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Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, March 23, 1889, Image 3

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PETERED OUT!
That's What's the matter With
the miuea.
Three weeks ago one could hardly
meet a man on the streets who was not
either starting or preparing to start for
the Santa Clara mines. Now, there is
no trick in finding half-a-dozen men in
the space of a block who have just re
turned from those mines, and whose "lips
drop curses" on those who got up the
blankety-blank fake and swindle.
Yesterday a patriarchal old miner
named Andrews, who has been
through it all in the course
of a prolonged lifetime, came into the
Herald office for the eminently Chris
tian purpose of lifting up his voice
through these columns "to prevent any
one going to those mines to put money
into the shrunken pouch of the Interna
tional Company of Mexico, and to gratify
the greed of the insatiable Mexican
Customs Officer."
"I was sent for from Calico," said Mr.
Andrews, "to go and investigate the new
mines, in the interest of Mr. Cole and
Mr. Campbell, of this city, who knew
that I had spent a lifetime in following
up tlio.se excitements, and would be lia
ble to tell, with tolerable accuracy, just
how much or how little there was in the
new alleged El Dorado.
"I went by steamer from San Diego
to Knsenada, and from there to the
placers by stage. I found absolutely
nothing worthy of the name of a mine
there. That is all there is to that.
"We had only been a few minutes in
camp when a Mexican came up to us and
showed us a fine specimen, which he
said he had just found, but we were in
formed by one of the men who had baen
some time in camp that the same identi
cal nugget had done service of that sort
every day—and sometimes several times
a day—since the camp started. It
was a portion of the "salting" of tbe
"I stayed long enough to satiety my
self that there is not, and cannot be, any
profitable work done in the Santa Clara
mines. Why, I watched the rockers
closely, and I never saw even a half dol
lar's worth taken out, and it was rarely,
very rarely indeed, that a 'color' was
found. The men who are at work there
are not making oO cents a day.
"The breaking up of the camp has set
in and made good progress. Those who
brought considerable supplies with them
are selling them as rapidly as they can
dispose of them. One man sold a tent to
ns for $30 for which he had paid $00
duty at Tia Juana, besides tbe original
cost. Bacon is selling at 25 cents a
pound which paid 40 cents a pound duty
to the Mexican customs officers. Flour
is selling at $2 a sack, and mining tools
are a drug in the market. Mr. Cole
bought a pick and shovel there for 50
cents, and brought them back with him
when he came home.
"The formation at Santa Clara —lam
speaking especially of Spanish Gulch—is
a brownish granite, and there is an en
tire absence of slate and clay. The
quartz ledges, of which so much has
been said, are what miners call 'gash'
ledges, of a wedge or V shape, running
down between walls of granite.
"Whether it is the case or not, there
is no denying that the impression is
strong—amounting even to conviction —
among the men do\vn there that the
International Company of Mexico have
worked up the excitement for purposes
of their own. It is certainly the fact that
men in their employ are prospecting all
over the country and locating ledges."
Another young fellow in the typical
miner's garb stated to a Herald man
that he had just returned that afternoon
the mines, and very glad to get back he
was. His language was even stronger
than that used by Mr. Andrews, and he
was unsparing in his condemnation of
the bilks who had started the excitement.
TOURIST TRAVEL.
New Arrangcnieuti Made 1 ester
day —Pullman's Oars.
On important meeting of coast railroad
men was held in San Francisco yester
day morning to decide what was to be
done regarding the second-class tourist
business. As a result, the following dis
patch was received here soon after noon
by Mr. J. B. Quigley, of the Burlington
road, from Coast Agent W. D. Sanborn:
"After April Ist we will not run free
excursions west of Ogden. Regular
Pullman rates to Ogden will be charged
by our road—free berths beyond that
point. Copy of agreement arrived at
will be mailed to you to-day."
This effectually disposes of the free
tourist berth service outof Southern Cali
fornia, the party which will be sent out
of here on the 23th inst. by the Burling
ton route being the last of the old
regime. All of the complications which
have arisen since Pullman bought up the
tourist cars on most of the Western
roads will also be done away with, and
the result will certainly be an improve
ment all around. The lines at present
holding out against the Pullman berth
rates to excursion passengers are the
Burlington, Rock Island, Denver and Rio
Grande, Chicago and Alton, Union Pa
cific and Walters, but their tether will
come to an end with the present month.
