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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, November 03, 1889, Image 6

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;>AILY HERALD.
—PCBLISHBD—
IKVEN DAYS A WEEK,
lOSBTH D. LTUCB. J AM KS J. AT KM.
AVERS A LYNCH, - PUBLISHERS.
CITY OFFICIAL. PAPER.
Bntered it the poetoffioe at Lo* Angelea as
second-class matter. I
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
at KJc. per Week, or 80c. per Month.
TKRMB BY MAIL, INCLUDINB IOSTAOB '. j
Daily Hbbald, one year $8.00
Daily Hbbald, six months *-25
Daily Hbbald, three months 2.25
Wbbxly Hbbald, one year * 00
Wkbxly Hbbald, six months 100
Wbkkly Hbbald, three months 60
Xllcstbatbd Hbbald, per copy lo
Office of Fabrication, 123-I'-'5 West Second
Strset, J-os Angeles. Telephone No. 156
II NUII, NOVEMBER 3, 1888.
A Unique and Handsome City.
Los Angelea has progressed far
enough to disclose the fact a remarkably
handsome city is about to be bnilt up
here. Some of our public buildings are
of notable elegance if not originality.
There is no city hall that we can recall
that surpasses our own in unique grace.
Of course there are larger buildings,
some of them costing ten times the
amount that ours has cost, but the facade
of the Fort-street edifice surpasses them
nearly all, and the interior finish is
unique and striking, the wainscots of
variegated Oeorgia marble being an ex
quisite conceit. The new Court House,
which is approaching completion, will
enjoy a notable distinction. In these
two public edifices there is a powerful
gauge of battle thrown down to
the Connecticut brown sandstone
by two of our local stones,
viz., the Sespe, which is largely
used in the City Hall, and the Flagstaff,
which is even more profusely employed
in the Court House. For ornamental
work admitting both of intaglio and re
lievo designs, the Seipe stone is inde
scribably fine, and, in our judgment, it
surpasses the Connecticut brown stone,
the finest example of the latter on the
Coast being the chaste and handsome
residence of the late Mr. J. C. Flood, on
Nob Hill.
In some of onr business blocks ice
have achieved striking results. On a
recent visit to Los Angeles, Gov. Stan
ford told Gen. £. £. Hewitt and a num
ber of other gentlemen that, in his judg
ment, the Bryson-Bonebrake block was
the handsomest edifice of the kind which
he bad seen, either in Europe or Amer
ica. Though its style is bizarre, it has
many features of notable beauty
and attractiveness. The entrance is
certainly the handsomest one we have
seen in the United States. The Colton
marble of the pilasters which support the
arch are of rare and unique beauty.
Though of a different style from the
Georgia marble, they are of equal if not
greater brilliance of coloring. Some of
our other business blocks are notable in
many ways, there being nothing in San
Francisco approaching them in elegance.
The block at the corner of Second and
Fort streets, comprising the Bank of
California and the Young Men's Christian
Association, which will shortly be sup
plemented by the Griffith block in pro
cess of erection, are unusually fine ex
amples of the architecture adapted to
such works.
Bat it ie in the residence quarters of
Los Angeles that such triumphs of light,
graceful and aerial art have been
achieved. Not relatively but absolutely
there are more supremely elegant private
reei ,'ences in Los Angeles than in San
Francisco. Of course we have noth
ing to rival the half dozen palaces on
Nob Hill. One of these, thfj built by
Mark Hopkins, is the handsomest house
in the United States, and in its interior
appointments it has few rivals anywhere.
But while we have no residences in Los
Angeles upoti which hundieis of thous
ands, to say nothing of millions of dollars,
have been spent, there is Ecarcely a
limit to the number of exquisite homes.
Here the ability to beautify extensive
grounds yields gracious effects, which are
unattainable in San Francisco. Such a
wealth of tree, shrub and flora are avail
able here that an effect infinitely greater
than that attainable by the mere ex
penditure of money in crowded thorough
fates is produced.
