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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, April 10, 1889, Image 3

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THE RACES.
Second Day of «■« «'•• Anglic.
Spring meeting-.
Judges—John Bryson, Al. Workman,
D. F. Donegan.
Starter —I. Rodman.
Assistant —B. J. Perry.
The morning of the second day of the
Los Angeles Spring Meeting was very
fine, but towards midday threatening
clouds and a slight hail storm in the city
kept away a good many people who
would otherwise have visited the track.
About 1,500 enthusiastic visitors were
present when the bell tapped for the
opening event, and the afternoon's sport
amply repaid them for their attendance.
The track was in good order, and specu
lation was brisk, a large crowd thronging
around the pool box.
The opening event, the 2:20 trot, post
poned from Monday, requiring two heats
to decide. E. A. DeCamps gray gelding
What Ho succeeded in winning the first
heat, but Gus Walters' chestnut gelding
Charlie D. won the next heat and race in
very clever fashion.
The trot over, four hones came to the
post for the seven-eighths of a mile run
ing race. G. W. was at once installed
favorite, but weight of money sent Car
rientes to the front in the betting, and,
wnen speculation fettled down, Car
rientes sold favorite, with G. W. close
up in the quotations. Waldo Johnson
had a whole host of admirers, and a lot
of money was invosted in the pool-box
upon his chance. H. E. Rose's Dan M.
Murphy was the despised outsider of the
party, his owner, I believe, not caring to
invest a cent upon him. After a short
delay at the post, caused by the frac
tiousness of G. W., who was
evidently looking for a hole in the
fence through which to creep,
the flag fell to a beautiful start. Car
rientes at once showed in the lead, but
but falling back, gave place to Dan M.
Murphy, who took up the running, with
G. W. and Waldo Johnson in close at
tendance. They maintained these posi
tions to the half-mile post, where Car
rientes took third place. It was a neck
ai d-neck race between the leaders to the
three-quarter mile post, Carrientes still
third. Entering the stretch, Dan M.
Murphy swerved, carrying with him
G. W. Carrientes then took the inside
track, but was unable to improve his
position. A line race up the straight re
sulted in a neck victory for Dan M.
Murphy, G. W. defeating Carrientes by
a length for second place. The rider of
G. W. promptly laid an objection against
Dan M. Murphy on the groundof a jostle.
After hearing the evidence of Clifford,
Dennison and Johnson, the judges over
ruled the objection, and declared Murphy
the winner.
The finish between Dan M. Murphy
and G. W. was worth going a long way
to witness, and opinions were divided as
to whether the result would be changed,
should the race be run again.
The second event on the card, the
Pioneer handicap, brought three horses
to the post. Dave Douglas was a strong
favoritein the pools, and after Othello
had won the first heat, Dan Dennison's
old horse pulled his supporters through
by winning two heats in easy fashion.
The starter got them away on even
terms for the first heat. Galgo made
the running two lengths ahead of Doug
las and Othello. At the half-mile post
Galgo came back to bis horses, and
Othello took up the running. Entering
the stretch Othello was still in the lead,
and although challenged by Dennison on
Dave Douglas, Hennessy kept Othello
going to the end, and won a magnificent
race by a head. Othello was now in
stalled a slight favorite in the pools, but
prior to the second heat being run, Dave
Douglas was again made favorite. The
starter again gave them a fine send off,
and after Othello had cut out the work
for the first quarter, Galgo took up the
running, with Dave Douglas close up.
At the turn for the straight Dave Douglas
took the lead and maintaining his lead
to the finish won cleverly by three
fourths of a length, Othello close up
third. Galgo was now sent to the stable,
and as the result was looked upon as a
certainty for Dave Douglas, there was
little betting. The starter again got them
away on even terms, and before they
had gone a quarter of a mile Dave Doug
las went to the front and never after
wards being headed won easily by three
lengths. The three-minute trotting race
proved a gift for Belle B. Glendene won
the first heat easily, Belle B. took the
next and Glendene the next, Belle B.
casting a shoe. The next heat was won
by Belle B. without a break, and as her
solitary opponent broke five tfmes and
on each occasion ran a considerable dis
tance, the judges very properly distanced
Glendene and awarded the race and
purse to Belle B.
NOTES.
Dan. M. Murphy furnished the sur
prise of the week. Those who bought
him for five or six dollars in sixty dollar
pools, were on thorns until the objection
was overruled.
