OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, January 18, 1889, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042460/1889-01-18/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

6
STATE LEGISLATION.
Nerada Delegation on the
Dumping of Sawdust.
THE CITY CHARTER APPROVED.
Resolutions in Memory of the Late
Governor Bartlett—Oakland's
Charter Sustained.
I Associated Press Dtat>atches to the Hebald 1
Sacramento, January 17. —The Senate
met at 11 o'clock. Immediately after
prayer and reading of the journal, three
messages were received from the Gover
nor. The first announced that the Com
mittee on Sawdust in the Rivers, ap
pointed by the Legislature of Nevada,
would arrive in Sacramento shortly to
confer with the River Committee of the
California Legislature.
The second requested the Senate to
approve a number of appointments made
by the late Governor Bartlett, and the
third was for similar action on appoint
ments of the present Governor.
Moffitt, of Alameda, moved that con
sideration of the last communication be
deferred for one week.
Jones, of Butte, amended to defer two
weeks.
Wilson, of San Francisco, offered an
amendment that the matter be consid
ered next Monday. Wilson's amend
ment was lost by a strict party vote, and
Moffitt's motion as amended was adopted
on the same vote.
A communication was also received
from the Governor announcing the ap
pointment of Joseph Craig ?s Prison Di
rector, vice J. K. Luttrell, withdrawn.
Bills were introduced aB follows: By
Moffitt, granting to the Board of Regents
of the University a portion of Mt. Diablo
for scientific purposes; by Conklia, ap
propriating $229,0C0 for the erection of
additional buildings for the home for the
chronic insane; by McComas, to regu
late and control the sale of intoxicat
ing liquors; by Caminetti, amending
the Code of Civil Proceedure, giving
additional powers to Probate Judges; by
Jones, amending the Civil Code in
relation to life insurances on natu
ral premiums; by Goucher, for
the establishment of the correct
border line between California and
Nevada; by McGowan, amending the
amending the Penal Code in regard to the
fish and game laws; by White, amend
ing the Civil Code in reference to con
tracts between husband and wife; by
Bowers, providing for the treatment of
juvenile prisoners in houses of correction.
Consideration of the Oakland charter
was the special order in tne senate this
afternoon. When it came up Yell, of
Mendocino, moved that it be referred to
the Judiciary Committee. A protracted
debate followed, and on motion to refer
was defeated by a vote of ayes 17, nays
19. The reading of the entire charter
was then begun and consumed over an
hour's time. When it was concluded a
vote to approve was taken and only
three voted against it. The committee
gave notice of a motion to reconsider.
Adjourned.
The Aaaembly.
Sacramento, January 17.—1n the
Assembly this morning, Seawell, of Men
docino, introduced a resolution passed by
the Board of State Prison Directors,
recommending that the State be divided
into two prison districts, so that certain
counties will send the prisoners to San
Quentin and other counties to Folsom.
The resolution was referred to the Com
mute on State Prisons.
The Speaker announced that he had
received papers in the contest of Price
vb. Frank, from San Mateo county. The
documents were referred to the Com
mittee on Elections.
The Committee on Labor and Capital
reported the following bills favorably:
The Act to provide for appointment of
Board of Examining Engineers to license
the engineers of portable and steam
engines and boilers and establish the
duties and compensation of said Board;
an act to regulate hours of labor and
employment of minors and females and
an act to establish and support a bureau
of labor statistics were introduced.
The Committee on County and Town
ship Governments reported favoring the
passage of a bill to provide for the correc
tion and establishment of a portion of
the eastern boundary line of the State.
_ The Committee on Municipal Corpora
tions reported favorably on the joint res
olution approving the recently adopted
charter of Los Angeles.
On motion of Matthews, of Tehama,
the resolution was made the special order
for 2 P. w. to-day.
The Committee on Ways and Means
reported favoring the passage of the Sen
ate bill providing for the payment of the
funeral expenses of the late Governor
Bartlett.
A message was received from the
Senate announcing the passing of a con
current resolution relating to the Na
tional Grange, and also a concurrent res
olution asking Congress to maintain the
Bcott Chinese Exclusion act.
