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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, April 27, 1889, Image 2

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BREACH OF PROMISE.
An interesting Case on Trial
Before Judge Wade.
FRANCES DYKES' SAD STORY.
How She Broke an Engagement For
Geo. F. Van Every, and the
Result Told by Her.
The story of a woman's alleged wrongs
is being brought out before Judge Wade
snd a jury in the case of Frances Dykes
against George F. Van Every to recover
$20,000 for breach of promise. Miss
Dyke's story, as told by herself on tbe
witness stand, is to the effect that in 1884,
when she was about 22 years of age, she
was residing with a lady named Mrs.
Mclntyre at Springfield, Missouri. Her
sister had gone to Goldsbororgh to get
married, and she followed the next day.
She stopped with her sister at tbe hotel
that night, but did not see her sister mar
ried, for the reason that she could not
delay her return to Springfield. Her
sister and her intruded husband accom
panied her a short distance on the train,
and then left at a small station and were
married. She did not stop over, but
went on, and shortly afterward
■he noticed Van Every sitting in the
Sdat across the aisle. Then she noticed
him cross the car and take a seat behind
her. He opened tbe conversation by ad
dressing her. He asked her where she
was going, and she replied, "home."
The conversation was continued until
they reached Springfield. She said that
he talked to her in a very gentlemanly
manner, and that when they reached
Springfield it was about night. He
asked permission to escort ber home,
and she gave her assent. She went
that night to the residence of Mrs.
Howes, >which was near the depot.
When they reached the door, Van Every
asked her if he might call on her, and
she replied that she knew no reason why
he should not, but did not suppot c he
would, for she thought he was a drum
mer. He knocked at tbe door for her,
and said good night, and left her. She
did not expect to ever see him again,and
was surprised when not long after
HE CALLED
On bar at Mr** Mclnty re's. He called
on ber there several times, and when
she went at to her parents' residence,
some six miles oat of town, be called
on ber there. He aeked ber to go out
driving with him, bat she refused, as
ahe was engaged to be married to a man
named Johns, who had a farm near by,
and she did not think it right. She did
not love Johns, bat she bad become en
gaged to him. This made no difleience
to Van Every, and he continued hiß
visits. Miss Dykes fell in love with him,
aid be urged ber to break her engage
ment with Johns. This she hesitated
about doing, but she finally yielded to
Van Every's wishi s in the matter, and
broke her engagement. Then Van Every
asked her to marry him, and she prom
ised him that she would, bat no time was
set. She returned to Mrs. Mclntyre's,
and he continued his visits.
One evening he called and Slid he had
come to tt>k« ber to her mother who was
ill. He had a buggy and she pot on her
shawl and hat and accompanied him.
After they had driven for some time she
noticed that the road was strange to her,
and she told him that he had taken the
wrong road. He said he guessed not,
that he had been over the road several
times and had lately noticed that trees
bad been cut, changing its appearance.
They drove on a considerable distance
acd then he said he thought that lie
must have
MADE A MISTAKE
and have taken tbe wrong road. Tbey
c ;nsidered what was beat to do,
and he concluded to drive back to Spring
field, which he did, and they reached
there about 11 o'clock at night. The
question as to whether Miss Dykes
should go to a friend's house or the hotel
then arose, and he suggested that it
would seem strange to her friend if she
tarred up at that time of night. He
told her he would get her a room at the
hotel, and then he would drive to her
mother's. She consented to stop at the
hotel, and he Et9rted to take ber there.