So handsome a city has Los Angeles
already become that it is a great pity
that so few of our visitors take the
trouble to see it thoroughly. It is no
trifling task to get over a city that covers
thirty-six square miles. It has many
striking quarters, but the indications are
that the hills to the west, Figueroa and
intersecting streets, and West Los An
geles generally.will be the leading fashion
able sections, although both East Los
Angeles and Eoyle Heights are rapidly
developing attractions that are leading
great masses of the best elements of
our social life in their direction.
If Los Angeles shall continue to im
prove during the next decade, archi
tecturally, as she has in the past, a pan
orama of indescribable beauty will be
übfolded in her lovely groves and alame
das. Any fair man who will go thor
oughly over the place will recognize her
claims now to exceptional and almost
unapproached beauty. But the favorite
fashion of the ordinary visitors to the
city of Los Augeles iB to sit around the
hotels, and form their impressions of the
place by a partial and fractional observa
tion.
Production and Proaperlty.
In an interview witb a newspaper rep
resentative, Mr. I. W. Hellman said that
Ihe people of Los Angeles will advance
the fortunes of their section more rapid ly
by energetically putting their shoulders
to the wheel themselves and stimulating
development and production, than by
depending upon outside assistance. We
want population—we want capital. These
we will get; but the quickest way to ac
complish the desired result is to throw
ourselves upon our own magnificent re
sources and compel the prosperity which
is within our reach. These are
truths which the Hkbald baa
THE LOS AKQELE3 DAILY HERALD; SUN DAY MORNIIVG. NOVEMBMR 3, 1889.
all along persisted in preaching.
The more we stimulate production and
develop our latent resources, the more
attractive will our section become to
strangers. We should lop off all impor
tation of articles we can produce our
selves by producing them. This will
give us capital by enabling us to keup a*
home all the capital that comes here
and all that we derive from the produc
tions we sell abroad. By following out
this rule there would soon be a plethora
of money hare. Increase creates in
crease, and the community or individual
that lives within its own resources will
soon have capital to extend its possibil
ities. When we are told that it
is cheaper to buy some things
abroad that we could produce here
than to produce them ourselves, we say
that the cheapness is a delusion. As
long as we have lands that are capable
of producing what we import, and fail to
do so, we not only contribute to our in
ury by discouraging their utilization,
Dut we diminish our power to progress
>y lessening our means of developing our
resources. Every acre of raw land
brought into cultivation increases our
power and advances us a step on the road
to prosperity. Los Angeles should abso
lutely import nothing that her soil
can produce. If our industrial en
ergies were properly directed upon
this maxim, it would not be
many years before there wonl t be a kind
of prosperity here that would attract so
great attention abroad as to turn a tide of
immigration to us that would give our
lands a value higher than they have yet
attained. And this value would be a per
manent, not a fluctuating one. The best
advertisement to the stranger is the ocu
lar demonstration of what our lands can
do. If our dairy lands are covered with
cattle and creameries instead of lying
waste and idle, tbe stranger will want
them. So of our fruit and grain lands.
It is within our power .to lop off a thou
sand channels by which money is now
sent abroad for what we could produce
here, and to do this is the work to which
we should all direct our attention.
There is so universal a concensus of
opinion amongst observant people who
have lately made extensive tours of onr
country that Los Angeles is the liveliest
and busiest city of its size they have
seen in their travels, that we accept
their conclusion as a fact. Indeed, no
one can go through this city and see the
evidences ot permanent improvement
going on everywhere—new houses and
business blocks in course of construction
in every direction—without realizing that
there is an unmistakable confi
dence amongst business men and capi
talists in its steady and substantial
growth. Having passed successfully
through the severe ordeal of a settling
process, after an abnormal season of
speculation, we are now advancing on a
solid and sure basis. The merits of our
immediate and tributary country are so
great that any one can see that a city
which is their commercial and financial
focus must increase indefinitely in wealth
and population. The productive capacity
of our back country has hardly been
touched. With nearly three mil
lion acres of land in our own county
alone, the major part of which
is susceptible of the highest
cultivation and but a small area of which
is still awaiting the hand of development,
there is ample reason for the growth
here of a great city. But beyond this,
our commercial possibilities are im
mensely enhanced by the fact that Los
Angeles is the natural outlet to the trade
of all the territory that lies between here
and Salt Lake. As soon as direct rail
communication is opened with Utah, the
mineral wealth of a vast and rich region
will be poured into our lap. The trade
of Arizona was ours even in the days of
mule teams. The railroads may have
diverted a portion of it to other cities,
but as we increase in size and in our
facilities for competing commercially
with Eastern cities, we shall command
all the trade worth having of that grow
ing Territory. We may not make a very
great showing just now in manufactures.