A message was received from Governor
Waterman, stating that he had received
a dispatch from Governor Stevenson, of
Nevada, announcing a commission of
eight will arrive on the 21st inst. to con
fer with the California Legislature on the
master of sawdust in the Truckee river.
Leave of absence was granted the
Prison Commission from 2 p. m. to-mor
row until Monday.
A lengthy discussion took place regard
ing the resolution referring to the Scott
Exclusion act, several members desiring
that it should be referred to a committee
until a number of grammatical errors
could be corrected.
The resolution passed by an almost
unanimous vote. However! Dibble has
given notice of a reconsideration.
A number of bills passed, among them
•one known an the "Telegraph Hill bill,"
and the Assembly took a recess till 2
F. M.
At the afternoon session of the Asaem -
bly Oatrom, Dibble and Mathewa were
appointed a committee to act with the
Senate Committee to arrange for a meet
ing at which resolutions should be passed
in memory of the late Governor Bartlett.
A resolution appointing George Hughea
Bill Clerk was adopted ; also a reaolution
appointing Misa Annie Ryan Aasiatant
Mailing Clerk.
Ewing, of San Francisco, introduced a
resolution that the attaches of the
previous Legislature who assisted in the
organization of the present House be al
lowed three days' salary, the Controller
having refused to allow them a week's
salary each. The resolution was adopted.
Adjourned.
Important Land Suit.
Washington, January 17.—The Secre
tary of the Interior rendered a decision
in the case of Jamea K. Martin, guardian
of Calvin Jamea, and the city of Chey
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING. JANUARY 18. 1889.
enne. Wyo., vs. Frances Nolan. The land
involved lies near Cheyenne, and is used
for water works. The decision sustains
that of the Commissioner of the General
Land Office rejecting Nolan's pre-emp
tion applicatton, but leaves the claim of
Cheyenne undetermined.
THE PLEA OF STATEHOOD.
Delegate Calno Continues the Ar.
su in en I for Utah.
Washington, January 17.—Hearing <*i
the claims of Utah to be admitted as a
State was coutinued by tbe House Com
mittee on Territories. Delegate Came,
of Utah, who began the argument in
favor of admission, yesterday, continued.
The attempt, he said, to create the be
lief that priestly influence would domi
nate the State aud that the Mormon peo
ple were subjected to ecclesiastical
tyranny, was part of a shrewdly devised
scheme and organized efforts to accom
plish the overthrow of the majority and
tbe elevation to power of the minority.
The doctrines of the church insisted
upon dissassociaticn of civil and
ecclesiastical powers. There is nowhere
to be found a body of people so generally
intelligent and well informed, whose
natural tendency was independence of
thought.
He took up published statements of
Governor West, and said he hoped the
committee would not believe such
"twaddle." What right had any one to
apply a religious test to the people of the
Territory seeking the privileges of State
hood in which they were Americans,
citizens of the United States, and bad
presented a constitution, republican in
form, prohibiting polygamy and provid
ing penalties against transgressors of the
fundamental law, and making a union of
church and State impossible.
Delegate Dubois, of Idaho, then ad
dressed the Committee in opposition to
the admission of Utah. He said that
statements had been made calculated to
mislead in regard to the sentiments of
communities adjacent to Utah and, in
compliance with tbe wishes of his own
Territory, he desired to address the com
mittee. There were about 15,000 Mor
mons in Idaho and there was no differ
ence between them and those in Utah.
He dwelt on the difficulty of securing the
conviction of the Mormons that practiced
polygamy in that part of the Territory in
which Mormons were settled. He said
that, in his judgment, one-third of the
adult Mormons in Idaho were in the
polygamy relation. He submitted a few
remarks in regard to the civil power of
the church. He said his Territory was
very much concerned in the fate of Utah
statehood,for that would mean polygamy
firmly entrenched. In conclusion he
presented a memorial of the Idaho Leg
islature unanimously opposing the ad
mission of Utah as a State of the Union.
ARAB BARBARITIES.
ITlurder and mutilation of (Hitalon
arles In Eaat Africa.