On tbe way he asked her to stop at his
office while he saw about some business
matters. She went in with him, and he
gave her a seat. They talked for a long
time, and then when he was ready to
start it was after midnight. He said
that the hotel was closed, and she did
not know what to do. After some talk
he said that she could sleep in
his bed at the office and he
would go elsewhere. He said that
there was a key to the door, and that she
would be perfectly safe. She did not
fancy this arrangement much, but felt
that it was the best that could be done
under the circumstances, and finally
consented to it. He then said "Good
night," and apparently left. After he
had gone she
LOOKED FOR THE KEY,
But could find none. She undressed and
went to bed, and shortly afterward Van
Every walked into the room and said:
"I came to see how you were getting
along." Miss Dykes asked and begged
him to go out, but he walked up to the
bed and talked to ber, urging her to con
sent to bis wishes, and finally, in fpire
of her objections, stayed with her until
morning. He urged that it would make
no difference, as they were to be mar
ried in two months. She returned
home, and in the course of time found
that she was likely to become a mother.
She begged him to keep his promise and
marry htr, but he put her off
with one excuse or another un
til her condition began to be
observable to others. Then he told her
that if she would go with him to Kansas
City he would msrry her there. She
accompanied him there, and still he de
dt layed the marriage until the became
derparate. One day she sent for him to
come to her room, and when entered she
locked the door and asked him if be was
going to marry her. He replied that he
was not. She then took a bottle of
chloroform and attempted to drink its
contents. She had swallowed a small
quantity of the paison when Van Every
sir-zed her arm and took the bottle away.
She became sick from tho
EFFECTS OF THE POISON,
And lie walked her up and down for a
long lime. He then promised to marry
her after he got back from a trip he was
going to take on business, and at-ked her
to stay with a friend of his during his
absence. She consented, and the next
day he took her to a hoos-, which she
afierwards learned was a sort of lying-in
hospital. She was treated very well here,
and ntially the baby was born. She had
grown a tached to the baby, when on the
seventh day after its birth, the woman in
charge came into the room, took the
LOS AUGELES DAILY HERALD- SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 27. 1889.
baby as if to attend to it, wrapped it up
and gave it to some one on the outside.
That was the last she ever saw of her
baby, and in her excitement she rose
from her bed too soon and bad a re
lapse. When she recovered Van Every
had left Kansas City and she had
a suspicion he had come to
Los Angeles. She wrote to the
postmaster, and, in reply, he wrote her
that Van Every was here. In Decem
ber, 1887, she arrived in Los Angeles and
learned that Van Every was residing
near Santa Monica. She went to that
place and asked to see bim. Admittance
was refused, and she said she wanted
her child. She had a revolver with her,
and as Van Every's brother pushed her
out of the gate it went off. She was ar
rested and for some time was confined
in the County Jail. The charge was fin
ally dismissed, owing to the non-appear
ance of the prosecuting witness. Suit was
then commenced in the Superior Court
and is now on trial.
This is the second suit com
menced by Miss Dykes against
Van Every. The first was commenced
in Kansas City, but owing to some defect
in the bond, papers had to be served
over again, and by that time Van Every
was out of that part of the country.
Van Every, in his answer, says that
the action is barred by the statute of
limitations, and that no damages should
be awarded, because he has a document,
signed by Miss Dykes, releasing him
from further liability for $200, which was
paid her. Miss Dykes is still on tbe
witness stand, and her cross-examina
tion will probably consume all of this
morning's session of the court.
CATALINA ISLAND.
It la Not Vet Sold—The Exact
Situation.
The Tribune in its issue of yesterday
morning sold Catalina Island and its
readers as well. In point of fact, the
island has not been transferred to any
one, neither has any bonding taken
place, nor anything tending to the sale
transpired beyond what was announced
in the Herald some days ago. Mr.
Shatto was seen daring the morning and
was asked by what authority his name was
given as authenticating the deal. He
replied: "None at all. I told no one
that the island was sold. As regards
the further details of the alleged news
wherever it was stated, that large quanti
ties of pipe were to be at
once shipped over to the island,
all there is in that, is that 250 feet of
pipe bave been sent over, although this
is nothing at all startling, for we are
sending pipe over there for water and
other purposes all the time."
