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Los Angeles daily herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1884-1890, February 14, 1890, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042460/1890-02-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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6
EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS.
A Lordly Tree that Ought to
Adorn this Section.
LET US RAISE OUR FUEL.
Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars
that Ought t» be Kept at Home
by Planting Trees.
Of all the 150 varieties of eucalyptus
the common blue gum is the most useful,
the most important tree for Southern
California. It does not thrive in Flor
ida; the cold spells of winter cat it
down or stunt its growth; but on the
Pacific Coast, from Eureka to Tia Juana,
a distance of 800 mi Ice, it is a stately,
mighty advance agent of our new civiliza
tion. Twenty years ago our plains were
absolutely treeless —desert-like, parched
and brown, lifeless almost —a picture o:
despair. Then the first boxes
of seedings were imported from
Australia and sold at public
auction in San Francisco, at $5
a tree. Today the precious little giants
sell at one cent a tree. Bemi Nadeau, a
recently departed genius deeply regretted
by his many friends, was one of the first
men to appreciate the value of the eucal
yptus as a fuel tree. He conceived and
executed the gigantic project of
planting 1,200 acres ef sandy land
at Florence to blue gums. Over
one million trees in one plantation!
Today it is a stately forest of mighty
trees, towering tall and straight 150 feet,
a monument to the enterprise of our by
gone friend. Every third year the trees
are cut down, yielding 60 cords of 4-foot
wood to the acre, worth $6 to $7 a cord
standing, or $7 to $8 cut and corded; the
net income is therefore $420 for the three
years, or $140 per acre per year. And
every time the trees are cut, a
new forest springs up from the old
stamps, and there is no expense to be
incurred after the first year for either
plowing, cultivating or irrigating, for
deep down into the hidden water courses
in the earth Joes the blue gum send
down its thirsty roots, thirty feet even,
where the water is as far below the sur
face ; and it makes its giant growth
in the poorest sandy wastes of our river
washes; drawing its sustenance out of
the atmosphere through its wealth of
evergreen leaves. What a perfume,
what a tonic is inhaled by the beautiful
foliage of the eucalyptus when night
brings rest and coolness to our plains.
Fevers lose their terror and malaria
departs with a creeping horror, where
the rustling, whispering groves of stately
eucalyptus waft fragrance over the house.
Pour boiling water over the leaves of the
bluegum and drink the powerful tonic.
It is equal to quinine to dispel the terrors
of sickness. The contagious atmosphere
of the sick-room today is cleaned by a
sprinkling on the floor of an essential
oil, "Eucalyptole," extracted by the
science of the chemist from the
resinous leaves of eucalyptus globulus or
eucalyptus amygdalina. Years ago the
winds would sweep over our treeless, un
resisting plains. The ''Santa Anas"
were a terror to the farmer and orchard
ist. Today miles of eucalyptus surround
our fields, line our avenues and encircle
our orchards. They act as pow
erful wind-breaks, protect the tender
bods of oar fruit trees from the
March winds, and yield an abund
ance of fuel, where of yore
the shiftless Mexican vainly hunted for
dried manure or brea to light his smoky
fire. Stranger, imagine the beauty of
oar avenues of blue gums twenty or a
hundred years from now, when the trees
average over 200 feet in length, over 15
feet in diameter, as they do to
day in their native land, Australia.
Our southern plains will rival then the
wonders of the Yosemite in their big
trees. The question of fuel and timber
supply is becoming more serious, more
important from year to year on the Pa
cific Coast, as the giant red wood yields
to tbe greedy ax of the all-absorb
ing lumber trusts. If you own
any lots or acres that are idle or unpro
ductive, plant them in blue gum. A
town lot 50x150 feet will grow 200 trees
six feet apart, and every tree when 5
years old, is worth $1.50 for fuel
in a city. Your lot thus yields
you $300 in five years or $00 a year,
and fifty acres in blue gums will yield
you an annual income of $7,000. The
Mayor of our city is planting 15C
acres to blue gums this season;
they will yield him a handsome
revenue a few years hence. The mighty
forest will be an object of beauty to be
hold and a source of perpetual income to
his heirs. Let the good work proceed ol
planting the beautiful blue gum in for
ests for fuel, around orchards and fields,
for wind-breiks and for ornament ie
sightly avenues, affording shade anc
shelter along our streets.