Twenty-five years ago San Francisco was
utterly destitute of them. That city got
its first start in that line from the ma
chinery trade of the Nevada mines.
Oars will be sent booming ahead when a
railroad from Salt Lake brings us cheap
coal and opens up the rich mining dis
tricts that lie between the Sierra Madre
and the Wasatch ranges.
Theke is undoubtedly a great deal of
dissatisfaction in this section at the ap
pointment of Mr. Hancock, of Sacra
mento, as Superintendent of the Citrus
Fair of Southern California by the State
Board of Agriculture. This appointment
in all conscience should have been
bestowed on some citizen of the dis
tinctively southern counties, where
the real business of raising citrus fruits
is carried on. To go to Sacramento for a
Superintendent looks very much like a
gratuitous snub to this section, and it is
jso regarded by many of our most repre
sentative horticulturists. As a matter of
fact, Southern California has been
largely ignored in the constitution of the
State Board of Agriculture.
Mr. J. F. Isbell, of Hi vara, is one of
the self-helping men who illustrate what
can be done in Los Angeles county where
people go to work in earnest. He and a
number of his neighbors have planted a
considerable portion of their grounds in
English walnuts. The yield of the
matured tree is so abundant that
the average money return of an
acre in walnuts is $200. There
is a ready demand for all the nuts
that can be raised. If all our farmers
were as self-reliant and industrious as
those of Rivara it would not be long be
fore every dollar of indebtedness of the
county would be wiped out, end our
people would not only be self-sustaining
but large exporters. When it comes to
estimating the value of an acre of land
that will yield a yearly crop valued at
$200 one is slightly puzzled. If its owner
were to appraise it at $300 an
acre there would be a fearful
howl from those whose principal amuse
ment is talking about the high-priced
lands of Lob Augeles county, and yet it
would seem to be absurd to place a lower
figure ou the rich bottom lands of the
Puente and S\n Felipe Lugo ranchos,
and upon the equally rich lands of the
Monte, Downey and Rivara. Neverthe
less, them are tens oi thousands of acres
iv those neighborhoods that can be
bought for from $103 to $150 an acre, and
which are dirt cheap at that figure.
What Los Angeles county imperatively
needs is increased production. We have
made considerable progress in that line
already, but it is only a marker to what
the next ten years should be made to
unfold.
The San Francisco Chronicle says that
the real estate transfers in that city for
the week amount to $115,505. This is
about the average weekly figure of real
estate transactions in the metropolitan
city, and yet the papers of that city are
not backward in talking about the
"bursted boom" of Los Angeles. It is a
cold day when tbe amount of our real
estate transfers, even at this time of set
tled values, does not equal that of a
whole week of San Francisco's record of
sales.
A man who calls himself Count de
Varmount has been sent to Sing Sing for
five years for forging the name of an edi
tor to a check. The lawyers who de
fended him evidently failed in their duty
to their client when they failed to in
terpose a plea of insanity. The man who
would forge an editor's name to a check,
when the names of millionaires were
available on all hands, could hardly be
considered in a responsible frame of
mind.
TURF TOPICS.
Some Exciting Sport at the Bay
District Track.
San Francisco, November 2.—At Bay
District track this afternoon Sanol
trotted a trial mile in 2.1G, and Palo Alto
a trial mile in 2.15.
Two twenty class.— Tbapsin won in
three straight heats; Junio second; Bay
Rose third. Best time 2 21J.
Two twenty-three class.—Nona J. won
first heat in 2.25; Arol won second,
third and fcarth heats. Best time 2.24}{.
