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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, January 19, 1889, Image 5

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MASHED ON BELLEW.
An Heiress Gone on the
Long-Haired Actor.
MISS COFFIN, OF CINCINNATI.
She Lays in Wait for Mrs. Potter's
Leading Man With an Empty
Revolver.
I Associated Press Dispatches to tne Hbbald.l
New Yoke, January 18.—The eccen
tric Miss Harriet E. Coffin, the heiress,
formerly of Cincinnati, whose mad in
fatuation with actor Kyrle E. Bellew,
has iv the past tempted her to brandish
knives and revolvers, and caused her
saaity to be questioned, created a dis
turbance at Palmer's Theatre to-night.
Bellew is supporting Mrs. James Brown
Potter. Miss Coffin called at the stage
entrance for the actor with a 32-caliber
revolver in her pocket. He saw her and
she raised such a rumpus that she Wai
arrested and locked up. She was
charged with carrying concealed
weapons and being disorderly. On her
person was found a largo sum of
money, and $1,700 in checks drawn on
her bank account. She vigorously re
sisted being searched and kicked an
officer. A note-book, with many sug
gestive remarks about Bellew, was found
on her person. Samples of the memo
randa are these: First, "Strength fail
ing fast. What shall I do? Bellew is
to blame." Second, "Feeling very
strange, and feeling the same feeling
that Bellew gave me on the stage when
I sat in the audience. Says he can kill
me. If I die I say it is his fault. He is
my passion. He has control of my
whole business. He gives me to under
stand that I fear him." The revolver, a
five-chambered 32-calibre weapon, which
was not loaded, was found in her pocket,
together with a box of arsenic wafers,
two handkerchiefs, a bottle of cough
medicine, and ber well-known note-book.
THE BLYTHE CASE.
A New move Made >>y Public Ad
ministrator Roach,
San Francisco, January 18. —Phil. A.
Roach, as administrator of the estate of
Thomas H. Blythe, deceased, and in his
individual capacity, has filed a complaint
in the Superior Court against Guillermo
Andrade and some two hundred other
defendants to compel them to interplead
and litigate between themselves and
their several claims aud pretenses in re
spect to the relations which existed
between the defendant Andrade and the
decedent Blythe at the time of the latter's
death, in regard to grants of certain lands
and properties in Mexico, standing in the
name of Andrade, and for the appoint
ment of a Receiver of said properties.
The document, whicli is very volumin
ous, gives a full description of the prop
erties and the history of the business re
lations between the deceased aud An
drade and others in this connection.
(Trill tors of i lie Hank Distrusted.
San Francisco, January 18.—A num
ber of the depositors of the suspended
California National Bank held a meeting
this evening and discußsed the methods
of procuring, if possible, some settlement
of the bank's indebtedness *o them. A
committee, consisting of E. A. Rix, W.
T. Crane, A. Robertson, K. H. Marchant,
Joseph Buttgenbach and J. B. Merritt,
was appointed to consult a lawyer and
see what steps should be taken to further
the interests of the bank's creditors.
During the meeting several depositors
declared their deposits had been received
up to an hour before the bank suspended,
and the officers of that institution were
severely censured by those present at the
meeting for their course in the matter.
Old-Timers' Reunion.
New York, January 18. —The four
teenth annual dinner of the Associated
Pioneers of the Teiritorial days of Cali
fornia and the reunion of the Forty
niners took place to-night. It was the
fortieth anniversary of their departure
for the gold fields. United States Dis
trict Attorney Wilbur, of Brooklyn,
made a salutation address which called
forth many recollections of the days of
the gold fever. General John C. Fre
mont, who was to have responded to the
toast of "the army and navy," sent a
letter of regret at his inability to attend.
Similar letters from General W. T. Sher
man, Demas Strong and William B.
Hampton were read.
Snubbed by tbe Governor.