Zanzibar, January 17.—The Arabs
have destroyed the German missionary
station at Tuga, fifteen miles west of
Dar-es-Salem. A majority of the slaves
captured by the German man-of-war
Leipsig lodged at the station. The mis
sionary escaped, but eight persons weie
massacred. Three bodies, one that of a
woman, were found mutilated barbar
ously. The Arabs carried off servants
and slaves. The French missionary sta
tions, near Tugu, are in imminent dan
ger. The Arabs are now joining in the
slave trade, principally from Kilwa and
Lindi Kicber. These accessions will
have the effect of re-invigorating the
revolt, which would have died out if the
Germans had not retained Bogauioyo
and Dar-es-Salem.
Opposed to Annexation.
Washington, January 17. —The propo
sition of General Vandever to acquire the
peninsula of Lower California, by pur
chase from Mexico, it seems, will not
meet with much encouragement from the
people of that Republic—at leaßt, here.
Sefior Romero, Mexican Minister here,
when spoken with regarding the matter,
said that he would not like to speculate
about the uncertainty of future events,
but that, in his opinion, the proposal to
buy Lower California, when no portion
of Mexican territory is for sale, would
have in Mexico exactly the same effect
as Mexico's proposal to buy Upper Cali
fornia,or American Calif ornia,wonld have
in the I cited States.
Sewall ou Samoa.
Wasuinoton, January 17. —The exam
ination of Sewall, Consul General at Sa
moa, by the Senate Committee on For
eign Relations has been practically con
cluded, but he is held here to await the
printing of his testimony, when he may
be recalled upon some point suggested by
the reading of it. Sewall is deeply inter
ested in the Samoan situation, and in
anxious to return to his post, but is more
anxious that the people of the United
States should arouse themselves to an in
telligent appreciation of the importance
of maintaining tbe independence of the
islands in order that they may properly
maintain their interests there.
Tbe Basrsrairemasters' Congress.
San Francisco, January 17. — The
final meeting of the National Association
of General Baggagemasters waa held
to-day. A committee was appointed to
secure national legislation upon the sub
ject of the transportation of dead bodies.
The following officers were elected for
the ensuing term: President, T. S
Newton, Detroit; Vice President, W. I.
Robinson, Cincinnati; Secretary and
Treasurer, J. E. Quick, Detroit. The
convention adjourned to meet at Detroit
July 17th next.
A Ducal Metort.
Pabis, January 17.—Reinach, the edi
tor of Republiijue Francais, in an article in
that paper states that a number of prom
inent Urleanists tecently told the Due
d'Aumale that it would be to the party's
interest to support Boulanger. The Due
replied that he did not know whether
such support would be to the party's in
terest, but he was sure it would not be to
its credit.
Harking Up Estee.
San Francisco, January 17. —A petition
was yesterday forwarded to General Har
rison, signed by every Republican mem
ber of the Nevada Legislature, and by 54
out of thess Republican members of the
California Legislature, praying for the
appointment of M. M. Estee, of thia
State to a position in General Harrison's
Cabinet.
Auctions of our Fruit.
San Francisco, January 17.—At the
meeting of the California Fruit Union
to-day there waa a lengthy diacußsion
upon the subject of the auction aale of
fruit, and a reaolution was adopted in
structing the directors to deal directly
with the auctioneers, when possible.
Status of tne Samoan Question.
Washington, January 17.—Secretary
Whitney eaya the State Department haa
done all it can in the Samoan ma'.ter and
it now rests with Congreaa, which alone
haa the power to declare war.
Don't Pay Sl.so for Other Brands
When yon can get the Crown for leas.
MEDICAL.
THE KNIFE MUST 001
A. W. BRINKIiRHOtT.
Diseases of Women a Specialty
CHRONIC DISEASES A SPECIALTY.
RECTAL ULCERATION, CATARRHAL CON
ditious of the RECTUM and INTESTINAL
TRACT poison the blood, Interfere with diges
tion and assimilation, producing so-called
CONSUMPTION. By removing the cause we
continue to cure this when all others fail.
PILES, FISTULA, FISSURE, RECTAL UL
cers, cured without Cutting, Ltgatlng, Burn
ing or Swallowing Medicine, by DR. A. W.