From and after April Ist, therefore, sec
ond-class passengers to Eastern points
must in addition to their tickets pur
chase berth checks, but on account of
the Burlington and Rock Island roads
running via the Denver & Rio Grande,
and therefore not having to pay the
Pullman rates beyond Ogden, all of the
lines will make an uniform charge on ex
cursion days of $- for berths to all points
East.
The first of the new tourist cars which
Pullman has built for the California
second-class business was in the Wolf
skin depot on Wednesday evening, and
went out with the Phillips' Union Pacific
party. Outwardly it presents a much
more attractive appearance than the old
style of car, being handsomely painted
and paneled, the name "Pullman" ap
pearing in bold letters. AVithin
are comfortable berths, carpet
ing, stoves, dining-rooms and beds,
the linen of which is changed
every day, so a second-class passenger
can now cross the continent in good solid
comfort. It will be a further incentive
to travel, without doubt, and as several
of the excursion agents have announced
their intention of remaining in the busi
ness, the liberal advertising which this
section has received at their hands will
be maintained.
THeIjEW EL DOiIADO.
An Anareleuo'* Tlewa on tne «.ol<t
Fake.
The following letter, written by a well
known gentleman of this city, will be
read with interest. Of course news much
later than the 10th instant is now known
here, but Mr. Harrington's letter, even
at that early date foreshadows the re
sults all now know:
Ensenada, March 10, 1889.
Editors Hebald—Presuming that a
line from the Mexican supply town of
the golden El Dorado would be accept
able to your readers, I will tell you the
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 23. 1889.
plain, unvarnished facts about the gold
mines as I have gleaned them from good,
reliable authorities — men who know
whereof they speak. I left Lis Angeles
Wednesday ."March 6th, at 3:50 r. m., via
California Southern railroad. On the
train I was fortunate to form the acquaint
ance of a party of three who were on
their way to the Santa Clara mines. We
arrived in San Diego that night at 9
o'clock, and looked about us to learn the
best way of getting to the mines. The
overland route presented many great dif
ficulties. We spent all day Thursday
and Friday perfecting our purchases and
getting our manifest all correct, and de
termined to go by boat to Ensenada,
which we did on Saturday morning, and
arrived here that evening. We experi
enced no difficulty in landing with our
luggage, as the officials here have deter
mined to place no obstacle in tho way of
parties seeking their fortune in this coun
try, which is undoubtedly full of gold;
but let me give fair warning to all that
the true facts are not known, and all is
not told that should be told. I know
nothing, personally, about the mines,
and it is not my desire to discourage
others from coming here; but let them
look before they leap. Every story I have
heard from the American Bide is very
much exaggerated. The placer mines
of Santa Clara are only two miles long,
and every foot of that ground is taken
up. I would not advise any but practical
miners to come here at all.
Our party—consisting of Dr. G. M.
Ellingsworth, Dr. B. Dozier, W. D.
Chafiee, Judge E. D. Singletary, Captain
Joe Ferner, W. D. S. Harrington and W.
H. Fitzpatrick—all from Los Angeles,
are equipped for a two months' stay, and
you shall hear from me again during that
time if you report the facts as I write
them to you.
Gold nuggets cannot be taken out of
every pan of dirt, neither can the gold be
had by digging a few shovelfuls of dirt.
My advice to my friends who never ex
perienced a rough journey is to stay at
home. lam nrpparpd for the worst, and
shall know whether or not there is any
gold in this section that can be worked
out with profit. Many come here and
expect to find gold such as is on exhibi
tion in the stores, and when they have
dug up a few shovelfuls of dirt and find
it not, they go away discouraged, glad to
get back to Ensenada, and take the
steamer home. We expect to buy plenty
of provisions at the mines as cheap as
we could in Los Angeles. If any old
prospectors come, let them buy no pro
visions until they reach Ensenada, and
all the baggage 'they bring let it be in
their hands. Picks and shovels can be
bought at the mines for a song
from the disappointed clerks and others
who left good jobs to try their
fortune at something they know noth
ing of—gold mining. To the sorrow of
many, who cannot adapt themselves to
all circumstances, they have found that
gold mining is a trade that requries some
little experience. We have two experi
enced miners with our party and are
prepared to endure many hardships, and
we fancy we shall strike a quartz ledge or
two if any are to be had. Two-thirds of
the crowd that are at the mines now will
leave there within a week, and those left
behind will stay until their provisions
give out or until they strike a ledge.