Sacramento, January 18. —Governor
Waterman this afternoon accepted from
Captain John Mullan the sum of $11,723,
money allowed to the State of California
on account of Indian depredations and
collected by Mullan from the Govern
ment. Governor Waterman says in a
communication to Captain Mullan: "I
don't recognize or receive you as acting
in the oapacity of agent or attorney for
California, but simply as a messenger
entrusted with these drafts for delivery
to the Governor."
Dishonest Officii) I*.
Trenton, N. J., January 18.—-A seri
ous defalcation by officials of the Penn
sylvania railroad has just been brought
to light. It appears that J. B. Cox, As
sistant Supervisor of the New York
division of the road, and W. A. Powell,
Supervisor, have for some time been col-1
lecting old ties and rails along the divis
ion, disposing of them to private parties
and appropriating the funds to their own
nse. Both men have been arrested and
placed under bail. The examination is
still going on.
Coming Excursionists.
San Francisco, January. 18.—Three
more Raymond and Whitcomb special
excursion trains leave Boston in Feb
ruary, one on the 7th, another on tbe
11th and the third on the 25th. The first
train goes by way of the Santa Fe route,
the others will go via Cincinnati, New
Orleans and El Paso.
Tbe Pope's Approval.
Rome, January 18.—The Moniteur de
nies that the Pope has admonished the
American Bishops on account of the pro
gress of socialism among Catholics. On
the contrary, his Holiness has eulogized
the religious zeal and activity displayed
by Catholics in America.
\1 run Clint; Artists.
London, January 18. —In connection
with the recent quarrel in the London
Artists' Club, Stott writes ridiculing the
idea of Whistler's assaulting him, be be
ing a small man. Stott hints that he
gave a lesson to Whistler, which the lat
ter took quite gently.
Bismarck* African Bill.
Berlin, January 18.—The East Africa
bill was submitted to the Buudesrath to
day. It is entitled, "A bill for the pre
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: JANUARY 19. l>B9s
tection of German interests and combat
ing tho slave trade in East Africa." It.
asks a grant of 2,000,000 marks. The
task of executing the provisions of the
Dill is entrusted to a commission which
shall have the right to supervise the pro
ceedings of the East Africa Company.
ISO Credits (or Terry.
San Francisco, January 18.—United
States District Attorney Carr has advised
Sheriff Hale, of Alameda county, in the
case of David S. Terry, confined for con
tempt of court, that no credits in time,
on the score of good behavior, can be al
lowed. Terry bas laid claim to some
thing like thirty days' credits and says
that on January 29th he will demand
that the Sheriff release him. His full
term of six months does not expire till
March 3d.
The Field Trials.
Bakersfield, January 18.—Sunlit beat
Croxtell's Scout and took third money
in the continuation of the field trials
to-day. The contest, for $50 a side be
tween Galatea and Sirius was declared
off, Galatea's owner forfeiting his Btake.
They Begrudged the Money.
Santa Rosa, January IS.—The Board
of Supervisors to-day passed a resolution
protesting against the legislation acced
ing to the demand of the London Exhibit
Committee for the appropriation of
$~'50,000.
Condensed Telegrams.
A portion of the imperial palace at
Pekin has been burned.
( Pueblo resents the rumor that it is
overrun with smallpox.
A cottOD warehouse bas been burned
at Liverpool. Loss, $250,000.
The United States ship Galena is re
ported at Kingston, Jsmaic, all well.
A shock of earthquake was felt in the
vicinity of Edinburgh, Scotland, yester
day.
Fighty-six people left the East by the
Santa Fe veßterday morning, on one of
Warner Bros.' excursion.
Of the Panama Canal Company, M.
De Lesseps will b« President, and his
son Charles, Vice-President,
A young man and woman suicided at
Monte Carlo yesterday after losing every
thing at the gambling tables.
The United States steamer Osseppee
Ims arrived at Kingston, Jamaica, with
"The Haytien Republic" in convoy.
The inquiry into General Swain's case
was conducted yesterday with closed
doors by the Board of Investigation.
Yesterday, in the unofficial count for
the Thirty-fifth Assembly district, Mor
row's net tgain was 36 and Ferral's
loss 4.