The finish between Hennessy on
Othello and Dennison on Dave Douglas,
was a treat.
E. J. Baldwin's string is decidedly off
color.
Carrientes was the best-looking horse
in the race, and ran like a carthorse.
Tbe special officers did good service in
keeping the track clear.
The dining room, in charge of those
old-timers, Messrs. Mendel Meyer and
Villa, is a credit to the management, and
that their cuisine is appreciated is proved
by their numerous customers.
SUMMARY.
Trotting—2:2o class, purse $600.
Qua William's aged c. g. Charlie D.
(Waters) • ,„• ■ ~ 3 113 3 1
R. A. De Camp's aged g. g. What Ho
(Wood) 1 3 2 4 1 3
W. Wllr.es' 4 b. m. Lena Wlls.es
2:31^.
Running—l'urse $150; all ages, of
which $25 to second; 10 lbs. above scale;
seven-eighths of a mile.
H. E. Rose's 3 b. o. Dan M. Murphy (Clff
lord). l
G. W. Trahern'aS b. g. G. W. (Dennison) . 2
E J. Baldwin's 3b. g. Carrientes (Johnson) 3
Also ran: Waldo Johnson (O'Brien).
Won by a neck; a length between second and
third.
Time: 1:30. „„ , .
Pools sold: G. W. $25, Carrientes $17, John
son $15, Murphy $5.
Pioneer Stakes Handicap, for all ages,
entrance $20, half forfeit, with $150
added; $50 to second. Distance one and
one-sixteenth miles heats:
G. W. Trahern's 0 b. h. Dave Douglas,
116 (Desmond) ail
B. K. Den's 3 b. c Othello. 101 (Ilenuessyjl 3 2
C. Slble 6 c. g. Galgo, 103 (Bible) .320
Time: 1:51' , I:6UK,
Fools sold: Dave Douglaa $20, Othello $ti,
Galgo $5.
Trotting—3 minute class; purse $200:
B. B. GlfTord'sbk. m. Belle B. (Glfford)3 12 1
K. D. Wise's 3 c.c.Glendlne(McC!arthy)l 2 10
Wm. Abbot's aged br. h. William A.
(Wood) 2 3 0 0
C. L. Fisher's aged br. h. Bay Tom
(Bayles) 4400
Time: 2:32, 2:28, 3:80k, 2:30.
Fools sold. Belle B. $20, Glendene $16,
Field $3.
TODays Programme.
FIRST HACI.
Running; inaugural sweepstakes for
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: WEDNESDAY MOKNING, APKIL 10. 1889,!
3-year olds and upwards, of 20 each, half
forfeit, with $150 added, tbe second horse
to receive $50; distance one mile.
P. C. Dornalech's eh. c, 3, by Jim
Brown-Eliza.
SECOND RACE.
Running—Purse $300, 10 per cent, en
trance, half-mile heats.
P. C. Dornalech's b. m., 4 years old,
by Kyrle-DalyEliza; N. A. Covarrubias'
eh. g. Gladstone; E. J. Baldwin's 3-year
old b. f. Alsho.
RACE FOR ROAD HORSES.
Pond Lily, S. S. Ellsworth, Charlie D.
Pools sold as follows:
First race—Luis P. $10, Gladiator $8,
Lillita $3, Hotspur $2, Eliza colt $1.
Second race —Gladstone $10, field $!>.
Third race—Charlie D. $10, Pond Lily
$6, S. S. Ellsworth $4.
The following are my selections:
First race—Lillita 1, Luis P. 2.
Second race—Gladstone 1, Alsho 2.
Third race—Charlie D. 1, S. S. Ells
worth 2.
CHIMSE GAMBLING.
An Effort to Brcalt It Up In Pro-
gre««i
The new police force is going to have
J its hands very full with the matter of
gambling in Chinatown. The games
have been let alone for some time, that
is, they were raided only when they were
carried on in an open and public fashion.
The resnlt is that they have increased
and multiplied beyond all precedent. It
is said by the Chinese merchants who
are heading the crusade against them,
that there are about forty, and that they
are doing excellent business. Most
of them have a sign over the door which
is easily comprehended by those who
speak the language. The sign is usually
two feet square, a bright green, with gilt
characters. It is posted over an ent
rance, where, after penetrating various
ways that are dark, one may come to a
large iron door, behind which the bones
may be heard rattling.
