OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, April 04, 1889, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042460/1889-04-04/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

6
"HOW I FOUND EMIN."
Story of Stanley's Perilous
Expedition.
MANY " HAIRBREADTH 'SCAPES."
Throngii Dangers and Obstacles of
Every Description, he Succeeds
in His Object.
(Associated Press Dispatches to the Herald
The following summary of Stanley's
letter to a friend in Edinburgh was
crowded out of yesterday's Hebald by
pressure of local news. It is given to
day as wired from London:
The expedition, which consisted of 369
officers and men, started from Yambunga
June 23,1357. On the first day the expe
dition marched twelve miles along the
liver bank to Yakhynde. During the
next six days the expedition marched
inland in an easterly direction through a
densely populated district. The natives
used every art known to molest and im
pede the advance of the party, but, al
though several conflicts took place, tbe
party did not lose a man. From July 4th
until October 18th Stanley followed the
left bank of the Aruwbimi. On August
Ist the first death occurred, the cause
being dysentery.
So far for thirty-four days the course
bad been singularly successful. The
party now entered a wild country, in
their nine days'march, through which
their sufferings multiplied and several
deaths occurred. On August 13th, on
arriving at Alosibbia, tbe natives pre
sented a bold front, and the party lost
five men from poisoned arrows.
On August 31st the expedition met a
party of Manyemas, and their misfor
tunes began on this date.
What Stanley describes as "an awful
month" begins on September 18th. On
leaving the station of the Aran Chief
Ugarrava, the expedition numbered 289,
having lost thirty-six by desertion and
death, and having left forty-four sick
with Ugarrava. They took the route
which led to the Arab settlement of
Kalinga Longa. The men lived on wild
fruits, fungi and nuts. Before reach
ing Kalinga Longa, Stanley lost fifty-five
men through starvation and deser
tion. A slave owner at Kilinga Longa
tried his utmost to ruin the expedition,
short of opening hostilities, He insisted
on purchasing their rifles, ammunition
and clothing, so that the expedition left
the station beggared. The men were ab
solutely naked, and were so weak that
they were unable to carry the boat.
Stanley was therefore obliged to leave
the boat, together with seventy loads of
goods, at Kilinga Longa under the care
of Surgeon Parke and Captain Nelson,
the latter of whom was unable to march.
After twelve days' journey the party,
on November 2nd, reached Ibwiri. Ihe
Arab devastation, which had reached
within a few miles of Ibwiri, was so
thorough that not a native hut was left
standing between Yaarrava and Ibwiri
What the Arabs did not destroy elephants
destroyed, turning the whole region into
• horrible wilderness.
Stanley continues: "Our sufferings
terminated at Ibwiri. We were beyond
the reach of the destroyers. We were on
virgin soil, a region abounding in food.
We ourselves were mere skeletons, and
a halt was, therefore, ordered for the
purpose of recuperating. From 289 per
sons, we now numbered 174. The suf
ferings had been so awlul, the calamit
ies so numerous and the forest so end
lees that our people refused to believe
that we would see the plains and cattle,
the Nyanza and Emm Pasha. They had
turned a deaf ear to our prayers and en
treaties, and, driven by hunger and suf
fering, they sold rifles and equipments for
a few ears of Indian corn. Perceivirg
that mild punishment would be of no
avail, I resorted to the death penalty,
and two of the worst cases were hanged
in tbe presence of all. We waited for
thirteen days at Ibwiri. Tbe supplies
were inexhaustible, and our people
glutted themselves with such effect that
we had 143 sleek and robust men when
we started for Albert Nyanza, November
24th. We were still 126 miles from Lake
Given Food. The distance seemed noth
ing.
"On December sth we emerged upon
the plains, leaving the deadly and
gloomy forest behind us. After 160 days
of continuous gloom we saw the light of
broad day shining still around, making
all things beautiful. The men literally
leaped and yelled with joy and raced
over the ground with their burdens. On
the 9th we entered the country of the
powerful chief, Mazamboni. The natives
flighted us, but we were prepared. The
war cries were terrible, from hill to hill,
pealing across tbe intervening valleys.
The people gathered in hundreds at
every point, war horns and drums an
nouncing the struggle. After a Blight
skirmish, ending in our capturing a cow,
the first beef we had tasted since we left
the ocean, tbe night was passed peace
fully, both sides preparing for the mor
row."