Mr. C. A. Summer, agent for tbe is
land, was next interviewed and said
that not a quarter of a dollar had changed
hands on tbe deal. There was a negotia
tion pending to be sure, he said, but that
is old news.
A Herald man was, daring the coarse
of the afternoon, fortunate enough to
meet Mr. Hazelton, one of the English
gentlemen who are here with the avowed
intention of purchasing the island. Mr.
Hezelton s poke freely on the matter, and
said in substance as follows:
"There are three of us over here on tbe
bisiness, Colonel Smith, Mr.
Simpson aud myself. Colonel Smith
was in Southern California last
year and, chancing to make the
trip to Catalina, was very mnch impressed
with that place. On his return to Eng
land he put it forward as a probably good
investment to purchase it, and we are
over here on the matter, We have looked
over the island thoroughly, and think it
a charming place, and destined by nature
for the fashionable resoit which, in the
event of purchase, we should make it.
We opened negotiations with the agents
of the island, but not a penny has passed
between as, nor have any papers been
signed. It is now a question of coming
to terms and something will be done,
one way or the other, very soon, for we
intend to start back for England in a few
days."
The I.o» Angeles Exhibit.
A special meeting of the Chamber of
Commerce will be held this afternoon at
half-past 8, at their rooms on First street.
It is called for the purpase of discussing
the project of a permanent exhibit with
the Board of Trade at San Francisco.
Secretary Ward, of the Board of Trade,
and J. B. Lankershim, both of whom
have recently visited the Exposition at
San Francisco, will speak on the matter,
as will also a number of others. It ap
pears that a wrong impression has been
created to the effect that his county has
not been fairly dealt with by the State
Board of Trade. Tbe object of the meet
ing is to give the correct statement of the
case and to discuss the best meats for
strengthening the exhibit.
A Change of Service.
Official notice was given out at the
Southern Pacific office yesterday that tbe
Oolden Gate special, leaving San Fran
cisco on Saturday, May llth, will be the
last. There will be no diminution of
service, however, as a new overland is to
be put on tbe Southern Pacific and Union
Pacific roads on the following day, and
will be the fastest regular daily train
ever run between the Coast and the East.
It will leave San Francisco at 6 :30 p. m.
daily, will arrive at Omaha in three days,
Chicago nineteen hours later, and New
York in 4 days and 21 hours, or twenty
six hours shorter than tbe present over
land time. It will be a limited train and
will only carry first-class passengers.
Pnllman Passengers.
The following Pullman passengers left
yesterday for San Francisco and the
East:
By tho 1:05 p. m. ttain: Mr. Van
Arnam, Mr. Shegrill, John Bidewell,
Jas. Barrett, Mr. Graham, L. W. Blum,
Mrs. McNair, Mrs. 8. A. Holliday, W.
M. Simpson, Mr. Watkins, Mrs. Mercer,
Mrs. Kissing.
By tbe 10:20 p. m. train: A. R. Gen
neaon, Carrie Leonard, 0. G. Wheeler,
J. B. F. Davis, Mr. Putnam, V. P.
Weaver, J. H. Stewart, Mr. Weeks, A.
Nelson, Dr. Grimes, J. De Barth Shorb,
H. G. Neustadter, Jno. Lawrence, W.
Simpson, W. W. Todly, Mr. Gage.
"Bromley, did yon tell Jones that I
never told the truth?" "I said, on the
contrary, that you occasionally inad
veitently told the truth." "Well, that's
something else. I won't allow any man
to intimate that I'm a constitutional
liar."—[Time.
Big Day for Bargains.
Remember the annual out price aalo at
Meyer Lewis A Co.,
101 and 103 North Spring street.
Scriver & Quinn.
38 Sooth Main street, sole agents for Heath A
Milllgen's beat prepared paints.
The Ulrl Walters at Brown's Res
taurant hare proved a drawing card. The
meals are first olass.
Only think how cheap you can lire at
Spenco's Keataurant! 46 S. Spring.