BRINKERHOFF'S Sure and Painless System of
operating. No chloroform or ether used.
#HW~ Moro than 150,000 operations and not
one death.
Caff-Shun tho old, painful cabbolic treat
ment—it is dangerous. Consultation free.
C. EDGAR SMITH, M. D.
Removed to cor. Main and Seventh Btreet,
Robarts' block. n3O-3m
CONSUMPTION,
CATARRH,
Bronchitis and Asthma,
Treated successfully by
DR9. DAVIS & BLAKESLEE
4514 North Spring Street,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Inhalation, combined with constitutional
medication, has superceded all others ln the
treatment of throat and lung diseases, and there
is scarcely a throat specialist in the civilized
world but has adopted some kind ol an inhaler.
showniabove is the one used en
tirely by us, after trying every other kind, and
by this means our well-known success during
the last four years has lately been increased to
a large extent.
CASES ON FILE.
Below we will give the symptoms of a few
cases and the result of the treatment. As some
of these persons object to our using their names
in the public print, we will suppress them, but
will gladly make them known to those calling
Case No 98G—R. N., aged 43, a commercial
traveler, stated that he h»d been sut ject to
cough every winter for twelve years. His work
was against him, and he was a good deal ex
posed to wet and cold. His couxh used to
trouble him badly ouly in the winter, but year
by year it ssemed to be coming on earlier, and
now he was hardly ever free from it. It came
on in fits, which shook him to p'eceß, and it
was always very bad the first thing in the morn
ing, often making him retch and vomit. There
was a great deal of phlegm, thick aud yellow,
which was difficult to get up unless he could
get some hot tea, or something to loosen it.
The shortness of breath was worse than all, for
it prevented him from going about, and inter
fered with his business. He had never spat
any blood worth speaking of but there were at
times streaks after a severe fit of coughing. He
became no thinner, generally loosing a little io
the winter and picking up in the summer. He
had had a great deal of treatment without re
lief . November Ist 18S7, he was given an ia
haler, with medicines, and went into the
country for three days, at the end of which
time he reported the cough easier, the phlegm
lighter in color and not so thick, and the breath
ing decidedly better. 'treatment continued.
November 10th the patient wrote to say that
he was better than he had been for years, and
was almost able to do without medicine. Jan.
6th, reported that he had not been using medi
cine for a month, and was entirely well.
Case No. 1,166—J P. R., aged 65 years, un
married. Was troubled for ten years with post
nasal catarrh The mucous wonld drop back
into tho throat and frequently be swallowed.
Has been troubled with a distressing headache,
from which he has never been free for almost
a year For the same length of time there has
been great distress after eating, and bleating of
the stomach and bowels. The bowels are con
stipated. The stomach will bear nothing but a
little cracker. He is also troubled with short
ness of breath and shifting pains over the liver,
btomach and chest. Has been treating a year
with different physicians withont relief, .inun
ary 2d, 1888, prescribed medical inhalation
for the throat and the proper constitutional
remedies for the stomach, and recommended a
diet. February 16th, 18S8, Mr. R. reports that
his headache bas been entirely gone for two
weeks, he can eat anything without distressing
himself, and examination shows his throat to be
entirely well.
Case No. 1,046—Mr. G. M. Came into office
December 6th, 1887, during a severe attack of
asthma. Had to be half carried np the stairs.
Took cold night before. Has been troubled with
asthma for eight years. Would never get over
the succession of attacks after taklug cold for
two weeks or more. Has need everything he
can hear tell of, and smoked everything, from
mullen leaves to arsenic Mr. M. took inhala
tion in office, and in half an hourleftbreathing
as freely as any one. Reported next day that
he had had no difficulty ln breathing after tak
ing treatment. During the following six months
Mr. M. took inhaler occasionally whenever he
would feel an attack coming on, but during the
past six months has taken no treatment what
ever, and has been entirely free from the dis
ease.
Many more cases could he mentioned, but
tha above, wo hope, is sufficient to convince
any fair-minded person of the superiority of
this method.
CONSULTATION FREE.
