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Los Angeles daily herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, March 24, 1889, Image 2

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BURNS FOR CHIEF.
A Stormy Meeting of the
Police Commission.
THE VOTE IS THREE TO TWO.
Messrs. Lindley and Knox Explain
Their Vote and Enter a
Strong Protest.
The principal topic of conversation on
the streets yesterday morning was the
possible chance of each candidate for
Chief of Police, and the combinations
which it was alleged had been arranged
to affect the matter. It was rumored
that a meeting of the Police Commis
sioners had been held during the early
hours of the morning, and that while no
agreement had been reached, yet it was
possible that such an event might hap
pen in the afternoon. It subsequently
transpired that no meeting had been
held in the morning, but that one would
take place at the St. Elmo Hotel at 2
o'clock in the afternoon. Prior to this
time the members of the Commission
had a persistent siege of office-seekers to
keep at arm's length, and it appeared
as if nearly every one on the street was
either alter a position for himself or for
someone else. According to the ordi
nance adopted by the Council the force
will consist of but seventy men, includ
ing tbe Captain, Sergeants, drivers and
clerk, and it was difficult for the Com
missioners to see how they could satisfy
even a tenth part of the number who had
applied.
At 2 o'clock the Commissioners,accom
panied by reporters, who were admitted
to the meetings for the first time, ascended
the stairs at the St. Elmo Hotel, and en
tered the parlors where Mayor Hazard
called the meeting to order, and ap
pointed Mr. Bilderrain as Secretary.
Mayor Hazard then read those portions
of the Charter, which apply to the Po
lice Commission, and inquired as to the
rule laid down for balloting.
Mr. Lindley suggested that the Com
mission follow the rule adopted on Fri
day, which was to vote viva voce.
Mr. Hazard Baid he thought the rule to
be followed was the one laid down in the
Charter.
No rule was found and the matter was
dropped.
Mr. Lindley said that he desired to
move for an adjournment until Monday
afternoon at 2 o'clock. H i desired tho
adjournment for the reasou that ho
thought the first thing to be done by the
Commission was a selection of a Chief
of Police. The selection of a Chief was
a most important matter, i and further
time should be taken for its considera
tion. "It is by the selection of the Chief
of Police," said he, "that we determine
the policy of the Board, as to whether
there shall be a corrupt or an honest ad
ministration, and we should not proceed
hastily. I believe it is the desire of the
Board to act in harmony, and this would
not be done if the election of Chief of
Police were gone into at once."
The Board should act deliberately so
that the opinion of the people should be
with it in its administration, and Mr.
Lindley said that he would enter a vigor
ous protest to immediate action, and
with documents which he had in his
pocket, which he did not deeire to pro
duce. He wanted ample time to con
sider the matter. He said he knew that
the public sentiment was against the
man who had been {named by some of
the Board. He wished to impress it
upon the Board that, if an election was
proceeded with at once, there would be
no harmony. If the election proceeded
at once it would not be on account of
any urgency, but on account of personal
motives, and he would put himself on
record as opposing it. If the matter was
pat over until Monday, he would be
ready to vote. An election before Mon
day would not be for the public interest.
He closed by saying, "We are elected
here to do our duty, and I will not act
hastily."
Mr. Knox seconded Mr. Lindley's mo
tion and said he endorsed and reiterated
what Mr. Lindley had said and was pre
pared to sign the written document in
Mr. Lindley's possession.
Mayor Hazzard said that he desired
that any paper to be signed should be
made public. Every man there had
made up his mind and there was no use
for longer delay. A month ago he had
said he would not vote for Mr. Burns if
any one of the charges against him could
be proven, but no evidence of the truth
of the charges could be produced, and he
was ready to vote.
Major Furrey said that there was a
document in existence and it should be
brought out and made public.
Mr. Bilderrain also said that he would
like to hear what was in the document
referred to by Mr. Lindley.
Mr. Lindley moved to adjoarn. Lost
by the following vote: Aye—Lindley
and Knox; Noes —Bilderrain, Furrey and
Hazard.
Mr. Knox moved to adjourn till 10
o'clock Monday. Lost by tbe same vote.
Mr. Knox moved to adjourn until 7:30
i. m. Lost by tbe same vote.