Here Stanley relates how negotiations
with the natives failed; how a detach
ment of forty persons, led by Lieutenant
Stairs, and another of thirty, left for
Araba and assaulted and carried the vil
lage, driving the natives into a general
rout. The march was resumed on the
13th. There were constant light fights
all along the route.
"On the afternoon of the 13th," says
Stanley, "we sighted the Nyanza, with
Kaavalia, the objective point cf the ex
pedition, six miles off. I had told the
men to prepare to see the Nyanza. They
murmured and doubted. When they
saw the Nyanza below them, many came
to kiss my hands. We were now 5,200
feet above the sea level and 2,900 feet
above the Albert Nyanza. After a
abort halt to enjoy the prospect
•we commenced the rugged and stormy
descent. Before the rear guard had
descended 100 feet, the natives from the
plateau poured after them, keeping the
mar guard busy until within a few hun
dred feet of the Nyanza plains. We
afterwards approached the village of Ka
kongo, situated at the southwest corner
of Albert Lake. Three houra were spent
hy us in attempting to make friends, but
we signally failed. They would not ex
change the blood of brotherhood, be
cause they never heard of any good peo
ple coming from the west side of the
lake. They would not accept any pres
ents from us, because they did not know
who we were, but they would give us
water to drink and show us the road up
to Nyam Sasaic. From these singular
people we learned that they had beard
that there was a white man at Ugunro,
but they had never heard of any
white man being on the west
iside, nor had they ever seen any
steamers on the lake. We were
asbown the path. We camped about a
■half mile from the lake ana then began
to consider our position. My couriers
from Zanzibar had evidently not arrived,
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HEKALD: THURSDAY MOTIVING, APKJL 4. 1689
or Emm Pasha, with his two steamers,
would have paid the southwest side of
the lake a visit to prepare the natives for
our coming. My boat was at Kilinga
Longa, 190 miles distant, and there were
no canoes obtainable. There was no
plan feasible except to retreat to Ibwiri,
build a fort, send a party back to Kilinf a
L >nga for the boat,store upeverything in
tbe fort not conveyable, leave a garrison
in tbe fort to hold it, march back to Al
bert lake and send a boat in search of
Emm Pasha. This was the plan which,
after a lengthy discussion with my offi
oen>, I resolved upn.
On January 17th we were i i Ibwiri
once again. After a few days' rest,
Lieutenant Stairs, with 100 men, was
sent to Kilinga Longa to bring the boat
and goods. On the return of Stairs with
the boat and goods, he was sent to Ugar
rva. He was to bring up the convales
cents.
"Soon after his departure I was at
tacked with gastritis and an abcess on
the arm. After a month's careful nurs
ing, I recovered and set out again for
Albert Nyanza on April 2d, accompanied
by Jephson and Parke. A garrison was
left at Ft. Bodo. On April 26th we ar
rived in the Mozambinis country again.
This time, after some hesitation, the
Mozamhini Chief decided to make 'blood
brotherhood' with me. His example was
followed by all the other chiefs as far as
the Nyanza. Every difficulty seemed
now to be removed. Food was supplied
gratis. When one day's march from
Nyanza the natives came from Kavali,
and said that a white man named
Malejja had given their chief a packet to
give to me, his son. They remained with
us that night, telling us wonderful stories
about big ships, etc., which left no doubt
on our mind that the white man was
Emm Pasha.
"The next day's march brought us to
the Chief of Kavali, who handed me a
note from Emm Pasha, to the effect that
there had been a native rumor that a
white man had been seen at the south
end of the lake. He had gone in a
steamer to make inquiries, but had been
unable to obtain reliable information.
He begged me to remain where I was
until he could communicate with me.
The next day, April 23rd, Jephson was
dispatched with a strong force to take
ihe boat to the Nyanza.
"On April 29th we once again reached
the bivouac ground reached by us
December 16th, and at 5 p. m. of that
day saw the Khedive (steamer), about
seven miles away. Soon after 7 o'clock,
Emm Pasha. Sig. Casati and Jephson
arrived ut our camp, where they were
heartily welcomed by all of us. We
v tre together until May 25th, when I
If it him, leaving Jephson, three
Soudanese and two Zanzibars in his
care.
"Fourteen days later I was at Fort
Bodo. At the fort were Captain Nelson
and Lieutenant Stairs. Lamer had re
turned from the Ugarrowas twenty-two
days after I had set out for the lake,
bringing with him, alas! only sixteen
men "out of fifty-six. All the rest were
dead.