Some time ago the Chinese merchants
went to the Lawson Patrol people
and complained that the gamb
ling among their customers was
upsetting trade. They asked that
men be sent down to patrol in fiont
of the houses where the games were in
progress to break up the business. This
was considered something of a new de
parture, as the interference with the
games had heretofore come from the out
side of Chinatown.
Yesterday the same syndicate of mer
chants went to a prominent attorney and
had a complaint drawn up against thirty
four proprietors and managers of games,
charging them under the State law with
carrying on a gambling busi
ness. The complaint was filed
before a justice of the peace, and a
warrant was issued for their arrest. The
merchants agreed to supply the Sheriff's
office with the necessary information for
the discovery and apprehension of the
men.
The result of the raids recently made
by the police force was that $500 was
paid into the city treasury yesterday.
Five dealers and twenty-five players
were taken before Justice Staunton.
The dealers pleaded guilty and
paid $50 apiece fine. The play
ers also confessed their guilt,
and were fined ten dollars apiece. This
action on the part of the defendants ex
cited some surprise. It is the usual cus
tom of the Chinese to fight these cases,
with the frequent result that they all get
off. It is not impossible that they con
sidered this a necessary sacrifice to gain
the good-will of the authorities.
The Chief of Police declares that he
will continue the raiding nntil, as far as
possible, the games shall be suppressed.
Acting in conjunction with the District
Attorney's office, which will be backed
by the leading Chinese merchants in the
fight, it is not improbable that the gam
bling will be held down for a time.
RECEPTION AND PARADE.
II on un Paid to stemming Delc
galea to tbe Grand Lodge.
A reception was tendered last night to
Grand Commander J. D. Vogan, of the
Select Knights, and the delegates to the
Grand Lodge of A. O. U. W., who have
just returned. Mr. Vogan is the
first Grand Commander ever elected
from Southern California. The mem
bers of both orders met at Opera
hall at 8 o'clock and paraded through
Main arid Spring streets to the old Ma
sonic Hall, on Spring street, where the
reception was held. Mr. S. A. Widney
delivered the address of welcome, which
was responded to by Grand Master Vo
gan. Miss Bennett was then called upon
for a piano solo, and played "Old Black
Joe," with variations. Captain A. F.
Mackay then told of the benefits derived
by a member of the order. Miss Rich
ards gave two very amusing recitations,
and was followed by Mrs. McCauley.who
favored ttie audience with vocal selec
tions. The Misses Clemens told several
stories very nicely in recitation, and after
the ode of tbe order, in which all joined,
the evening closed with a general social.
Pullman Paiienieri,
The following Pullman passengers left
yesterday for San Francisco and the
East:
By the 1:20 p. m. train: H. T. Miller,
Mrs. E. H. Bailey, H. T. Nobles, Mr.
Bigelow, M. J. Denton, Mr. Habn, Mrs.
J. Cook, Mr. Reondwald, Mr. Dans, H.
G. English, J. Helm, Captain Barrett,
Mrs. Tolles, Chas. Sutro, Mr. Cornelius,
Mrs. E. E. Evans, Mr. Kamesb, Mr.
Laventhal, H. H. Thomas, Miss Wake
man, Bey. A. L. Trew, Mr. Hubert, Mr.
Pol ask i, Mr. Kobinson.
By the 10:20 p. h. train: Prof. Bull,
Mr. Johnson, C. F. Harrington, W. A.
Winocks, Mr. Griffith, E. T. Nelson, Mr.
Murphy, W. E. Waters, Mr. Clarke, A.
Seagrave, J. J. Rosenthal, H. J. Philpot
W. D. Farrand.
A Well-Known, man.
Mr. B. H. Barrows, of the literary
bureau of the Union Pacific, arrived in
the city yesterday from Omaha. Mr.
Barrows makes a trip over the entire sys
tem once a year, and collects data for
his literary work, which is given to the
public in the form of pamphlets, posters
and other advertising He was American
Consul at Dublin from 1876 to 1885, and
is as well-known in English-speaking
circles the other side of the Atlantic as
he is here.
Tin- Flower festival.