Persons at a distance can send for a list, of
questions and be treated as success!ully at home.
Office hours—lo A. v. to 6 p. M.oud 7 to 8
' DRS. DAVIS & BLAKESLEE,
45% North Spring street,
d2l lm LO3 ANGELES, CAL.
33. C.WEIGHT^
The Real Estate Broker,
Has gone into his new office, Rooms 3 and 4,
upstairs,
IN THE REDICK BUILDING,
Corner of Fort and First Sts.,
Where he can be found by his many frieuds
or by parties having business with him. '
—he is offering—
BARGAINS
—IN—
Large and Small Tracts of Land
Which it will bo to the interest of capitalists
to Investigate before purchasing
JalOlm
o. f. heinzemanT
Druggist and Chemist,
No. 422 N. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day or
night. d2ltf
COCKLE'S
ANTI-BILIOUS
PILLS.
The Great English Remedy.
FOR LIVER, BILE, INDIGESTION. ETC.
Free from mercury; contains only pare
Vegetable Ingredients. Agents, LANG LEY _
MICHAELS, San Francisco. isVyklrly
WOOD AND COAL.
Wholesale and Retail.
COAL,
Charcoal, Wood, Coke.
The above to be always bad at tho lowest
prices at
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Coal and Wood Co.,
OFFICE: OOE. SECOND AND SPRING STS.,
Bryson-Bonebrake Building (basement).
Telephone 1,023.
YARD: COR. JACKSON AND ALAMEDA STS.,
Telephone 315.
Special inducements given to Hotels,
Restaurants and the trade.
We are prepared to deliver Greta coal la
lots to suit at a low figure. d2012m
Coal, Coal.
Tho undersigned have several cargoes of
Wellington,
Greta,
Scotch Splint,
Wallsend
—AND—
COKE
Due and some discharging, is prepared to sell
in CARLOAD LOTS on track.
Liberal Discount to the Trade.
Also has PORTLAND CEMENT, PIG IRON
and FIRE BRICK for sale.
For further particulars inquire of
J. J. MELLUS,
jstf 231 Los Angnles «tr«»et.
Now is the Time to
Purchase Coal.
To make room for cargoes of coal now due,
the Los Angeles Gas Compasy offer for sale at
their yard, Aliso street, best hand "picked
Australian GretaandiWallsendCoals at 813.50
PER TON, in:qnantitles ofjnot less than ten
tons; $14 for single ton, and 75 cents per 100
lbs. in smaller lots.
LOS ANGELES GAS CO.
dlBtf
NEWHALL BROS.,
SOUTH FIELD, WELLINGTON COAL, ?16
PER TON DELIVERED.
WOOD, COKE, HAY, GRAIN AND MILL FEED.
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
110 WEST FIFTH ST.
Telephone 4(>2. j4tf
WOODLAND LIHIULH IiUUS.
J^ew^Sousi^!
Wagon Material, Hardwood,
Iron, Steel,
Blacksmiths' Coal and Tools,
Cabinet Woods, etc.
JOHN WIGMORE & 00.
13 and 14 South Los Ansroles Street.
jl tf
SCHALLERT-G ANAHL
LUMRER COMPANY.
MAIN OFFICB AND TABD—
Corner first and Alanieda Streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
BRANCH YARDS—
East Los Angeles Lumber Yard, cor, Hoff and
Water streets.
Washington-street Lumber Yard, cor. Washing
ton street and Grand avenue.
Garvania Lumber Yard. Qarvanza. o23trf
J. A. Henderson President.
J. R. Smhrr Vice-Pres. and Treat
Wm. F. Marshall Secretary,
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
LDMBER COMPANY.
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL.
Office and yard, ISO East First St., Los Angeles,
d!9-tf
J. I, GRIFFITH COMPANY,
LUMBER DEALERS.
Manufacturers of
Doors, Windows, Blinds, Stairs,
STAIR-RAILS, BALLU6TERB,
Newell Posts and mill work of every descrlp
tlon, and dealers ln Lime, etc.