"On June 16th I left Fort Bodo with
all the ZaLzibar men and 101 of Emm's
people, leavinc all my officers at the
fort. On June 24th we reached Kilonga,
and on July 19th the Ugarrowas. The
latter station was deserted. Passing
down the river as fast as we could, daily
expecting to meet the couriers I had sent
to Major Bartelott, we indulged ourselves
in pleasing anticipations as we neared
the goal.
"August 10ih we overtook the Ugarro
was with a flotilla of fifty-seven canoes,
and our couriers, reduced to seventeen,
who related an awful story of hair
breadth escapes and tragic scenes. Three
had been slain, two were still feeble from
wounds, and all except five bore on their
bodies the scars of arrow wounds."
A week later Stanley met the rear col
umn of the expedition at Bunalya, and
found Mr. Bonney. From the latter
Stanley learned, greatly to his sorrow,
of the shooting of Major Bartellot by a
native a month before. Jamison had
gone to Stanley Falls to try to get more
men from Tippoo Tib. Ward was at
Bangala, and Bonney was the only white
man at Bunalya. After describing what
a wreck he found the rear column to be,
Stanley complains of the officers at
Yambunga having too readily accepted
the deserters' report of his death, and
sending his personal kit, medicines, etc ,
down to the Congo, leaving him naked
of the necessities for bis return to Emm.
The letter then summarizes what has
been accomplished. Theexpediiion was
100 days in a continuous, unbroken, com
pact, forest. The grass land was tra
versed in eight days. How far west be
yond the Congo the forest reaches Stan
ley does not know. The superficial ex
tent tf the tract described above, totally
covered by forest, is 246,000 square
miles. North of the Congo, between
Upsoto and Aruwbimi, the forest em
braces another 20,000 square miles. Be
tween Yumbanga and Nyanza, Stanley
came across five distinct languages. At
a distance of fifty mi!es from the camp
at Nyanza they saw a mountain probably
17,000 or 18,000 feet in height above the
sea, its summit covered with snow. It is
called Ruevenzari, and will prove a rival
to Kelimarriro. Three natives who saw
the lake to the south agree that it is
large, but not so large as tbe Albert Ny
anza.
Emm Pasha has two battalions of regu
lars, the first consisting of 750 rifles, and
the second of 640. Beside these he has
a respectable force of irregulars. In con
versation with Stanley, Emm said if he
consented to go away from there they
would have nearly 10,000 people with
them. Emm was much worried to know
how all the women and children, num
bering over two thousand, could be
brought away. He and Stanley dis
cussed the matter at great length,
but reached no conclusion. Emm
said the Egyptians, of whom he
had 100 men, beside their wo
men and children, would be very
willing to leave and he would be glad to
get rid of them, as they undermine his
authority and nullify his endeavors for a
retreat. When he informed them that
Khartoum had fallen and Gordon Pasha
was slain, they told the Nubians it was a
concocted story and tbat some day
steamers would ascend the river to their
relief. Emm proposed after Stanley's
departure to visit Ft. Bodo.
Stanley says, in conclusion, that he in
structed the officers at the fort to destroy
it and accompany Emm to tbe Nyanza.
He hopes to meet them all there, as he
intended making a short cut to the
Nyanza along the new route.
Mrs. Livermore will give her famous
lecture, "Superfluous Women," at Ar
mory Hall, Thursday evening, April 4th,
at 7:30. Admission, 10 cents.
If Yon Live—Outside the city, write to us
for your floe shoes. Large assortment of E. C.
Burt's celebrated shoes.
Meyib Lxwis A Co.'s,
101 aud 103 N. Spring Street.
Drifted Snow
Roller flour. Seymour 4 Johnaon Co.
"Paint your buggr for fjl," at P. H. Mathews.
Hremony cures neuralgia. 143. E First st.
Children Cry for. Pitcher's Castoria.
ctjacobs OIK
ONCE CURED NO RELAPSE.
Oilsjflal Statement, 1883. original Statement, 1881.
R.n.wedNnv, 1886. Renewed Hot. t, UK.
Mr *. B. Kyle, Tower Mr. Jno. H. Wall, lit E.