Trot for gentlemen's road-horses, own
ers to drive —But two heats were trotted,
Stoneman winning both, in 2:37 and
2:.'!'. i. In the first heat Humphrey's geld
ing ran away, dashing into Olawson's
cart, tearing off a wheel and dismounting
Humphreys and Clawson. The horses
then dashed down the stretch, and were
finally stopped by the stable-boys.
Neither of the drivers was badly in
jured.
NASHVILLE RACES.
Nashville, November 2. —Maiden two
year-olds, four furlongs—Mary K. won,
Little Rubbitt second, Miss Longford
third; time, 55%.
Three-year-olds and upwards, one and
three-sixteenths miles — Buckler won,
Cashier second, Fostoria third; time,
1:30.
Free handicap for three-year-olds and
upwards, mile and seventy yards—Arun
del won, Bertha second, Pell Mell third;
time, 1:56.
Free handicap for two-year-olds, six
furlongs—Polhemus won, Armiel second,
Frank Shaw third; time, 1 :22%.
Three-year-olds and upwards, five fur
longs—Black Diamond won, Governor
Ross second, Mediator third; time,
1:09. 3 4.
Same conditions as fifth—Catherine B.
won, Haramboume second Glen Pearl
third; time, 1:08.
EVENTS AT ELIZABETH.
Elizabeth, N. J., November 2.—
Three-fourths of a mile—Lela May won,
Badge second, Winona third; time, 1:20.
One and one-eighth miles—King Crab
won, Lavinia Bell second, Huntress
third; time, 2:o4>£.
Six-eighths of a mile—Frejols won,
Facial second, Kasson third; time,
1:20)4.
Three-fourths of a mile — Oarsman
won, Puzzle second, Lonely third; time.
1:2114-.
Five-eighths of a mile—Hop filly wod,
Mamie B. second, Laurent third ; time,
1:07)^.
One mile—Wilfred won, Bravo second,
St. James third; time, 1:503^.
THEY WON'T BE BULLDOZED.
Secretary Noble's Cherokre Circular
Acta as a Boomerang.
St. Louis, November 2 —The latest
advices from the Cherokee Indian Nation
are that the recent order of Secretary
Noble in regard to Cherokee affairs,
which was received at Tahlequah last
evening, has had just the opposite
effect the Commissioners expected it
would have. The Indians, who favored
the sale of the outlet before, are now ob
stinate. They say the Government has
adopted bulldozing tactics, and they will
not yield an inch. Chief Mayes is re
ported as saying: "The order 'is no sur
prise to us. We understand it was de
signed to coerce us into selling. The
Government cannot bulldoze us in this
manner."
He denied that he was in favor of sell
ing the strip. He reiterated his former
opinion that it would require a change in
the constitution before any land could be
sold.
Ex-Chief Bushy Head and other lead
ers favored making issue with the Gov
ernment as to the fee simple ownership
of the outlet. The cattlemen of the strip
will be present at the opening of the
Council next Monday, and attempt to
influence the Indians.
The Cherokee Livestock Association
aas decided to resist Secretary Noble's
onler, and to adopt legal measures to that
md.
A Question ol Jurisdiction.
Baltimore, November 2.—ln the United
States Court this morning counsel for
Henry Jones, charged with being the
ring leader of the Navassa island rioters,
obtained a writ of habeas corpus, return
able Wednesday. The action is to test
the constitutionality of the low which
gives the United States authority over
Navassa island. The new constitution
of Hayti claims jurisdiction over the
island.
Turbulent Guatemalans.
New Mexico, Njvember 2—General
G. M. Barrundia, of Guatemala, left to
day, ostensibly for Oaxaca. Many claim
he has gone to Guatemala to rouse tbe
people to revolution. Telegrams received
here state that the entire northern and
eastern sections of Guatemala are both
ready and anxious to engage in rebellion
against tbe government of President
Bnailas.
Marine Intelligence.
New York, November s—Arrived:
The steamer Etruria and City of Chi
cago, from Liverpool; Rhoeita, from
Hamburg.
THEY ARE TWINS.
The Two Dakotas Join the
Sisterhood of States.
BORN AT THE SAME MOMENT.
The President's Proclamations De
claring Them Members of
the Union.