The most important of other varieties
of eucalyptus are:
1. Eucalyptus citriodora, whose foliage
is bo strongly scented that if your ham
merely touches one of its slender, pointec
leaves, its sweet odor will be perceivet
for hours. Its leaves yield by distillation
a large quantity of volatile essential oil
of excellent lemon-like fragrance.
Eucalyptus amygdalina, a lordly tree,
has reached a height of 470 feet in Aus
tralia, and yields an oil of remarkable
antiseptic power, largely used for medi
cinal purposes.
Eucalyptus ficifolia, a dwarfed species
with beautiful glossy leaves resembling
those of the rubber tree, and bearing
magnificent crimson-colored flowers.
Eucalyptus nastrata, the red gum,
grows straight and tall, without twistinj
the trunk, and the bark does not natur
ally peel off.
Eucalyptus resinifera, or mahogany
eucalyptus of New South Wales, is of
great value as a timber tree and fur
nishes wood of remarkable strength and
durability.
Seedling trees of the blue'gum can be
procured at a trifling cost. They should
be planted in March or April, when all
the danger of frost is passed, and after
the ground, plowed twice, is free from
weeds. During the first year's growth
the ground should be cultivated three or
four times; afterwards no further ex
pense of any kind need be incurred, and
the grove will be forever a source of un
failing revenue to its fortunate owner.
The cost of trees is about 1 cent per tree,
and at eight feet apart each way 700
trees are needed to the acre; cost of
trees per acre therefore is $7; cost of
plowing, setting out tbe trees and culti
vating them four times during the first
summer is about $20 per acre. After the
first year the trees will take care of
themselves.
Around the city of Los Angeles there
are large bodies of low-priced land suit
able for the growth of gum trees, footbill
lands too hilly to be ever leveled for irri
gation, worth from $20 to $50 an acre,
cienega lands, too moist for oranges,
THE LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD: FRIDAY MORMNG, FEBRUARY I I LWO
worth from $50 to $100 an these
lands once planted to gums, will yield a
handsome revenue. Los Angeles now
sends away for coal hundreds
of thousands of dollars annually
to New Mexico, to Australia, to
England. All that money is withdrawn
forever from our circulation here. One
tenth of our lands, now idle and unpro
ductive, if covered with gum groves,
would supply ub a sufficiency of home
grown fuel, and keep in circulation
here the large sums we waste in im
porting the fuel we should produce on
our own lands. Here ia a sound indus
try presenting absolutely no difficulties
and yielding unquestionably the largest
returns in absolute profit, with the mini
mum of expense.
THE RIVERSIDE FAIR.
Tke Tklrd nay and Its Brisk t
Attract tons.
| Special Correspondence to the Hkbald. ]
There is one poetical exhibitor at the
fair whose card bears the name R. M.
Stratton. The arrangement of navels,
sweets, Malta bloods and lemons is ex
ceedingly effective, and above all is a
placard with this fitting quotation:
For, 10, the winter is past;
The rsin is over and gone;
The flowers appear on the earth;
The time of the singing of birds is come.
And the voice of the turtle is heard iuourltnd.
It is delightful weather now, for the
"norther" stayed but two days. I had
thought to write that it is an ill wind
tbat blows nobody good, but I will now
have to write that the fairest day has its
discomfort. The Editorial Association is
here in full force. They dropped into
quiet Riverside this afternoon and held
a pow-wow at the opera bouse this even
ing. President Ayers presided with dig
nity. Luminous Scip Craig, G. S. 8.,
read a paper entitled: "Redlands, the
Center of the Universe." Sec
retary Vail's paper was enti
tled: "Does Prohibition Prohibit
in Pasadena?" Just as he concluded
a parrot in the wings screeched: "A
cracker, please give me a cracker!"
There was unbroken silence for a mo
ment, but tha gurgle of a jug in the rear
of the box occupied by the contingency
from tbe N. C. B. restored equanimity.
Berry, of San Diego, sang the old song :
"There's a Good Time Coming," fol
lowed by Young, of National City, who
trilled the lament: "But We're Tired
of Waiting." Booth, of the Bazoo,
read a scientific article on the
way to prevent bricks from melt
ing at the Needles in the summer
time. Arthur Kearney, of the Courier,
read the history of the rise of Republi
canism in San Bernardino county, and
Kiylineer, of the same journal, sang:
"McGinty's at the Bottom of the Sea."
Dyer, of the East Side Champion, recited
an original ode beginning:
"Newspaper men are we.
Editors bright and free;
Out for a jolly spree,
A wild iamboree,
Eec, ree,
A wild jamboree."