ZS&L *"> •» ' Bolton * Man. i
ms'-iim aevero,l yean; "Suffered Acute palm t
grew worn; eminent months In both knees; m
ohyitilani attended me; bad could not get up
had spurns; no relief; not ..... .
ejected to Ureter hours; "t»l™. Applied St. Jn
rubbed Alt over with Bt. coin Oil at night; muca
Jacobs Oil; first appllca- relieved In tho morning,
tloa relieved; MCond re- Tried it again, pain auAl
moved pain; continued ly left me entirely. X
w cured me; no relapse haTehadnoreturnofpaln
in four years; do as much ■Inco. I am completely
work at ever." cured."
AT DRT/00X8TB AND DEALERS EVERYWHERE.
THE CHARLES A. VOGELER CO.. Baltimore.. Md.
HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS.
Arrowy Hot Springs!
2,000 feet above sea, 70 miles from Loa An
geles, 6 miles north of San Bernardino. Moun
tain Sanitarium, Mineral, Vapor and Mud
Ba'hs.
Tourists and invalids will now find amid the
most attractive surroundings, above fog and
dust, al< essentials to comfott, content snd cure
Excellent table, reasonable rates. Residcnl
physician, postofllce and telephone. Stages
meet trains at depot. San Bernardino.
Address "MANAGER." for circular, or B. F.
i OCLTER, comer Second and Spring. Los An
geles. m3l 3m
A SUCCESSFUL CHANGE.
" THE CLIFTON,"
At the corner of Fort and Temole sts., under the
new management, is now the bast private hotel
in the city. The rooms, both slugle and en
suite, are large, sunny and well furnished, and
its table unequalled in the city. The kitchen
is under the direct management of the famous
chef, F. le Russie Smith, a cook of thirty five
years' experience, and in that capacity has
served bo h Grant and Garfield; has also been
chief cook on Pacific and Atlantic Ocean
steamers, and was a chief in the Union Pacific
dining car service for six years.
Its convenience to business adds greatly to its
popularity.
Breakfast, 6:30 to 8:30; Lunch, 12 to 2;
Dinner, 6 tc 8.
Summer rates now in force. m(> lm
The Hunter Dining Parlor,
136 SOUTH BPRING STREET,
(Bet. Second and Third Sts.)
Tbe Largest and Rett Family Res
taurant In the city—Seats
ITS People.
Meals Only 25 Cents.
Ice cream every day. Board per week $1.50.
Polite aud attentive lady waiters in attend
ance. None but white cooks employed.
mlO lm F. M BPRIWWEH, Prop.
The Silver Moon
RESTAURANT.
N"o. 43 South Main Street,
Between First and Second Street.
EVERYTHING NEAT AND CLEAN.
Best 2oc. .Tleal In the City.
Meal Ticket, 21 Meals, $4.50.
mls lm MRS. M. E. FRANCIS, Proprietor.
TWO BROTHERS
HaTing had many years' experience in tbe
Restaurant business, we can certainly give you
satisfaction. Strangers and others visiting ihis
city will 2nd it to their advantage to give us a
trial. MEALS, 25 CENTB. 21 Meal Ticket', $4.
Steaks and Chops a specialty. The Finest Ice
Cream and Pastry in the city. Chicken every
Sunday. Breakfast, 5:45 to 11 a. m., with
extra bill of fare. The choicest Tea and Coffee
in the oity.
20 E. SECOND ST , a few doors below Main.
THOS. & GUY BEDFORO, Prop'rs.
m 22 lm
James' Restaurant,
Near tbe Old Santa Monica Depot,
IN SANTA mONICA,
Is now reopened under the management of Mr.
Entile, formerly chief cook of the Campi Res
taurant In Los Angeles.
Meals served iv American, French and Italian
styles at all hours.
PRIVATE ROOMS FOR PARTIES AND;
FAMILIES.
Single meals, 25 and 50 cents. m 6 lm*
l\o Chinese Employed!
THE OUAKERIESTADRANT,
Reopened at 148 8. Spring St.
YOU ARE INVITED.
MEALS, 25 CENTS.
Removed From 83 Temple Street.
W. H. TRIPP, Prop.
m 5-1 m
Hotel Lincoln,
Corner of Hill and Second Streets,
Strictly a first-class hotel; appointments
perfect; all modern improvements; eU
gantly situated and furnished.
THOMAS PASCOE, Proprietor.
m 29 lm
The CORFU DINING PARLORS,
38 8. SPRING ST., (up Btairs,)
Are now open. Parties wishing an extra fam
ily table will find this will fill a long felt want.
EVERYTHING NEW; meals Bent out on short
notice. Special arrangements can be made for
Private Dinners or Luncheon.