The general offices of the St. Paul,
Minneapolis and Omaha Road were par
tially destroyed by fire yesterday. Loss,
$40,000.
The British bark Silbel, 1,000 tons,
from London to Rangoon, has been re
ported missing at Lloyd's. She carried
twenty men.
Andrew Shurnan. who has for nearly
thirty years been connected with the
Chicago Evening Journal, has retired
from the editorahip.
Yice-President-eiect Morton is looking
out for a suitanle residence in Washing
ton. He does not contemplate buying or
building a home there.
General George D. Ruggles, of the
Uiincil otatcs Army, arrived in San
Francisco ou the Golden Gate special.
He will be attached to General Miles'
staff.
Bazaar rumors are current at Suakim,
Ito the effect that Dervishes are massing
!at Khartoum for an advance upon Don
|gola, and that the Mahdi intends to in
vade Egypt.
The President has approved the act
to provide arms, ammunition, etc., to the
Oregon and Montana militia, and the act
amending the postal laws in regard to
special delivery letters.
Yesterday tbe bill to provide for a
special election to be held in February
to decide certain constitutional amend-
ments passed the House and is now in
the hands of the Governor.
Four German missionaries, one of
them a woman, was massacred at
Zanzibar by the Arabs. Three mission
aries and one woman are held for
ransom. The German admiral has
landed a force to occupy Dar-es-Salem as
a garrison.
The Board of Trade of Jacksonville,
Fla., have passed a resolution demand
ing protection against the competition of
foreign fruit and asking for Con
gressional action imposing a duty of $1 a
box of two cubic feet capacity, or in that
proportion, on all oranges and lemons
sent from foreign countries. The move
ment in this direction bas been made
special throughout the State, irrespective
of party.
Gov. '/ultck Here.
Governor Myer Zulick, of Arizona Ter
ritory, is at the Depot Hotel, having
stopped over here on his way- to the
opening of the Legislature at Prescott.
He says that Arizona is forging steadily
ahead and that in the w< st3rn part of the
Territory the agricultural prospects are
very encouraging. He remarked that he
is a little envious of Los Angeles and
wishes that he had such a superb city in
his domain. He will continue his jour
ney on the Santa Fe overland to-day.
Lost His Wile.
A man by the name of C. F. E. Byers
presented himself at Dr. Choat's office
last evening and asked for medical
assistance. He was wounded in the
head. He said the barkeeper of the
Point Saloon, a man by the name of
Shubert, had taken his wife away from
him. and when he remonstrated, had
pitched into him and struck him over
the head with some sort of a blunt
instrument, he did not know what.
SLubert could not be found by the police.
Depot Jottlncs.
Judge R. Egan of the Santa Fe estab
lishment is in the city.
General Manager Dan McCool re
turned yesterday from Saa Bernardino.
The Arizona will be pas
sengers on the Santa Fe overland to-day.
The Lydia Thompson troupe have
booked seats on the train bound to Santa
Barbara to-day.
General Passenger Agent E. A. Ford
of the Pennsylvania system is in town,
accompanied by Mr. H. A. Dering.
Mr. Cleveland continues fo exercise
the veto power in the manner that
proved so exasperating to the Republi
can guardians of the Constitution. His
latest abuse in this direction was send
ing hack a bill appropriating money to
repay funds lost by a postmaster in the
course of transmission to a deposit office.
The only ground Mr. Cleveland had fo.
interrupting and defeating the benevo
lent intentions of Congress was that the
power to make compensation in such
cases was already placed in the hands cf
the Postmaster-General by a general
law and that the money had been paid.
This, of course, is simply a frivolous ex
planation, as has been pointed oat in the
cases of vetoes on like grounds of private
pension bills.—[New York Times.
MONTANA'S STATEHOOD.
Preparations to be Made for
Its Admission.
THE HELENA CONSTITUTION.
If it is Ratified, the PresidentlWill
Proclaim the Territory a
State.
