpet* From 35c. per yard np,
Hand-loom " From 65c. " ' r
Three-ply " From 90c. " "
Tape6try Brussels " From 65c. " •'
Body " " . From OOc. " "
Moquette " From $1.20 " "
White Blank Wall Papers from per roll up.
And all other goods in our line at equally low prices. Our stock is new and bright,
and worthy your inspection.
Price lists to the country on application. Estimates famished.
BEN COHEN, 240-242 S. bpring St., Los Angeles.
ROUSE & CURTIS,
General Commission Merchants,
AND DEALERS IN
POTATOES, ONIONS, BEANS, BUTTER,
CHEESE, EGGS, POULTRY, ETC.
POTATOES IN OAR LOTS A SPECIALTY.
110 Upper Main Street and 539 North Main Street,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. TELEPHONE NO. 861.
(129-lro
THE BEST
The Wet.
For Bale at all first-class coal yards. Ask for no other.
O-eneral Office—6o9 East Street- n29-2m
COAL. COAL. COAL.
South Field Wellington and Foreign Steam Coal.
I beg to announce to tbe public that I have entered into tbe coal business
in this city, and am prepared to supply customers with the best grades of
Domestic and STEAM COAL at lowest market prices. Special rates for carloads
and large lots.
HANCOCK BAISTISriNG,
COAL dgaler,
Office: Room 24, Lanlranco Building, 118 North main SirosH.
PASADENA TRANSFER CO., AGENT r?, I WHOLESALE YARDS AT
PASADENA. I WILMINGTON. n gR 3™
MONTGOMERY, GRANT & CO..
233 IV. Lei Angeles St. Branch Stores at Pomona and San Bernardino.
NORWEGIAN STEEL PLOWS. BTRACUBE CHILLED PLOWS.
BUGGIES AT COST, AND VEHICLES OF ALL SAME.
We carry everything required by the Farmer and Orchardist. jal'l2m "
RECEIVED AND NOW ON SALE AT
HARPER & REYNOLDS CO.^
Carload of those celebrated wrought-iron Home Comfort Ranges; also several car
loads of Cooking and Heating Stoves for Coal, Wood, Coal Oil and Gasoline
on hand. ZZZZLZ
A very fine assortment of Geo. Wostenholm's I X L.and Humason & Buckley's
Pocket Cutlery, American Carvers and Table Knives in fine cases, also those
celebrated brands of Razors, "Progress," "Bengal," and Wade & Butcher.
Complete stock of all kinds of Builders' Hardware and Mechanics' Tools always
on hand.
§ HARPER & REYNOLDS 00.
48 and 50 North Main Street. n ic-e»
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