Further gurgling of the jug in the box
of the brethren from tbe north led to a
wild rush in that direction, and the asso
ciation went into executive session.
While at the fair I button-holed nearly
all of the members of the association as
to the merits of the citrus exhibit, and
the concensus of opinion was that the
quality of the fruits displayed was very
high, in fact, had never been surpassed
by any previous exhibition in Southern
California.
Tbe exhibitors have at last their dis
plays in order, and with fair weather
there is hope that goodly crowds will
render in their shekels at the door. So
far the attendance has been light. Ex
ceedingly so.
THE CITRUS DISPLAY. •
Owing to the lack in Riverside of a
large hall, the exhibit of citrus fruits oc
cupies a half a dozen rooms in the opera
house, and consequently the scenic effect
of the magnificent and generous display
of golden fruitage is sadly marred and
the magnitude of the exhibit greatly les
sened to the eye. But it is a grand dis
play—a bounteous one. It brings
back the mythological romancing of
the golden apples of Hesperides, which
grew in the garden under the shadow of
the mysterious mountain. God-like that
Jupiter should covet the gorgeous,
golden globes and lesser ones than he
brave disaster in the desire to drain their
sweetness. Even a meaner lover than
the one who captured the swift-footed
Atalanta would tempt the best woman
who ever wore shoe stringß if he should
cast the golden glories of the Riverside
Fair at her feet. There are in round
numbers 200 entries of exhibits by
orange-growers. Placing the extent of
each exhibit at four boxes of oranges and
lemons, and it makes a display of 8,000
boxes or 75,000 oranges, includ
ing lemonß. Mr. J. D. McNabb
exhibits an immense pyramid of
seedlings containing 3,200 oranges, or
over sixty boxes. A. B. Haight has a
mammoth showing. A great basket ten
feet long by four feet Hide ia laden with
navels and Mediterranean sweets, while
its green-clad sides are festooned with
luscious fruit. The towering handle of
the basket is formed of Tangerine
oranges and branches. Beside this mas
terpiece is a tall tripod of lemons and
one of oranges; a swinging globe of
navela, and high pyramids underneath
of lemons and oranges. J. §. Castleman
has great double pyramids of Washington
navels, and Messrs. Leek & Perley an
immense pyramid of navels which
will average only thirty-six to the
box. B. Evanston has a mag
nificent display of St. Michael's
and navels. Master Leman Dyer ex
hibits a large harp, the framo of navels
and twining green branches and the
strings of St. Michael's. Miss Gilliland
exhibits a folding screen, bordered with
green leaves, and panels bearing re
spectively rich clusters of Tangerine
oranges, calla lillies, lemons and violets.
A charming design by Mr. Hosp repre
sents a picture and frame, the latter and
the background of leaves, while the cen
ter, or picture, is a cluster of golden
fruit. The effect is superb. I have men
tioned only the more striking of the novel
and artistic arrangements of fruit, for
everywhere the eye rests there
are arbors of green and gold,
ornate structures in various forms,
crescents.stars, crosses, miniature houses
and conventional tiers.
The display of lemons comparatively
equals that of oranges and all that is
needed to keep up the canter is more
and more people, which the naughty
norther, (still a howling, apparently
keeps away. It is the biggest blow
known here in twelve months.
Mariner.
Riverside, February 12th.
Railway Nates.
Two orange specials left the city yes
terday on the Southern Pacific, one to
the North and the other to the East by
the Sunset route. The Santa Fe also
shipped two trains containing thirty-five
cars of citrus fruit.
General Manager K. H. Wade and
General Agent Williamson Dunn went
down to Riverside yesterday, where the
Citrus Fair is in progress.
General Paaaenger Agent 8. B, Hynes
went to San Diego yesterday.
THE GROCERS' EXCURSION.
meeting at tke Committees to Ar.
range for tke Entertainment.
Yesterday morning the committees
which have been appointed by the Board
of Trade and Chamber of Commerce to
attend to tbe entertainment of the gro
cers and produce dealers, who will arrive
here in an excursion next Monday, met
at the Chamber of Commerce rooms.