I Associated Press Dtsnatohes to the Hebald. i
Washington, January 18.—The "Om
nibus" bill which passed the House to
day, in so far as it relates to Montana,
authorizes the inhabitants of that Terri
tory to choose delegates to form a con
vention. In each district into which the
Territory is divided three delegates shall
be elected, but no elector shall vote for
more than two persons for delegates.
The election shall be held on the second
Monday in May, 1889, and the number
of delegates shall be seventy-four. The
delegates shall meet on July 4, 1889, and
are authorized to form a Constitution
and State Government, provided that,
at, the time of the election of
delegates, the Constitution adopted by
the constitutional convention held at
Helena in 1884 shall be submitted to the
people for ratification or rejection. If
the constitution is ratified, the conven
tion authorized by this act shall re-sub
mit it to the people, with such changes
only as may be necessary in order to
comply with the provisions of this act.
If agti i ratified the President, of the
United States may issue his proclama
tion declaring the State of Montana ad
mitted as a State into the Union, from
and after the date of the proclamation.
Until otherwise provided, the State of
Montana shall be entitled to one Repre
sentative in the House of Representa
tives. Land sections 18 and 36 in every
township are granted to the State for tbe
supuort of common schools, and 90,000
acres of land are granted for the support
of the agricultural colleges. Five per
cent of the proceeds of the sale of public
lands is also granted for common school
purposes.
Dried Fruit Association.
San Francisco, January 18. — The
Dried Dried Fruit Assciation met this
morning in the rooms of the State Board
of Horticulture. General Manager John
T. Cutting read his annual report, and
the Secretray read his. Both were
adopted. A resolution was adopted
thanking Cutting for his services during
the year. Letters were read from
various persons in New York showing
the dried fruit business to be very dull.
Goodsell of New York took the floor and
discussed the auction system for some
time answering que3ti3ns on the drisd
fruit business generally. The proposed
London exhibit was indorsed and A. T.
Hatch, Suisun, N. W. Motherill, Fresno,
John T. Cutting, San Francisco, R. B.
Blowers, Woodland, J. H. Flickinger,
San Jose, A. G. Freeman, San Fran
cisco, H. Weinstock, Sacramento, O
Stevens, Yolo, and Isadore Jacobs,
San Francisco, were elected; Trustees for.
the ensuing year.
Concentration ol the Army.
Santa Barbara, January 18. —General
Grierson, U. S. A., Commander of the
Department of Arizona, has been in
Santa Barbara since last night. The
General says that General Schofield,
commanding the armies of the United
States, has issued orders for a concentra
tion next summer, at some place in each
of the divisions, of as many soldiers as
can be spared from the frontier garri
sons, for practice and instruction. About
ten companies of infantry and twenty
companies of cavalry will be brought
together from this department, and the
General's visit to Santa Barbara had
reference to the selection of this place as
a possible point for concentration.
Is Newland* a Prodigal?
San Francisco, January 18. — Ex-
Judge James G. Maguire, leading coun
sel for Mrs. Terry in the cases of Sharon
vs. Sharon and Sharon vs. Hill, the one
iv the United Stare Circuit Court and
the other in the State Courts, has filed a
notice of motion iv the Superior Court
that he will immediately ask for the
appointment of a receiver for the estate
of William Sharon on the ground mainly
that Frank G. New;ands was squander
ing the estate in New York and had
gone outside of his authority as trustee.
The Smallpox in Denver.
Denver, January 18.—The Health
Commissioner to-day made affidavit that
there are only four mild cases of small
pox within the city limits. The remain
der of the cases are at the Pest House,
isolated several miles from the city and
under the strictest quarantine. The
city authorities have taken every means
to prevent the disease from spreading
and there is no fear or possibility of its
becoming epidemic.
Export Duties Abolished.
Washington, January 18. —The De
partment of State is informed that the
Japanese government has abolished the
export duty on drugs, woven goods, tim
ber, cereals, spirits, beasts, fuel, etc.
President Harrison can relieve the
Southern people of a burden of apprehen
sion by announcing in his inaugural ad
dress that he will not pursue a policy
calculated to breed race troubles, and
that he recognizes that the race problem
can be solved more readily by the South
ern people themselves, and without out
side interference. — [Savannah News,
(Dem.)