Breakfast 7 a. m. to UK.! Busine«s Men's
Lunch, 12 to 2r. m.; Dinner, 5:30 to Bp. a.
m26-lm
ILLICtTS
Restaurant and Oyster Parlors,
41 and 43 North main Street.
rST- PRIVATE ROOMS upstairs for ladloi
and families, where meals will be served iv the
best style.
mietf JFHBV IFI.IOtT, Proprietor.
Santa Monica Pavilion.
RESTAURANT and FAMILY RESORT
ECKERT A HOPF, Proprietors.
FISH DINNERS A SPECIALTY.
m22tf
London's Celebrated
Surgeon Dentist,
DU. GEORGE H. JONES,
Cordially endorses the
and adds: "Unlike bristles, It Is harmless
In use, and being a most excellent polisher
and absorbent Thoroughly Preserves
the Teeth."
AT ALL DRIJUHISTS.
Its Economy. Holder (imperishable) 35
cents. Polishers only need be renewed, 18
(boxed) 85 cents. Dealers or mailed.
HORSEY rtPF'O CO., Ctlca, N. Y.
JBEST FITTING CORSET, I^ WORLPT
I FOR SALE BY LEADING I
1 RETAIL ESTABLISHMENTS J
BANKINU HOUSES.
BANK,
Cor. Fort aud Second Sts., Angele.
Snbsoribed Capital. $600,00
Paid op Capital $300,0->
Surplus $20,00>
directors:
Hervey Llndley, J. 0. Kays. E. W. Jones
Juan Bernard, J. Frankenfleld.
H. G. Newhall President
H. 0. Witmer Vloe-Prosident
T. J. Weldon. Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General Banking aud Exchange Business
transacted. Jy4 4m
FARMERS' AND MERCHANTS' BANS
Or LOS AKSELXS, CAL.
Isaias W. Hbllman President
L. C. Goodwin Vice-President
Capital (paid up! - - $500,000.
Surplus aud Reserve Fund 750,000.
Total, .... 81,250,000.
DIRECTORS.
0. W. Childs, C. E. Thorn, Jose Masoarel, J
B. Lankershlm C. Dacommun, Philippe Gar
nior, L. 0. Goodwin. L. L. Bradbury, Isaias W.
H oilman.
STOCKHOLDERS.
0. W. Childs, L. L. Bradbury, Philippe Gar
oler, J irnes B. Lankershlm, T. L. Duque, Jose
Mascarel, Chas. Ducommun, Andrew Glassoll,
Cameron E. Thorn, Domingo Ameatoy, Louis
Polaskl, L. C. Goodwin, Prestloy C. Baker. L.
J. Rose, Frank Lecouvreur, Oliver H. Bliss
Sarah J. Leo, Estate D. Solomon, Chris. Henne
Jacob Kuhrts, Isaias W. Hellman. al
gECCRITY SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST CO.
40 S. Mala Street, Los Angeles, Cal.
Capital, $200,000.00.
F. N. Myers. 8, A. Fleming, J. F. Sartobi,
President. Vice-President. Cashier.
STOCKHOLDERS—Isaias W. Hellman, O. W.
Childs, Engene GermaiD, S. A. Fleming, F. N.
Myers. J. F. Sartori, T. L. Duque. J. A. Graves,
J. C. Daly, Morris 8. Hellman, Thomas Mere
dith, Samuel Polaski, Join P. Moran, J. L
Cherry, Nathan Well, Isldor Polaski, W. M
Caswell, R. Y. Mcßride. James H. Shankland,
John H. Battle, G- W. Perkins, A. J. Brown
President Fourth National Bank of Grand
Kapids, M. B. Shaw.
5 per cent Interest Paid on Deposits.
Money loaned on ranches and city property
at lowest rates of Interest.
Bonds and mortgages bought and sold.
Savings deposits solicited. ml? 12m
JMJB ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block, Loa Angeles, Cal
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Reserve Fund, $100,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
R. S. BAKER Vioe-Presidenl
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS;
H. L. MacnelL Jotham Blxby,
John E. Plater, Robert 8. Baker,
John A. Faxton, Geo. W. Prescott,
Geo. H. Stewart.
Buy and Bell Exchange on San Fran
Cisco, New York, London, Paris, Berlin »ad
Frankfort.
Buy Exchange on all parts of tho United States
and Europe.