There is gold there, but not one out of
twenty-five will strike it, and do not fail
to impress your readers with that fact.
W. I). S. Harrington,
SEMI-TROPIC FRUIT.
It Uoes East to Advertise Lot in.
ajcles County.
The San Francisco Call, of last Wed
nesday, in an account of the meetiag of
the Directors of the State Board of
Trade, speaks of the gratification which
was manifested by that organization at
learning that Los Angeles had joined
forces with them in exhibiting the
products of the State in the car traveling
through the East. One of the directors
remarked at the meeting in question that
soon it would be possible to show the
people of the East some of the semi
tropic productions of California, and in
this connection it was admitted that the
exhibit thus far had been of a temperate
rather than a semi-tropic order. This
demonstrates the fact that the exhibit
sent on by this county will occupy a
very conspicuous place in the car and at
tract a considerable degree of attention.
It was mentioned in yesterday's
Herald that some of the fruit had been
donated by Eugene Germain. The
names of others who have contributed
thus far to help advertise the county are
Joseph Miller of Cahuenga, H. Fuller of
Azasa, H. Jevne and Hervey Lindley of
this city and the Sierra Vintage Com
pany. Mr. G. A. Van Alstine collected
the products and helped put them in or
der to be dispatched East. It is of the
highest importance that an interest
should be taken by fruit-growers in this
exhibit, and that the Chamber should be
supplied with plenty of materials with
which to continue the advertising of the
section.
Depot Jotting's.
A special train of cattle from Arizona,
are en route to this city.
Mr. C. L. Mixer, agent for the South
ern Pacific at San Diego, is in the city.
General Manager Dan McCool, of the
Santa Fe system, has returned to town.
Judge Egan, the right-of-way attorney
for the Santa Fe's California lines, is in
th city.
Trainmaster J. H. Whedon, of the
California Central and California South
ern, is in town.
Mr. Thos. Nickerson, one of the stock
holders in the Santa Fe, who has been
paying a visit to the town, returned yes
terday to Boston.
It is rumored that Mr. H. B. Wilkins
is to be transferred to the Sonora branch
of the Santa Fe road with headquarters
at Guaymas, Mex.
Excursion News.
A Raymond & Whitcomb excursion of
three carloads of tourists and a combin
ation coach will leave El Paso on Sun
day night for this city.
A Sunset excursion of seventy-five
people is on the road here from Boston,
and is due on Monday night.
A Walters excnrsion from the East
will arrive here on Tuesday next.
Mr. T. Walton, Special Excursion
Commissioner for the Southern Pacific,
is booming up the Santa Barbara travel.
He has made arrangements with the
hotel-keepers there whereby a cheap
round trip may be made.
The next Sunset eaatbound party will
leave on the 31st inst.
A meeting of members of tbe Apex
Athletic Club will be held this evening
at Judge Lockwood's courtroom, at half
past 7 o'clock. A large attendance is de
sired, as business of importance will be
transacted.
You Smile, and Why?
Because you jußt boughtthat nobby suit at a
very low price from Mullen, Bluett A Co.,
Spring and Firat.
Geo. O. Ford and J. B. Myer
Hare purchased the C ataliua Hotel.
Suppressing Fan Tan.
A war is being made on the fan tan
tames in Chinatown, instigated by the
Chinese merchants themselves, who say
that they experience great difficulty in
collecting their debts while the games
are running. A number of Lawson's
patrolmen are now guarding the streets
in front of certain of the games to pre
vent them from continuing.
It is said by those who claim to know
that there are some very queer features
in this apparently laudable undertaking.
It has been known for some time that
money was being put up by some of the
games and not by some of the others.
They have not been interfered with, ex
cept when they became too open and
flagrant, it being the policy of the present
police administration cot to burden the
criminal courts with aimless and ueeless
efforts at prosecution for this crime. The
money that has been collected went into
the hands of a clique of Chinamen, who
claimed that they used it to
secure immunity for the games that
put up. This would have seemed a
reasonable statement if the other games
had been stopped, but they were as free
from interference as those that paid the
levy. The fact appears to be that the
scheme was nothing more or less than
blackmail, and it also appears that this
crusade has been made solely for the
purpose of forcing the outside games to
come into the pool.