An effort will be made to have the
itinerary changed so as to admit of the
visitors staying two days, Monday and
Tuesday, in Los Angeles. Monday after
noon they will be taken for a drive about
the city, and in the evening there will be
a reception. If they remain over Tues
day they will be taken out to Alhambra
and to Sunny Slope. They will be given
a lunch at Arcadia, and then be driven
through tho Santa Anita ranch and Mon
rovia. At 4:20 p. m. they will' be re
turnee to the train to leave for Santa
Barbara. A special committee, consist
ing of Mayor Hazard and Ganeral John
R. Mathews ard Secretary Patton, was
appointed to meet the excursionists at
Pomona. A committee on ways and
means, consisting of M. A. Newmark, H.
Jevne and H. Howell, was appointed.
The meeting then adjourned, subject to
the call of the chair.
Pklllla Pavy Vindicated.
Readers of the Herald doubtless re
member Mr. Phillip Pavy, who for some
time had charge of the Sunny Slope
ranch belonging to an English company.
The affairs in the company were for
some time in such condition aa to bring
in no revenue, and there was much dis
satisfaction among the shareholders in
consequence. One of the officers of the
company made charges against Mr.
Pavy that be had mismanaged its affairs.
Mr. Pavy was incensed as well as sur
prised at the accusation. He courted
the fullest investigation as to his man
agement, and met the charges against
hint boldly. He demanded a retraction
under the penalty of an action for libel
for its refusal. As will be seen by the
subjoined communication the retraction
has been made:
(Copy)
London, January 15, 1890.
Phillip Pavy, Eso. : In iccordance witn the
condition contained in your cablegram to L J.
Rose & Co., limited, of the lith August, 1889, I
hereby withdraw 11 accusations mads against
you iv my letter to you of the lGth March,
1889.
[Signed | D. G. Sandeman.
Mr. Pavy is to be congratulated on the
result, which is very gratifying to his
many friends here, who hope to see him
again on the Pacific Slope, but his com
ing here may not be for some time yet,
as advices are that he is engaged in some
heavy nnd lucrative enterprises in Lon
don. Mr. Barton, of Fresno, who looked
into the affairs of the company, some
months ago in an interview published in
the Herald completely vindicated Mr.
Pavy of any negligence or mistake in
the affairs at Sunny Slope.
OIL DISCOVERED.
It Conies to tke Surface In Verdugo
Park.
It is reported that the recent rains have
at the mouth of the Verdugo enfion
washed away the earth in such a man
ner as to disclose the presence of an oil
bearing region. One of the residents of
that vicijity came into the city last even
ing with a bottle of oil, which he had
scooped up in a hurry. He stated tbat
the water had washed away the earth at
the base of the hills, and that since then
there have appeared several places close
together where the oil oozes from the
ground and floats off on the water in
considerable quantities. One of the oily
streams is of a bluish color, and is as
thick as the ordinary crude oil. The
land is owned by Verdugo and the loca
tion is within sight of Judge Ross's
house and at the southeast end of what
is known as Verdugo park. This discov
ery should be investigated by an expert.
You don't know how much better you will
feel if you take Hood's Sarsaparilla. It will
overcome that tired feeling, purify your blood,
give you a good appetite, aud make you bright,
active and strong. Be sure to get Hood's
Sarsaparilla. Sold by druggists.
Beecham's Pills act like maglo on a weak
stomach.
A can oi Ardenter mustard will please you
Your grocer has it.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria^
A PURELY
VEGETABLE
California Production
But is Worthy of Mention!
DON'T FAILTOREUTHIS NOTICE.
A FEW WELL-KNOWN FACTS.
SICK HEADACHE, CONSTIPATION
INDI< IESTION, DYSPEPSIA, IGsS OF
APPETITE, BILIOUSNESS and the
many diseases that flesh is heir to have their
origin in disordered liver and kidneys.
W hen the kidneys fail to throw off the
poisonous acids from the system then fol
lows the many complications of disease as
above. CLEANSE AND ASSIST these
very important organs of the body by the
use of NATURE'S OWN PURELY VEG
ETABLE REMEDY, THE GREAT s "
ERRA KIDNEY AND LIVER CURE and
you will rind that LIFE IS WORTH LTV
INC FOR. We have placed this wonderful
medicine before tiic public as a DEI.IOIIT
FUL BEVERAGE. You no longer dread the
hour that calls on you to take your pre
scribed dose, but instead will long for the
time to come. This valuable remedy i a
warranted PURELY VEGETABLE \)V
LIGHTFUL TO THE TASTE, a BLOOD
PURIFIER and STRENGTH GIVER that
does not interfere with business or pleasure-
NOT A CATHARTIC, but a GENTLE
REGULATOR, that gives life and renewal
VIGOR TO EVERY ORGAN. For all
female disorders THE GREAT SIERRA
KIDNEY AND LIVER CURE has uo
equal. One trial will convince the most
skeptical. Price, §1 per bottle; six bottles
for $5. For sale by all druggists.