TENTS at Foy'a harness Shop, 217LosAngele>
street.
POOR BEEF.
I* Caused a. Row Among; tbe Whit
tier Railroad men.
The Southern Pacific's section fore
man, Mr. Maag, at Whittier, has been
having a lively time during the past few
days. He is a married man and also
acts as boarding boss for the boys, bnt in
the latter role appears not to have given
satisfaction. Several complaints were,
from time to time, made about tbe board
without any improvement being effected,
and on Thursday afternoon the men
brought the thing to a crisis by going out
on strike. The chief point of grievance,
so they informed headquarters here, was
that they had third-rate beef placed be
fore them to eat, whilst the section boss
and his family feasted off choice cuts. A
new gang of men was sent down
on the first train yesterday morning,
and the section foreman, glad to have a
gang again, at once took them out to
work. The strikers however, appeared
ou tbe scene, and a dispute followed,
ending in a stand-up fight between the
boss and one of thelocked-outs. No body
interfered and they had a rough and
tumble set-to for several minutes, the
affair terminating in tbe retirement of
both combatants with honors easy.
A FISH POND.
Row It Was Destroyed—Damages
Desired.
B. Ballerino has presented a demand
to tbe City Council for $2,000 damages.
He says that two years ago he con
structed a dam and embankment in a
natural water course on bis own land
about a mile south of the Seventh-street
lake. He built it for the purpose of re
taining a small flow of water and creat
ing a lake, in which he desired to raise
edible fish. The pond was formed and cov
ered about an acre to the depth of four
feat, and he had in it a thriving and in
creasing shoal of carp. Tbe Seventh
street lake, owned by tbe city, covered
several acres and was twenty-five feet
deep, and was located , in the same water
course. On the 4th of April he alleges
that this vast body of water was let loose
by tbe order cf one of the office h of the
city, and it rushed down upon and swept
away his dam and his fish, damaging
him" to the extent cf $2,000.
tvin Leave the Combination.
A dispatch was received in tbe city
yesterday, announcing that the Northern
Pacific had given notice of its withdrawal
from the Transcontinental Association,
to take effect on July 19th. The reason
for this is a dispute with the Union Pa
cific. The Northern Pacific refused, some
time ago, to allow the Union Pacific to
book passengers into the Sound country,
above Portland, which it regards as its
own territory even at tbe full local rates.
Tbe matter would have been taken up by
the Transcontinental Association, and the
Northern Pacific was forced to take water,
and, seeing this, it has declared its in
tention of standing alone. After it with
draws, it will be able to advance rates at
ten days' notice, or lower them at
three days' notice, but it will have to be
very careful about starting any war, or
elee it may fall under the ban of tbe
Inter-State Commissioners. The with
drawal is looked upon in railroad circles,
as merely a bluff to gain its point, but, if
it remains outside, the result will proba
bly be a general split up. It is thought,
however, that at the forthcoming meeting
of the Transcontinental Association,
matters will be satisfactorily arranged
again.
Telegraph Olflclals.
Advices were received at the Santa Fe
office yesterday of the arrival at Albu
querque of a party of telegraph magnates
comprising a number of Western Union
officials, and the heads of the telegraph
departments of several railroads. The
members of tbe party arc en route to this
city on a tour of inspection, and will
arrive here about Sunday next. Among
them are Mr. M. C. Bristol, of Chicago,
General Superintendent of the Western
Union construction department; Mr.
Frank Jaynes.the Western Union's Super
intendent at San Francisco, and Mr.L.B.
Hoeber, Superintendent of Telegraph for
the Atlantic and Pacific with head
quarters in this city.
DISEASED BLOOD.
Humors, Blotches, Sores, Scales,
Crusts, and Loss of Hair Cured.
Terrible Blood, Poison. Suffered all
a man could suffer and live.