MANUFACTURERS' PEICES
For Clothing; and Furnishing; Goods,
SPECIAL BULLETIN FOR THIS WEEK.
Boys' handsome blouse suits, all colors, $1;
regular price, $1 75.
Boys' durable school suits, $1,50; regular
price, S3.
Boys' dress suits, imported goods, $5; regular
price, $9 50.
Boys' kilt suits at $1.50, $2, $3 and $5; worth
double.
Boys' knee pants, 25c, 35c,40c., 50c,; worth
double.
Boys' hats, new spring Btyle, 25c, 50c, ond
75c ; regular price, 75c. tosl 50.
Boys' shirt waists, 15c. 25c, 40c. and 50c:
regular price, 3d cents to $1.
Men's jeans pants, extra strong, 75c; regular
price, $1.25.
Men's cassimore pauts, new styles, $1; regu
lar price, $1.75.
Men's fancy cassimere, new styles, $1.50:
regular price, $2.25.
Men's fine dress pants, $2.50; regular price,
*4.
Men's imported worsted,s3 !)0; regular price,
$7.
Men's business suits, new designs, $5; regu
lar price, $9.
Men's all-wool suits, elegant goods, $7.50;
regular price, $12.50
Men's flue dress suits, $10.50; regular price,
$1(5.30.
M."-'s underwear and shirts at prices that
wlii attonif-h you.
Uu / your goods direct irom the manufacturers.
We Lave our owu iactory at 88 and 90 Walker
street, New York. These dull times it's a duty
you owe yourself and family to buy where you
can get the best value for the least money.
Our prices are the talk of the town.
Plunder Store Co.,
19 North Main street.
Money! Money! Money!
Tne root of all evil—but save it by buying
clothing at sacrifice figures.—Mullen, Bluett &
Co., Spring and First.
Dyspepsia and Liver Complaint.
Is it not worth the small price of 75 cents to
free yourself of every symptom of these dis
tressing complaints, if you think so call at our
store and get a bottle of Shiloh's Vitallzer.
Every bottle has a printed guarantee on it, use
accordingly, and if it does you no good it will
cost you noihing. Sold by C. F. Heinzeman.
Dealers and Consumers of Beer
Will find it to their advantage to call on Phila
delphia Brewery, Aliso street, lor the best lager
or steam-beer, good on draught for weeks at
lowest prices. Bottled lager $1.20 per doien, if
bottles returned. Delivered to any part of the
oity. Telephone 91.
Four Cents Per Day
Secures a policy of $5,000 and $25 per week
indemnity in the Capital Accident Company.
Herbert C. Parks.
State Manager, Lot Angeles.
Notary Public and Commissioner
.lomrj i tiuiu: una t/oauniHieuer
For New York and Arizona, G. A. Doblnson
134 West Second street. Hollenbeck Block.
Try the Monarch Paint.
The only absolutely pure lead, oil and zinc
paint iv the city. For sale by J. M. Blackburn,
310 South Spring street.
Sherwin-Williams Paint.
P. H. Matthews, sole ageut, corner Second
and Los Angeles streets. Telephone 1025.
Go to S. M. Perry's
For anything yon want in the way of gas fix
tures, plumbing goods, etc. No. 30 South Main
St. Bath tabs made to order.
Catalina Hotel Is Enlarged
The finest table and best management.
Philadelphia Ice-Cream Factory.
12 North Spring Btreet. Telephone, 303.
Tufts' Lyon Arms Co.
iuiis' y„ai araii i t).
Will remove April -Ist from First st. to 40 S.
Spring. _
Cherry, Mahogany.
nd other stains and varnishes, at P. H.
athews', Second aud Los Augeles. Telephone
MS,
A package of Srand Republic Buffos will last
n economical unooker all day. They are all
lavana tobacco and they only cost 10 cents a
ackage,
St. Louis Lead, Eastern Oil
And painters'supplies, at P. H. Mathews'.
I am happy. I have a Orand Republic Baffo.
bought four for 10 cents. Their all Havana
>bacco.
Htemouy cures rheumatism. 143 E. First st.
I«llgC___AN-OCB.
No ReasoDable Offer Kef ased
FOB
Three Upright and Two spare
PIANOS !
MUST BE SOLD WITHIN A WEEK.