The Executive Committee of the
Flower Festival Society, vigilant as ever,
reported yesterday that Hazard's Pavilion
was undergoing a first-class scouring, all
reminders of Sam Jones' and Mr. Moody's
audiences will be washed out preparatory
to the reception of fragrant cypress and
gay flowers. Tbe greatest interest in the
Festival prevails in all directions and the
work of tbe managers will be warmly
supplemented by hosts of friends.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoriju
Defending Their Officials.
Editors Herald—There appeared in
the Redlands CUrograph of March 30th a
review of tbe remarks of the New York
Financier upon the financial condition of
the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Rail
road Company, and after his review the
writer presumes to present bis views on
the cause of the present condition of
affairs of the company, and he evidently
considers himself fully competent to en
lighten the reader in regard to all the
different ramifications of the financial
losß and gain of the company.
The part of his article calling forth this
reply seems to be directed at the heads
of Manager McCool and his aids,wherein
he represents the employees of the Cali
fornia lines as being greatly dissatisfied
with the present local management. The
why and the wherefore of this uncalled
for and unjust attack is a mystery,unless
it was prompted by some party or parties
having an axe to grind. If so, they had
much better spend more time in prepara
tion, for they must know it would meet
the eyes of those who, by virtue of their
disinterested attitude, would judge of the
question coolly and fairly on its merits.
He says, "How about those strikes '!"
And to the reader not familiar with the
history of those so-called strikes, and pre
suming that the writer was talking his
tory, it would appear that immediately
on the advent of the present local man
agement there was an effort on its part to
cut the pay, thereby precipitating the
strikes, when as a matter of fact the first
strike that agitated tbe interests of the
Santa Fe here in California was the
active sympathy of the Brotherhood of
Locomotive Engineers with their striking
brothers on the Q system, and the writer
of this well remembers the general feel
ing of admiration expressed by all at the
action of General Manager McCool as he
went among the engineers, using every
reasonable form of argument to convince
them of tbe folly of their hopes to injure
one road by crippling one of its strongest
rivals. Tbe next strike of any conse
quence was that of the B. of R.R.1!.,
and the causes which led to it were as
foreign to a matter of wages as was that
of the former, the management being in
no way, shape or manner responsible for
it. Thus he goes on to speak of the dif
ference of feeling existing now among
employees and that of a year ago. He says
Something about going among them
and gaining their confidence, and all that
balderhash about listening to their tales
of injustices and tyranny, and further
says there are few in the employ now
who were there a comparatively short
time ago—making it appear as though
the injustice was pre\eating men from
staging in the employ of the company,
when as a matter of fact the youngest
men in the service, with one or two ex
ceptions, came here over a year ago, and
the writer of this considers himself on
the bottom rung of the ladder, and he
came here two years ago, and the only
element of uneasiness we know of is the
fear of tbe next time card chopping off
more heads.
It is not the purpose of this article to
go into a lengthy review of the entire
matter calling forth this reply, but in so
far as it represents us to the country in
the light it does, we feel called upon to
deny the slanderous allegations con
tained in the articles in question, and as
a body of men having had life long expe
rience in every State and Terri
tory in the Union, and feeling our
selves capable of studying the
question on all sides, make this
as our reply, that considering the condi
tion of affairs against which tbe present
local management has bad to contend
for the pact two years, the interests of
tbe Santa Fe are fully as well, if not bet
ter, handled than they could be were
any change to be made. The article
goes on to speak of several extravagant
lineß being built, when, as a matter of
fact, they were all projected and nearly
all built prior to the advent of the pres
ent local management. So how about
the keen judgment and foresight of their
predecessors in office.
If the gentleman will take the pains to
go among them as he says, he will find
that with the exception of a few sore
heads he cannot find in all the United
States, a railroad system where the em
ployees are better satisfied with their
treatment, or have a warmer feeling for
the gentlemen whom tbe company has
seen tit to honor with their confidence,
and it is a noted fact that where such a
feeling exists, a much be)tar service is
obtained than where there is an ill
feeling of enmity existing toward the
management on the part of the em
ployes. It is a noted fact that, many
times, where stockholders wonder at
small leaks and extravagant bills, way
beyond what close calculations would
lead them to expect, were they to take a
practical tour of observation, they could
trace it to the gulf that lies between the
officers and employes, for it is a fact the
employe enjoying the confidence and
respect of his superior officers renders
better service tban does he who feels
keenly the lack of it, and such treatment
of the employes by the officers is always
transmitted to the patrons of the road,
and is thereby coined into dollars and
cents. Feeling we have fully explained
our attitude which was, by the article in
question, misrepresented, and thanking
you for so much space, we respectfully
retire from the discussion.