Face and body covered with aw
ful sores. Used the Cutlcura
Hemedles ten weeks and Is prac
tically cured. A remarkable case.
I contracted a terrible blood-poisoning a year
ago. I doctored with two good physicians,
neither of whom did me any good. I suffered
all a man can suffer and live. Hearing of your
Clticuba Remedikb I concluded to try them,
knowing if they did me no good they could
make me no worse. I have been using them
about ten weeks, and am most happy to say
that I am almost rid of the awful sores that
covered my face snd body. My face was as bad,
if not worse, than that of Miss Boynton, spoken
of in your book, and I would say to any one in
the same condition, to ase Cuticura, and they
will surely be cured. You may use this letter
in the interests of Buffering humanity.
£. W. REYNOLDS, Ashlsnd, Ohio.
Covered with Running- Sores IT
years.
I have been troubled with a skin and scalp
disease for seventeen years. My head at times
was one running sore, and my body was Cov
ered with them as large as a half dollar. I tried
a great many remedies without effect until I
used the Cuticura Remedies, and am thank
ful to state that after two months of their vie
I am entirely cured. I leel It my duty to you
and the public to state the above case.
L. it McDOWKLL, Jamesburg, N. J.
Dug and Scratched 38 years.
Igo Mr. Dennis Downing ten years better. I
have dog and scratched for thirty-eight years.
I had what is termed praritis, and have suffered
everj thing, and tried a number of doctors but
got no relief. Anybody could have gotiffiOO
had they cured me. The Cuticuba Remedies
cured me. God bless the man who invented
Cuticuba.
CHENEY GREEN, Cambridge, Mass.
Cutlcura Remedies
Are sold everywhere. Price, Cuticura, 50c.;
Soap, 25c; Resolvent, »1. Prepared by the
Potter Dbuo and Chemical Corporation,
Boston.
stsaT-Send for "How to Cure Skin Diseases,"
61 pages, 50 illustrations and 100 testimonials.
pTTV/TPLES, black heads, chapped and oily
A J.IVJ. skin prevented by Cuticura Mcdi
cated Soap.
Adßk ACHLNO SIDKS AND BaGK,
i-NBHip. klducy and uterine pains and
■aHtywTT weaknesses relieved Ha on,'
WmhMtf minute by the Cutlcurn Autl
faßSßhU* fain Plaster, tbe first and only
Instantaneous pain killing, strengthening plas
ter.
Disinfect Yoor Vineyards j
—BY— I
ONGERTH'S INSECTICIDE I]
Recommended by J. DE BARTH SHORB. t
—FOR SALE BY—
E. STEELE, 113 West First Street.
P. O. Box 1,974. a2O lm
O. B. FUJLJLJER & CO~
(Bscceasors to McLain A Lehman.)
Pioneer Track and Transfer Co.
Ho. 8 Markbt Bt., Los Angeles, Cal.
Safe and Plsno Moving. All kinds of Track Work
Telephone 137. a 1 tf
PURE
CREAM P™**
SiSS
r OWDEp HTRACIS
Used by the Unltea States Government. Endorsed by the heads of tne ureat universities
and Publio Food Analysts, as the Strongest, Purest and most Healthful. Dr. Price's Cream
Bating Powder does not contain Ammonia, Lime or Alnm. Dr. Price's Delicious Flavoring
Extracts, Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, Almond, Rose, etc., do not contain Poisonous Oils or
Chemicals.
PRICE BIKISr. POffDEK CO. New York. Chicago. San Francisco.
TROY LAUNDRY CO.
Works: 571, 573, 575 North Main Street.
MAIN OFFICE: UNDER LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
FIRST AND SPRING STREETS.
&i o
a a Z
30 13 ST
~2 5
HOTEL, RESTAURANT and FAMILY WASHING.
TROY SYSTEM.
PRICEB AS LOW AS ANY LAUNDRY. Ja273m cod
MISCELLANEOUS.