Rough on Upson: Upson Downes —
"Say, Kirby, where's that silk umbrella
I loaned you?" Kirby Stone—"l found
it was my own, so I kept it." Upson
Downes —"Jove! Is that so? And here
I've been lodging Old Hyson the last
three weeks, thinking it was his."—
[Puck.
The big trusts do not intend to go out
of business the next four years. They
have lately ordered the Boston Sugar Re
finery to close down, and are perhaps
getting ready to squeeze the people a
little harder to make up campaign ex
penses.—[St.. Saul Globe, (Dem.)
Tho sooner that certain wild-eyed men
learn that anarchy in this country con
never change from a theory into a condi
tion, the better it will be for them.
Hemp is not to be put on the free list,
but there is plenty in the country for
rope-making.—[New York World.
The Republicans promise to give us an
era of unparalleled prosperity. Gentlt
men, will you kindly put your hands on
the shoulders of that era and give it a
shove thia way?— New York Herald,
(Ind.)
Tbe shares of all the trusts have goiiH
booming up since the Republican buc
cess. The monopolists know their
1 Iriends.—[New York World (Dem.)
SPECIAL SHE
FOR
Monday, Janary 21, Only.
850 YARDS ALL-WOOL FRENCH
BROADCLOTHS, 50 to 54 inches wide,
reduced from $1.88 to 90c.
350 YARDS ALL-WOOL BROAD
CLOTHS, 40 inches wide, reduced
from $1 to 65c.
450 YARDS SWAINLAND, ALL
WOOL PRINTED FLANNELS, 30
inches wide, reduced from 75c. to 50c.
500 PAIRS GENTLEMEN'S ALL
WOOL, SEAMLESS, SHAWKNIT
HALF HOSE, Gray and Brown, re
duced from 50c. to 35c, or three pairs
for $1.
SHAWKNIT CAMEL'S HAIR HALF
HOSE, same price, three pairs for f.l.
Call and examine our 50c. UNLATJN
DRIED WHITE SHIRTS.
Our $1 LAUNDRIED SHIRT, which
we have reduced to 75c, is the best
value ever offered in Los Angeles.
GRAND DISPLAY
Of the above goods in our show windows.
THE COULTER
Dry Goods House
ioi, 103, 105 S. Spring St.,
LOS ANGELES, CAE.
HOTEL del CORONADO.
SAN DIEGO COUNTY,
IS THE HOST
Remarkable and Magnificent
On the continent of America.
The climate of the peninsula whereon
this gorgeous structure stands
is both
PrcservatiYß _acfl_ Restoratlye.
There is NO MUD and LESS FOGS
than prevail back in the country. The
temperature during the winter is 8°
warmer at Coronado than that of the
most favored of the five world-renown
ed Mediterranean resorts.
Rates, from $2 per day by the month;
transients, $3 per day and up accord
ing to room,
E. S. BABI'OCK, Jr., Manager.
Maps showing floor plans, also rates,
can be ascertained and printed matter
to be had at the
HOTEL del CORONADO
Excursion and Information
Agency,
Cor. Spring and Franklin Sts.,
Near tho Santa Fe Office,
LOS ANGELEB : : CALIFORNIA.
Hotel Keepers, Attention!
THE HOTEL Del CAMPO AT ANAHEIM,
is being furnished by tbe owners and is offered
lor rent on very reasonable terms to a live and
experienced hotel keeper. Tbe house is new,
well situated, and a large patronage is assured.
Fall particulars will be given by calling upon
the
ANAHEIM IMPROVEMENT COMPANY.
TflGO, REISER, President.
d3O-tf
NOTICE.
For Sale, Cheap, For Cash,
—ONK OF THE LARGEST—
HOTEL RANGES
Made by Baker Iron Works; cost $165; and two
oi a medium size,sloo each; also one St. Louis
Stand Range.