Mr. Bilderrain moved that the Board
proceed to the election of a chief.
Mr. Lindley moved, as a substitute,
that the Board organize and elect its offi
cers. Carried.
Mr. Knox moved that a receßS be
taken nntil Mayor's Clerk Robinson ar
rived. Ruled out of order.
Mayor Hazard called for nominations
for chairman.
Mr. Lindley said he did not believe in
the Commission being run by a chair
man.
Mayor Hazard said be did not want to
ran the meeting.
A recess for 30 minutes was then
taken, at the end of which Mr. Lindley
placed Mayor Hazard in nomination for
chairman. He was unanimously elected,
as was Mr. Robinson, for secretary.
Mr. Knox moved that the rule adopted
at a former meeting, to tbe effect that
ballots should be open, be adopted.
Carried.
Mr. Lindley moved that the election of
a Chief of Police be postponed until Mon
day morning at 10 o'clock and asked,as a
personal favor, that the other members
allow this extension of time.
The motion was lost by the same vote
as before.
Mr. Bilderrain moved that the Board
proceed to nominate candidates for Chief
of Police.
Mayor Hazard resigned his chair to
Mr. Bilderrain and said he took great
pleasure in nominating J. Frank Burns,
who had been Sheriff for two terms and
who was, in every respect, qualified for
the position. He hoped he would be
elected and read a petition signed by a
number of business men requesting Mr.
Burns' appointment.
Mr. Knox placed the name of T. PI.
Ward in nomination.
Major Furrey said that Mr. Ward had
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 24, 1889.
told him he would not accept the po
sition.
Mr. Bilderrain said that he seconded
the nomination of Mr. Burns, who he
knew was thoroughly fitted for the po
sition.
Nominations were then closed.
Mr. Lindley moved that the election
be postponed until Monday. Lost by
the same vote as before.
Mr. Bilderrain moved that the Board
proceed to the election of a Chief.
Carried.
The roll was called with the following
result:
J. F. Burns—Bilderrain, Furrey and
Hazard.
T. H. Ward—Kuox and Lindley.
Mayor Hazard then declared J. F.
Burns elected Chief of Police.
Mr. Lindley said he desired to explain
his vote and read the following document:
Los Anoklss, C»L, March 21, 1889.
1o the Honorable Police Commission oj the City
of Lot Angeles:
Gkntlemkn:—The undersigued members ol
this CoinmlssioD, duly appointed by the honor
able City Counsil ol this city nnder the pro
visions of the new city Charter, which Com
missioners the framers of the new Charter in
tended should be non-partißan, and which
Commission w\s provided for, to take from the
City Council and the Mayor of this city the
contest and contention caused by the appoint
ment of the Police department of this city; and
believing that said Commission was intended
to be composed of citizens unpledged except as
to serving said city to the best ends, and for
the benefit of the community, and in the inter
ests of good government; now, therefore in vot
ing on the appointment of a Chief of Police
for the elty, wo desire to explain our votes iv
this mauner, viz: That we most emphatically
condemn the manner and means used in the
interest of Mr Burns for Chief of Police, as not
in the interest of good government, contrary to
the apirlt and Intent of the framers of the City
Charter; in this: that it has forced the Com
mission, or a portion at least thereof, to enter
upon the discharge of their duties, not as a de
liberative body as it should be, not aa citizens
employed seeking to serve the best interest* of
this great and growing city, but ou tne con
trary merely as a machine to carry
out trades and pledges made prior
to the time of taking their seats, and
we most emphatically protest against such
methods as tending toward a corrupt govern
ment, and not in the interests of the many, but
the personal Interests of the few; we desire to
place ourselves in direct opposition to the ap
pointment of Mr. Burns, as, in our opinion, his
appointment is not the wisn of the people we
represent, and we think a man cbuld be selected
that would be nearer to their liking, and do no
one any Injury. And again, we condemn said
appointment on the ground that his occupancy
is at the expense and barter of several other
offices under the city government, and we de
sire to specifically state that some of the ap
pointive offices have been, or are about being
filled by men, appointed, not on account of
efficiency, but on account of trades made for
support qf Mr. Burns as Chief of Police.