Receive Money on open sccount and cor
tiflcateof deposit, and do a general banklni
and exchange business.
jr/lIRBT NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000-
RESERVB $205,000.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
E. F. SFENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Bpence, J. D. Blcknell, 8. H
Mott, Wm. Lacy, J. F. Crank, H. Mabnry
J. M. Elliott. a 1
rJIHB UNIVERSITY BAN X OF LOS AN GELES
No. 119 New High street
CAPITALSTOCK PAID CP - - ■ ■ $100,000
R. M. WIDNEY- - • President
GEO. L. ARNOLD • • • Cashier
GEO. BINBABAUQH, • • Telle:
directors:
R. M. Widnby, Chas A. Warner.
D O. Miltihobi 0. M. Wbli.h.
S. W. Little, L. J. P. Morrill,
D. R. Risley.
Eight per cent, bonds secured by first mort
gage on real estate, with Interest payable semi
annually, are offered to Investors of $250 and
upwards. aug9-tl
gOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL BANE
NADBAU BLOCK.
L. N. BREED President
WM. F. BOSBYSHELL Vice-President
C. N. FLINT Cash lei
Paid-in Capital $200.00'
SCBPHJB 20,000
Authorized Capital 500,000
Directors—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, H. A
Barclay, Charles E. Day, E. C. Bosbyshell, M.
Hagan, Frank Rader. Louis Gottschalk, D.
Remlck, Thos. Goss, William F. Bosbyshell.
aug24-tl
ANGELES SAVINGS BANK,
130 NORTH MAIN STREET.
CAPITAL $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN Pbbsidbnt
W. M. CASWELL. Becbbtaby
I. W. Hellman. John E. Plateb,
Kobrbt S. Baker, John A. Paxtoh,
L. C. Goodwin.
Torm deposits will be received in sums ol
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums o!
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Los Angeles, July 1. 1834. altf
JOB ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Cob. First and Spbino Sts.
Capital $500,000 00
SuBFLUfi and Undivided Profits. 50,000 00
TOTAL $550,000 00
GEO. H. BONBBRAKE President
JOHN BRYBON, Sb Vice-President.
F. C. HOWES Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Db. W. Q. Oochban, H. H. Marsha*.
Pbeby M. Gbeen, John Bbyson, Bb.,
Db. 11. Sjmsabauoh, F. C. Howes,
GEOR9E H. BONEBBAKB.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. ]y8
TATEMENT OF THE CONDITION "
—or the—
LOS ANGELEB NATIONAL BANK,
Of Los Angeles, California,
Febbuary 20,1889.
RESOURCES.
Loans and Discouuts $1,049,945 63
Expense Account 3,519 76
Banking Housp and Fixtures ... 178,505 44
cash assets.
Government Bonds 560 200 00
Due from Banks aud Cash in Safe 945,279 57
$2,737,450~40 !
LIABILITIES.
Capital $ 500,000 00
Surplus 50 000 00
Undivided Profits 22,968 31
National Bank Notes Outstaadlng 45,000 00
Deposits 2,119,482 09
m! 4 lm $2,737,450 40
R. W. POINDEXTER,
19 W. First St.,
Investment Banker,
And Gensral Financial Agent. Money loaned
on approved securities. Property held in
trim, and funds invested for parties desiring a
fiduciary agent.
REFERENCES.
Los Angeles National Bank, First National
Bank, State Loan and Trust Co. it 1 Cm
~GEO. W. COOKE & CO.r
—WHOLESALE— j
Paper Dealers and Bookbinders,
100 North I,os Angeles Street,
LOB ANGELES, OAA. 3tl J
faEDICAE.
DR. STEINHAftT'S
Essence of Life
Sold, for 80 years In Europe and on the Pacific
Gout.
ESSENCE OF LIFE curei permanently the
worst cases of nervous debility, physical weak
ne s, exhausted vitality, youthful abuses, ex
cesses, and tho like Diseases of men however
induced aud no matter how Inveterate, speed
ily, thoroughly and permanently cured by the
ESSENCE OF LIFE.
PEICES—S2.SO, In liquid or pill torn, or five
times the quantity, $10.
Call or address—
DR STEIN HART,
REMOVED TO
US', West First Street, Room 8,
LOS ANGELES, CAL,
Office Hocbb—9 a. m. to 4r. v. Sunday—lo
to 1 o'clock.
SYPHILIS.
Gonorrhoea and skin diseases treated and cured
by a graduated specialist. Office hours from
10 to 3, 115H West First street, room 2. Ad
vice and treatment by mall. Address, SPE
CIALIST.