Associated Picas Dispatches to the Hbbald. I
Washington, November 2. —The fol
lowing dispatch was sent from the Execu
tive Mansion this afternoon by Secretary
Blame to Governors Mellette and Miller,
of North and South Dakota:
"The last act in the admission of the
two Dakotas as States into tbe Union was
completed this afternoon at the Execu
tive Mansion at 3 o'clock and 40 min
utes, by tbe President signing at that
moment the proclamation required by
law for the admission of the two States.
The article on Prohibition submitted
separately in each State, was adopted in
both. The article providing for minority
representation in South Dakota was
rejected by the people. This is the first
instance in the history of the National
Government of two States (North and
South Dakota) entering into the Union at
the same moment"
[SignedJ James G. Blame."
Following is tho text of the prcclama
mation admitting North Dakota:
By the President of the United States of
America — a proclamation.
Whereas, The Congress of the United
States did by an act approved on the
twenty-second day of February, one
thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine,
provide that the inhabitants of the Terri
tory of Dakota might, upon the condi
tions prescribed in said act, become the
States of North Dakota and South Da
kota, and
Whereas, It was provided by said act
that the area comprising the Territory of
Dakota should, for the purposes of the
act be divided on the line of the seventh
standard parallel produced due west to
the western boundary line of the Terri
tory, and that the delegates elected, as
therein provided, to a Constitutional
Convention in the district north of said
parallel, should assemble in convention
at the time prescribed in the act, at the
city of Bismarck, and
Whereas, It was provided by the
said act that the delegates elected as
aforesaid should, after they had met and
organized, declare on behalf of the peo
ple of North Dakota that they adopt the
Constitution of the United States, where
upon said convention should be author
ized to form a constitution and a State
government for the proposed State of
North Dakota; and
Whereas, It was provided by the said
act that the constitution so adopted
should be republican in form and make
no distinction in civil or political rights
on account of race or color, except as to
Indians not taxed, and not be repugnant
to tho Constitution oi the United States
and the principles of the Declaration of
Independence, and the convention
should, by ordinance, irrevocable with
out the consent of the United States
and the people of said States, make cer
tain provisions prescribed in said act;
aud
Whereas, It was provided by said act
that the constitutions of North Dakota
and South Dakota should respectively
incorporate an agreement to be reached
in accordance to tbe provisions of the act
for the equitable division of all the public
records, and also for the apportionment
of the debts and liabilities of said Terri
tory, and that each of the said States
should obligate itself to pay its proportion
of such debts and liabilities, the same as
if they had been created by such States
respectively, and
Whereas, It was provided by said act
that the constitution thus formed for the
people of North Dakota should, by ordi
nance of the convention forming the
same, be submitted to the people of
North Dakota at an election to be held
therein on the first Tuesday in October,
eighteen hundred and eighty-nine, for
ratification or rejection by the q
voters of said proposed State, and that
the returns of said election Bhould be
made to the Secretary of the Territory of
Dakota, who, with the Governor and
Chief Justice thereof, or any two of them,
should canvass the same; and if a ma
jority of the legal votes cast should be
for the constitution, the Governor should
certify the result to the President of the
United States, together with a statement
of the votes cast thereon, and upon the
separate articles or propositions, and a
copy of said constitution, articles, propo
sitions and ordinances; and
Whereas, It has been certified to me
by the Governor of the Territory of Da
kota that within the timo prescribed by
said act of Congress, a constitution for
the proposed State of North Dakota has
been adopted, and he same ratified by
a majority of the qualified voters of said
proposed State, in accordance with the
conditions prescribed in said act; and,
Whereas, It has also bsen certifi d to
me by said Governor, that at the same
time that the body of the same constitu
tion was submitted, a vote of the people
on a separate article, numbered twenty
and entitled "Prohibition," was also sub
mitted and received a majority of all the
votes cast for and against said article, as
well as a majority of all the votes cast
for and against the constitution, and was
adopted; and,
Whereas, A duly authenticated copy
of said constitution, article, ordinances
and propositions, as required by said act
has been received by me,
Now Tlierefore, I, Benjtmin Harrison,
President of the United States of Amer
ica, do, in accordance with the
provisions of the act of Con
gress aforesaid, declare and proclaim the
fact that the conditions imposed by Con
gress on the State of North Dakota to
entitle that State to admission to the
Union, have been ratified and accepted,
and that the admission of said State into
the Union is now complete.