Santa Fb Employes.
Tble Week at Red Rice's.
Special sale of new f arniture at less tban
secoud hand prices. Look you. New antique
bedroom sets, bes', modern styles, worth $40,
for $18 to $22. Superb ash sets worth $28,
$30 and $35, for $14, $15 and $18. Beauti
ful solid walnut sets, cost $50, for $25 and
$28. Get there. Pretty ash hotel sets for $12
$13. New bed louoges for $10. Good Domes
tic sewing machine for $7.50. Baby carriage
for $4 50. Best duck top Clipper mattresses
for $tj; worth $11. Carpets, crockery, glasa
ware, mirrors, groceries; everything pertaining
to housefurnishlng and housekeeping, at prices
only found at Red Rice's "everything supply
stores," 328 and 330 South Spring street, DBt.
Fourth and Fifth streets, A lot of counter
shelving and store fixtures yet on sale.
Howe Scales and Store Trucks.
Buy plstform and counter scales and store
trucks from Hawley, King & Co., 60-70 North
Los Angeles street.
The Cheapest and Best.
For the cheapest and best fitting suits go to
Qordan Bros.', 22 S. Spring et.
For Sale or Rent.
Nine-roem house and barn, lawn, flowers,
etc.; a most delightful home; will be rented to
responsible parlies only. Address P. O. box
442, city.
Christopher's Toast Foundry,
No. 12 North Spring street, is the cheapest and
best, place to eat in the city. Everything neat
and clean.
Notary Public and Commissioner
For New York and Arisona, G. A. Doblnson
134 West Second street. Hollenbeuk Block.
Private Entrance for
Ladtei to the hot baths at the Natatorium ready
at all hours, 25 cent,. Fine porcelain tubs.
Theo. Rapp, Wood Engraver,
No. 10 Court street, room 9. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Reasonable prices.
The "Sterling"
Cigar Is hand made, Havana filled, and Is sire
to please, all for an nickel.
Catalina Island.
New steamer. Four trips a week.
BKB the fine 840 watch sold by Hoi llngsworth
in clubs at SI per week In Installments. 30
South Spring street.
MISCELLANEOUS.
TO?
CREAM P^i
JPWDIpI EXTRACTS
Used by the United States Government. Endorsed by the heads ot tne urear, umvenltlea
ana Publio Food Analysts, as the Strongest, Parest and most Healthful. Dr. Price's Cream
Baking Powder does not contain Ammonia, Lime or Alum. Dr. Price's Delicious Flavoring
Extract*. Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Almond, ltose, etc., do not co tain Poisonous Oilsor
Chemicals.
PHICE BIKISC FOWfIEB 00. New York. Chicago. San f rancl.tn.
$1000 REWARD
FOR ANY MINERAL FOUND IN THIS MEDICINE.
THE
GREAT SIERRA KIDNEY LIVER CORE
Purifies and Enriches the Blood without Blotches.
Sure Cure for FEMALE COMPLAINTS.
Gives Life and Vigor to EVERY ORGAN.
Positively Cures all URINARY DISORDERS.
Sure Cure for DIABETES and BRIGHT'S DISEASE.
Never Fails to Cure Catarrh of STOMACH and BLADDER
Cures Burning. Smarting Pains in SMALL OF BACK.
DELIGHTFUL TO THE TASTE.
FOB SALE BY ALL, DRUGGISTS.
SISRXiA CHEMICAL 00.
OFFICE, 18 TOST ST., SAX FRANCISCO, CAE.
commission and storage.
KENNEDY & Co,<
—Wholesale and Retail—
Commission Merchants,
BUTTER, EGG 3, HAMS, ETC.,
Fresh Ranch Eggs Received Dally.
Poultry Dressed to Order.
Goods Delivered to any part of city.
116 WEST SIXTH ST.
TELEPHONE 1044. m 29 lm
NAUD'S WAREHOUSE,
R. G. Wstsb, Proprietor.
GRAIN, WOOL
—AND—
General merchandise Warehouse.
Advances made on wool.
BTOBAOE, COMMISSION ADD IHSDOAMCF.