TO~THE ON Xt HEM UN ATE.
Its f^ornM,'SeffinslWeak
ness, Impotenoy aud Lost Manhood permanent
ly cared. The siok snd afflicted should not fall
to call upon him. The Doctor has traveled ex
tensively in Europe' and Inspected thoroughly
the various hospitals there, obtaining a great
deal of valuable information, which he is com
petent to impart to those in need of his services.
The Doctor cures where others fall. Try him.
DR. GIBBON will make no charge unless he
effects a cure. Persons sta distance CURED AT
HOME. All communications strictly confiden
tial. All letters answered in plain envelopes,
Send ten dollars for a package of medicine.
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Box
1957, San Francisco, Cal.
Mention Loa Angeles Hbbald. dlO tf
38 North Main Street,
LOS ANOELES.
GONORRHEA, GLEET and all unnatural
discharges promptly and privately cured.
st •>illl.l.H permanently eradicated with
out mercury, SEMINAL WEAKNEBB, loss of
sexual power. Varicocele, skin and bladder
diseases are cured for life. No experimenting.
Both sexes consult in confidence.
Those residing st a distance may be cured at
home. Call or address Dr. White's Medical
Dispensary, 39 N. Main street, Los Angeles.
Cal. mlo6m
UEBIO COMPANY'S
EXTRACT OP MEAT.
finest and
Meat Flavoring Stock
—roß—
SOUPS, HADE DISHES and SAUCES.
Annual sale 800.000 jars.
Genuine only with
fac-slmiie of Baron f J „ X»_
Llehis's signature in jfCftZ. %jt^9C*C
BLUE INK tSS!W(Q «P|
beL To be had of all Storekeepers, Grocers,
and Oruggista dec2lmondi thurl2m
DRUNKBNiVbSS"
Or the Liquor Habit Positively
Cured by Administering- Dr.
Haines' CSelden Specific.
It can be given In a cup of coffee or tea
without the knowledge of tho peison taking
it; Is absolutely harmless and will effect a
permanent and speedy cure, whether the
Eatlent Is a moderate drinker or an alco
ollc wreck. Thousands of drunkards have
been made temperate men who have taken
Golden Specific in their coffee without their
knowledge, .and to-day believe they quit drink
ing of their'own free will. IT NEVER FAILB.
The system once impregnated with the Specific
it becomes an utter impossibility for the liqno
appetite to exist For sale by R. W. Ellis 4 Co
Druggists, 27 S. Spring St., Los Angeles.
mv9-eod-d*wklv lv
TT'IO'TTTI A treated without
H I J*-) I II J . f\ the use of the
* ■*•'**"' *■* — » knife or detec
tion from business, also all other diseases of
the rectum. Cnre guaranteed
C. I K).Alt SMITH, TI. D., graduate
Cleveland Homoeopathic Hospital College
1874. Assistant In '70 and '77 to N. Schneider,
Dean and Professor of Surgery in Cleveland
College; alto Surgeon of L. S. & M. S. R. R.
Removed to corner Main and Seventh streets,
Robait's block, Los Angel's, Cal. References
given. Consultation free. Bend for pamphlet.
Office hours, 9a.a.to 4 p. T*lT T T?*Q|
m. Sundays and holidays II ." .
excepted. mlstf
A DlgG haaglven untTer
jfß^^wtiU^^B sa! satisfaction In the
to 6 dats. ( tire of Gonorrhoea and
J_W^™BoliSSi. W ■ Blast, I prescribe It and
mSSM feel safe In recommend
— ****** , lt to all suf re re r..
■BMgOtaflWaA Aj, bTO SEB, M.D.,
m 111.
PRICE, SI.OO.
Sold by Druggists.
lalß 18m
A Speedy Cure Warranted.
DR. BELL'S GERMAN EXTRACT CURES
all private syphilitic, urinary, skin and
blood diseases, female complaints, and all
such diseases as are brought about by indiscre
tion and excesses, $1. Dr. Bell's French Wash
cures all private disea.cs, blood poißon, old
sores and ulcers, G. and 0., in two or throe days,
$1. No preparation on earth equal to it. For
sale only at the Berlin Drug more, 405W
South Spring at., Los Angeles, Cal. al lm'
C. F. HEINZ EM AN,
Druggist and Chemist,
No. 188 N. Main St., Eos A ugeles, Cal.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day or
night. m 21tf
COCKLE'S
ANTI-BILIOUS
PILLS.