In testimony whereof, I have hereunto
set my hand and caused the seal of the
United States to be affixed.
Done at the City of Washington this
2d day of November, in tbe year of our
Lord, one thousand eight hundred and
eighty-niire, and of the Indepsndence of
the United States of America, the one
hundred and fourteenth.
By the President,
Ben.iamin Harrison.
James G. Blame,
[seal] Secretary of State,
following is the text of the nroclama
tion admitting South Dakota:
By the President of the United States oj
America — a Proclamation:
Whereas, TheCongresi of the United
States did by an act approved on the 22d
day of February, one thousand eight
hundred and eighty-nine, provide that
'he inhabitants of the Territory of Da
kota might, upon the conditions pre
scribed in said act, become the States of
North Dakota and South Dakota, and
Whereas, It was provided by said ac'.
that said area comprising the Territory
of Dakota should for the purposes of the
act be divided on the line of the seventh
standard parallel p-oducsd west to the
western boundary of said Territory, and
that the delegates elected as therein pro
vided to the constitutional convention
in the districts south of the parallel
should at the time prescribed in the act
assemble in convention at the city of
Sioux Falls; and
Whereas, It was provided by the
said act that the delegates elected as
aforesaid, should, after they met and or
ganized, declare, on behalf of the people
of South Dakota, that they adopt the
Constitution of tho United States, where
upon said convention should be author
ized to form a constitution and State
government for the purpose of the State
of South Dakota; aud
Whereas, It was provided by said act
that the constitution so adopted should
be republican iv form, and make no dis
tinction in civil or political rights on ac
count of race or color, except as to In
dians not taxed, and not to be repugnant
to the Constitution of the United Slates
and the principles of the Declaration of
Independence, and that the constitution
should be irrevocable without tbe con
sent of the United States; and the people
of said States should make certain pro
visions prescribed in said act; and
Whereas, It was provided by the said
act that the constitutions of North Dakota
and South Dakota should respectively
incorporate an agreement to be reached
in accordance with the provisions of the
act, for an equitable division of all prop
erty belonging to the Territory of Dakota,
the disposition of all public records, and
also for the apportionment of the debts
and liabilities of said Territory, and that
each of said States should obligate itself
to pay its proportion of such debts and
liabilities the same aB if they had been
created by such States respectively ; and
Whereas, It was provided by the said
act that at the election for delegates to the
Constitutional Convention in South Da
kota, as therein provided, each elector
might have written or printed on his
ballot the words "For the S ; oux Falls
Constitution," or the words, "Against
the Sioux Falls Constitution"; that the
votes on this question should be returned
and canvassed in the same manner as the
votes for tho election of delegates,
and if the majority of a)i the
votea cast on this question should
be for the Sioux Falls constitution it
should be the duty of the convention
which might assemble at Sioux Falls
as is provided in the act to submit to the
people of South Dakoti for ratification
or rejection at an election provided for
in the said act the constitution framed
at Sioux Falls and adopted November 3,
1885, and also the articles and proposi
tions separately submitted at the State
elections, including the question
of locating the temporary eeat
of government, with such changes
only as related to the name and
boundary of the proposed State, to the
reapportionment of judicial and legisla
tive districts and such amendments as
might be necessary in order to comply
with the provisions of the act.