Shorthand s. rv -
SsK, Telegraphy
Day and Evening Sessions. Best Methods.
Skillful Teachers. Lowest Rates. Situations
Free. LONGLEY A WAGNER,
Room 1, No. 24 W. First Street
A LARGE ASSORTMENT
Lord Fauntleroy Caps
—AT—
The Corset Emporium,
221 SOUTH SPRING ST.
Cal9 lm
■ft fk M fh ft f ISSUED BY STATES,
U II N II V J COUNTIES, CITIES,
nll II 11 il I SCHOOL OISTRICIS. ETC..
II U II U U I- BOUGHT and SOLD.
Wo deal in Land Warrants and Scrip.
Applicable to Government Land, and Transact a
Heg-nlar Hanking- Business.
Correspondence Solicited.
S. A. KEMI CO., Barkers.
100 WASHINGTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILL,
FOR MEN ONLY!
1 DiKITIVF For LOST or FAILING MANHOOD;
M rWOI I HE General and NERVOUS DEBILITY;
i"ITTTf> X* Weaknees of Body and Mind: Effects
Yj \J JCVAJ of Errors or Excec3e» in Old or Young.
Itobnil, Noble SUIHOOD Ml] How lii havse «nd
Blr.Wh.D»> lk.l NI>KVK[.OI'HI OKI.OS k I'AKTSof BODY.
IbHOlulfl. u.r.lllntt lIOnK rSSATSRST— Ben.ltl. In . day.
S>n If.llfT fr.nl 47 Stain, Territories, and For.lirnroii.trlM.
You ran write Lh.in. Book, full njilanutlati, and proof, uallfrd
(pealed) frev. Addrea. ERIE MEDICAL CO., BUFFALO, N. 1.
]a 9 eodAwkly
FOR FINE BUGGIES
—AND—
CARRIAGES'
—«0 TO—
H. GIESE,
Thi Fibs Ikflimsht Dhalkb.
44 to 48 W. Lqs Angeles st. Los Angeles.
THE HAMMAM BATHS,
A 70 South Main street,
— t&k Under Dr. Royer's direc
tion has become a popular
/sSjfiSr a, institution. Ladies' depart
a as meut open from 8 a. m. to
I r ■Bf. V. Gents' department
n. ~ MM open night and day and no
sly - A*m charges for gentlemen bath-
ers "'"'"'"lt'S over night.
C. S. Traphagen, B. M'gr.
m2B 3m
"SUMMIT UMEr
Brick Masons and Plasterers:
Please take notice that the above lime is the
best in the market. By trying this lime yon
will be convinced of our claim fiat it is the
best to be had in this market or on the coast
The H. T Holmes Lime Co. of 8. F. concede it
to be superior to Santa Cruz lime.
SAN PEDRO ST., BET. 4TH AND STH.
Los Angeles Storage, Commis
sion and Lumber Co.
GET YOUR CLOTHING
Kenovated, Dyed, Repaired tc Altered
AT THE OLD BILIABLB
Los Angeles Steam Dyeing & Cleaning Co.
OFFICE, NO. 3 ARCADIA STREET,
Opp. Wells-Fargo Express Office.
Dyeing, Cleaning and Repairing of every des
. criptlon.
'a! 3 lm* QUBTAVE MASQUELIER. Manager.
WALTON &WACHTEL
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In
FURNITURE
OF ALL KINDS,
At Lowest Possible Rates.
■ 14, SIS and 218 South Spring St., I
Bet Third snd Foarth Sts. m 6-tf '
Storasre and Commission. j
MISCELLANEOUS.
SITE WANTED^
FOR
INDUSTRIAL
EXPOSITION
OF
Southern_California!
Tbe Industrial Exposition of Southern Cali
fornia hereby request offers of ground for a per
manent Exhibition building. It it necessary
that such ground shall be fairly central and
near street car lines,and of not less dimensions
than 250x300 feet.