Agents for all kinds of Agricultural Imple
ments. Wholesale and retail dealers in Im
ported and Domestic Wines, Brandies and
Whiskies. 634 to 666 Alameda street.
ml2-tf
ISTewnall Bros.,
COAL, WOOD, HAY, GRAIN, ETC.
In large or small qnantitles.
lIS W. Flftb St. Telephone 468.
IT WILL PAY YOU TO CALL ON US
m2l lm
Mewible Offer MM
FOR
Three DmM and Two spare
PIANOS !
MUST BE 80LD WITHIN A WEEK.
For terms see
J. B. O'CONNOR,
218 South Main street, Panorama Building.
m 241 f
State Loan and Trust Co.
Bryson-Bonebrake Building.
Capital • 1,000,000.
DIRECTORS:
George H. Bonebrake, President.
John Bryson and E. F. Spence, Vice-Presidents.
H. O. Witmer, L. N.Breed, W. G.Cochran,
H. J. Woollacott, P M. Green, L. W. Dennis,
Samuel B Hunt, Secretary.
We act as trustees for corporations, syndicates
and estates. Loan money on choice real estate
and collaterals. Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on time deposits. Have safety de
posit vaalts equal to any in the United Stitos.
Rent boxes at reasonable rates. astf
af§feA. P. ROZ A
Is Now Driving Hack No. 29.
IF YOU WANT A CARRIAGE,
CALL UP
Telephone 232 During the Day.
Telephone 693 During the Night,
And you will receive prompt attention.
m2B lm*
Farmers, Attention!
Horse Rate. Horse Rakes.
We have on hand a few of tbe best One and
Two-Horse Rakes ever brought to this market,
which we are
Closing Out at $15 and $18 each.
Call and see them.
Brown & Foster Hardware Co..
36 SOUTH SPRING ST. A3 lm ddkw
THE HAMMAM BATHB,
A 76 South Main street,
flfk__ Under Dr. Royer's direc-
tlon has beoome a popular
jBB: V institution. Ladles' depart
-1 jifw Iment open from Ba.m. to
9 Jr' Mop. a. Gents' department
v ~ Mk open night and day and no
charges for gentlemen bath-
era remaining over night.
C. 8. Trapbagen, B. M'gr.
Kf.Al, ligl'Al'K,
Valuable Farm
3263 ACRES
ON BRANNAN ISLAND
BELONGING TO THE ESTATE OP THE
late DX. F. Z KILE, situated in Sacramento
county about one mile below and opposite tbe
town of Rio Vista, fronting about one mile on
the Sacramento river and extending along the
north bank of Seven-Mile slough nearly three
and a half miles, and including valuable im
provements, such as houses, barns, warehouse,
etc , with some personal property. About 700
acres now under a lease which expires Decem
ber, 1890.
—ALSO,—
1061 acres, more or less, situated on ANDROB
ISLAND, at the junction on Georgiana slough
and the Moquelumne river, with about two and
a half miles of navigable water frontage.
These landi are thoronghly reclaimed, con
venient to market, and are unsurpassed for
productiveness by any in the State.
To be sold subject to the approval of the Pro
bate Court
Bids will be received at the office of the ex
ecutors, 137 Montgomery street, San Francisco,
where maps of the property may be seen and
snch further Information had as may be re
quired. 0. LIVERMORE,
E. H. TAFT,
Executors.
Ban Francisco, February 25,1889. m2tf
RAMONA 1
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley.
Only Three Miles from City Limits of Lot
Angeles.
Property of San Gabriel Wine Co..
Original Owsen.
LOCATED AT SHORB'B STATION,
On line of 8. P. R. R and Ban Gabriel
Valley Rapid Transit R. R ~
From 10 to 15 minntes to the Plata, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, ok
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TSBHB.
PUREST SPRING WATEE
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at Office ol
SAN GABRIEL WINE CO.,
Ramona, Los Angeles county, Cal.
Or to J. M. TIERNAN, Ramona. a7tf
SPECIALS
SISTERS OF CHARITY TRACT—6 lots,
50x105 each, for $4000
FLOWER ST., between Ninth and Tenth
Sts., 50x155 to alley; per ft 60
FIB ST ST., BOYLE HEIGHTS, bet Chi
cago and St. Louis sts., west of new
cable engine-house, per ft. 80
HOPE ST., Cameron tract—soxlso to
alley 2200
ELLIS AYE., south side - 45x150 to
alley 1350
BIJB9 TRACT, Bear New Wolfskin
Depot-Per ft 30
BURLINGTON AVE.,Bonnie Brae tract—
50x150 to alley 1500
For tliese and many more see
POMEROY & GATES,
16 COURT STREET.
Largest and newest list In the |city.