F. W. BRATJN & CO.,
Wholesale Agents,
0015 eod6m • Los Angeles.
! Paris Exposition, 1889: »
3 Grand Prizes—s Gold Medals. I
MENIEH
CHOCOLATE
PUREST, HEALTHIEST, BEST.!
Ask for Yellow Wrapper. 1
for Sale Everywliere. n
A TBEMffiNDOUS CUT IN CARPETS!
Every article in our store will sold at oneo Wnnrn solus M MMI MM n.t. ukMi
will never get such prices on CARPETS again We aare not |«tM»e time fc» Ual <iu> p»w» l<ul
If yon will call you will soon be convinced tint wo menu bUtIUeH
We offer as a big drive a special line of TAPKBTKV HKl'ssKt.;; i \>; ri. fit >t .'ft ~„„.,
a yard, sewed and laid. Same goods are selling Im town today »< tM Ot
We offer a large lot of BODY BRUSSELS CARPETS AND IOKNUM |HMM (hi. Mm km
tbe best makes of goods, all patterns, at $1 00 a yard, Hewed Mid laid
We also oiler ourentire line of BMITHS' KOQUE TMS,lOOlOMMt,tttl Nm >m,l Hffef
■ndlaid. All cbolce styles. All goods sold strictly lor cash.
Lion's Carpet Store,
148 and 145 South Main Bt, Los Angles. Oal
fel4-lm *
SPRING ST, LOS A.N SELES.
FOR FAMILY AND USE.
wlthoutfacsimile: J[l
om cork. /M r '^** B ****** ulam __^y
THE GREAT APPETIZER.
Famous H. J. W. Old Bourbon and Rye Whiskey.
ABSOLUTELY PURE—NO IUSEI, Oil,.
A great relief to those troubled with Consumption, Dyspepsia, Debility, Malaria
Chills and Fever, Loss.of Appetite, Indigestion, etc. Price, $1.00 per quart bottle
bix bottles for $5,00.
FOR SALE BY
6 H, Roberts, agent for Monrovia, Cal. f Anoelena Pharmacy, 1208 Temple st., city.
Geo. B. Hogin, sgent for Pasadena, Cal. Temple-st. Ur»o Co., cor. Temple and Beaudry
O, R. Johnson, ageut for Inglewood, Cal. avenue, city
H.C.Worland, drug store, Station B, Boyle Geo. Qckrie, 224 South Main street city
Heights. H. J. Woolucott. Branch, 351 S Spring, city.
Cable pharmacy, Boyle Heights. C Laux, 48 South Spring street city
Wredb & Bcehlbr. 143 East First St., city. C Laux, 447 South Fort street 'city- '
Wrede A Buehlbb (branch), 421 East First Btuetttg & Berls 115 South Spring st city
street city. 8. W. Lockett, Druggist, cor. Fort and Second
Macbice Lee, 000 San Fernando St., city. streeis, cit*.
Raymond Hotel, East Pasadena. Matson ABRUHN.cor.Fifth «nd Bepot grounds,
f n-fZZSf&a&u. li*S2 st Y Petkb Dkbkum. No. 8 East First st. The Arcade.
J. D Yates, 116 W. Sixth Btr-»et. nl7 3m
Fritz, arboqast, 417 N. Main (Washington Hotel Metropole, Avalon, Catallna Island
Baloon). „„ „ T A , t Urban & Buehler, 595 South Olive, Phar-
Ed. Meyers, 23 N.Los Angeles street. The macists. 1
Champion Saloon. Louis Mesmer, D. 8. Hotel Bar, city.
Ocean \ law Hotel Redondo Beach, Cal. John Mcnoah, agent for Downey, Cal
ttea'l ea ' fo ' Azu ' a > ( ' al ,- . t , Hllmann & Miller, sgent for Panta Ana, Cal.
Felix Clavere cor Commercial and Los An- L. Esselhurn, agent ior Yuma, Arizona Tor
geles sts., city. L. Roth, 141 E. First st., city
Charles Faube, 213 and 215 Commercial st , Henry Gercke Shade Saloon, Boyle Heights.