Whereas, It was provided by the said
act that the constitution formed for the
people of South Dakota should be an or
dinance of the convention forming the
same to be submitted to the people of
South Dakota at an election to be held
1 on the first Tuesday in October, 1887, for
ratification or rejection by the qualified
voters of the said proposed State, and
that the returns of said election should be
' made to tbe Secretary of the Territory of
• Dukota, who with the Governor and
Chief Justice thereof, or any two of them,
should canvass the same, aud if a major
; ity of the legal votes cast should be f<r
■ the constitution the Governor should cer
tify the result to the President of the
United States, together with a statement
lof the votes cast thereon and upon its
separate articles or propositions, and a
copy of said constitution, articles, propo
sitions and ordinances; and
Whereas, It has been certified to me
by the Governor of the Territory of
Dakota that at the aforesaid election for
delegates the "Sioux Falls Constitution"
was submitted to the people of the pro
posed State of South Dakota as provided
in the said act; that a majority of all the
votes cast on this question were "for the
Sioux Falls Constitution;" that said con
stitution was at the time prescribed in
the act re-submitted to the peep l !} of
South Dakota with the proper changes
and amendments and has now been
adopted and ratified by the majority of
the qualifhd voters of said proposed State
in accordance with tha conditions pro
scribed in said act; and,
Whereas, It is also certified to me by
the said Governor that at the same time
that the body of said constitution was
submitted to a vote of the people, two
additional articles were submitted sepa
rately, to-wit: An article numbered
24, entitied"Prohibition," which received
a majority of ail the votes cast for and
against said article, as well as a majority
of all the votes cast for and agvinst the
constitution, and was adopted. An arti
cle numbered twenty-five, entitled, "Mi
nority Representation," which did not
receive a majority of the votes cast
thereon, or upon the constitution and
was rejected; and
Whereas, A duly authenticated copy
of the said constitution, additional arti
cles, ordinances and propositions, as re
quired by the said act, has been received
by me. Now, therefore, I, Benjamin
Harrison, Preaident of the United States
of America, do, in accordance with the
act of Congress aforesaid, declare and pro
claim the fact that the conditions imposed
[ by Congress on the State of South Dakota
to entitle that Btate to admission to tbe
Union have been ratified and accepted,
and that the admission of the said State
into the Union is now complete.
In testimony whereof, I have
hereunto set my hand and caused 1
the seal of the United States of
America to be affixed.
Done at the City of Washington, this
2d day of November, in the year of our
Lord one thousand eight hundred and
eighty-nine, and of the independence of
the United States of America, the one
hundred and fourteenth.
[seal] Benjamin Harrison,
By the President.
James G. Blame,
Secretary of State.
New Fiih-CnLmc Station.
Washington, November 2.—Upon rec
ommendation of the United States Fish
Commissioners, the immediate establish
ment of a fish-culture station at Fort
Gaston, California, military reeervation,
has been authorized.
Uettlng Evidence at Winnipeg-.
Winnipeg, November 2.—Assistant
State's Attorney Baker, of Chicago, who
has been here for several days in connec
tion with the Cronin case, in securing
additional evidence, returned to Chicago
this morning. It is not unlikely that
the ex-pri6oner Mills may go to Chicago
next week to give evidence in regard to
Burkes statements while in jail here.
BLOODY APACHES.
The Details of the Arizona
Butchery.
SHERIFF REYNOLD "J' SAD FATE.
How the Indian Murderers Effected
Their Escape—Soldiers in
Pursuit.
Associated Press Dispatches to the Hbrald.J
fThe introduction to the following dis
patch will be found on page 11. Owing
to the press of local matter the telegrams
of lesser importance were this morning
crowded out. —Ed.]
Florence, Ariz., November 2.—The
Sheriff had removed the shackles from
the legs of the six Indians before they
started to walk up the grade,
but they were handcuffed together
by the wrists in sets of two,
their outer hands being free. Sheriff
Reynolds was in front of the column
and Deputy Holmes and the Mexican
prisoner were in the rear of tbe column.
At a signal from one of the Indians the
bherfff was seized by the two immedi
ately back of him, while the two Indians
immediately in front of the Deputy
wheeled about and secured his gun, with
which, after killing him, they shot the
Sheriff, who was being held by their
companions.
During the melee the Mexican pris
oner ran forward to the stage, about 200
yards to the front, and warned Driver
Middleton. The latter drew his pistol,
but was shot twice by the Indians, the
first bullet ranging torwsrdthe top of the
head | the other passing through the lower
part of his face.
After securing the keys to their shackles
and removing them, the Indianß muti
lated the body of Reynolds by crushing
his skull in a horrible manner. They
then disappeared.