HOMES.
Finest Quality of Fruit Lands.
NEAR EOS ANGEEES,
AT REASONABLE PRICES AND ON LIBER
AL TERMS TO ACTUAL SETTLERS',
Eight thousand acres now subdivided (17,000
acres in all) in San Fernando Valley, from Bto
12 miles from the Plaza, into 5,10,12 and 40
. acre tracts, ranging from $25 to $150 per acre,
and on snch liberal terms that any one can own I
a home. A frnltful soli, easily cultivated; a
1 healthy and delightful climate; excellent
. schools and churches; two railroads. With Los
Angeles markets for everything raised on the
farm, these lands offer inducements to settlers
i that cannot be duplicated.
Also, a Stock Range of 1,250 acres, only four
miles from city limits, at a very low figure.
Can be subdivided into two or three ranges.
For maps, price ■ and terms apply to
I PROVIDENCIA LAND WATER AND DEVEL
OPMENT COMPANY,
Roems 8 and 9, Bryson <& Bonebrake Block
]all 3m
r NOTIOE.
'■■ THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER 00.
° will strictly enforce the following rule; The
* hours for sprinkling are between 6 and 8
0 o'clock a. K. and 6 and 8 o'clock r. M. For a
'" violation of the above regulation the water
will be shat off and a fine of two dollars will
be charged before water will be turned on
again.
Tbe Towering Mastodon of Tented Shows
111
U-Rlng Circus, Royal Roman Hip
podrome, elevated Stage and
.">.Continent Menagerie*
Now In permanent consolidation with
S. fl. BARRETT'S
Universal Menagerie,2-Rlng Circa*,
Racing Carnival and Great
World* Fair
—WILL EXHIBIT IN—
LOS ANGELES,
THURSDAY, APRIL 11
Two Performances on Lot Near
Kama Ec Depot.
An extraordinary mi ideation of the two leading
Shows of America. Perfecting by their felici
tous consolidation the most voluminous and
Vast Amusement Organization
That mind can conceive or capital produoe. In
each and every department the consummation
of a perfect Show, wonderful In extent and
variety, multitudinous In choice and accept
able attraction!, and presenting each act and
feature with style, method and el gance, appre
ciated by patrons and commended by eveiy-
Dody.
LARGEST TENTS EVER CO INSTRUCTED
Whose mighty mazes of canvas canopy more
space and encloses more novel snd prominent
features than the tents of a dozen contemporary
exhlbitont. A matchless
HIPPODROIrIATICAL,
ZOOLOGICAL.,
EQUESTRIAN,
—AND—
SPECTACULAR EXHIBITION J
To witness which thousands coma daily many
leagues.
A PARADE
WITHOUT A PARALLEL I
lal gleaming glamour and Impressive spectaca
nr grandeur, presenting sumptuous scenes,
thrilling surprises and gorgeous effects neTer
before witnessed on the public streets. The
Children's Dream of Fairyland!
A delightful episode of the magnificent Free
Street Parade.
ELECTRIFYING
Hippadromatic Sports!
Realistic Gladiatorial Contests, excitlngCharlot
and Running Races and thrilling Trials of
Speed. The poetical, historical, dashing and
ever memorable
SHERIDAN'S RIDE
Vividly, artistically and realistically repro
duced on onr mammoth Hippodrome Track.
The most comprehensive and
exhaustive
Zoological Collection
Ever shown nnder canvaa. The largest and
best trained herd of Elephants, two Immense
Hippopotami, fifty golden, statae-orowned and
sumptuously adorned cages filled with the
strangest objects known to Natural History,
monstrous Pi'thons, Anacondas and Boa-oon
strtctors, huge African and Amazonian Sauriani
and Reptiles, multt-hued Birds from the Trop
ics and rare and curious Beasts from every land
and clime. A
New and Salient Kevolutioi
IN TINTED ENTERTAINMENTS.
Also exhibit at Pasadena, April 4th
Santa Ana, 6th ; San Diego, 6th; River
side, Bth; San Bernardino, 9th; Pomona
10th; Ventura, 12th; Santa Barl ira,l3th
3

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