It f s the purpose of this Association to erect
permanent buildings of modern and attractive
architecture. The advantages to the locality
will be very great, and bidders should consider
these advantages and canvass their respective
neighborhoods, and aid as far as possible in
this grand enterprise, which in the most pro
gressive cities of our country have been of such
material advantage.
Offers should be addressed to
E. A. FORESTER, Chairman.
THOMAS A. LEWIS,
M. DODSWORTH,
a 24 Gt W. E. HUGHEB.
—or—
Spring and Summer Millinery
-AT
" THE FAMOUS,"
123 8. Spring St.,
ON TUESDAY, APRIL 2d, and WEDNESDAY,
APRIL 3d, and throughout the week. Quick
sales and small profits is our motto. New
York pressing business in connection with
"The Famous."
Wholesale departments a d country milliners
will take notice. m2B lan
State Loan aad Tut Co.
Bryson-Bonebrake Building.
Capital 51,000,008.
DIRECTORS:
Oeorge H. Boneorake, President.
John Bryson and E. F. Spence, Vice-Presidents.
H. 0. Wltmer. L. N. Breed, W. G. Cochran,
H. J. Woollacott, P. H.Green, L. W. Dennis,
Samuel B. Hunt, Secretary.
We act as trustees tor corporations, syndicates
and estates. Loan money on choice real estate
and collaterals. Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on time deposits. Have safety de
posit vaults equal to any in the United States.
Rent boxes at reasonable rates. aStf
Look and Read I
If you wish to sell or buy Second hand Far
niture, Carpets, or Trunks,
Bo sure and give us a call. We havo in stock a
large variety of goods too numerous to men
tion, all of which we offer cheap for cash, or
will sell on Installments.
W. P. MARTIN A BRO.,
No. 349 8. Spring st. Lock box, 1921.
a! 9 3m
H. P. GREGORY & 00.
117 N. I,e>s Angeles St.,
Boilers, Engines. Steam Pumps, !
OTTO OAS ESCJINES,
—AND —
General Power Machinery. <
I Agents for "HINKLK" PATENT PASSENGER i
AND FREIGHT ELEVATORS. '
[ Correspondence Solicited. ais Si"
Maison de Paris.
GRAND SPRING OPENING
Monday, Tuesday. Wednesday,
MARCH 18, 19, 30.
THB
Largest Most Elegant Display
EVER EXHIBITED IN THE CITY.
Also, good taste in oar cheap goods, at
the most reasonable price.
MME. DELER,
28 W. FIRST ST.,
Third Door from Spring Street,
8,15 12m LOS ANGELES. CAL.
W. C. FURREY.
Builders' Hardware
Full Stock at Lowest Prices.
The finest stock of GARDEN HOSE In the city.
LAWN SPRINKLERB In every variety.
PUMPS for destroying the scale bug a specialty.
THE MODEL GRAND RANGE, the leader of
them all.
METAL ROOFING and SANITARY PLUMBING
a specialty.
Will the public kindly give mc a call.
51 and 61 N. Spring St.
116 S. Fort St.
a2O«
Farmers, Attention!
Horse Rates. Horse Rakes.
We have on band a few of the best One and
Two-Horse Rakes ever brought to this market,
which we are
Closing Out at $15 and $18 each.
Call and see them.
Brown & Foster Hardware Co.,
36 SOUTH SPRING ST. S3 lm dAw
—THE—
Los Angeles Woolen Mills
Are now running and prepared to furnish
WOOLEN BATS for comforters and top mat
tresses. Also to wash and finish in first-class
style all kinds of blankets.
Mills on Pearl street, near Fifth street
m2B 2m
AUCTION BAX.EH.
—GENERAL—
Auction and Commission House,
NOS. 119 and 121 W. SECOND ST.
Peremptory Bales of New and Second-Hand
Furniture
TUESDAY, APRIL 23,
THURSDAY, APRIL 25, and
SATURDAY, APRIL 27,
At 10 A.m and 2 r. v.