Hbrvey Lisdlf.v.
George C. Knox.
When Mr. Lindley had finished read
ing the document, considerable excite
ment manifested itself. Major Furrey
jumped from his seat and paced up and
down the floor, and Mayor Hazard said:
"I'll ask the gentleman who he means
when he says that a barter was made?',
Mr. Lindley said that he had made no
specific charges against any one.
Major Furrey said that he considered
the statement a direct, dirty insult.
Mr. Lindley said he was prepared to
stand by his statements and his position.
Major Furrey said that the charge was
outrageous.
Mr. Knox rose to his feet, and all the
Commissioners talked at once.
Mayor Hazard called for order, and
said that he considered that the reading
of the document was an ungentlemanly
thing to do.
Mr. Knox wanted to make a statement
but Secretary Robinson had a petition
in his hand and Mayor Hazard insisted
on having it read, and Mr. Knox could
take the floor afterward.
Secretary Robinson read a petition
from Rose and Bilderman, asking per
mission to open a saloon under the St.
Elmo under a transferred license.
On motion of Mr. Knox the rules were
suspended and the change of license was
granted.
Mr. Knox moved that hereafter ap
plications for licenses lay over for one
week. Carried.
The Board then adjourned until Mon
day at 2 :30 o'clock.
THE LADIES FIOHT.
One of Then Is Arrested for As
sault.
Mrs. Antonia Laughlan was arrested
yesterday afternoon on the charge of an as
sault with a deadly weapon. The complain
ing witness is Francisca Avila. Both
the women are diver ceil, and the quarrel
out of which the fight grew had its origin
in the fact that both the women were in
love with the same man. Antonia
Laughlin is the former wife of Richard,
son of Thomas Laughlin. After the di
vorce she went to live with A. H. Bon
cbette. A little while ago Mrs. Laughlin
became suspicious that Bonchette was
paying attentions to another woman, and
she began to watch him. Friday even
ing she watched him and caught him
in company with Francisca Avila,
who is the divorced wife of a
well-known lawyer of this city.
Mrs. Laughlin was armed. She
says that she was carrying the revolver
to her husband, and she had it wrapped
in a piece of newspaper. At all events,
however, the gun came to be in her
hands, there was a lively war of words,
and the weapon was discharged. Mrs.
Laughlin says that Francisca threatened
her with a rock. The man Bonchette
undertook to stop the row when he saw
it gathering, and grabbed first one and
then the other of the two combatants.
Mrs. Laughlin's claim is that he jogged
her elbow, and the explosion of the gun
was due to this. This statement, how
ever, does not fit with that of the other
two spectators to the affair, who say that
Mrs. Laughlin threatened to kill Fran
cisca.
Mrs. Laughlin was put under $500 bail
by Justice Lock wood.
E. Berman, watchmaker and jeweler,
having located at 34 South Spring street,
is prepared to do all kinds of work in
that line. Watches will have personal
attention in repairing and adjusting.
The Savings Department of the State
Loan and Trust Company, Bryson-Bone
orake building, will be open every Satur
day evening from 7 to 9 o'clock, and
every day from 10 to 3 o'clock.
Money! Money! Money!
The root of all eyil—but save it by buying
clothing at sacrifice figures—Mullen, Bluett &
Co., Spring and First.
Cure For Sick Headache.
If yon want a remedy for bllltousness,
blotches and pimples ou the face, and a sure
cure for sick headache, call at C. H. Hance's.
the Druggist, 79 North Spring street. Dr.
Qunn's Liver Pills; only one for a dose, sample
free: full box 25 cents,
If Yon Are Not Rich
You may yet be lucky and every man is in luck
who gets one of these great bargains now of
fered: $25 blsck dress suits for $15, $18 sack
suits for $10. $5 bins flannel pants f0r52.50 at
K. Adams, the one price clothier, 15 8. Spring
street.
We have a speedy and positive cure for
catarrh, diphtheria, canker month, and head
ache in Shiloh's Catarrh Remedy. A nasal
injector free with each bottle. Use it if you
desire health and sweet breath. Price, 50
cents. Bold by C. F Heinzeman.
What's the nse of repining, when you can
buy a Grand Republic Clgarro lor 5 oents or
four Buffos for 10 cents.