W 11. LEV V,
SECOND-HAND DEALER,
112 to 118 Upper main Street.
jS-lm
Tie Western Intelligence Office,
J. VI I,MET * CO.,
Employment and Rental Bureau
Business conducted on a strictly fair and ,
square basis.
•Ive us a call at 36J* 8. SPRING ST. (Upstairs),
ILOS ANGELES, CAL.
Separate apartment for Ladies. ja 19 lm*
MISCELLANEOUS.
GREAT P| OLT Sffi
Positively Going Oot of Business.
Selling Out Everything.
Goods Positively Sold at Eastern Mannfaetnreps' Prices.
GREATEST SACRIFICE SALE IN
FURNITURE
EVER PRESENTED TO YOU.
EyThe Stockholders of this Company have decided that
everything must be sold before the FIRST OF FEB
RUARY, 1889.
NO ARTICLE WILL BE SPARED.
i Grandest Money Saving Opportunity of the Times
ALL GOODS DELIVERED FREE.
Pacific Furniture Co.,
226. 228 AND 230 SOUTH MAIN ST, M i.
CLEARANCE SALE
CARPETS, WALL PAPER, Etc.
AT THE
Philadelphia Carpet and Wall Paper House.
Nov Is your time to get cheap
CARPETS, "W-A.Lilj PAPERS, Etc.
Two-ply Ingrain Carpets From 35c. per yard sip.
Hand-loom " From 65c. " '*
Three-ply " From 90c. " "
Tapestry Brussels " From 65c. " "
Body " " From 900. " ••
Mcquette " From $1.20 " "
White Blank Wall Papers from 6V4C. per roll np.
And all other goods In our line at equally low prices. Our stock Is new and bright,
and worthy your inspection.
Price lists to the country on application. Estimates furnished.
BEN COHEN. 240-2/p S. spring St.. Los Angeles.
ROUSE & CURTIS,
General Commission Merchants,
AND DEALERS IN
POTATOES, ONIONS, BEANS, BUTTER,
CHEESE, EGGS, POULTRY, ETC.
POTATOES IN OAR LOTS A SPECIALTY.
110 Upper Main Street and 539 North Main Street,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED. TELEPHONE NO. 881.
d29-lm
THE BEST
The Market.
For sale at all first-class coal yards. Ask for no other.
General Office—6o9 East Firnt Street- n29-2m
COAL. COAL. COAL.
South Field Wellington and Foreign Steam Coal.
I beg to announce to the public that I have entered into the coal business
in this city, and am prepared to supply customers with the best grades of
Domestic and STEAM COAL at lowest market prices. Special rates for carloads
and large lots.
HA IST COCK BANNING,
COAL. DEALER,
Office: Room 84, Eanfranco Bulldlnsr, 118 North main Street.
PASADENA TRANSFER CO., AGENTS, I WHOLESALE YARDS AT
PASADENA. I WILMINGTON. 12s 3m
MONTGOMERY, GRANT <fc CO.,
233 N. Ln Ansrelesi St. Branch store* at Pomona and. San Bernardino.
NORWEGIAN STEEL PLOWS. SYRACUSE CHILLED PLOWS.
BUGGIES AT COST, AND VEHICLES OF ALL KIND3'THE SAME. !B
We carry everything required by the Farmer Hnd Orchardiet. jal 12m "
RECEIVED AND NOW ON SALE AT
HARPER & REYNOLDS [CO. 5 !
Carload of those celebrated wrought-iron Home Comfort Ranges; also several car
loads of Cooking and Heating Stoves for Coal, Wood, Coal Oil and Gasoline
on hand.
A very fine assortment of Geo. Wostenholm's I X L and Ha mason & Buckley's
Pocket Cutlery, American Carvers and Table Knives in fine cases, also those
celebrated brands of Razors, "Progress," "Bengal," and Wade & Butcher.
Complete stock of all kinds of Builders' Hardware and Mechanics' Tools always
on hand.
HAEPER & REYNOLDS CO.
48 and 50 North Main Street. nio-ea
5

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