Liberal cash advances made on consignments.
Outside sales made on application.
UEN O. RHOADES Auctioneer.
]a 5-tf ________
By W. E. BEESON,
MONDAY. APRIL 30th,
At No. 28 Soutn Main street.
—ALL THE —
Furniture and Contents
OF 23 FINELY FURNISHED ROOMS,
Consisting of elegant Bedroom Sets, Bed
Lounges, Bed Clothes, Carpets, Curtains, Toilet
Sets, etc.
Ladies invited to attend. Sale at 10 a. m.
sharp.
BEN O. RHOADES,
•27 3t Auctioneer.
SALE
By JOHN C. BELL * CO.,
REAL ESTATE & GENERAL AUCTIONEERS,
Office: 160 8. Los Angeles st, bet. Second
and Third.
AUCTION SALE OF
FINE FURNITURE
On Monday Next, April 2»tta,
At 10 o'clock,
In the brick building (TourisV House) at the
junction of North New and Old Mom streets,
nearly opposite the Pico House and Plata The
finest lot of furniture that has been offered Ihia
season. Also, a fine Piano, Cover and Stool,
made by tho celebrated Steinway & Co.. N. Y.
The furniture Is in excellent condition, con
sisting of Chamber Sets, finely polished Black
Walnut, Laurel, Oak and Cherry, Marble Tops,
with French Pier Glasses; Clipper Spring Mat
tresses, best live geese Feather Pillows, M talon
All-Wool Blankets, silk bound, Marseille!-
Spreads, Sheets and Pillow Cases, fine Brussels
Carpets, Parlor Sets in black walnut, crimson
silk plush and silk puffin, custom made to or
der in Han Francisco; patent Rockers, one
Range, Kitchen Furniture, etc.
Notics.—The Auction Sale of fine Furniture
takes place in the heart of the city on Monday
next.lat the Junction of New Main, nearly oppo
site the Pico House and Plaza. Tho furniture
has been used only a few months and is new
and also the fine Bedding and Carpets. Orders
positive to sell without reserve * Ladies and
gentlemen are cordially iuvited to attend tho
sale. John C. Bell will sell sharp on time
Don'tforget the fine Steinway Piano
_r__r-For further particulars call at ICO South
Los Angele* street.
JOHN C. REEL, Auctioneer.
160 South Los Angehs street. ,26 4c
A UCTION SALE, BY JOHN 0. BBLL A CO..
A real estate, stock and geueral auctioneers
Removed office to 100 South Los Angeles street
bet. Second and Third sts. Large sic oi
Horses-Family, Rood and Driving Horses 1(10
8 , '^.i^ 61 , 68 Hec ° nd Third,',e«
of Cathedral, this day, April 27, at 10 o'clock
Special Sale without reserve. New style Sur
reys, Phaetons, Sidebar Open aud Top Buggi 'a
and road carts; ai so , double and single SeXk
harness, to tne highest bidder for cash
7if^, 0 i BeBares , on . Q ?; lclnd Ben''e-»<>mesiiig- U(l "
le footers.very fast.high heads md steppers. The
?^ r .sP' a^ a y flrBt cUs "' m ° s * of them built
th»J h. I * h » rn _*» °y Smith, of New York;
?s_i« »t condition. Sold on account of owner
rt. J.?.i° r ? uro P c - « ; «n be seen after Wednes
day, at the Auction Horse and Carriage Mart,
where you oan try them and ride after them
each and every day before the sale, on appli
cation to John C. Bell, tho Auctioneer. Parties
JSS5 T °/ ft c » d l»oent towns and cities In want
of fine stylish turnouts, don't fail to see them
oeiore the day of sale. Don't forget the number.
« .„ JOHN O- BULL, Auctioneer.
Office: No. 100 S Los Angeles st. a25-3t

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