For terms sea
J. B. O'CONNOR,
218 South Main street. Panorama Building.
f 241 f
H. P. GREGORY & CO.
11T !t. Los Angeles St.,
Boilers, Engines, Steam Pumps,
OTTO GAB ENGINES,
General Power Machinery.
Agenti lor "HINKLE" PATENT PASSENGER
AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS.
Correspondence Solicited. mls 2m^
The Only Reliable Optical Institute,
131-133 B. Spring St., L. A. Theater Bldg.
TnE LOB ANGELES OPTICAL INSTITUTE,
N. STRASSBURGER,
SCIENTIFIC OPTICIAN.
Testing of eyes free. Grinding of lenses to order
a specialty. No peddlers employed. I use my
own name only. Absolute porfect fitting guar
anteed where glasses are required, ml 4 12m
miSCELLAIMUOIJs.
CBEAH m*™**
b« BUMS
2JH2K HAVDRIII6
p QWDff mum
Use.l by the Unltea States Government. Enaorsed by the heads ol tne Great uai verities
and Public Food Analysts, as the Strongest, Purest and most Healthful. Dr. Price's Cream
flaking Powder does not contain Ammonia, Lime or Alum. Dr. Price's Delicious Flavoring
I \ira ts. Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Almond, Hose, etc., do not co tain Poisonous Oilsor
(/liemicals.
PRICE RtKINO I'IIWBKK CO. New York. Chicago. San Francisco.
Those who haveused «a?Tr.-
V ttTI J il fi i giving satis faction, and a customer with Bron
-6 LJ drfi rS>i 1 ' chitis says it is the only remedy that gives in-
CMS. g}3 l_J stent relief"—Bßßßßl.L & Covkb, Druggists,
= v H 0 Havp" * * tlie Pleasure to inform yoi
- i -Ji_ S£a iiavc that your preparations are meeting
§Cgg N ' j -Vl/TH ( r-* > with largo sales. ******* Wo hear
• ■ IC ' Nothing but praise tITIS
-'-Ci'l 'hem.I'—Naacawbh1 '—Naacawbh is Co., Druggists, Visalia,
' U I,"*" '-T'j That It wiii accompiish ihe end desired in all
gffi&feis* i »' 1 lib affections of the Throat and Lungs and you not
SS3IS(P*' TCP - n tr\ 17w If w j 11 °t>ly Will not be without it yourself,
'K\ MVJ l( r> 11 wm but will recommend it to others, st
JiVl "j_l~ljf thousands have done who have tried everything
rM t\ f? 41 on n «iM|]?fffl| else in vain, money is no object where health It
11)) /JvlpAuJlvi\\lr * II fling sum of one dollar oan COnVIDCe JOU
S~*\ V v I pnrchafe a remedy that will stand between yo»
/2 , fft fitfl II and one of the most dreaded of human ills.
(QtjlttS AS™V.^ Is prepared only by the ABIETINE MEDICAJ
, ''>D|SE/'ISES' f THROAX^—£<B»-Otrculars sent free, containing detailed
U NO6 -Soii .n Gtf^lff defICri - IOU *
SANTA ABIE
tor Sale by C. H. HANCE, 77 and 79 North Spring Street.
F. W. BRAUN & CO.,
| WHOLESALE AGENTS. sB-12m LOS ANGELES,
MONTGOMERY, GRANT & CO.,
233 N. I.oa Anareles St. Branca Stores at;pam«na and San Bernardino.
NORWEGIAN STEEL PLOWS. SYRACUSE CHILLED PLOWS.
BUGGIES AT COST, AND VEHICLES OF ALL KINDS THE SAME.
We carry everything reqnlred by the Farmer and Orchardlst. ml 10m
GALLUP, NEW MEXICO, COAL.
WHOLESALE AND EETAIL.
CHAS. A. MARRINER, General Sales Agent.
Office and Yard. 607 East First Street.
TELEPHONE 900.
Screened Lnmp Coal, Delivered Loose 811 OO Per Ton.
In Sacks 12 00 " "
Single Sack, In Yard 60 Per Sack.
" " Delivered 15 " "
CAR LOTS A SPECIALTY, mlo 3m
RECEIVED AND NOW ON SALE AT
HARPER & REYNOLDS CO.