A beantlfal steamship, the Hermosa, now
running to Catalina.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castora
AN OPEN QUESTION.
Is Harrison a Descendant ol Paca
bontaiY
It is popularly believed that President
Harrison is descended from Pocahontas
and from the Parliamentary soldier and
regicide General Thomas Harrison, who
was executed in 1(500.
Pocahontas, daughter of Powhatan,
manifested a friendliness for the early
white settlers of Virginia when Bhe was
but a girl. The story of how she saved
the life of Captain John Smith, who had
been captured and condemned to death
by her father —how she on several occa
sions, made known to the settlers their
danger when about to be attacked—is
well known to all acquainted with the
early history of America. Her subsequent
marriage with John Rolfe, an English
man —her removal to England where a
son was born, from whom numerous
wealthy families of Virginia claim de
scent—is the basis of the opinion that
President Harrison is one of her de
scendants.
Whether this be true or not i r , is, how
ever, well known that President Harrison
is a descendant of a noted family, distin
guished alike in peace and war. The
name of Harrison is already indelibly
written upon the pages of American his
tory, for General Wm. Henry Harrison —
the ninth President of the United States
—was the grandfather of General Ben.
Harrison.
The election of another member of the
Harrison family is but another proof of
the prevailing disposition of the public to
return to healthy administration of pub
lic affairs so characteristic of the earlier
years of government. A similar desire
has been manifested for a revival of
early manners and customs in many
various ways, of which mention in par
ticular can be made of the prevailing de
mand for those old time preparations
which were so successfully employed in
the prevention and cure of the ills and
ailments which frequented the early log
cabin homes.
After much inquiry and research a
noted manufacturer has procured the orig
inal methods used in their preparation
and again under the name of Warner's
Log Cabin Remedies, the public is pos
sessed of those well-known preparations
for the cure of coughs, colds, consump
tion in its early stages, blood disorders,
catarrh, dyspepsia, debility, and other
common disorders.
Notwithstanding the large amount of
time, attention and expense which the
manufacture of Warner's Safe Cure de
mands —its well-known reputation as the
only remedy for the prevention and
cure of kidney diseases being world-wide
—tbe manufacturer is resolved to push
the merit of Warner's Log Cabin Sar
saparilla to the front because of its splen
did blood purifying properties and gteat
value a3 a household remedy and spring
time system renovator.
Pocahontas, during her life-long friend
ship for the white settlers of Virginia,
besides her many acts of kindness, is said
to have contributed much valuable in
formation to the log cabin home con
cerning the successful methods employed
by the Indians in the treatment of dis
ease, and it matters little whether the
alleged relationship between herself and
tbe President be true or not, for the
name of Pocahontas is already immortal.
The Hole in the Wall.
Four of them | and a hie rush inside, because
of our noted discount sale in men's and boys'
clothing of the best quality, at Spring and
First—Mullen, Bluett & Co.
Eggs, Eggs, Eggs
Of the celebrated Wyandotte fowl; also a few
roosters of Wyandotte and light Brahmas, at
844 West Tenth street.
Christopher's Toast Foundry,
No. 12 North Spring street, is the cheapest and
best place to eat in the city. Everything neat
and clean.
Theo. Rapp, Wood Engraven,
No. 10 Conrt street, room 9. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Reasonable prices.
Just What You Want.
Gas stoves, for heating and cooking, at B. M.
Perry's 30 South Main street.
Herbert 0. Parka, State Manager, Capital Acci
dent Company:
I acknowledge receipt of my claim against
your company for weekly benefits while dis
abled, and thank you for prompt settlement.
Adoi.ph Fritz.
Los Angeles
TENTS at Foy's harness Shop, 217LosAngeles
street.
Hicmony king of herbs 143 E. First street
MISCELLANEOUS.
Notteasoßable Offer Kefased
FOR
Three DiriHit anil Two Spare
PIANOS !
MUST BE SOLD WITHIN A WEEK.
For terms see
J. B. O'CONNOR,
218 South Main street, Panorama Building.
m24tf
FORTY ivnl-LJON S3
01 Artificial Teeth Manufactured in this
country alone last year show the need of
the*
Which has proved Itself to he a Perfect Pol
isher, Cleanser and Preservative,
without the Irritation of the Gums, aud Scratch
ing of the Enamel known to be caused by
bristles.