»»,.,;„ '«. □ „ n ti. .m. Chicago Brewing Co., 128 South Spring, city
s™«Jls Schneider 8 East First St.. city. ihelen & Scheuddig, S. W. cor. Los Angeles
Stephens Nicoletti, 365 New High st., city. and Second, city. sowe
Jacob Adlopf, cor. Seventh and Main, city. 1 '
,1. BOBUtSOK, l.amnnda Part. Cal
JOE BAYER & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
WINE and LIQUOR
MERCHANTS,
29 NORTH MAIN ST. Telephone 38.
feSlm
TWO CARLOADS OF RANGES
DAMAGED BY WATER.
The ranges were in a washout and had to be unloaded in the rain, which has caused them
to rust a little, and each will be sold from $3 to $5 less.
F. E. Browne's, 30 South Main St-
OPPOSITE MOTT MARKET. ill m
HOTEL ARCADIA!
SANTA MONICA;
This delightful Hotel is now open, and Tourists should not fail to give it a trial. Situated on the bluff overlooking the
ocean, the view ia magnificent from ocean and land sides. GOOD SURF BATHING. Hot salt water bathe. Fine drives
in the canyona and on the beach. The house has all modern conveniences; elevator, steam, etc.
4 Trains per day each way. jal7 3m j. W . SCOTT, Lessee.
EAYMOND, EAST PASADENA*
Anion* »»»e Orange Groves of tne beautiful San Uabrlel Valley, eight miles from L,oa Angeles,
C. B. DIEHRiLL) Manager (during the summer season manager ofthe Crawford House, White Mountains, N. H.)
woi^ l vo y uTwhn«°ti. B ß«o?i to Tho F"™ 011 , 0 and «>end a day, a week, a month, or the whole season, then go out and stay a few hours it i« w.n
the 2l\S»!iK!%fflew' ew fro , m f P'™*,™: and that view alone will well repay ybu, although there are many othe?'lnteresU E i
f^SSJ2SSLS!E&SiIS2" MS E ,n thf lloteXgronnda, whlOh are now under the charge of Mr. 0. H. Hovey
say there must S. ov 7 f N "" erie ». Cambridge, Mass. Tourists visiting Los Angeles should make a trip to tfi&
* nd ° ttW tt * tte,< »» * m*M*W*** O. H. Merrill, Manager ol The Bayinnpd. East
038 W
M*M'K|.|.4l«MtHl»,
IiAMONA 1
TJ.o (few ..f Mm Him, U»l, r | B j Vullny.
>'.«!» n.i».. miim Imm oitv l.lmlta ot i M
A»«otee.
r<«v«r«v •»• MM Win, u».
• •, 1 (.-<•> ra ■ «>»«„,,.
t,OOATKI> AT NIIOKI.'N HT AXIOM,
On lino <tt N V II U H, n (Uhttal
vmipr H»,>i.t nun X U.,
l i.'in <ll i» in ml utile, Io tlm ri,,, i „ |-
■■'In, I'll, ' "
I'llkU.'KHT m-I'KIIAN TOWN LOTH.
vii. i. x mm, n
AUKKAUK rKdI'KH r
roriH tn :<»«»
IV l*».H'r Hl'lllNO W A I'll; It
Imiali*Nitll>U>qt.auMMai cutmniiwl,
Apply ,1 OITW of
CAN UAHUIIfI. WlNIt OOi,
K»mon», 1., i, AnfMMM*Bt7, Otli
J T,f Or to J. M TIKKNAN. tUmoue.
SOUTH FIELD
WELLINGTON:-: COAL.
Tho hint fuel for dOBUttO nnil nlonm pnr-
POMI In tho H. F Wellington coul. for snlo lv
• I UlUltlliOH to Milt t>y
HANCOCK HANNINGk
Wholesale nil l Kotall Doalerln
Coal, Wood and Charcoal.
TELEPHONE 36.
HAVE REMOVED TO
130 W. Second Street.
Yard at Junction of San Fernando and
Railroad Streets.
YARD TELEPHONE, 1047.
115 4m
'* d£rJi « a
• • —1 ° - n
! || j
FOR
AWNINGS, FLAGS,
T X NTS!
Truck, Hay and Wagon Covers,
— 00 TO—
A. W. SWANFELDT,
Corner of Second and £an Pedro sts. jals 3m
0. F. HBINZEMAN,
Druggist and Chemist,
No. 183 N. nam St., f.oa Angelei, Oal
Prescriptions c»refnlly compounded day and
nieh*. diltf

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