Middleton after recovering sufficiently
walked back to Riverside and gave the
alarm. The Mexican prisoner after he
bad warned Middleton, ran towards the
hills. Hs was fired at several
times but not hit. After ihe Indians had
left he secured a horse and rode into
Florence and gave himself up.
It is thought that as the Sheriff of
Pinal county and his posse are nine hours
behind the murderere, there is little
prospects of the latter being captured.
Three of the Indians were sentenced
for the shooting of Al Sieber, Chief of
Scouts at San Carlos reservation, in June,
1887; one for the murder of a freighter
and the'others for the killing of other
Indians.
A dispatch from Iveson says troops
have been ordered out from Apache, San
Carlos, Fort McDowell and Lowell to in
tercept the murderers, if possible.
Tucson, November •2. —Advices from
Globe concerning the massacre of Sheriff
Reynolds, say that a stage driver
who has just arrived, reports
that it is believed that Apaches
from the reservation ambushed
the stage, as the Apache prisoners had
many friendß who were anxious for their
release. The winding of the road would
give the Indians plenty of time to cut
across the trail and waylay the stage
after it left Globe.
OCTOIIEU It AI \N,
Figures showing; the Excessive
Hatnfall In October. '89.
San Fhancisco, November 2.—The Sig
nal Service weather summary for the
month of October, issued today, states
that the most marked meteorological
feature of tho month was the excessive
rainfall occurring throughout California,
which over the greater part of the State
was more than double the heaviest Octo
ber rainfall previously recorded. This
large rainfall resulted in many localities
in serious damage to crops, particularly
in the case of raisins and table grapes.
Rain fell in Northern California on the
7ch, B'h, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 25th,
26th, 27th and 29th, and in Southern
California on the Bth, 13th, 18th, 20th,
21st, 22d and 231.
The difference between the normal
rainfall for October and the rainfall for
October, 1889, is shown in the followine
figures:
Stations.
Joie '
ta Cruz
mo
Angeles
I 00 iucl
1 20 "
.78 "
.46 "
.47 "
41 '•
a Barbara
Diego
SAN DIKUO DOINUS
Tne Giaud Jury Continue* to 6,ct
In it* Work.
San Diego, November 2.—lndictments
issued by the Grand Jury were served
today on Comstock and Trotehe the
courthouse architects, and J. 8. McCor
mick, contractor, charging them with
collusion to defraud the county. They
gave bail in the sum of $5 000.
EDITOR SMITH'S TROUBLES.
The contempt case of W. G. Smith and
W. E. Simpson, of the Sun, for criticiz
ing the actions of the Grand Jury, was
dismissed this afternoon. W. G. Smith
was at once arrested on the charge of
criminal libel against Perry J. Wilden
upon an indictment from the Grand
Jury. A $5,000 bond was at once given
Tlie Stockton's Poor Playing.
Stockton, Nov. 2 -The feature of the
game today was the high grade errors of
the champions, in which Van Haltren
led the list Wild throwing, fumbles
and poor work generally, resulted in the
benators getting fourteen runs, of which
only one was earned. The Sacranientos
put up a good game but their four errors
cost jnst tuat number of runs. Score,
bacraraento 14, Stockton 4.
) Strictly Business.
I San Francisco, November 2.—The
Exaviiner will contain an interview to
morrow with Governor Waterman, in
which the Governor announces that he
is a candidate for renomination. When
asked what would be his policy for the
future administration, the Governor re
plied, it would be "strictly business."
Tin- Oakland* {Jetting Even.
San Francisco, November 2.—The
Oaklands today returned their defeat of
Thursday and played a good even game.
The local learn started well, but made a
poor showing before the close, having a
record of seven errors to the Oaklanders
2. Score: Oakland, 6; San Francisco,2.
Bond* Voted at San Bernardino.
Sah Bsrnardino. November 2.—An
(•lectin for $160,000 worth of bonds was
held today. Everything passed off
quietly. The total vote cast was 758
--vote for bonds, 718; against bonds 40 '
Hate, diminutive in size, completely
covered with butterflies with spread
wings, are worn at receptions and
, teas.

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