The Great English Remedy.
FOR LIVER, BILE, INDIGESTION ETC.
Free from mercury; contains only pure
Vegetable Ingredients. Agents, LANGLEY A
MICHAELS. Ban Francisco. 4*w*'vlv
BEE OUR BONANZA HOLLINGSWORTH FAMILY OF
20-Tooth, 24-Tooth and 30-Tooth Rakes
The JOHN P.MANNY MOWER is on ton, snd don't you forget it!
We carry the Red, White and Blue Mower; slso, Star Rake, aud Ohio Selt-Dumn Rake.
BENICIA HEADERS, EXCELSIOR BINDERS, ADVANuE ENGINES, THRESHERS.
MONTGOMERY, GRANT & CO..
£33 IN. L,os Angeles St., Los Angeles, Cal. Also at Bam Bernardino, si 10m
WOOD IND C»AL,
WHOLESALE. COAL. RETAIL.
South Field Wellington Coal,
The Beet Domestic and Steam Coal brought
to this market. Call and get our prioea.
HANCOCK BANNING,
Coal Dealer.
OFFICE TEL , NO. 30.
OFFICE, 118 NORTH MAIN ST.. ROOM 24,
NEW LANFRANCO BUILDING.
YARD TEL., NO. 1047.
YARD, OPPOSITE 8. P. FREIGHT DEPOT
SAN FERNANDO ST. MB lm
i
NOTICE.
Now la the time to lay in your supply of CoaL
The Ship "Hilma" now discharging 1500
'I ONS English Coke aud Welch Anthracite
Coal at Port of San Pedro for
LOS ANGELES GAS COMPANY,
Office, 8»5 Nortb Main Street,
LOB ANGELES CITY.
Will sell cheap on railroad track, this city, iv
order to make room for another cargo to arrive.
CALL AND GET QUOTATIONS.
Wholesale and Retail.
NEW MEXICO COAL
Screened Lump Coal, Delivered Loose •11 .OO
In Backs 18.00
Single Sacks, Delivered 7ft
" at Yard SO
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Coal and Wood Co.,
OFFICE: COR. SECOND AND SPRING BTS„
Bryson-Bonebrake Building (basement).
Tilbphonb 315.
CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY.
d2O 12m
commission and stobaue.
KEN NE D V & CO.
—Wholesale and Retail—
Commission Merchants,
BUTTER, EGG 3, HAMS, ETC.,
Fresh Ranch Eggs Received Dally.
Poultry Dressed to Order.
Goods Delivered to any part of city.
116 WEST SIXTH ST.
TELEPHONE 1044. m 29 lm
TffilnriFWA^
E. G. Wbyss, Proprietor.
GRAIN, WOOL
—AND—
General merchandise Warehouse.
Advances made on wool.
Btobasb, Commission and Insubancb.
Agents for all kinds of Agricultural Imple
ments. Wholesale and retail dealers In Im
ported and Domestic Wines, Brandies aud
Whiskies. 684 to 666 Alameda street.
mlB-tf
]N"ewhall Bros.,
COAL, WOOD, HAY, GRAIN, ETC.
In large or small quantities.
118 W. tilth St. Telephone 468.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO CALL ON UB
m2l lm
CARHIA(iESANI) WAUONS.
FOR FmE BUGttIES
—AND—
CARRIAGES
—80 TO—
H. GIEBE,
Thb Fabh Imflsmeht Dbalbb.
44 to 48 N. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles.
Furniture and Carpets.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In
FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDS,
At Lowest Fosaible linos.
914, 816 and 818 south Spring St.,
Bet Third aud Fourth Sts. m 8-tf
Storage and Commission.
No Keasonable OlTepßefased
FOR
Tiro Dsriglit and Two Smiare
PIANOS !
MUST BE SOLD WITHIN A WEEK.
For terms sea
J. B. O'CONNOR,
218 South Main street, Panorama Building.
m24tf
GASOLINE STOVES
AT COST.
To close out my ttock I make a reduction on
each Stove and Oven of
$4.00.
F. E. BROWN,
a2tf No. 44 South Spring street.
NOTICE.
THE LOS ANGELKS CITY WATER CO.
will strictly enforce tho following rule: The
hours for sprinkling are between 6 and 8
o'clock a. m. and 6 and 8 o'clock p. m. For a
violation of the above regulation tbe wato
wlll be shut off and a flue of two dollars will
be charged before water will be turned on
ag»'"

xml | txt