Carload of those celebrated wrought-iron Home Comfort Ranges; also several car
loads of Cooking and Heating Stoves for Coal, Wood, Coal Oil and Gasoline
on hand.
A very fine assortment of Geo. Wostenholm's I X L and Humason & Buckley's
Pocket Cutlery, American Carvers and Table Knives in fine cases, alsotho*"
celebrated brands of Razors, "Progress," "Bengal," and Wade & Butcher.
Complete stock of all kinds of Builders' Hardware and Mechanics' Tools always
on hand.
HARPER & REYNOLDS CO.
48 and SO North Main Street nio-em
Over $1,000,000 Worth of Properties for Exchange
A TtmTTXyq ABB HOW OtTKBING FOB ONX-FOPBTH
IVI C*A j /-\ 1 y I I I 1 O value lor cash several houses and lots, vacant
lots and desirable sere properties /—I A T TTrY~VRT*vTT A GO Fi
in Los Angeles City and Couuty, IJ VV_L\jJJN JL-ZrV. wanted
at once by some ol our cut turners, who are willing to sacrifice choice properties. Please
call now QFFICE, W est°llr. s tst.
Properties for exchange in California and all Eastern States.
Ranch Properties for Sale or Exchange. Cheapest in California. mIG lm
$30 a Year-What it Will Do.
THE UNION DEBENTURE BOND CO., OF BOSTON, MASS, 0 M'ITAL $500,000, WILL
invest this small amount (divided into quarterly, semi annual or anuual payments), each
year for ten years, and return #500 to you.
This Is ot the rate of nearly 10 per cent, compound interest.
Learn to save your money. Buy oue or two bonds, aud have $1,000 or more saved up in
ten years.
Call and get full information at once.
WJVI. ALRICHB, Agent,
mlo-12m 131 8. Spring street, Los Angeles Theatre Building.
Established 1840. JJ J| Jj
CUNARD. M
—lIETWIKN—
Europe and America.
For tickets, etc., apply to
A. W. H. PEYTON,
AGENT,
73 Nortu Spring; Street,
LO9 ANGELES, CALm 22 lm
Oil* _ir^__P____k>f^
Sill
jf* . ,
These caps can be found at the following
Draggle!*: <1. E. Fullerton, C. H. Hanee,
Thompson _ Co., H. Germain, E. Williams,
Beau A Sargent, Wrede St Buehler, Blackman
& Qifford, South Side Pharmacy, 169 S. Main at.
Dr. J. M. Harris, Boyle Heights.
119 12m d_w
B4NKISO HOTSES.
BANK^
Cor. Fort and Second sts., Los Angeles.
Subscribed Capital ¥500 000
Paid up Capitol *3oo!ooO
Surplus $20,000
dihectors:
Hervey Llndley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones.
Jnan Bernard, J. Frankenfleld.
H. G. Newhall President
H. C. Witmer Vioe-President
T. J. Weldon. Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. ; V 4 4m
LIABMERo" AND MERCHANTS' BANK
£ Or LOS AJJGELE9, CAL.
Ibai as W. Hellman President
L. C. Goodwin Vice-President
Capital (paid np) - - $500,000.
Surplus and Reserve Fund 750,000.
Total, .... $1,250,000.
DIRECTORS.
O.W. Childs, C. E. Thorn, Jose Masctrel, J
B. Lankersnim C. Dncommuu, Philippe Gar
HeUmun Go0llwin • L L - Bradbury, Isaias W.
STOCKHOLDERS.
O. W. Childs, L. L. Bradbury, Philippe Gam
ier, J »mea B. Lankershlm, T. L. Duque, Jose
Mutcarel, chas. Ducommun, Andrew GlasseU.
Cameron E. Thorn Domingo Amettoy, Louis
Polaski, L. C. Goodwin, Prestley C. Baker. l!
J. Rose, Frsnk Lecouvreor, Oliver H Buss.
Sarah J. Lee, Estate D. Solomon, Chris. Henna. 1
Jacob Knhrts. Isaias W. Hellman. ml
gECURITY SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST CO.
40 8. Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal
Capital, $200,000.00.
F. N. Myers, B, A. Fleming, J. F. Sartort
I'iesident. Vice-President. Cashier.
STOCKHOLDERS—Isaias W. Hellman O W
Childs, Eugene Germain, S. A. Fleming, F N'
Myers, J. F Sartori, T. L. Dnqne, J. A. Graves!