AT ALL ORUUtiISTI.
Its Economy. Holder (Imperishable) 35
cents. Polishers only need be renewed, 18
(boxed) 86 cents. Dealers or mailed.
HORSEY Ifl'F'O CO., IJtlca, N. Y.
hT r^reqory &"ca
117 N. Los Angeles St.,
Boilers, Engines, Steam Pumps,
OTTO OAS EXJINFS,
—AND—
General Power Machinery.
Agents for "HINKLE" PATENT PABSENGER
AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS.
Correspondence Solicited. mls 2m
The Only Kellable Optlcul Institute,
131-133 a. Spring St, L. A. Theater Bldg.
TIIK LOB ANGELES OPTICAL INSTITUTE,
N. STRASSBURGER,
SCIENTIFIC OPTICIAN.
Testing of eyes free. Orindlng of lenses toorder
a specialty. No peddlers employed. I use my
own name only. Absolute porfect fitting guar
anteed where glasses are required. ml 4 12m
I . »__■»_ 1
"redondo beach.
We respectfully invite the attention of the public to the
following facts relative to this property :
It is the nearest port to Los Angeles, where freight and
passenger vessels of largest size can transfer direct to rail
way cars.
It will be connected with Los Angeles and the general
system by
TWO LINES OF RAILWAY.
On one of these a first-class service will be provided, and
HOURLY TRAINS
Will be run during the daytime, thus making REDONDO the
SEASIDE SUBURB OF LOS ANGELES.
It will also have the
Finest Hotel
Between Coronado and Monterey, to be erected immediately ;
has the finest beach for bathing and the best fishing on the
Coast; is abundantly supplied with
PURE, SOFT WATER,
And has the richest soil of any seaside resort in the country.
It will have elegant and commodious buildings for the
permanent use of the
CHATAUQUA ASSEMBLY,
And has a greater variety of attractions for the tourist and
health-seeker than can elsewhere be found on the shores of
the Pacific.
This property has been subdivided into lots, suitably
arranged both for homes and business purposes, and the Com
pany propose to spare no expense in making Redondo the
Most Popular Resort in California.
For particulars as to property and terms of sale, inquire of
REDONDO BEACH COMPANY,
Court and Main Streets, Los Angeles, Cal.
INGLEWOOD
The Centinela-Inglewood Land Company offer for sale
choice residence lota in one~ of the most beautiful orange
groves in California. Is located midway between Los
Angeles and the sea and has a perfect climate, the result of
protection from high winds and sudden changes in tempera
ture. The town is provided with a magnificent water system
derived from
Flowing Artesian Wells.
One of the railway lines of the Santa Fe system runs
through this place, and affords easy access to Los Angeles or
the seaside.
Eucalyptus Avenue
* a IE *»flg
The Company also have for sale land adjacent to the
town, in tracts of from One Acre to One Section. The
soil is a rich, sandy loam, and for the growth of the orange,
lemon, and all the deciduous fruits, as well as for vegetables,
flowers, or nursery stock
CANNOT BE EXCELLED IN THE STATE.
Considering the uniformity in the character of the soil, its
great productiveness, and the comparatively trifling cost of
cultivation, these lands are offered at a bargain.
Terms of Sale—One-fourth cash; balance in one, two
and three years at a low rate of interest.
ADDREBB—
Centinela-Inglewood Land Company,
COUBT AND MAIN STKEETS, : LOS ANGELES, CAL
HEAL ESTATE.
The Gem of the Ban Gabriel Valley.
Only Three Miles from City Limits of Lot
Angeles.
Property of San Uabrlel Wine Co..
Original Owners.
LOCATED AT SHORB'S STATION,
On line of 8. P. R. R. anil Ban Gabriel
Valley Rapid Transit R. X ,
From 10 to lfj minntos to the Plaia, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TKKMS.
PUREST SPRING WATKK
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed,
Apply at Office of
SAN GABRIEL WINE CO.,
Ramona, Los Angeles county, Cal.