538 N. Alameda St., Los Angeles.
jl-tf
KBBCKHO FF>C 17Z2HEB
Mill and Lumber Company.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers ln
LTJM BEBI
Yards at San Pedro (Wharf), Los Angeles
(Main office), Pomona, Pasadena, Puenta, La
manda, Monrovia, Asuuh, Giendora, Lords
bur*, Burbank.
Planing Mills at Los Angeles, Pomona, Hon
rovia. n25-tf
Western Lomber CoT
YARD:
Cor. Ninth and San Peuro Streets.
LUMBER of all class can be had at this yard,
ja6-tf
D. R. BOZBLL. A. BCCBLL.
ROZELL BROS.,
—DEALERS IN—
Lumber and Building Material.
Yard corner Main and Jefferson Sts,,
Telephone No. 745. Los Angeles, Cal,
]a stf
PERRY, MOTT & COS
Lumber Yards
AND PLANING MILLS,
Nn.76 Commercial Street. Jl-tf
BAKER IRON WORKS.
5-42-561 Buena Vista St.,
Lob Angeles.
Adjoining Southern Pacific Ground
oH.
MANUFACTURING JEWELERS.
B. OONRADI
OPTICIAN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
No. 16 South Main Street.
WATCHES, DIAMONDS. JEWELRY, ETC.
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry Carefully Re
paired and Warranted. . jal lm
li. -A.. FISHING CO.,
Stalls 9,11 13,18,18, 20 Mott Market
Jal lm FRED HANIMAN, Proprieto
THE DAILY AND WEEKLY HERALD.
—=THE= —
HERALD
Daily and "Weekly,
THE
Leading Journal
OF
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.
Established Fifteen Years Ago.
Published Under One Management and Policy Con
tinuously Ever Since.
D
DLD
DLALD
DLARALD
DLARERALD
DLAREH ERALD
DLAREHEHERALD
DLARKHEHEHERALD
DLAREHEHTHF HERALD
DLAREHE HTDTHEHERALD
REHEHTDADTHEHERALD
D LAREHEHTD AE AD IHEHKRALD
DLAREHEHTDAERE ADTHEHE RALD
DLAREHEHTDAEADTHEHERALD
, DLAREHEHTDADTHEHERALD
DLAREHEHTDTHEHERALD
DL ARE H EHTH EIIE RALD
DLAREHEHEHERALD
DLAREHEHERALD
DLAREHERALD
DLARERALD
DLARALD
DLALD
DLD
D
HOW MANY WAYS CAN THIS BE READ?
*J>HE LOS ANGELES HERALD IS BY ALL ACKNOWLEDGED
have been the prime factor in the discovery and making known of the
resources of this section. To its sagacious outgivings more than to any
other agency our marvelous development is attributed.
THE HERALD has from its inception watched with a single eye
the budding industries of this portion of the State. For each good en
terprise this journal has at all times had a word of cheerful encourage
ment. In spite of the skeptical, it has survived to see all of its earlier
predictions funfilled to the letter.
THE HERALD to-day takes the lead in all respects among the
papers of Southern California. Its first care still is the material, intel
lectual aud social interests of its section. It aims to be truthful rather
than over-zealous in its publication of news; to be conservative rather
than over-sensational, in its policy; to be clean and decent, respecting
the sacred piecincts of the home and fireside, rathor than indecently
salacious in its tone.
THE HERALD gets all the news irom all quarters of the globe
with promptness accuracy and dispatch. Its local staff is energetic
and well-trained to miss nothingof real importance to its readers. It ia
always alive to all public enterprises. «
THE HERALD still takes pride in aiding any legitimate material,
intellectual or social movement which will benefit the people. No other
journal in this section approaches it in those important respects.
For a Clean Family Paper Take the Herald!
FOR THE MATERIAL INTERESTS OF THE
COUNTRY TAKE THE HERALD I
For Full Local News of All Sorts Take the HERALD
For Careful and Able Editorials on All the Happen
ings of the Day Take the Herald 1
The Los Angeles Herald,
THE CLEANEST, ABLEST, MOST COMPLETE AND SATISFACTORY
JOURNAL IN
SOUTH CALIFORNIA

xml | txt