J. C. Daly, Morris S. Hellman, Thomas Mere :
dith, Samuel Polaski, Jo h n P. Moran, J. L
Cherry, Nathan Weil, Isidor Polaski, W M
Caswell, R. y. Mcßride. James 11. Shaukland'
John H. Bartle, G. W. Perkins, A. J. Brown
President Fourth National Bank of Grand
Rapids, M. B. Shaw.
a per cent Interest Paid an Deposits.
Money loaned on ranches and city property
at lowest rates of interest. «pc«r
Bonds and mortgages bought and sold.
savings deposits solicited. nii7-I2ui
ANGELES COUNTY BANK, ~
Temple Block, Los Angeles, CaL
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Reserve Fund, $100,000.
K OHN n ?-/^ TKR President
R. 8. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART........ctsISsr
_ . . DIRECTORS:
H. L. MacnelL Jotham Bixby,
John E. Plater, Robert 8. Baker,
John A. Paxton, Geo. W. Prescott,
Geo. H. Stewart.
Bny and Sell Exchange on Ban Fran
cisco, New York, London, Paris, Berlin aad
Frankfort.
Buy Exchange on all parts of the United States
and Europe.
Receive Money on open account and osr
titlcate of deposit, snd do a general banking
and exchange business.
JjUHST NATIONAL BANK UK I.CJ6 ANIiELKS
CAPITAL BTOCK $200,000.
REBEBVE $205,000.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
E. F. SPENCE... President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier.
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bieknell, B. H
Mott. Wm. Lacy, J. F. Crank, H. Mabary
J. M. Elliott. ml
rrUIE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOB ANGELES
No. 119 New High street
capitalstock, paid dp - $100,000
B. ff. WIDNEY- ~ T~ . President
GEO. L. ARNOLD • . ■ Cashier
GEO, BINSABAUGH, • • Teller
directors:
R. M. Widnby, Chas. A. Wabneb.
D O. Miltimobb C. M. Wells.
8. W. Littu, L. J. P. Morrill,
D. R. Risley.
Eight per cent, bonds secured by first mort
gage on real estate, with interest payable semi
annually, are offered to Investors of $250 and
upwards. aug9-tf
gOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATION AL BANS
NADEAU BLOCK.
L. N. BBEED President
WM. F. BOSBYSHELL Vice-President
C. N. FLINT Cashier
Paid-in Capital $200,000
Sobplos 20,000
Authorized Capital 500,000
Directors—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, H. A.
Barclay, Charles E. Day, E. C. Bosbyshell, M.
Hagsn, Frank Rader, Louis Gottschalk, D.
Remick, Thos. Goss, William F. BosbysheU.
aug24-M
T OS ANGELES SAVINGS BANK,
130 NORTH MAIN STREET.
CAPITAL $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL. Secbetabt
I. W. Hellman, John B. Plateb,
Bobrbt S. Bakbb, John A. Paxton,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received In sums of
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums at
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Los Angeles, Jnly 1. 1884. mltf
ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
COB. First and Speins Sts,
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus and Undivided Profits. 50,000 00
Total $550,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKB President
JOHN BRYSON, Sb Vice-President
F. 0, HOWES Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Mabxhak.
Perky M. Green, John Bryson, Bb.,
Db, H. Sinhabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrakb.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. ]y8
STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION
kj —OF THE —
LOB ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Of Loa Angeles, California,
Febbuary 26, 1889.
RESOURCES.
Loans and Disconuts $1,049,94!) (S3
Expense Account 3,519 76
Banking House and Fixtures .... 178,505 44
cash assets.
Government Bonds SCO 200 00
Due from Banks and Cash in Safe 945,279 57
$2,737,450 40
LIABILITIES.
Capital $ 500,000 00
Surplus 50 000 00
Undivided Profits 22,!)t!8 31
National Bank Notes Outstanding 45,000 00
Deposits 2.119.482 09
ml 4 lm $2,737,450 40
"a eT&niedt & CO.
sttfl Manufacturers of and
SypPPnre Ground Bone.
IF YOU WANT YOUB
Chickens to Lay
And be Healthy, feed them Crushed
Bone.
OFFICE AND WAREROOMS—
84, EAST SECOND ST.
ASK YOUK GROCER FOB IT. ml 7 1
3

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