Or to J. M. TIERNAN, Ramona. m7tl
SPECIALS
SISTERS OF CHARITY TRACT—6 lots,
00x105 each, for $1000
FLOWER ST., between Ninth and Tenth
Sts., 50x155 to alley; per ft 60
FIRST ST., BOYLE HEIGHTS, bet. Chi
cago and St. Louis sts , west of new
cablo euglue-houße, per ft 80
NINTH ST., bet. Willow and Holmes,
to alley 2000
ELLIS AYE., sonth side - 45x150 to
alloy 1350
BLI8=» TRACT, Bear New Wolfskfll
Depot-Per ft 30
BURLINGTON AVE.,Bonnie Brae tract—
50x150 to alley 1500
For tnese and many more see
POMEROY & GATES.
18 COURT STREET.
Largest and newest list In tbe city.
MANTER & WILSON,
OF DELANO, KERN CO., CAL.,
—HAVE
SEVERAL THOUSAND ACRES
—OF—
First-Class Alfalfa Land
WITHIN THE ARTESIAN BELT,
IN KERN AND TULARE COUNTIES
FOR s \ i.i; AT VERY LOW PRICES.
Come and see, and yon will not go away with
out purchasing. d 22 3m*
WOOD AND COAL.
WHOLESALE. COAL. RETAIL.
South Field Wellington Coal,
The Best Domestic and Steam Coal brought
to this market. Call aud get our prices.
HANCOCK BANNING,
Coal Dealer.
OFFICE TEL., NO. 30.
OFFICE. 118 NORTH MAIN ST., ROOM 24,
NEW LANFRANCO BUILDING.
YARD TEL., NO. 1047.
YARD, OPPOSITE 8. P. FREIGHT DEPOT,
SAN FERNANDO ST. m 8 lm
COAL. COAL. COAL.
NOTICE.
Now is the time to lay in your snpply of Coal.
The Ship "Hllma" now discharging ISOO
TONS English Coke and Welch Anthracite
Coal at Port of San Pedro for
LOS ANGELES GAS COMPANY,
Office, 205 North 'lain Street,
LOB ANGELES CITY.
Will sell cheap on railroad track, this city, In
order to make room for another cargo to arrive.
CALL AND GET QUOTATIONS.
"Wholesale and Retail.
NEW MEXICO COAL.
Screened Lump Coal, Delivered Loose..•ll .OO
In Backs 12.00
Single Sacks, Delivered 76
•' •' at Yard SO
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Coal and Wood Co.,
OFFICE: COR. SECOND AND SPRING STS.,
Bryson-Bonebrake Building (basement).
Telephone 315.
CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY.
d2O 12m
HOMES.
Finest Quality of fruit Lands,
NEAR EOS AN4.EI.ES,
AT REASONABLE PRICES AND ON LIBER
AL TERMS TO ACTUAL SETTLERS.
Eight thousand acres now subdivided (17,000
acres iv all) in San Fernando Valley, from 8 to
12 miles from the Plaza, into 5,10, 12 and 40
acre tracts, ranging from $25 to $150 per acre,
and on such liberal terms that any one can own
ahome. A fruitful soil, easily cnltivated; a
healthy and delightful climate; excellent
schools and churches; two railroads. With Los
Angeles markets for everything raised on the
farm, these lauds offer inducements to settlers
that cannot be duplicated.
Also, a Stock Range of 1,250 acres, only fonr
miles from city limits, at a vory low figure.
Can be subdivided into two or three rangos.
For maps, prloes and terms apply to
PROVIDENCIA LAND WATER AND DEVEL
OPMENT COMPANY,
Rooms S and 9, Bryson & Bonebrake Block
Jail 3m
Old Gold and Silver Bought
—AND—
Jewelry manufactured to Order
OR REPAIRED, BY
JULES WOLTER,
7% Commercial St. (Upstairs).
Meerschaum Pipes aud Cigar Holders neatly
repaired and mounted. mIS lm
O. B. FULLER <k CO.,
(Successors to McLain St Lehman.)
Pioneer Track and Transfer Co.
No. 8 Market St., Lob Anoki.es, Cal.
Safe and Piano Moving. All kinds of Truck Work
Tslephone 197. ml tt

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